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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 03, 1905, Image 18

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LOS ANGELES HERALD
' BY THE HERALD COMPANY.
FIIAJK O. FtflfcAirSOJ! Fre»ld«?»«
IHMIT. M. YOST Kdllorlal M«nm#f
S. If, liAVKHTV llnnlnc** Miui«««
OLDEST MOfININO I'APEIt IN
LOS ANOKLES.
1 oitnilr.l Oct. 3, 1N73. Thlrtr-thlrd V»ar.
rlinnihor t»t CnmnMTCr Mtillillnw.
TEI.Kf'ttONES-Sunset, Tress 1L Home,
The. I tern Id.
Official Paper of Los Angeles
The only Democratic newspaper In
Southern California receiving the full A«
soclntoil Preps reports.
NKWS SEIIVICE-MeuilKT of the As«o
rl.atert Tress, receiving IU full report,
nvernr' B 23,000 words a tiny.
EASTERN AOKNTB-S'mlth A Thomp
son, Potter building, New York; Trlbuuo
I)iill<lliik, Chicago.
HATES Of HUHSCniPTION. WITH
SUNDAY MAGAZINE)!
Daily, by canter, per month $ .«;
Dally, I>V mull, thrco months I.MJ
Dally, I>y miiM. six montlis g.W
Dhllv. by mull, ono year '>'
Sunday Uer.iW, by mull, one. yenr J.^o
Weekly Uerald, by mall, olio yenr 1.00
Entered nt Voalofflce, Los Angeles, ns
Second-class Matter.
THE HiTkaT.D IN SAN KUANCTSCO-
J,ns AiikcH'S Mini Southern California visit
or* tv Bail FranclsCO will find The Herald
cm fdle ut thn news stands In the Paluce
mid St. FrAuCll hotels, and for sale, by
Conner * Co., Mrt Market; nt News Co.. S.
T. Ferry, n,nd on thn ntr»rt* hy Whi-iitley.
Population of Los Angeles 201.249
AVhen all tho returns nre In concern-
Ing football casualties on Thanksgiving
day the record will recall some of the
Manchuria battle statistics.
Tho Sixth ward has a terrible re
minder of tho blunder made In turning
out a loyal and capable councilman and
putting In his place the grotesque mis
fit now in evidence.
Instead of "locking horns" over the
appointment of a permanent board of
public works It might bo well for the
mayor ami the councllmen to drop Into
the fashion and arbitrate.
Why not retain college football but
eliminate tho manslaughter feature?
And yet, that might put the game on a
level with the bloodless bullfights, that
have only excited ridicule.
According to census figures the pro
portion of Illiterate males in the United
States la 101 per thousand, and of
females 112 per thousand. So, tho males
still hold the intellectual fort.
The "walking delegate" job appears
to be a lucrative one in New York,
Judging from v case disclosed in which
certain walking delegates got $250 for
promising to prevent a strike.
A point in Montana holds the winter
record thus far with a temperature of
twenty-four degrees below zero. The
cold record for Los Angeles this sea
son is thirty-four degrees above.
The bitr Boston store of the J. W.
Koblnson company is about to follow
the fashion of its claps by extending
through to Hill street. How everlast
ingly the Los Angeles stores do grow!
The police commission has acted
commendably in taking the licenses
from billiiird places that tolerate gam
bling. There is no more dangerous
pitfall for boys in the city than is seen
in such places.
If the railways can afford to haul to
New York for shipment to Europe car
loads of oranges at the rate of $1 per
hundred pounds, .why can they not
afford the same rate on oranges that
stop at Xew V'ork
Tomorow evening the chamber of
commerce on behalf of Los Angeles,
will tender a public reception to Lieut,
den, Chaft'ee. It will be an informal
occasion, a general invitation to the
public being extended.
Another important extension of city
transit service is announced. Th»
Sixth-street line is to be continued to
Western avenue, and the operation of
the new part iB expected to be ready
within the next two months.
