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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 11, 1905, Image 9

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1905-09-11/ed-1/seq-9/

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Second Section
MEMORIAL SERVICES AND ROLL CALL OF DEPARTED
HEROES WRING TEARS FROM EYES IN VAST ASSEMBLY
IMPRESSIVE WEEE
CEBEMOHIES AT
TENT CITY
Vacant Chairs Tell
Sad Story
Four Veterans Deceased
in Last Year
Sunday Breaks All Records for Attend.
ance at Eighteenth Annual G.
A. R. Encampment at Hun.
tlngton Beach
Special to The Herald.
HUNTINGTON BEACH, Sept. 10.—
ffhere was no abatement to the crowd
at the camp ground today. In fact It
Wight be called the banner day in
point of attendance. The Pacific Elec
tric cars were crowded with visitors
until afternoon, and while many were
equipped with fishing tackle, a large
majority visited the camp ground ani
passed the day with the veterans and
their friends.
When the memorial service began at
10:30 a. m. there was hardly standing
room in the big tent. The service
opened with the hymn "Nearer My God
to Thee," which was followed by a roll
call of the comrades deceased since last
encampment, the number totaling
(seventy-four.
There were four vacant chairs on the
platform, appropriately draped, to rep
resent the departed members of the G.
'A. R., the ladies' auxiliary, the army
nurses and the Sons of Veterans.
Comrade W. A. Packard sang a solo,
"The Vacant Chair," and at its conclu
sion there were tears In many eyes
throughout the assemblage.
Impressive Memorial Sermon
j Chaplain RevC E.^O?" Mclntyre dellv
tered the memorial sermon in an elo
quent and impressive manner, holding
his audience spellbound and bringing
forth smiles and tears during his dis
course. At its conclusion the national
anthem was sung with a fervor indica
tive of reverence and patriotism, and
the vast audience was dismissed with a
prayer by Comrade Lincoln of Long
Beach.
During the afternoon a large portion
Df the crowd congregated on the beach
and at the pavilion, where they were
entertained with Instrumental music,
while music, song and story were in
order at the encampment, Comrade
[Packard again taking a prominent part
In entertaining the assemblage.
Tonight a sacred and patriotic concert
;was given under the direction of Com
rade Herendeen, and Mrs. Helen E.
Huff delivered an address on "The
jnag," interspersed with humor and
pathos.
Tomorrow will be auxiliary day, when
(the camp will be under "petticoat gov
ernment," and the veterans look for
ward to the proceedings with a great
deal of anticipation.
POLICE UNABLE TO FIX
VALUATION OF PAPERS
Poys Charged With Stealing May Con.
sequently Escape Punishment
for Trivial Offense
Miguel Pearlls, Floyd Stoddard, Dolph
Rivera and Walter Moore were arresteJ
yesterday morning on the charge of
petit larceny, but, though the police
claim to have positive evidence that
they are guilty, they cannot be con
victed. The case is a peculiar one.
The lads are accused of stealing a
quantity of papers from the Examiner
office on South Broadway and disposing
of them. But the trouble Is they find
the papers are valueless. Now tho
police are contemplating having a nenr
complaint Issued, charging the boys
■with obtaining money under false pre
tenses.
DELINQUENT OFFENDER IS
FINALLY CAUGHT BY POLICE
ilohn Brown Induced Judge to Allow
Him to Go After Fine and
Skipped
After successfully eluding the police
for the past three weeks, John Brown,
whom the police Judge had allowed to
go to the home of a friend to secure the
nmount of his fine but failed to appear
with the money, was arrested early yes
terday morning by Officer Peterson.
Brown smiled when the officer landed
him In the station and remarked that
|f he had seen the officer first he would
pot have had to serve time.
FINDS HER MOTHER DEAD;
HEART FAILURE THE CAUSE
Mrs. Ruth Cox, " 1810 East Eighth
Itreet,' 88 years of age, was found dead
tri her' home by her daughter, Mrs. C.
Jjindsay, yesterday morning. Her death
fj ascribed- to heart failure, , ■ 'j
Los Angeles Herald.
OPEN WORKINGMEN'S HOME
WITH BEFITTING CEREMONY
PASTORS OF CHURCHES ASSIST
VOLUNTEERS
New Building at 128 East First Street
Formally Dedicated as an Institu
tion for Laboring Class — Coffee
Parlors and Dormitories Features
With music and rejoicing the new
workingmen's home, built by the "Vol
unteers of America, was dedicated yes
terday afternoon at 128 East ; First
street.
■ *A large audience assembled in the
hall where the service was held. Small
flags and bunting were used in the
decorations.
