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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, October 17, 1905, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1905-10-17/ed-1/seq-7/

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WdtiSff lute In Los Angeles. Twelve
•Jrhtjf instructors. Largest school
_"■ "" buildings and grounds.
Beautiful surroundings. Preparatory
department under special teachers Just
edded. Investigate.
0.13-5-7 Went Seventh Street.
F. nnOWIMSnifII'.GEK. President.
PAI.li TIUnM OFENS SEPT. 11.
I Class and private instruction in every
department of music and language by
best teachers. The value and importance
to children of our kindergarten work
should be known to every parent. Phys-
ical culture by foremost teacher. For
catalogue, terms, etc., apply to Conserv-
atory, 232 S. Hill Bt. LOUIS EVANS. Mgr.
PENMANSHIP
Failures elsewhere succeed here. It's the
TEACHER— it'B tho SYSTEM. Visit one
Of our large classes. Ages 12 to 62. 501
Currier. Bids.
Home 2196. Main 6576.
•■ SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA — w* y
AND GRAHAM SCHOOL OF &HQRTHAJ>fb\
♦A* S OffAMO AVC AOJ AA*O£L£d, CAL+'
fiOO S. Hill *t. But and Evening.
»-— fc *1 2,000.
J^*fflWWmi*#J» ANGELUS VISTA.
fe"W«Mir!i«S#jsr Eaßt front, ten-
'BilllMSUlXttM' room, colonial
T>s3fTZtTTrrJaSy stylo residence,
* southwest, on high
•w*^ % ground, built by
the day and no
pains spared to make It an Ideal home;
I corner lot, 70x175; can be made 170x178
.'? by adding In the two adjoining lots;
f,' good opportunity, and worth far more
money; owner obliged to sell.
EPWIX AI.DEnSOiV. 200 l.nnchlln nlilg-
EDUCATIONAL
A^SA^INB~^GHT^^Om^ITOW~IN
session. . WADE & WADE, 318 East
First st.
Beach Property
t TUESDAY ONLY
VENICE. VENICE CANAL LOT FAC-
ING ST. MARK'S ISLAND ON AL-
TAIR CANAL, NEAR LION CANAL,
30X90. TWO NEW COTTAGES BUILT
* NEAR THIS LOT AND JUST COM-
PLETED. YOU CAN BUY THIS LOT
FOR EXACTLY $350 UNDER THE
MARKET, AND ONLY $500 CASH: $313
IN MAY, 1906, AND $313 IN NOVEM-
BER. IMB.
, PRICE FOR TWO DAYS, $1000.
302 Mason BisJldtag
C©r. 4tli aid Broadway
Home 6576. Main 4090.
j, _ lot.
Wnflmniragtoiiii
Inner Harbor; must have money; will
. take $400.
McFATRIDGE CO., 319 S. Spring St.
r Miscellaneous
;
FOR SALE— GREATEST VALUES IN
household goods ever known; gigantio
removal sale; puffed edged Swiss cur-
tains, 40c pair; $2.25 portieres, $1.60; door
panels, 30c; box couches, $2.50; couch
covers, $1.10; steel sanitary couches,
$4.50; dressers, $5.75; washstanda, $2.50;
6-plece toilet sets, $1,75; 6-foot extension
tables, $5; 52-plece dinner sets, $4.50;
1 set knixes and forks, 75c; linoleum, 50c;
treasure tables, $3.50. Buy now; It means
dollars saved to you. J. M. OVERELL,
652-654 So. Main St.
FOR SALE— LUMBER, LOT OF FENC-
Ing and shelving, only $16 per thou-
sand. Rustic, flooring, celling and
' bevel siding, only $22.60. Shakes, $10
! , per thousand. We always keep a
bargain counter in building material.
; Come and see us at the largest lum-
1 ber yard in Los Angeles.
IKi X NATIONAL LUMBER COMPANY,
Twentieth and Alameda streets.
DON'T SPOIL YOUR HOME BY USING
plno rustic when we will sell you red-
wood at only $30 per M.
E NATIONAL LUMBER COMPANY,
y, Twentieth and Alameda streets.
j Branch office. Ninth and Maple.
8 FOR SALE— LATHI LATH! LATH! WE
W are overstocked with them and are
selling at cost. See us for price.
NATIONAL LUMBER COMPANY,
Twentieth and Alameda streets.
FOR SALE— NEW AND SECOND-HAND
billiard and pool tables. Bar fixtures ot
all kinds; easy payments. Send for cat-
alogue. THE BRUNSWICK-BALKB-
COLLENDER CO.. 620 8. Broadway,
Lob Angelaa.