The local gas company announces a
reduction In price to 85 cents a thou
sand feet, effective January 1. That is
acceptable, but what thousands of Los
Angeles families are crying 1 aloud for
Is kiis where there Is no gas.
Olflciuls of a bank in an Illinois town
nre h;ii<iiy because burglars got oidy a
sinull amount of money from the safe]
most of it beiiitf "hidden under tho
carpet." .Nearly us good an idea as the
stocking s.ife. or the cookstove.
President MeCurdy of tho Jlutunl
Life company says "hla condition of
health Imperatively demiuids his re
tirement fruni active business." Then
it appears that he was not running
that 1160,000 a year Job for his health.
Ju courting electric transit extension
Instead of fighting it, Pasadena affords
on example that Loh Angeles might
profitably ntudy. Pusadena distin
guishes* th* difference between fighting
(;n enemy imd lighting Ms own Inter*
cstn.
How would you like railway traveling
In North Dakota now? Minneapolis re
ports tho arrival of a train after having
been stalled three days on the Dakota
prairies in the midst of :i blizzard, with
the temperature an low us 2S below
zero.
Now the worst yet, an reported from
Ppokane: "The discovery that strych
nine is being used to stimulate mem
bers of the Spokane high school foot
ball loam during gamon has aroused
parents and school authorities, 1 ; etc,
J^lext!
Yesterday's editorial In The Herald
concerning the personally conducted
tourist car buxliieHu alluded to trang
jiriri.'tUoii of passengers to and from
Houtheru California "by way of the
Houthern route, which is several hun
dred miles longer, etc." The types
chunked "northern" to "southern."
PART lit.
SCHOOLS AND RELIGION
In the course of a recent address to
students of the state university, In
criticism of our public school system,
President Wheeler made this state
ment: "The first thlnn that appeals to
me Is rellßon. Let the pupil be taught
the religion of life; as a result of thto
conduct tho child will learn to respect
the thing* about him, obedience will
become a habit nnd he will learn to do
what he In told to do. Oood manners
nnd proper deportment will be part of
the child* make-up."
It Is surprising to notice thnt Presi
dent Wheeler has been subjected to
sharp criticism for this expression, evi
dently resulting from misconception of
his meaning. The Oakland Enquirer,
for Instance, drawing the hasty In
ference that the distinguished nlurn
tor would Introduce "religion" Into our
common school system, reads him a
lecture In state law pertaining to the
subject. It finally snys: "President
Wheeler ought to befiimlllar with the
provision of the constitution of Cali
fornia and tho fact that It precludes
religious Instruction In the common
schools or In the university."
But In tho quotation from President
Wheeler's address, to which exception
Is taken, wo find nothing to justify
the deduction that conventional re
ligious Instruction In tho schools was
thought of by the speaker. The word
"religion" has a very wide scope of
meaning. It goes far beyond tho
signification attached to it In most
of the Christian churches.
It was religion In Its broad ethical
sense, evidently, that President
Wheeler had In mind when he was
delivering that address. Directly fol
lowing the remark about religion ap
pealing to him ns the first thing, he
explains: "I mean, not the use of any
of the institutions set among us. Many
of our university boys are handicapped
by a lack of good manners, and for
this reason fall to get along-. All this
Is part of that which I call religion."
A humorist of the last generation
said, In substance, that the religion he
admired was the kind that showed In
down weight nt tho grocery. The re
ligion that President Wheeler extols
Is the kind that Is calculated to make
better boys and girls at school and
consequently better men and women
later In life.
SUPERVISORS MUST DECIDE
Next Tuesday, as now understood, the
county supervisors will decide whether
the big corporations shall get practical
control of the inner harbor at Kan
Pedro by the scheme of securing the
Incorporation of the village of Wil
mington iia a city. If tho supervisors
consent to the making of a city out of
the village, solely for the furtherance
of the corporate harbor scheme, the
corporations will expect to hold the
winning hand in their fight with the
people of Los Angeles county. The
three corporations seem to have no
doubt of their ability to carry an elec
tion on the incorporation issue, in view
of the many employes they control in
the village and near enough to It for
service on election day.
