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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 31, 1905, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1905-07-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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EOS ANGELES FACES CRISIS IN WATER SUPPLY
OWENS RIVER DEAL
IS FINAL RESORT
t HAS NO ALTERNATIVE IN
CRISIS
IS ONLY SOURCE OF SUPPLY
Report of Enolneers State Schema
Under Consideration Present! Only
Feasible Plan for Adequate
Water Provision
Continued From Pa«e On».
heat which at one time made the
klopea of this range run with molten
rook. Much of the land taken up by
squatter* for grazing purposes Is noth
ing more than lava bdds. .
SUPPLY IS INEXHAUSTIBLE
Commissioners Elliott, Baker and
Mead Are Enthusiastic
Water Commissioner J. M. Elliott is
oh* of the men who has made a per
sonal Investigation of the valley and lti
resources. He said yesterday:
"1 most heartily approve of the
scheme, as It will give to Los Angele*
an Inexhaustible supply of 'the purest
water.
."For many years I have watched the
growth of the city and the lessening of
the water supply and have Investigated
almost every plan which has been ad
vanced for furnishing the city with
water, but believe this to be the only
feasible one so far discovered.
."I have personally been over the
ground and have investigated the
conditions existing In the Owen's val
ley. Before I went up there I may have
thought that Fred Eaton's enthusiasm
had carried him' away, but when I
stood In the valley of the Owens, beside
the rushing river, and looked upon the
miles and miles of towering mountains
making up the Sierra Nevada range,
I, too, caught the enthusiasm. It was
a- great deal better than I expected.
."The water supply there appears to
be Inexhaustible, and there Is enough
of It to supply the whole of Southern
California."
Is Rushing Torrent
"In winter we have more water than
we can use from the Lob Angeles river,
but this gives out in summer. In sum
mer the Owens river Is a rushing tor
• rent, running perhaps 35,000 miner's
inches, enough water to supply all o?
Southern 'California.' This flow come*
when we need it most. \
"I have also been over a part of the
route which It is proposed the aqueduct
shall follow, and I believe it quite
feasible. There are also several good
reservoir sites where it would be pos
sible, to conserve the storm water ar.ii
thus prevent any waste."
Commissioner Fred Baker, who
was from making the trip
through the valley with Mr. Elliott on
account of a strike, is nevertheless en
thusiastic and said yesterday:
"This is the greatest thing that ever
happened and the commission has suc
ceeded In getting options which will
make the water rights cost about a
million dollars, while if it had been
known that the city was after them
they would nave gone up to JS.OOO.Ojo.
"The valley stands In the shadow of
the great, Sierra Nevadas and Is fed by
their perpetual snows. There is enough
water there to; supply all of Southern
California." : . ..-.-, ;
I Mead Gives Details
William Mead is another water com
missioner who believes that the solu
tion of the water problem has been
found. • He said yesterday:
"The citizens of Los Angeles are now
contemplating 1 the greatest develop
ment enterprise ever attempted In the
southwest and one of the greatest and
most far reaching on 1 record anywhere.
"United States Engineer Llpplncott
assures us that bringing the Owens
river Into San Fernando valley will
give us a water supply manyfold
greater than Los Angeles needs or can
use at the present time or for years to
come and the city can sell enough wa
ter for irrigation purposes to double
the area of cultivated land In Los An
geles county.
. "This is one of the side issues of this
tremendous and far reaching plan
which has been outlined, but while It
is but a side issue it will mean much
to our city In order to grow and pros
per the country about us must be pros
perous. Los Angeles county is now one
of the richest agricultural counties in
the state and this means the United
Slates. -.;',• '■':_■
"When we get this great supply of
water and barley fields are transformed
Into orange orchards and vineyards,
the country will jump into the lead and
the overflow of this prosperity will not
alone react) Los Angeles but will ex
tend to Pasadena, the beach towns,
away down into Orange county and
possibly to San Diego.