Hotels and Lodging Houses
' FOR SALE-ROOMING HOUSE AT
Angela' Flight; lovely location; neat,
clean, homelike; 38 rooms; clears $100
per month long lease. We are mining
men, going to mines; will give best bar-
gain In city.
McFATRIDGE CO., 319 South Spring St.
FOR EXCHANGE
Real Estate.
BEN WHITE
1 Will Exchange
your property; immense bargains: ap-
ply at once. Satisfaction and quick re-
* suits. Member Realty Board. 304-5 IiItY-
SON BLOCK, 2d and Spring sts.
FOR EXCHANGE—
$950 equity in Pasadena lot.
$1365 equity in 7 lots, S. Hollywood
V (Colegrove).
$1250— Clear; 10 acres in Corona.
Any or all of above properties for a
clear ranch, good building lots or equity
in a cottage. WM. N. HOLWAY, HI
Grant Bldg. Home 1939; Main 4570.
,S, S FOR EXCHANGE—
' MONROVIA FOR LOS ANGELES. 21
LOTS AND 2-STORY HOUSE. FLOW-
ERS, ETC., LOTS IN 8-YEAR-OLD
j, ORANGES, GRAND VIEW; NEAR
ELECTRIC CARS.
1 R. E. IBBETSON & CO..
HOME 2410. 316 TRUST BUILDING.
fOR EXCHANGE-WE WILL GIVE
someone a good deal in a fine lot in tha
. Westlake district for an automobile.
BROWN ft WQOjffi, JWJ^ajfc *
Votes Begin to Come
In Thick and Fast
The Herald's Popular Salesladies Contest
The All Absorbing Subject Among
Scores of People in Los Angeles
LANE & CO.'S STORE.
Miss Edith House . .' 1,271
Miss t)rmah Beal 869
Mies Dolly Mclntee 822
Miss J. Dunlap 564
Miss Helen Rich 310
COULTER & CO.'S STORE
Mi'sa Carrie Lee ....1,242
Mrs. Bristol 932
Miss Sarah Hughes 901
Mrs. J. Bidlson 745
NEW YORK SUIT HOUSE.
Miss Edythe Learned 1,238
Mrs. A. J. West 893
Miss T. Hayes 798
Mrs. E. Randolph 741
Miss T. Hagan ; . 672
H. M. MOSHER'S STORE.
Miss Mabel Beck .1,229
Mrs. M. M. Lyon 733
THE BROADWAY.
Miss Maude Blanck 1,194
Miss Eva Snook 1,042
Miss Ida Ebblnger 943
Miss Edith Houston 903
Miss Saydee See 742
Mies Adeline Caldwell 502
MEHESY CURIO BTORE.
Miss Grace Gray . ...; 1,192
HAMBURGER'S STORE.
Miss Rose Guggenheim 1,172
Miss L. Navin 971
Miss Margaret Fitzgerald ...... 944
Mrs. W. J. Lloyd 736
Miss Mabel Davis 564
VILLE DE PARIS.
Miss Clara Flues 1,163
Miss Etta Schumacher 914
Mrs. Shipman 892
Miss B. Mauer 463
Miss ,R. Binder 452
Miss Mabel Beirne 721
JACOBY BROS.' STORE.
Miss Daisy Vlckers 1,119
Miss Mable Schaffle 875
Mrs. B. Lusby 462
Mrs. L. Hackett 449
Mrs. W. J." Workman 386
FIFTH STREET STORE.
Miss May Turk 1,039
Miss Verna Garver 668
Miss Daisy Mclntyre 604
Miss Ethelda Cantwell 564
Miss Emma Rennow 564
BOSTON STORE.
Miss Metta Herman 934
Miss Helen Harms 919
Miss Frances Curd 831
CHARLTON & CO.
Miss Lillian Smith .....'. 932
Miss Margaret McNiven 819
HALES STORE.
Miss Sarah Hite 867
Mrs. C. McCarthy 609
NAMES WITHOUT BUSINESS AD
,': DRESS.
Miss Mac Hogan, residence 928
Denver avenue 643
Miss Mabel Gordon, care Cres
cent Drug company 448
Votes for the candidates In the
Popular Salesladies Contest have
been coming into the office ever since
the names of the candidates were
announced, and it is now predicted
that a perfect avalanche will be re
corded before the ballot box closes
for the last time December 2?. No
end of excitement and interest is
being aroused throughout the town
where the news of the contest has
gone, and many ladles are already
scouring the field for possible sub
scriptions. There is a vote published
in each paper which when properly
Los Angeles Herald
Popular Salesladies Contest
Fill in the name of the lady whom you wish' to vote for and her busi
ness address. Bring or mail to the manager of the Contest Depart
ment care of Los Angeles Herald. This coupon counts for one vote.