Seated on the platform with mem
bers of the Volunteers were Rev. T. G.
Atteberry, pastor of the Los Angeles
Institutional church, and Rev. D. F.
McCarty, pastor of the Grace Meth
odist church.
Col. Walter Duncan of San Fran
cisco, in charge of the Volunteer work
on the coast, conducted the service.
His preliminary remarks were full of
praise for the achievements in the
erection of the home for worklngmen.
Rev. Mr. McCarty made a congratu
latory address on the work done, say-
Ing that the Volunteers were a great
stimulus to the churches.
Rev. Mr. Atteberry spoke of the
urgent need of closer affiliation in
Christian work, advancing the idea
that the Volunteers were doing the
work that the churches ought to do;
that the doors of the churches should
be kept open dally for the cause of
Christianity.
Mrs. Walter Duncan spoke of the
work in San Francisco, making local
applications to the achievements here.
Inspect Building
At the close of the service the con
gregation was Invited to inspect tha
building. Adjutant and Mrs. Hughes,
in charge of the local work, acted as
host and hostess.
The first floor of the building con
tains a hall for services by the Volun
teers, with a seating capacity of 600.
Adjoining this hall is a coffee parlor
where light refreshments will be
served.
The second floor contains thirty-five
rooms, including ■ the offices and head
quarters of tho local branch. The
third floor contains forty-three rooms,
including a large dormitory of thirty
four beds.
The lot has been leased for five years.
The building, including furnishings,
will cost about $30,000.
REGAINS CONSCIOUSNESS
AFTER 30 HOURS' OBLIVION
Mrs. A. L. Hollister Asserts She Was
Stricken With Epilepsy While
Turning Off the Gas
After more than thirty hours of un
consciousness as a result of a partial
asphyxiation, Mrs. A. L. Hollister of
1057 South Olive street is still In a
critical condition, brought on by her
terrible experience and her attendants
are doubtful whether she will ever en
tirely recover from the effects of the
Inhalation of gas.
The suicide theory In the case Is de
clared absurd by both Mrs. Hollister
and her nurses. The woman was
scarcely able to speak yesterday, but
emphatically denied • the report that
she had attempted to take her own
life.
"I was about to get up at an early
hour Friday morning, when I felt an
epileptic attack coming on," said Mrs.
Hollister.
"I remember trying to turn out the
gas, : but I • think : I must have been
stricken Just- atr that moment .and •%
LOS ANGELES, CAL., MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER n, 1905.
VETERANS "MOVING IN" AT TENTED CITY
I fell I suppose I must have left the
Jet open.
"The fact that a window in the
room was partly open and the fact that
I was found by servants in the house
before the gas had entirely filled the
room is, I suppose, responsible for my
being alive today."
Physicians spent nearly thirty hours
In an effort to revive the woman be
fore restoring consciousness.
FALLING PINE CONE SAVES
TWO FROM SNAKE'S VENOM
HUNTERS NARROWLY ESCAPE
DEATH FROM TWO SOURCES
Fifty.Pound Cone Misses Heads of
Sleeping Nlmrods by a Few Inches,
and In the Morning They Find Rat.
tlesnake Pinioned Close to Beds
That blessings often come in dis
guise was demonstrated a few days
ago by two young men who returned
to Las Angeles yesterday afternoon
from a hunting trip in the Santiago
mountains.
According to the story told by the
two, they narrowly escaped death
twice in one night, while sleeping on
top of a mountain peak. A heavy pine
cone, weighting over fifty pounds, fell
from a tree under which they were
sleeping and struck the ground be
tween the two, missing their heads
.but a few Inches.
The cone fell with such force that
they were awakened by the Jar and
after discussing their narrow escape
they decided to move to a place of
greater safety.
When the two men arose in the
morning the narrow escape from the
huge pine cone was again discussed
and when day appeared the size and
shape of the cone were Investigated
by them.
Great was their surprise when they
learned that the pine cone, in its fall,
had pinioned to the ground a huge
rattlesnake, the skin of which the two
young men now exhibit with a great
deal of' pride, as they tell their story
of a "blessing in disguise."
YOUNG WOMEN REORGANIZE
SODALITY OF ST. VIBIANA
New Officers Chosen and Committee
Selected to Prepare Enter.
talnments
The election of officers and reorgani
zation of the Young Ladles'. sodality of
the Cathedral of St. Vibiana was held
yesterday afternoon, resulting In the
selection of Miss Norton, president;
Miss Byrne, vice president; Miss M.
Molony, secording secretary; Miss Do
mlnguez, corresponding secretary, and
Miss Morarlty, treasurer. The enter
tainment committee is composed of
Misses Bernard, Klinkhammer and K.