Great Surplus of Water
"We shall have 20,000 miner's Inches
of water to sell to the little municipali
ties ; and ranchers. Of course, this \
water could be sold at a price which
would I pay the entire . operating ex
penses of the system, but the plan out
liped Is , to pay the running expenses
from the city consumers, as is the cus
tom now, and sell the surplua water at
Cost ' ■: ;
"The people will be asked to lend
their aid by voting bonds, but they will
have tite assurance . that the water
BY J. M. ELLIOTT
WATER COMMISSIONER
I most heartily approve of the
plan, as It will give to Los An
geles a supply of the purest water,
which will b« practically Inex
haustible. I have personally looked
over the ground and conditions In
the valley, and must say that
what I saw exceeded my expecta
tions. I have Investigated tvtry
scheme which has been proposed
for Increasing the water supply of
the city, and I believe this to be
the only feasible one yst ad*
vancsd.
EDWARD KERN, PRESIDENT
BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS.
department will take care of the bonds
after they are issued.
"The average citizen will get the
vast benefits accruing from this sys
ttm •without expending one penny
more than at the present time for his
water, and when the system Is 'com*
plete the charge for water for a five
room cottage will not tbe higher than
25 cents a month. We could make
that price now If we did not have to
spend so much money for extensions
and In buying land."
GIVE EATON GREAT CREDIT
Those Connected With Scheme Lavish
Praise Upon ex-Msfyor '
"Fred Eaton, he did it." That Is
what the water commissioners and oth
ers connected with the scheme are say
ing of the ex-mayor. , t
Since Mr. Eaton fcought his stock
ranch In the , Owens valley thirteen
years ago, he has been at work on this
scheme and in the last year has had
the co-operation of the water commis
sioners. An engineer himself, Mr.
Eaton observed and studied the land
and the formation of the rock that lay
along the route from Mojave to his
ranch. Engineers agree now that the
waterß of the Owens river once flowed
down the now arid valley, past the
present site of Mojave and into the Los
Angeles river In the San Fernando
valley.
A series of mighty upheavals broke
the ribs of some of the lesser sierras
and threw a range of mountains across
the path of the river, and they say that
it has been flowing into Owens lake for
at least ten centuries.
The ranchers of the valley look on
the visit of Mr. Eaton as a special dis
pensation of Providence. Many of them
had taken up government claims, to
find them practically worthless on ac
count of the soda and lava In the soil.
Thought He Was Land Mad
To the ranchers Eaton appeared to
be land mad and It is said they-whis
pered among themselves that he had
been eating loco weed fixer] up as a
salad. Accordingly, they advanced the
price of their arid ranches a few hun
dred dollars and the frenzied land
grabber stood the raise without turning
a hair.
It is just three months ago that Mr.
Eaton made his real strike. That is
when he secured an option on Rickey "a
entire stock ranch for $5,000,000. Rickey
Is* one of the few men to make money
out en the Owens valley. Ten years
ago he entered the valley and by close
application 'to stock raising secured
about 50,000 acres of land. This, with
his water rights, have made him
wealthy.
Just two days ago Mr. Eaton secured
an option on the last piece of land In
the valley and Is now on his way back
to Los Angeles.
While the water commissioners were
busily engaged In a correspondence
with F. H. Newell, chief of the United
States reclamation service, conducted
from thlß end through J. B. Llpplncott,
United States engineer, Mr. Eaton was
busy buying options.
That Eaton didn't get "wise" to the
schemes of the ranchers throughout the
length and breadth of the valley worked
on him to sell grazing land, which was
nothing more than lava bedß, was one
of the never-ceasing wonders of the
valley, but they will soon know that if
he was not "wise" he was "wiser."
WILL NOT TRY TO CLOBE
"TRAIL" BHOW3 ON SUNDAY
PORTLAND, Ore., July 80.— It is
stated definitely that the exposition
management will not make any further
legal fight against the Trail amusement
concessionaires who were given , an. In
junction in the circuit court ■ restrain
ing the exposition from interfering with
their keeping open on Sunday.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, JULY $t'i 1905.
BY FRED BAKER
WATER COMMISSIONER
This It the greatest thing that
ever nippened Id Lot AAgeles or
ahy other city. Why, euch an op
portunity does not come once In
a million year*. The right* to all
this' water can be bought for lest
than a million dollar*, and they
are priceless to this city, The
valley- stands In the shadow of
the great •lerrat And the river la
fed from the perpetual snow of
the mountain*. There Is enough
water there to supply all of South*
em California.
WILLIAM MEAD, WATER COM.
MISSIONER.