Miss
Address
Not good after October 24.
BUILDING PERMITS
Superintendent Backus Yesterday isrusd
building permits as follows:
Arroyo Seco, 3261— Frank Hoak, 3274 Ar
royo Seco, owner and builder; one-story
frame residence; $12C. .
Allessandro street, ISS9— M. Smith, at
lot, owner; M. Stutz. builder; two-story
frame store and residence; $2200.
Avenuo Forty-lour, 118 West— J. A.
Mathis, 123 Avenue Forty-two, owner; G.
Smith, builder; one-story, five- room
frame residence; $1500.
Berendo street, 1020— W. E. Stevens, 1856
Wlnneld, owner and builder; one-story,
hlx-room frame residence $1000.
Bartol street, 168— Andrew Lewlson. 167
Won Thirty-sjventh, owner; H. Lewlson,
builder; one-story, six-room frame rosi-
P Brooklyn avenue, 2459— C. Fickett, San
Pedro, owner; C. E. Lotz, builder; two
btorv, eight-room frnme residence; $2400.
Be'llovue avenue, 1815— John Morrison.
1417 West First, owner and builder; one
story frame residence; $400.
Compton avenuo, 4711-Tillle Hall, at lot,
owner; A. L. Bowman, builder; one-story
frame residence; $460. _•■■• ■•'-■■ ■■-■■•-« y~
Compton avonti9 and Fifty-fourth— R.
H. Lucas. 731 East Thirty-first, owner oud
builder: one-story frame residence: $126.
Douglas street, 866— A. W. Bradley.
Hotel Rochester, owner; R. T. Drew and
sons, builders; one-story frame residence;
Echsndla street. fiOl— Brooklyn Heights
Congregational church, at lot, owner; Mr.
Curtis, builder; addition to one-story
frame church building; $120.
Echandla street, 405— William Steward
son, H3l North Main, owner; B. K. Grovea,
■ _ FOR EXCHA _ N -°-
Real Estate
MAXON WILL EXCHANGE YOUR
property, any location. Large list to
select from. MAXON REALTY CO..
114-115 Stlmsofc Bldg.
Miscellaneous
CHE3APEST LOTS IKT TOWN.
lIAWTHORNB TRACT.
CLOSING OUT SAL.H.
Tours while they last at
* tan to iisoo.
60 per cent lower than lota
In adjoining tracts. '
Fine 50-foot lots, fully improved.
W. F. THORNE & CO., OWNERS.
J HomeJllii^Rosgi .3Ui_2lLßv£d\ygX, •
LOS ANGELES . HERALD': TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER; Vj, xqo*. U
filled out and forwarded to Tho Herald
office will count as one vote. There
is another and better way of rolling
up a large count quickly, however,
and that is by getting your friends
and relatives to subscribe for the
paper and cast their votes for you. If
they already take The Herald get
them to send the paper to an eastern
friend or relative. It will serve as
promotion literature for California and
establish a dally correspondence. A
fow dollars cannot be better invested
than in purchasing The Herald from
one to five years in advance for your
self. For every cent spent in this
contest there is value given for
amount received. Unlike other con
tests, votes are not purchased merely
for the purpose of securing votes, but
there Is a cent's worth of news ex
changed for every cent turned Into
The Herald office. Now is the time
to get In and work for some popular
saleslady whom you think is deserv
ing and would appreciate one of the
valuable prizes now being offered.
These prizes are tha most liberal ever
offered by any southern California
paper, and it can be considered from
the standpoint of a handsome Christ
mas present. The successful candi
dates will receive orders for the prizes
immediately at the close of the con
test, and it is optional with them
to make selections to their own liking.
The first prize, a Grand Upright Kings
bury Piano, can be had in either oak
or mahogany. Second prize can be
had in either earrings or a twin dia
mond ring, valued at $225. The third
prize, a ladies' diamond ring, valued
at $150. The fourth prize can be had
in either a tailor made suit or gown,
valued at $100, and the fifth prize in
either a tailor made suit or gown,
valued at $50. The votes -were not
"counted on Sunday, but the vote of
yesterday was . quite heavy, as will
be noticed in the changes, and by to
night the numbers will have reached
well up in the thousands.
There wasn't one young lady dis
couraged by yesterday's count, which
is good evidence of grit and "stick
toltiveness" of the candidates. They
are all In it to win, and a very inter
esting tug-of-war is promised. A few
hundred votes, or even a thousand,
does not make much difference now,
as the contest is so young. It is In
its infancy yet and every young lady
has an equal chance of winning one
of the five prizes. Now is the time
for the candidates to get in their work.