Bell.
Members of the sodality will take up
special work in Sunday school teaching.
They will form a reading club to take
up a course of special studies.
Rev. T. F. Fahey, the director, has
planned many events for next season,
among which will be several enter
tainments. The sodality has about
fifty members. A reunion and tea Is
being planned to be held at Echo park
next week.
CARRIED 28 MILEB ON
COWCATCHER AND LIVES
SEDALIA, Mo., Sept. 10.— After being
struck by an express train and carried
twenty-eight miles on the pilot of the
engine Warren Prlne of this city, twen
ty-six years old, was able to relate his
terrible experience when he was picked
up a mile and a half ; east ' of , Tlpton
this morning:. One of . PrJno'B legs . Is
broken, but otherwise there eeema -to
; b« n* bpBW fractured, ,',
OLD TIME CIRCUS CLOWN
EAGERLY AWAITS BIG SHOW
FORMER BARNUM & BAILEY BUF.
FOON SICK IN HOSPITAL
Though Enfeebled by Old Age, John
Billings Still Has as Merry a Heart
and Smile as When He Was the
Children's Idol
Eighty-five years old but still a
clrcusman at heart, John Billings, who
was employed as a clown by the Bar
num & Bailey show for fifteen years,
lies ill in the county hospital, Impa
tient to Join the old company when It
comes to Los Angeles in two weeks.
While his body is racked with pain
and his back has been stooped by the
weight of eighty-five years, nothing has
been able to dim the mirthful light
which burns in his eyes and the smile
which plays across his face.
"Yes, I made an ass of myself twice
every day for fifteen years," said the
old clrcusman yesterday afternoon in
speaking of his earlier experiences,
"and I have never been so happy as I
was during those years, when I w:is
holding the attention of thousands, by
some daring or silly stunt.
"Those were happy days under the
old tent when we would work long
after midnight getting ready for the
next day's run 200 miles up the state,
and we couldn't sleep because the lion
was restless or the hyena had a left
over bone on which he started gnawing
Just about the time we were going to
close our eyes for a few minutes' doze.
Will Watch a Performance
"Yes, those were happy days," and
then after a moment's pause the
white haired old man turned to his
nurse and asked her if she thought
that he could possibly be well by tha
time the clrcuß comes to town, and
when she told him that It was possible
the. humorous smile left his face for a
moment and was supplanted by one of
gratefulness for the knowledge that he
would be able to attend at least one
more performance of a three-ringed
circus where he had been one of the
central figures among its numerous at
tractions.
"If I am well enough I am going to
that show If it is the last thing I do
on this earth," sold Billings while the
nurse busied herself with preparing his
medicine, "and as sure as I go to see
that show I'll be as bad as ever anil
ask them to give me a Job again. Well,
I hope they turn me down because I
am getting too old to do clown stunts
like I used to."
DETECTIVES ARE BAFFLED
IN SEARCH FOR WAITER
Entangling Circumstances Make Defi.
. nite Clew to Whereabouts
Impossible
Circumstances surrounding the dis
appearance of George Perkins, a waiter
formerly employed at the Del Monte
taven, from his room at the Catallna
hotel, 239 South Broadway, are so con
fusing that all efforts of the detectives
to locate him have so far been baffled.
On the morning of August 12, George
Heath, proprietor of the Catallna, was
rudely awakened from his slumbers by
a loud ringing of the bell. He went
Into the hall and saw a man attired
In an outing suit, apparently an Eng
lishman, who demanded to see the
man in room 19. Heath showed him
to the door.
After Heath retired he heard a loud
pounding as though some one was
knocking.. At periods the noise kept
up until Heath, fearing that all of
the roomers would be awakened arose
again and went , to Perkins" door,
where ho found the stranger standing.
iTae proprietor, beicama - Incensed *>•-
cause of the noise and requested the
stranger to cease it.
Perkins kept very irregular hours
and when he did not appear for several
days no suspicion was aroused. Dur
ing the absence of Perkins several
messages purporting to have come
from different restaurants were re
ceived.
Becoming suspicious Heath investi
gated. He ascertained that Perkins
had not occupied his room, though all
of his effects were In place. He tele
phoned to the restaurants where Per
kins had been employed and was told
that they had not called for him.
Recently the affair was reported to
the police, but no trace of the missing
man has been found.