ENGLAND WOULD
ADVISE JAPAN
WILL SUPPORT ALLY DURING
NEGOTIATIONS
REFUSES TO AID ARMISTICE
British Diplomats Await Assurances
Thar Russian Plenipotentiaries
Are Empowered and Ready
to End War
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, July 80.— Japan
comes to the Washington conference
assured, that whatever her peace
terms, they will have the sympathetic
approval of Great Britain. Several
suggestions from Washington to Lou
don that the cause of peace would be
served by an .explanation to Japan
from her . ally favoring moderation In
her demands upon Russia have not
availed to change the British govern
ment in its apparently unalterable de
termination to stand by Japan however
severe she makes her conditions of
peace. Nor has the British government
seen Its way clear to render assistance
to Washington In the efforts which this
government Is making to obtain an
armistice. '■ y.-f.
Advices reaching here show that
London Is opposed to an armistice until
Japan has been satisfied that the pleni
potentiaries are prepared to discuss
means of- ending the war; that Russia
is ready to conclude peace and has so
empowered her plenipotentiaries Great
Britain, it is believed, might favor an
armistice, but even In such event it is
satd«he would be willing to offer Japan
advice on the subject.
As understood, in Washington, Lord
Lanhdowiie'B position Is that, as the
loyal ally of Japan, Great Britain can
afford to take no step nor assume any
attitude that would In the remotest de
gree ' redound to the advantage of
Japan's enemy.
MUST AWAIT DECISION
Protests Prom China and Korea Will
Not Be Considered
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, July JO.-Bia.ron Ko
mura, the Japanese peace plenipoten
tiary, and Baron Kaneko, the Japan
ese financial agent, both of whom are
Harvard graduates, .went to ' Peekaklll
BY WILLIAM MEAD
WATER COMMISSIONER
This proposition to bring the
Owens river Into the Ban Fer
nando valley It the greatest de
velopment enterprise ever at
tempted In the southwest. Ws
are assured by competent en
gineers that not only will the sup
ply be sufficient for domestlo use,
but the surplus will double the
area of cultivated (and In Los
Angeles county. This means that
Los Angeles county will be the
richest agricultural county In the
United State*.
THEODORE SUMMERLAND, PREBIDENT OF CITY COUNCIL
today, where they visited some friends
of thpjr college days. ._.
Work at the headquarters of the
peace commission, was not entirely
suspended, however, as several of the
secretaries continued their labors with
the dispatches and mail. Some of the
suite spent the day at various resorts
near 'the city, while others visited
friends. ■'..<■
Dispatches announcing that Korea,
like China, would protest against a
treaty of peace in which she was not
consulted were called to the. attention
of Aimar Sato of the commission, and
all he would say was that the time for
any of these protests to be made was
after the negotiations had been con
cluded.
"No one," he said, "has any business
before the commissioners but them
selves" - ■ •"
A number of Japanese newspaper
correspondents are in the city. Sev
eral came with Baron Komura's party.
Among those in the city today it is the
decided opinion that when peace is de
clared Japan, having become a world
power, will elevate her ministries in
the capitals of the powers to embas
sies. All agreed that it was the under
standing in Japan that if peace is de
clared at the coming, negotiations
•Baron Komura woulcTbecome a count,
which, carries, with : it in Japan a gift
of a large sum of money, and that
Minister Takahira would be elevated
to the rank of an ambassador. .
OUTLINES ELECTIVE SYSTEM
Russia Will Give Franchises Under
Restricted Condition
By Associated Press.
ST. PETERSBURG, July SO.— The
following are the principal points of an
elective system approved by the coun
cil of ministers for the proposed na
tional assembly. The aim has been to
elaborate a scheme eliminating as far
as possible class representation.
The only classes excluded from the
franchise are soldiers, persons under
the age of 25 years, foreigners, women,
governors and vice-governors of prov
inces, prefects and police authorities,
nomada and persons deprived of civil
rights.
For St. Petersburg, Moscow and
eighteen of the larger towhs there will
be a system of electoral colleges num
bering 160 members; for St. Petersburg,
Moscow and eighty other towns, these
members will be elected by electors # cf
the first degree, comprising owners of
land and house property exceeding $1500
In value, the electors in the case of St.
Petersburg, Moscow and 1500 other
towns to include also the holders of
Industrial patents and paying specified
taxes, with no distinction as to re
ligion.