A few gotten on the start are worth
ten times the amount later on. Get
your friends in line and solicit their
patronage; and you need have no
fear of not being successful.
Receipt books, subscription blanks,
etc., for securing subscriptions will be
gladly furnished to all who desire
them if the want is made knowh at
the office or by mail.
Votes on subscriptions allowed as fol
1 month's subscription to Dally Her
ald 65 votes; 3 months' subscription
to Daily Herald, 300 votes; 6 months'
subscription to Dally Herald, 800 votes;
12 months' subscription to Daily Her
ald, 1700 voi-i.
PRICE OF DAILY HERALD
1 month's subscription to Daily Her*
aid 65c; 3 months' subscriptions to
Daily Herald, $1.95; 6 months' sub
scription to Daily Herald, $3.90; 12
months' subscription to Dally Herald,
'Those who are already subscribers
to this paper may secure votes In this
contest by paying In advance as long
a» desired. Payments In arrears count
the same as payments In advance.
builder; move and repair one-story frame
residence; $50.
Elden avenue, 1237— William Bosbyshell,
at lot, owner; F. Burlsh, builder" addition
to one-story frame residence; $150.
Fifty-fifth street, 1441 Eust-Lulu B.
Bulock. 1433 East Fifty-fifth, owner and
builder; one-story frame residence; $160.
Flf ty-flfth street, 200 feet east of Latham
— C. A. Oage, 1227 East Fortieth, owner
and builder; one-Btory Iramo residence;
$200.
Forty-sixth street. 1538 East-W. A.
Rlggs, 1340 East Forty-seventh, owner
and builder; one-story frame residence;
$800.
Forty-eighth street, 420 East-J. A. Alles,
1151 East— Flfty-flrst, owner and builder;
iwo-story, six-room frame residence 1 $1700.
Forty-eighth street. 1457 East— Mrs. A.
Randall, 1347 East Forty-sixth, owner and
builder; one-story frame residence; )75.
Forty-flfth street, 1440 East— John Ever
hart, at lot, owner and builder; one-story,
five-room frame residence; $800.
Fo-tv-nlnth street, 739 East— M. D. Judd.
738 South Wall, owner; one-story frame
barn; $28.
Fifty-sixth street. 1231 East-Henry
Beaver, 1040 East Fifty-seventh, owner
and builder; one-story frame barn; $SO.
Forty-fifth street, 1044 Went— M. J.
Skelton, 13S South Grand, owner and
builder; one and one-half-story, seven
room frame residence; $2500.
Forty-second street. 4i>o East— Effle M.
Wills, 824 East Twenty-ninth, owner; J.
A. Kemp, builder; one-story, five-room
frame residence; $1500.
Gless avenue, 417 South*-Ike Friedman,
629 Ruth, owner and builder; one-story
frame residence; $1000.
Hancock street, 234 North — Mrs. A.
M. Avery, 288 North Hancock, owner;
Webb Si Van Loren, builder; one-story
frame residence; $1259.
Hoover street, 1610 North — F. W.
Gross, Acton, owner: S. K. Fraser,
builder; one-story frame building;
$376.
Huber avenue, 1244 — Stella Stump, at
lot, owner and builder; addition to one-
Btory frame residence; $760.
Hunter street, 2421 — F. B. Btach, S2l
American National bank building,
owner and builder; one-Btory frame
residence; $400. *?•• < ■■:
Kohler street, 784 — Mrs. IT. Eberle,
1105 East Eighth, owner; W. F. Gilbert,
builder; addition to one-story frame
residence; $35. ■■ . • <
Mohawk street, 1122 — C. A. Parmelee,
232 South Spring, owner; J. A. Mathls.
builder; one-story, five-room frame
residence; $1400. ■ -.'-•■ . _ ,
Morgan avenue, 28S5 — G. M. Ford,
2861 Morgan, owner and builder; one
story frame rcßldenco; 130Q.'
COMPANY NOT A COMPETITOR
Representative of Mojavo Water En.
terprlse Says Concern Is Not to
Oppose Owens Scheme
"J. H. Braly, president of the South
ern California Savings bank, has been
done an Injustice by being accused of
having a large financial Interest in the
Mojave water scheme," said A. E.
Poole, yesterday, "and we have been
done an injustice by the satement that
we are coming Into Los Angeles and
compete with power companies and the
Owens river water scheme. Mr. Braly
has not one cent's Interest In the enter
prise, nor has his bank, and we are not
coming Into Los Angeles to compete
with anybody."