The real issue involved in the fight
for Wilmington is whether the corpora
tions nhall be ollowed, as has been ap
propriately said, "to build a fence
around the inner harbor." If they win
in the fight the material for the fence
and the means necessary to build it
will be at their command. "Wilmington
is the key of the situation, and with
that socure an advantage would be
obtained that might prove to be con
clusive.
Hut the supervisors control that key.
If tiiey decline to permit the corpora
tions to work their scheme of convert
ing the village into a city, the harbor
fencing proposition will fail. It Is upon
the supervisors, therefore, that the re
sponsibility now rests. They are the
official representatives of Los Angeles
county and they are the trusted cus
todians of public interests therein. It
seems quite improbable, in view of the
facts, that the corporate Interests will
prove stronger than the interests of the
people.
It would bo a grave reflection upon
the character and fidelity of the su
pervisors to imagine for a moment that
they would lend their aid to the furth
erance of the scheme which the corpo
rations are attempting to hatch at Wil
mington.
CONGRESS TOMORROW
Tomorrow the first session of the
fifty-ninth congress will begin. This
congress will be remarkable lor the
numerical disparity between the politi
cal parties, although it will not reach
the record in that rospe<:t. In the house
of representatives tliero will be 250 Re
publicans und 136 Democrats. No third
party members will be seated, for the
first tlinp, with one exception, since
1ST!). In the last congress there were
206 Republicans', 174 Democrats and two
Union Labor me n.
Tht- Republicans will have absolute
control of legislation throughout the
session and responsibility will rest en
tirely upon them. Democrats will stand
for the principles of their party and will
combat all legislation that they mny re.
gtml as pernicious, but when Issues
come to a party vote the Democrats will
be utterly powerless. Whatever line of
policy the Republican members agree
upon in caucus will go through without
a hitch.
The president's message, which may
not bo delivered until tomorrow, will bo
one of the most important papers ever
transmitted to congress. It will deal
with many questions of great moment
to the nation and will clearly deflne the
executive policy in respect to each of
them. And it is probable that in some
of the recommendations there will \w
points calculated to cause a good deal
of buzzing In the Republican hive.
Perhaps the moot important question
discussed in the message will be the
proposition to enlurge the powers of the
Interstate commerce commission so as
to cover control of railway traffic rat-
Ing. The viewy of the president on that
Usue have been expressed in a general
way, but they will l»o - amplified, uu
LOS ANGELES HERALD* SUNDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 3, 190*
doubt, In the annual message. The
somewhat similar question of putting
life Insurance business under federal
control also Is likely to be discussed by
the president. Next in public Interest
will be the treatment of the Panama
canal question, particularly the para
mount point whether the sea level or
the lock system shall be adopted.
Those issues, however, are only ex
nmplra of the especially Important work
that will be cut out for congress. As
a whole, the Job probably Is the biggest
Hint a congress ever has confronted,
and us n, consequence the session will
lie unusually long. Upon the leaders
of the Republican party rests the en
tire responsibility for the output of
legislation and the nation will hold
them to Mrlrt accountability.
I HERALD THE BEST PAPER
♦ From the Kan Pedro News.
* The I/o« AnßPlr* Hi-rnM In fnnt
), ini.ilnu to (lir front and Will noun,
'"If It In not ulri-mlj, liiromr the
1 1 lirnt morning pnprr In l.o» An*
. > (telrn. It hn« all thft »ru» "»'1
1 ' It* ntntrtnrnl* nre to li«- rcllnl
' | upon In thnt rcitnrrl. It flora not
• > devote n eolunin or no rrery dar
) ) to nlmar, nrlthrr dnpa It linve n
■ i pnajr rirvotrd »■> the laudation of
• ' Ha owner. In fart It print* n
I \ nood olrnn *hect, with the new* of
< i the day In a ronrlae form, nnd I*
< ' trying in build up California. It
„ ha* no rnonilM lo mnlie op irlrnn*
■ i to reprint-, nnd In *liort, It la the
' ' paper for the people nnd they are
I 1 fant finding It out. The anbnrrlp
< • tlon of the Herald In San I'rdro
| ) ha* Rnlncil more In the paat week
* mentioned.