WAITING FOR HER FIANCE
WHEN FOUND BY OFFICER
DAUGHTER OF POMONA RANCHER
CAUSES WORRY
Miss Dula Seeley Escapes From Her
Guardian and Hides In Hotel — Is
Discovered by Deputy Sheriff After
Two Days' Search
Waiting for her lover to come and
claim her, Miss Dula Seeley of Po
mona was found by a deputy sheriff
at one of the hotels last evening, after
a search of two days. Miss Seeley Is
the daughter of a prominent rancher
living near Pomona and a week ago
she came to Los Angeles with an aunt
to spend a few days. It was at that
time she disappeared and nothing had
since been heard from her.
According to information gained last
evening, Miss Seeley is engaged to
rr.arry a prominent Los Angeles man,
but the engagement was kept a secret
from her parents, as they did not ap
prove of it, she being not yet eighteen
years old. Secret messages have been
from time to time exchanged when
the all-seeing eyes of the parents were
not watching.
When Miss Seeley and her aunt
found themselves comfortably located
at once of the near-by beaches, the girl
conceived and carried out the plan of
escape from her guardians. She came
to Los Angeles and installed herself
at a hotel. The theory of the parents
was that the girl was waiting for the
man who, unfortunately for her plans,
is absent -from Los Angeles.
After falling to locate the girl, the
Pomona officer applied Friday to the
police for help, but they were not as
successful as he and last evening,
when he found the girl, he took her to
the police station.
Miss Seeley would not talk and when
questioned only hid her pretty face
in her hands and sobbed.
FOUR ESTABLISHMENTS '
ARE RAIDED BY POLICE
Plain Clothes Officers Prefer Charges
of Violating Liquor Law Against
Proprietors
Four establishments were raided by
Capt. Auble's orders yesterday after
noon and a considerable quantity of
liquor was confiscated. During the
morning two officers assert they pro
cured liquor from the drug store
operated by A. J. Maerz at Washington
street and Vermont avenue, and shortly
afterward the proprietor was arrested.
' N. Kawanakl of 119 North San Pedro
street is charged with selling liquor
and beer in his restaurant to officers in
plain clothes and he was arrested.
S. Kawanakl of 110 North San Pedro
street and K. Kawanakl of 114 North
San Pedro street were arrested shortly
afterward by the police.
In the San Pedro street resorts a large
quantity, of beer. and. wine .was found
,by, the iwllcv ' ► - " - \i
ELECTROCUTED ON
TELEPHONE POLE
LINEMAN ENTANGLED AMONG
LIVE WIRES
BODY IS SEVERELY BURNED
Frank M. Feltwell Comes Into Contact
With Deadly Current as He Climbs
To Perform a Soldering
Operation
Frank M. Feltwell, a splicer employed
by the Sunset Telephone company, be
came entangled in several electric
light wires in Santa Monica yesterday
afternoon, while climbing a pole to
make telephone repairs, and was elec
trocuted.
When Feltwell touched the live wires
and the electric current passed through
him, he fell dead to the ground, twenty
feet below. His arms and legs, where
they came in contact with the live wire,
were terribly burned.
Feltwell was 32 years old and had
lived in Los Angeles at 1714 Vargas
street with his wife and one child for
nearly three years. Since coming to
Los Angeles from Philadelphia he had
worked continually for the Sunset
Telephone company.
When the accident occurred he was
climbing the pole to make a solder on
the telephone wire. The coroner will
hold an inquest in Santa Monica to
day.
CHARGED WITH FORGERY;
IN CUSTODY OF POLICE
A. A. Greenbaum Said to Have Given
Bogus Checks to Pay
for Cigars
Detective McKenzle returned yester
day from Phoenix, Ariz., with A. A.
Grenbaum, who was arrested there re
cently on behalf of the Los Angeles
authorities, charged with being .con
nected with a forgery scheme.
According to the police Greenbaum
would order cigars from a dealer In
another city and then offer a bogus
check to insure the firm against loss.
Detective McKenzle said that a large
quantity of goods Is in the express
office at Phoenix which Grenbaum had
secured from R. L. Craig & Co., cigar
dealers of this city.
FREE SHAVES OFFERED
FOR A WHOLE YEAR
Barber Miller Offers Liberal Reward
for Identification of Practical
Jokers at His Wedding
Special to The Herald.
NEW YORK, Sept. 10.— "Let Joy be
unconflned," remarked Philip Miller, a
barber, last night at the close of the
ceremony which terminated his
wldowerhood and united him to Rose
Ladner, a prosperous dressmaker.
Just then fifteen waiters popped into
the Miller home, at 781 Third avenue,
took off their coats, slipped on their
linen Jackets and ranged themselves
silently before the astonished knight
of the strop.
"Well?" said Mr. Miller.
"Well?" echoed the walterß, In
chorus.