Mr. Poole is the representative of the
eastern capitalists who have acquired
the rancho Verde, with all riparian
rights of the Mojavo river. The
company that has acquired these
rights has not definitely decided what
to do with them. There are two courses
that are open, both of which promise
excellent results. One Is to irrigate tha
agricultural land in tho vlcinty, a total
of about 200,000 acres, and the other
Is to bring the water over the moun
tains and furnish some of the Southern
California cities with It for domestic
/use.
"The statement that we paid $350,000
for the ranch Is another falsity with
which we have had to- contend. We
paid much less than this and with the
ranch secured about $107,000 worth of
personal property, such as cattle, horses,
and other, agricultural and ranching
facilities," continued Mr. Poole. "The
cost of moving the Santa Fe railroad
from the reservoir bed will be less
than $150,000, and the company has
consented to be moved if we pay the
expense."
ORDINANCE A BAR TO
NEW REFINING PLANT
COUNCIL PROHIBITS SULPHUR
INDUSTRY
Former Councilman Todd Seizes Psy
chological Moment and Gets Law
Which Prevents Operation of Pro
posed Plant Within City Limits
The Intention of the fire commission
and thp mayor to encourage Industrie's
received a rude slap yesterday morning
when Attorney Robert A. Tood, for
merly councilman from the Eighth
ward sledded through an ordinance to
prohibit the building, operation or main
tenance of a sulphur refining plant
anywhere In the city limits. Ex-Coun
cilman Todd got this ordinance through
In a record breaking time, for it was
not two minutes from the time he
stated that he ana his former constit
uents wanted the ordinance until It had
passed by a unanimous vote of the
council.
Mr. Todd chose an oportune time.
It was 12:30 o'clock and the motion to
adjourn for lunch had been made when,
before it was seconded, Mr. Todd
stepped to the front with his ordi
nance and in two sentences told what
It was. It was placed on its passage
and passed In a hurry, for the council
men were hungry and worif from tho
morning's work.
There had been no ordinance of this
nature before and thereby hangs a' tal°.
At the meeting of the fire commis
sion a week ago last Saturday, P. M.
Paulson, representing the StauiTer
Chemical company of San Francisco
asked for permission to insall a sul
phur refining plant in the block
bounded by St. James, St. John's rin J
Holly stcpet and the Santa Fe rallroal
The chemical company had purchased
the entire block for the purpose of
erecting the factory and as this com
pany has several similar institutions In
operation in the large cities of the
coast It believed It could secure a
permit without much trouble.
A mild protest was received from
property owners of the neighborhood,
who feared that the fumes from tho
factory would be unbearable, but Mr.
Paulson stated that the factory was
equipped with a device for preventing
fumes from escaping.
"We want to do all we can to en
courage the erection and operation, of
(actorles In Los Angeles, but before
we grant this permit we want to see
the plans of the fume destroying de
vice," said Mayor McAleer.
On this understanding the proposi
tion was laid over for two weeks, at
the request of Mr. Paulson, that a din»
gram might be prepared and presented
to the boafd. The case was to have
come up for final settlement yesterday,
A gas plant, an oil refinery and the
Santa Fe switch yards are now oper
ated In the locality where It was pro
posed to establish the sulphur plant.
"We don't want a sulphur plant."
was Mr. Todd's explanation. "We have
enough to bear with the gas plant and
the oil refinery, without having any
more odorous Institutions."
The Staufter Chemical company had
proposed to spend $100,000 in erecting
the plant and believed it saw a profit
able business ahead, as Southern Cali
fornia Is a large consumer of sulphur.
It is used In spraying fruit trees and
plants. In the curing of fruits and tho
manufacture of fertilizer. It is be
lieved that the ordinance will be re
pealed by the council.
FREEHOLDERS TO BE ELECTED
Santa Monica Votes for Men Who
Will Draft the New City
Charter
Special to The Herald.
SANTA MONICA, Oct. 16.— With
Mayor T. H. Dudley at Its head and
the names of fourteen substantial citi
zens appended. It. Is conceded that the
non-partisan ticket for a board ot
freeholders will meet with little or no
opposition at tomorrow's election.
There is a citizens' ticket in the field
containing but eight names, seven
nominees having withdrawn .since its
acceptance, and of the candidates re
maining three are also on the non
partisan ticket. Equitable considera
tion for both ends of the city is the
only point Involved. The candidates
are: Non-partisan— T. H. Dudley, O.
H. Hutton, G. D. Snyder, C. A. Stll
son, R. R. Tanner, H. X. Goetz, W. I.