For the provinces a similar system
of colleges will be elected by voters of
three categories, .namely, land owner*,
electors of other towns than the before
mentioned large towns and cantonal
representatives of peasants. Here also
property qualification Is required of
$750 and similar tax qualifications.
The election will be by a secret ballot
and an absolute majority Is required.
REPORTS LIVELY FIGHTING
Russians Driven From Strongholds on
Northern Island
By Auoclated Press.
TOKIO, July 30, 7 p. m— The follow
ing dispatch has been received from the
Japanese army headquarters:
"Our Independent cavalry which en
tered ilykbfC . (on Sakhallen Island,
forty-five miles northeast of Fort Due)
Jujy 27 withdrew on finding conditions
In the city unfavorable to Its occupa
tion. Our, army, Intending to crush tht
i enemy's forces . before', they retreated
t BY PRESIDENT KOEPFLI
;; CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
' • This proposition Is so far
; | reaching, so tremendous, that It la
< > hard for those of us not entirely
' • familiar with the case to Judge.
; I of Its merits, but I have eyttty
< > confidence In the men who hay*
• • evolved the scheme and It must
', I be good. Of course, more water
i .'ls an absolute necessity to the
1 ■ future prosperity of Los Angeles,
;',; ', and the fact Is established that
< > we must get It and bring It a
' ' long distance and at great ex
,,, ', pense, but we must have water.
from the eminences west of Rykoff.
commenced to advance at 3 a.-m. on
July 28. The van, together with an In
dependent body of cavalry, advanced by
forced marches, taking and dislodging
the enemy, holding the northern ex
tremity of Rykoff and rushed Into th«
town. Confused street fighting ensued,
but the town was completely taken at
8:30 o'clock in the morning.
"The enemy's main strength, • which
opposed our right column, fled in dis
order southward, taking the short route
leading to Pareonot. . .■ -^
"On July 28 a detachment 'which' was
sent south in pursuit of the enemy met
the enemy's infantry, some 800 "strong,
at a point six miles south of Rykoff.
•and killed over 200 and captured 500.
. "The enemy's strength' opposed to our
right column was of some 3000 Infantry
and four guns and four machine guns,
and that opposed to our left colntfin
some 2000 infantry and four guns."
JAPANESE ARE VICTORS
Mikado's Troops Steadily Gaining In
Sakhalien Island
By Associated Press.
, TOKIO, July 30, noon.— The following
report has been received from the head
quarters of the imperial army: J
"Our force on the island of Sakhalin ■
advanced on July 27 and hotly chased
the enemy from early in the morning.
Our vanguard occupied Del Benskoa
the same afternoon. While our cavalry
entered Rykoff another detachment was
sent ngalnst the enemy at Nomlha and
Ivovskoe, dislodged the enemy's force,
holding Vydernlcovsky and vicinity and
immediately commenced pursuit. The
enemy holding the latter place con
sisted of infantry with several guns.
"The temperature is 93 degrees fah
renheit." ,
RESERVISTS SHOW DISCONTENT
Russian Journal Says Neglect of FamU
lies Causes Distress
By Associated Press.
ST. PETERSBURG, July 31.— The
Novoe Vremya publishes this morning
a report from Khersu that there in
great discontent among the reservists
in Manchuria at the distress Inflicted or.
their families because of the negligence
of the authorities who have failed 'to
provide proper support for them. This
qutspoken admission from a Russia 1 )
source is looked upon as significant.
TEMPERATURE DROPS 29
DEGREES IN 12 MINUTES
Freakish Weather and Remarkable
Hailstorm Experienced at
The Dalle*
By Associated Press.
THE DALLES, Ore., July 88— A sud
den drop In temperature, bringing with
It a severe hailstorm, accompanied with
thunder, swept suddenly 'over the city
this afternoon. The storm was entirely
unexpected and after the drop In temp
erature had occurred the thermometer
again took' a Jump and the heat was
almost as oppressive as before.
About 3 o'clock; the temperature be
gan to drop and rapidly receded from
94 degrees to 60 degrees, a drop of 29
points occurring In twelve minutes. \
A hailstorm followed of a peculiar
nature. Small Irregular chunks of Ice.
differing entirely from the regular hall
stones,' poured from the cloud*. ■ '
KAIBER GOES TO VIBIT
KING OP DENMARK
By Associated Press.