The Herald has received from a vot
ing machine manufacturing company
of Indianapolis a letter from which
this is an extract: "Wo are in the mar
ket for business and can supply voting
machines at a price far less than tho
bid submitted by our competition and
If given an opportunity we will gladly
send a machine and a representative
to any place desiring machines." The
company also claims that its machines
"are perfect in their operation and
cannot be tampered with." It has not
been in the California market, as stat
ed, "because we did not know and were
not advised that machines were to be
purchased by cities In your stato."
No tangible excuse can be offered for
the car accident whereby former Coun
cilman Davenport lost his life and
many other lives were Jeopardized. In
tho middle of a bright afternoon, with
no view obstruction on any side and
with the brake gearing of the two cars
In perfect order, a terrible collision oc
curred. The blame for this inexcusable
horror lies between tho two motormen,
or possibly upon both of them.
The proper thing to do concerning the
voting machine proposition is to defer
action indefinitely. The uncertainty
about the operation of the machines,
the suspicion of graft in tho selling
price of the kind under consideration,
and the depleted state of the city
treasury all demand that the proposi
tion be laid on the shelf.
It Is a kind of pride to be encouraged
that Andrew Carnegie exhibits. His
grandfather was a shoemaker and Mr.
Carnegie says, "I tell you his grandson
is prouder of the fact that his grand
father was an honest shoemaker than
if there were twenty dukes in his an
cestry." Good for Andrew.
A dispatch from Chicago tells of a
wager won by Southern California of
ficials based on the delivery of a carload
of Northern California oranges In that
city before Thanksgiving day. Carloads
of Southern California oranges, as us
ual, were in the New York market two
weeks before that day.
A chance now for whisky consumers
to reduce expenses. The state food
commissioners of Pennsylvania says:
"So-called pure rye whisky is nothing
more than a mixture of raw alcohol,
prune Juice and caramel." Mix your
own poison and save 300 per cent of
cost.
Fifty years ago there was warfare
at Sebastopol between harbor forts and
bombarding war vessels. But then the
Russians were holding at bay the fleets
of France and Great Britain, not fight
ing among themselves as they lately
have been doing there.
Now comes a profesor of the State
university faculty with the statement
that "animals have reflective capacity
which qualifies them to be- classed as
reasoning beings, with intelligence cor
responding to man's intelligence." Well,
why not?
Riverside Is proud of the prosperity
indicated by a rpcord of 200 now build
ings, costing half a million dollars,
erected during the ten months ending
with October. A charming homeland is
Riverside.
Kansas City reports the destruction
by fire of a Standard OH warehouse
In that city. It Is not intimated, how
ever, that the loss will force the Btand-'
nrd into bankruptcy.
UGHT ON THE BUBJECT.
Nell— Of course, «h«'« not pretty, but
It'n remurkttbla how b«r £»«• light* up
when she tulks.
Bell*— Oh, that* not «o reuiulutbl*.
BbV» c«t a Untwn Jaw*
NOTES BY THE BYSTANDER
LOS ANOELES, Dec. 2.— 1 have been
asked many times why It is that most
v In thin city— and also, alas, many
women — have such a strained, hard ex
prrf-sion, accompanied by wrinkles.
"Is It the climate?"
I am not a beauty doctor, but during
several years of residence hero I have
observed thla fact, to which attention
In called, and have figured out the
cause in a manner which to me, at
least, answers all question*.
No, it Is not tho Los Angelen climate,
If you will make a study of tho thou
sands who pour Into Los Angeles from
all eectlons of tho east and north, you
will readily discover, In the facial ex
pressions of both tho men ami women,
that they wero reared In localities
where the winters were severe; where
they were compelled to fnco sleet and
snow, heavy cold and rigorous condi
tions. They arrlvo here with th« dam
a«o to their faces already done. It may
not be evident at once, but as the con
tinual sunshine and warmth of South
ern California begin to harden the
skin — which has not been accustomed
to relaxation — the resultant tan nnd
glow of health emphasize tho condi
tions which wero already thoro.