Hull, A. M. Jamison, W. S. Vawter,
R. F. Jones, D. O. Holt, B. A. Nebeker,
E. J. Vawter, Roy and A. N. Archer.
Citizens— O. H. Hutton, R. R. Tanner,
W. I. Hull. B. Li. Balsley. T. H. Elliott,
T. A. Moody, W. L. Muller and T.
Menzles.
Elaborate arrangements nre being
made at Mtramar, the beautiful home
of Miss Gorglnla Jones, daughter of
Senator R. F. Jones, for Friday's lawn
fete, the proceeds of which will be
donated to the "out-door hospital fund
for consumptives" at Oceano. A feature
of the occasion will be the presentation
of Tennyson's "Dreams of Fair Wo
men," by a number of well known
young people.
BOY PRISONER HAB BAD RECORD
Special to Tha Herald.
WHITTIER. Oct. 18.— Wesley Bruyn,
th« 18-year-old (ton of S. H. Bruyn,
who is In Jail in Loa Angeles charged
with stealing a watch and diamond
ring from C. C. Davln of Bast Sail
Gabriel, was recently expelled from
the publlo school here. . The parents
Bay they ara unable to control the
h«w. *■'- ■ :•'.•' -"
WANTS RAILWAY
FRANCHISES
DORSEY SYNDICATE WILL ASK
FROM PASADENA
Rancher Watson Guilty of Speeding
Auto— Noted Guests of City.
Y. M. C. A. Friction.
Other News
Pasadena Agener.
114 East Colorado Street
PASADENA, Oct. 16.— Mayor Water
house and other city officials received
notice today that Wllber O. Dow,
manager for the Senator Dorsey Inter
ests In this section, will appear before
the city council at its regular meeting
tomorrow to ask for certain street
railway franchises.
The lines projected extend east from
Lave avenue on Villa, East Orange
Grove and Mountain streets to the
great tract of land the Dorsey com
pany Intends to open for settlement
in the near future.
This seems to put the seal of truth
upon many of the rumors which have
been flying about concerning the new
scheme of Senator Dorsey and his as
sociates. The syndicate owns 380 acres
north of Villa and east of Hill streets
and Senator Dorsey is said to own the
beautiful Fair Oaks ranch, recently
purchased In that same section.
According to the city charter, all
franchises must be offered for sale to
the highest bidder. If It be true that
the Huntington forces are working In
harmony with those headed by Senator
Dorsey, as seems altogether probable,
the franchises will be secured without
opposition. The proposed lines will con
nect with Pacific Electric lines already
In operation In this city.
Autolst Fined
The police court had a long session
today on account of tha trial of C. A.
Watson, a Redlands rancher, accused
of speeding his automobile on Colorado
street. .
The case was vigorously contested,
but resulted in a verdict of guilty, a
verdict which the Redlands man says
he will not appeal from. The city a
side of the case waß well worked up,
some twenty witnesses being sub
poenaed to testify against the auto
driver.
It was shown that the machine wai
going at a speed exceeding ten miles
an hour, some of the witnesses ns
sertlng that it was as high as twenty
miles, and that although repeatedly
called to, the driver did not stop, but
after striking l'rosser and knocking
him down, went faster than before un
til out of sight.
Watson's attorney put up a stubborn
defense, but offered no evidence to off
set that of the city. Watson says that
he was going very Blowly, that sud
denly he saw two wheelmen have a
mlx-up and one of them ran in front
of the auto, so thnt the machine struck
the rear wheel. Police Judge Wood will
pronounce sentence tomorrow morning.
Educators Guests of City
Dr. Nathan C. Schaeffer and Prof. J.
N. Wllkerson, of the National Educa
tional association, were guests of Pas
adena this forenoon, going on to Los
Angeles at noon. They were met at an
early hour this morning by Dean
Chamberlain of Throop Polytechnic and
his brother. Prof. James Chamberlain
of the State Normal school at Los An
geles, and on their arrival on the Santa
Fe, were met by Secretary Coolldge of
the board of trade. After breakfast
the party took a long drive about the
city. Both pf the distinguished edu
cators were profuse In their praise of
the beauties of the Crown City, Presi
dent Schaeffer remarking that "Pasa
dena is the most beautiful city I have
even seen." Both gentlemen occupied
seats on the platform at the morning
chapel exercises at Throop and made
Inspiring addresses to the students.
President AVllkerson among other
things told the students that he was
Vsure that Pasadena Is the place where
one ought to get his impressions ot
Southern California, and Throop is a
very good place to get impressions of
Pasadena," a sentiment which pleased
the young people Immensely.
Friction In Local Y. M. C. A.
It is reported that Physical Director
George W. Braden of the local Y. M. C.
A. will go before the board oi directors
tomorrow evening wltri a proposition
which in effect means that either he or
General Secretary Sams must resign.