DANTSIO, Prussia, July 80.— Kmperor
William sailed today aboard the Im
perial yacht Hoheneollerri tor Cww
liagen tv visit King Christian.'
..AMUSEMENTS __„
JtfOROSCO'S BURBJiNK THEATER
The B«tt Company and Ihe Mil Plays Ift America for the Money ; | .;£',
Here If a Startler for Ton-Tha Play TKU Wt*R It IT
OUR MOTTO-Don't B6ast Unleis You Can Make Good. Wa Boast and C«A
Prove That We Have the Best Play, Played the Bist, In the
City This Week Irrespective of Price. It Is a $2.00
Show for 50c We Are Proud of It.
Tonlght-- A &ir-Matihe« Saturday *•»*
• '■• ' \ ■ •
xTLl.*»««a)»a) ... .
Piney
— =- Kidfie
A cast of ufiequallea exfrellehee hn& scenery that's seconfl to TI6M." Every Bur- !
bank favorite in the cast, and others who will become favorites.
Order Tour Seats Early This Wech or You Won't Get Them
NfiXT WEEK^Ahother crackerjaek: "IN SIGHT OF ST. PAUI/8,", -with all tne"
favorites In the cast, whloh will be further strengthened by the appearance «C ,
Mr. Harry Mestayer and Miss Lillian Lamson i
Prices alt the tlrm»— Evonlnns 10c, 25c, 850 and 60c. Matinees, Saturday and Gun-
day, 10c. and 26c, no higher. . . . < ...
Go Where the Crowds Go. The
. v BurbanK's Way Is the People's Way
QRPHEUM , " PRINOfITttE B K o?hi^ n iSf 4mTNrt
Modern Vaudeville
Week* Commencing Tonight
HE.MRIETTE DE SERRIS LIVING STATUARY, in Bronze and Marble; Da
KOE TRIO, European Acrobats; TALL JT AND ROGERS, the Legit and His
Friend; BERTIE FOWLER, the Merry Monologue Maid; FIGMAN-MANOLA
COMPANY, "Catching a Husband"; GODFREY AND HENDERSON, "'Daugh-
ter of Isls"; HARPER, DESMOND AND BAILEY, Colored Entertainers; Or-
pheum Motion Pictures; Last Week of the Greatest Sensation of the Day, .
THE HAZARDOUS GLOBE. . .
Prices — 10c, 25c, 60c. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday.
f^ttJUtn O&FRJf HOUSE HAW ST., featweea jlr»t and S«o»d. •
MKJtMU \JfCKJt nUI/JC Phonei: Main lH7j Horn* 41*.
THE FAMILT TBEATFR '
Queen of the White Slaves
The Abduction, the Mysterious Tribunal, the Great Shipwreck Scene, ■ all Pro-
duced with perfect realism. Matinees Sunday, Tuesday, Satuf-day, 10c and 2BC.
Evenings, 10c, 25c. 50c. Next Week— "WEDDED AND PARTED." . .
TJENICE OF AMERICA ....Venice Assembly
Monday, July 31— A Great Musical Feast Day
AUDITORttfM— B p. m., scenes from FAMOUS OPERAS. j>re6*nt«d In cftktume ■
1 by MME. GBNEVRA JOHNSTONE-BISHOP, MR. SYDNEY LLOYD WRIGHT- •
SON. MR. JOHANN HAAB ZINCK, MR. SPAULDING. MISS ARLEY &
MOTT. &,nfl the beautiful little operetta: "THE LAND OF NOD,'! by FIJTY
CHILDREN from the Doblnson School of Expression.
AMPHITHEATER— 7:3O to 9:30 p. m., grand concert by AREND'S VENICE i
BAND. . | , J
TUESDAY, ATTG. IST-BQTTAL StTFFRAGE DAY. Only public appearance of
MISS SUSAN B. ANTHONY. Addresses by MISS ANTHONY, the REV. ANNA
H. SHAW, the HON. HENRY FRANK, and the HON. FRANCIS S. MbNNETT.
WHERE TO LIVE IN COMFORT AT LITTLE COST.
In our cozy villas and tents you can live cheaper than In Lbs Angeles. Prices
range from $15 PER MONTH UP; everything furnished. Including GAS ■ FOR
COOKING. ELKCTRIC LIGHTS and LAUNDRY. WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE.