And again. It Is true that a large pro
portion of people who come to Los An
geles have passed through great men
tal as well as physical suffering. They
havo broken down under tho strain jf
tho fearful contest with conditions
which compelled them at last to peek
a new homo rmd another chance away
out hero on the shores of the Pacific,
remote from tho old home and kindred
and friends. Nature stamps men and
women with the results of tholr soul
strugglcß. In tho face of almost any
man you moot you can calculate tho
stress of the storms and the battles and
the shipwrecks through which ho has
passed.
An eastern acquaintance of mine
cnlls It "the desjrt face." lie isn't far
wrong. You sen that same hard, dis
tant and yet kindly countenance with
every minor who comes out from Death
valley. It is v very good name for it.
Persons who ride much on the Ver
non line, out Central avenue, have com
plained much in my hearing; that the
conductors and motormen of the com
pany not on duty occupy tho best seats
In the cars and seem to have small re
gard for the rights of tho passengers,
who have paid.
One man told me recently: "I have
frequently seen all the front scats oc
cupied by motormen and conductor?,
with passengers standing. I havo seen
six railway employes occupying the six
Keats next tho windows, compelling a
man and wlfc\ or young woman and her
escort, to occupy different seats. The
other day I counted fourteen conductors
and motormen on one car. They occu
pied all tho available seats in front, and
four of them sat Inside. AVhen the car
began to fill up at the Arcade depot
the male passengers got up and yielded
their places to the ladles. Did the rail
way employes budge? Not an Inch.
They sat there like statues and never
offered the commonest civilities. In all
my two years of constant riding on tliu
Vernon line I never saw but one of
these employes offer to give up his seat
And on every Tuesday — which Is pay
day at the barns — the railway em
ployes simply take possession of most
of tho Vernon cars."
I have heard these complaints so fre
quently of late, Mr. Editor, that I
thought I would mention tho matter in
my letter to you. I feel sure that tho
incivility reported Is one wholly of
thoughtlessness, because theso men are
mostly young and at times weary from
REPUBLICAN ORGANS DIFFER
Boss Ruef Appears to Have Stirred Up
a Hornet's Nest In the "Grand
Old Party"
From the Fresno Republican.
The Sucramento Union indignantly
protests against the suggestion that
Abe Ruef may capture the next Re
publican state convention, as he has
already captured San Francisco, and
foist on the Btate a dummy ticket, with
Schmitz at the head. Says the Union:
To the Union it appears inconceiva
ble that the Republican party of Cali
fornia will permit itself literally to be
captured by this shameiesa schemer.
We cannot believe that a party to
which he has thrice proved himself a
traitor will accept him as a factor in
its councils, much leBS as a dominating
leader.
And then the Union threatens to do
a little "traltorlng" itself, by support
ing the Democratic ticket, if Ruef and
his gang capture the Republican ma
chine.
But why should we not have Ruef as
controller of the state machine, as dic
tator of nominations, and finally as
senator himself? Mr. Ruef 1b a man of
demonstrated Bbllity, and of personally
clean habits. If he is a gTatter, it is
merely aa part of a system founded on
graft, and the reproach belongs to the
system, more than to him personally.