For some time there has been more
or less friction between the two lead
ers in association work, said to be due
to Secretary Sams' Interference with
the work of the physical director. Un
less the directors can patch up tho
present difficulty one of the two will
probably give up the work. Friends
of the association, who admire both
young men as splendid workers and
natural leaders, hope that reports of
the present difficulty are exaggerated.
Younger members of the association
are circulating a petition in favor of
Mr. Braden to present to the board
tomorrow night •
For Using "Freezem"
Sanitary Inspector Huddlestone has
sworn out warrants for A. J. and G. E.
Proctor, the North Fair Oaks avenue,
North Pasadena, meatmarket propri
etors, on the charge of using pre
servatives on meat offered for sale.
These warrants will be served tomor
row and the Proctors will tell Police
Judge Wood all about It. The arrests
are made because of a pumber of com
plaints which have been made lately
by people buying meat at the Proctor
market. The state law provides a
The Palace
\/U7C«ttf«« rah j^^~^7^
The King is in the kitchen ; his subjects appreciate "^^^^ffj I j
his good cooking — The lobsters broiled or boiled are L$L .-/g^ I
the pink of perfectioa « | §1
• _ EXCELLENT MUSIC NOON AND NIGHT- •
w * g g-% r\ f f # Basement of
Jahnke oh Enderlein asyssgsg.
heavy fine for persons proven guilty of
the use of meat preservatives.
Paiadena Brevities
Sir Henry Irving, the great English
actor whose death occurred Saturday,
was a cousin of Mrs. A. Irving Laird,
wife of Dr. J. W. Laird of this city.
Miss Maxlne, the 3-year-old daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Rodgers, for
merly residents of Pasadena, won first
prize at the recent Portland baby show
in competition with one thousand chil
dren.
While Mrs. F. T. Kuranaga, wife of
the Colorado Japanese merchant was
In San Francisco recently, her trunk
was broken into and Jewelry and sil
verware to the value of $400 was stolen.
There Is no clew to the thief.
Mrs. Charlotte Stevens, wife of Alfred
Stevens, died this morning in Altadena
at the age of 43 years. She had re
sided In Pasadena for twenty-three
years, and was a native of England.
Interment Tuesday.
Congdon May Reconsider
It Is understood that the board of
supervisors will take up Justice Cong
don's resignation at the meeting tomor
row, and after accepting the same, will
proceed to the choice of his successor.
There Is a rumor about the strets to
day to the effect that Justice Congdon
is ready to reconsider his action m
sending In his resignation and will
probably recall the same when the
board convenes tomorrow.
Constable W. C. Austin this morning
arrested C. C. Tllley, proprietor of a
road house on the road between Pa.sa
dena and Los Angeles, on tho charge
of selling Intoxicating liquors without
a license. Tllley will be arraigned be
fore Justice Klamroth tomorrow morn-
Ing.
BEET SUGAR INDUSTRY GROWS
Reports From Ventura Show Increase
In Output of Saccharine Pro.
duclng Vegetable
Special to The Herald.
OXNARD, Oct. 16.— The growing of
sugar beets in this county, which In
dustry had its birth In 1898, Instead of
dying out, as was predicted by many,
has Increased and Is still Increasing.
Thp rrop of 1905, the bulk of which Is
harvested, was the largest, both in
acreage and yield, since the erection of
the factory. There were grave appre
hensions regarding the Deet and its
effect upon the soil. Many placed the
limit of time which land would suc
cessfully produce beets at three sea
sons. It was claimed that any orop
which went so far into the soil as the
sugar beet must soon sap all the vital
ity from the earth. But seven years
has shown this theory to be incorrect.
Land which has grown beets each suc
ceeding year has produced an excellent
crop this season, and the per cent of
saccharine matter has run high, 18 and
19 per cent being the average, while
some have gone as high as 25 and even
33 per cent.
With the successful season Just clos
ing the American Beet Sugar company
has decided to offer an advance In price
for the crop of 1906. Contracts will be
made at the following figures: The
minimum price to be paid will be $3.60
per ton for beets testing 11 per cent,
and for each 1 per cent of sugar above
that there will be paid 25 cents addi
tional up to and including 15 per cent.
This brings 16 per cent beets up to
$4.50 per ton. For each additional per
cent above 15. 30 cents per ton will be
paid. At this rate beets averaging 20
per cent will bring $6 per ton. This
advance in price will mean a larger
acreage next season than this, and
every effort will be put forth to bring
I about a high per cent of sugar.
A COI-D IN OJfB DAY
TO CUKE
Take LAXATIVE BROMO Quinine Tab
lets. Druggists refund money If It fails
to cure. E. W. GROVE'S signature la
on each box. 26c.