Sift atrTi THFMTJtII VBXM&O. MAYBR A CO.. Proprietor* \
CL/TJtU iilC/TiCK . j. honB .. Main jjgo; home &7
COMMENCING TONIGHT— Th» Belasco Theater Stock Cbmpany . present* '
the Famously Funny Farcical > Frivolity, Overflowing With Laughter— .
— NIOBE —
Prices— Every Night. 75c, 60c, 35c, 25c. Thursday and Saturday Matinees,' Boc. SSe, •
25c. NEXT WEEK— Henry Arthur Joneß' Powerful Play, "THE DANCING GIRL.' 1 ■
CHUTES ■ ' / • Ivwr Afternoon and Evening
GRAND OPEN AIR CONCERTS BY DONATELLI'S ITALIAN BAND.
Japanese Tea House and Garden now open. One hundred other attractions.
Chutes Stock Company In "THE JUDGE ACCORDIN' TO STATOOTS," begins '.
an unlimited engagement under the management 61 R. G. Sloane, Tuesday evening,
August Ist. Admission 10c. ' . ' '
WILSON TO VISIT
THE PRESIDENT
IS GOING TO SAGAMORE HILL
TODAY
SECRETARY WILL NOT RESIGN
Roosevelt Has Perfect Confidence
That Head of Agriculture De.
partment Will Clear Up
"Graft" Scandal
By Associated Pres»
OYSTER BAY, July ■ 80.— Secretary
Wilson of the department of agricul
ture is expected at Sagamore hill to
morrow. His visit will enable him and
the president 'to discuss the situation
In the department as It relates to the
investigations now in progress. All
rumors of the Intention of Secretary
Wilson to resign from the cabinet may
be put aside as merely conjectural.
The secretary has no present intention
of leaving the cabinet and the presi
dent knows of no reason why he should
resign. ,v, v .'.' ■
The president, it may be said, re
poses Implicit confidence! In Secretary
Wilson and is thoroughly satisfied that
he will solve the difficulties now pre
•ented to the entire satisfaction of the
chief executive and of the country.
It Is probable Secretary Wilson
would have come to Oyster Day before
this had It not been for the unsettled
condition of his department, which
rendered It practically impossible for
him to leave Washington. He is press
ing every phase of the investigations
now in progress and will develop every
fact which the country ought to know.
That the president is confident ' that
the , secretary will purge the, depart,
mtn of any Boandal , that may , attach
to It Is evidenced . by the fact that he
has not Interfered with the pending
Investigations. All Matters brought to
his attention have been turned over to
Secretary Wilson with Instructions to
inquire into them This the secretary
has done, and hla work has the ap
proval of the president.
It is the determination of both the
president and Secretary Wilson to clear
the department of agriculture of every,
form of "graft." , ' :
To this end the likelihood is that
every bureau of the department will/
be Inquired Into carefully, with a view I
to ascertaining 1 whether any such con
dition exists as was developed in the j
bureau of statistics. Quietly but eM
f ectlvely Secretary Wilson has been |
working to this end for many months.
Many employes of the department
have been dropped from the rolls.'
practically without the knowledge of
the general public Some have been
dismissed outright, while others have '.
been permitted to resign. Assurances'
are given that no stone will be left un- '
turned to eliminate every taint ; of '
scandal In the department of- agrlcul
ture.
SHATTERS AMERICAN v
AUTOMOBILE RECORD
Walter Christie Cover* . Kilometer
at Cap* May In Twenty.five
Seconds Flat r
CAPE MAY, N. J.. July SO.-Being
officially timed today by Sam Butler,
secretary of the Automobile Club of
America, Walter Christie, in his 120
horsepower automobile, reduced the
American kilometer record by making
the distance In 25 seconds fiat.
He made several attempts but could
not reduce his own time further today,
his best later time being 25 1-6 seconds.
He will try again for the world's kilo
meter and mile record on August 19. ,
ENGLISH SCIENTISTS CRUISE
ALONG LABRADOR COAST
ST. JOHN'S, N. F.. July 30.-aoverhor
McGregor and, a. party of English
colonial scientists started today,' for; a
six weeks' cruise along Labrador
coast It is , expected that important
results , will accrue from this ■ expedi
tion ' representing the Industrial ; future
of Labrador.

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