Five minutes later the bridegroom
was telephoning for the police. The
waiters, in French, Dutch and Yiddish,
declared excitedly that somebody had
telephoned to Wiler's agency for them
to hurry to Miller's wedding.
Miller rang up Capt. Lantry and all
the "cops" in the East Fifty-first street
precinct. So a relief expedition was
organized in a Jiffy and the waiters
were promptly led away from the wed
ding.
When Miller went downstairs to wel
come the police he found somebody had
pasted on his shop window a placard
inviting everybody to drop in. Also a
crowd of urchins pelted him with rice.
After the bluecoats had restored order
Miller made an announcement.
"I will give free shaves for a year, "
he said, "to the man who will find out
who sent those waiters."
RIDES IN ENGINE TANK
- TO REACH DYING MOTHER
Young Man Takes Desperate Chances
to Reach His Parent's
Deathbed
Special to The Herald. ■
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Sept. 10.— The
fireman on the fast Chicago & Alton
train out of Kansas City found a man
in the water tank of the locomotive at
Blackburn, eighty miles from this city.
He gave the name of James P. Hitch
ins, and had climbed Into the tank Just
before the train left Kansas City.
He explained that he ' had received
word that his mother was dying In St
Louis. He had no money and had taken
this hazardous method of getting to his
destination.
"Were not • you afraid of being
drowned?" asked the fireman.
"I had to take that chance," was the
reply. OHQHEBHI
He was allowed to dry out his clothes
in the engine cab and permitted to oom-
City News
DESERTED WIFE
PURSUES HUSBAND
OVERTAKES HIM AND WOMAN
AT SEASIDE
HE HAS CEASED TO LOVE HER
Mrs. J. C. Talbert of Whlttier Creates
Sensation at Laguna Beach Hotel
When She Confronts Her
Spouao
Deserted by her husband for another
woman, Mrs. J. C. Talbert, member of
one of the most prominent families of
Whlttier, swooped down on the recre
ant spouse at the Laguna Beach hotel
Saturday night and after roundly scor
ing the young man for his conduct, at
tempted to swear out a warrant i for
his arrest.
The story of desertion as told by
Mrs. Talbert caused a sensation at the
little summer resort where the husband
had taken up a temporary residence.
Talbert married a Whlttier belle
about four years ago. The couple lived
happily together until about five
months ago, when, according to the as
sertions of the wife, Talbert became In
fatuated with another woman and
eloped with her.
They went to Laguna Beach and reg
istered at the hotel as A. C. Johnson
and wife. The next day he rented a
cottage and Introduced the woman to
many of his acquaintances as his wife."
The couple were looked upon as a
newly married pair and were received
into the best social circles of the beach
resort
Affairs were progressing splendidly
when the real Mrs. Talbert with her
uncle, T. L. Lie of Pasadena, appeared
on the scene. She met him in the
lobby of the hotel, where he was chat
ting with the girl whom he had intro
duced as his wife.
Talbert Is said to have positively re
fused to return to his wife and told
her uncle he could never love her again
and would not go back to Whlttier with
her. ; :-',^.*.v:-'.i^-r-.^>iy
This enraged the wife, who secured
a fast team and started on a fifteen
mile drive to Santa Ana In search of
county officials to issue a warrant for
Talbert's arrest. Her uncle was left
to guard the Talbert cottage, but he
became sleepy and neglected his post
and the couple escaped to Los Angeles.
The wife returned to Laguna early
Sunday morning without a warrant.
Swimming Is part of the curriculum of
the public schools in Yarmouth, England.
Tho boys are taken to the shore In par
ties and are trained till they can swim
fifty yards In the sea. ■ ■
| f THE MARK OF <it)OU CLOTHES.
I" I ITNOW PS FOH BEST VALUgg.
BO ~
SEMI-ANNUAL
" MANHATTAN "
SHIRT
SALE!
BEGINS TODAY
Entire stock of plain and
plaited bosom Manhattan
shirts, except white shirts,
on sale at the following
prices. Sale begins today
— rboth stores.
$1.50 Manhattan rt»f |f|
Shirts now ...«pi.lU
$2.60 Manhattan fl»| Q C
Shirts now ..«pi«O%7
$2.50 Manhattan ti»| £. ff .
Shirts now «pi.U*/
$3.00 Manhattan tf»| f% C
Shirts now *pl»"wf
We would snggrert an early
■election, for Miwahattans CO
•with ■ rush »t cot, price*.
LEADING CLOTHIERS. ■■'
TWO STOItESi
117 to 125 North Spring Street.
337 to 341 ; Bouth • Spring ' Street.

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