If you wnnt to go runt, C. Ilnrdock,
Agt. Illinois Central R. R.. 238 S. Spring.
REVIEW POPULAR NOVELS
Special to The Herald.
HOLLYWOOD. O^t. 16.— The Wo
man's club of Hollywood gave its first
program for the winter this afternoon
at the residence of Mrs. F. W. Stith.
The feature of the afternoon was the
review of the popular novels of the
past year by Miss Eleanor Hammcck,
head of the English department of the
Hollywood Union high school. Among
the books Miss Hammack reviewed
were "Constance Trescott," "Isldro,"
"Marriage of William Ashe," "Divine
Fire" and some of HowellB 1 and Kip
ling's works. After her review tho
remainder of the afternoon was spent
In a round table discussion of the
books reviewed.
The ladies of St. Catherine's guiU
announce they have cleared about $600
by their "International Market."
''about the merit
JESSEMOORE f T^fHfS
WHISKEY JiiP^r ill/>y
I H. J. WOOLLACOTT, 124-126 North Spring Street M
1 Distributor H
7
RANCHERS MAKE
QUICK CAPTURE
ARREST THREE MEN CHARGED
WITH BURGLARY
Thieves Carry Away Silverware From
Home of San Bernardino County
Man — Posse Does Some
Fast Trailing
Special to Tho Herald.
SAN BERNADINO, Oct. 16.— Three
men, who are accused of robbing tho
home of Ernest Merryfleld south of
Colton last night, are now In the county
Jail as the result of the vlgorus action
of Mr. Merryfield and his nelgbors im
mediately after the burglary occurred.
The thieves forced an entrance to the
house and gathered together a bundle
of silverware Rnd other valuables. They
were discoverer! Just as they left the
house. Mr. Merryfleld at once grabbed
a pistol and aroused his three brothers
and other neighbors who lived close at
hand.
Armed with pistols, rifles and shot
guns the little posse set out after
the thieves and trailed them through
the orange orchards a half a mile or
more, where they sudenly came upon
the three men, who were arrested.
Surrounding the men they compelled
them to throw up their hands and drbp
their plunder. They then disarmed and
searched tha men and compelled them
to march back to the house at tha
point of guns. Mr. Merryfleld tele
phoned to Colton for an officer, and
Deputy Sheriff Charles Ward re
sponded. The prisoners were then
brought to the county Jail.
Today the officers have been hunting
down suspicious characters In the vi
cinity and havo placed four mare won
derers under arrest on suspicion.,
The officers have praise tor the
prompt work of the men who started
in pursuit of the thieves and say if
more people would do the same when
they have opportunity, Instead of wait
ing for the officers to come, that more,
thieves would be captured.
Daggett liquor sellers will get no
license for their saloons this year. From
this time on the town must be dry until
the next election, unless the matter is
carried to the supreme court by tho
saloonlsts. The demurrer in tha action
brought In the superior court by the
saloon men, In the name of T. B. Flint,
was today sustained by Judges Oster
and Bledsoe, which ends the matter
except In case of an appeal. At tha
election last fall the antl-sa.loon men
quietly got together and voted the sa
loons out of that precinct.
County Horticultural Commissioner
S. A. Pease went to Highland this
morning to Investigate a report that
came to his office and which had
alarmed the fruit growers of that fa
vored section, that black scale in quan
tities had appeared in the orchards
there. He made a careful search, but
was unable to locate a single speci
men of the dreaded bug in any of the
orchards.
Henry Hodgen was today sentenced
by Judge Bledsoe to five years in Fol-
Bom prison for the burglary of tho
Harvey house at Barstow about tftn
days ago.
STUDENTS VIEW ART WORKS
Special to The Herald.
CLAREMONT, Oct 16.— This after
noon from 3 to 6, a reception to and
an exhibition of the works of Mrs.
H. T. Jenkens, the new directress of
the art department of Pomona college,
was given. The exhibition, all the
work of Mrs. Jenkins, done both In
Europe and America, covered the walls
of the art rooms in Holmes hall, and
comprised many examples of still-life,
portraits, figures and landscapes In
oil, water colors and pastels, flower
painting and animals. Many of these
pictures have been hung in the large
exhibitions of New York and Paris.
One of the Interesting features was
the manual training and art work of
Teacher's college, Columbia university,
from which the new directress Is a
graduate.
The rooms were tastefully decorated
with flowers and shrubbery. Refresh
ments were served by the young ladies
of the art department.
The guests Included many people;
from the surrounding towns, the fac
ulty, students and patrons of the col
lege from Pomona and Claremont.

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