His standing os the accredited leader
of the party was atteßted during the
last legislative session by no less an
authority than "W. F. Herrln, whose
leadership the Union hau earnestly
commended. When the long suspense
was at last broken, and the slaves who
filled the majority of the Beats in the
state legislature received tho final
"word" from their owner for whom
they were to cast the vote of the state
for senator, it was Huef who was en
trusted with tho sovereign "word." If
W. V. Herrin is a fit leader for tho
party (tbe Union itself hath said It),
and if tbe system by which alone his
leadership became possible Is to be tol
erated, then there ran be no more ob
jection to Ruef bossing the state con
vention than there was to his dictating
to the state legislature, lie choie us a
personally excellent and capable | man
for . eeuator. . There . was , no objection
to tho man, but only to tbe authority
much standing, but It deems to mo that!
their attention should be called to their
want of courtesy, if not understanding
of duty. Mr. Huntlngton hlmnelf, rid
ing on a prus, would have no right to
usurp a sea.t when ladles or passengers
who have paid are standing. And the
boya themselves wilt admit that's right.
Isn't It a trifle curious, Mr. Editor,
that so many ladles persist In the folly
of wearing: costumes In street oars that
are only proper to wetir In carriages?
The other night while on Broad
way, I saw a handsome young woman
attired In a flue silk dress with fluffy
laces and embroideries, whlto slippers,
etc., crossing the street In a pouring
rain, stepping Into puddles of water ns
she ran and the rain beating down up
on her uncovered head. She was no
compnnled by uu elderly lady, nlso
handsomely dressed and barchended, I
felt sorry for them.
It Is truo they were In proper oven-
Ing costume, and looked stylish as any
body when they once reached the thea
ter, where they were manifestly rcnlng;
but It seemed to mo curious that they
should Ignore the weather nnd tho
means of transportation within their
reach.
I confess to being somewhat of n
stickler for "everything In Its place."
If the costumes described had beMi
covered by a long cloak or by a erav
enette, they would have appeared to
better advantage— by reason of not bo-
Ing seen.
If ladies will wear carriage costumes
on the street, they should take some
precaution to protect themselves from
Inclement weather.
'• • *
A winter visitor who brought letters
of Introduction to me six weeks ago,
told me lost night that of all tho slghte
he had beheld In this city he was most
deeply impressed by tho beauty, sim
plicity and tenderness of all the ar
rangements for the burial of the dead,
in Los Angeles. Now, wasn't that
queer? Here Is what ho said:
"A daughter of an eastern friend of
mine died In this city recently. • The
undertaker came and hung a soft bunch
of gray silk rlbbou3 on tho door knob.
And after the corpse had been laid out
he placed over tho body a perfect man
tle of flowers. Ho returned next day,
bringing a beautiful gray casket.
"At the cemetery I observed that the
dirt from the grave was completely
covered by a tarpaulin and that chairs
wero arranged alongside for minnbcrs
of the family.
"But tho grave itself was a study
that fascinated mo. Tho opening was
completely hidden by green willows
which appeared to have grown out from
the sides. These In turn were fringed
with roHes, no that when the coffin was
laid across It thero was nothing to be
seen of tho grave. When tho brief
services were concluded the undertaker
! stooped and touched a button — as It
seemed to me — and slowly the casket
began to descend, apparently of Its own
motion.
"Almost imperceptibly it sank lower
and lower, still closely pressed by the
greenery and flowers, until in an In
stant tho bending willows sprang back
Into place at the top. The casket had
disappeared. The grave was still cov
ered over by the roses.
"The whole performance struck mo
as being beautiful and tender beyond
description. In all the course of my
eastern experience I never saw any
thing like It. It seems to me that Los
Angeles has learned now to rob death
of many of its terrors." 4
And that's right, too.
THE BYSTANDER.
which controlled his choice. Why can
we not trust Mr. Ruef, who seems to
be a shrewd judge of men, to choose
us a personally excellent man for gov
ernor, too? And if he is fit to choose
us governors and senators, and to be
the repository of the soverelgnity of the
Southern Pacific railroad, why not
Ruef himself for senator? He is a
typical product of the system; as good
as uny, and abler than most.
The truth is that we shall all be
wasting our breath, unless our anti-
Ruef howl goes much further than
howling against Ruef. Opposition to
Ruef, In the secret interest of some
rival boss of the Bame system, is worse
than vain — It Is dishonest. And even
honest opposition to Ituef, which does
not go through him to the system, is
sheer stupidity. If the state legislature
is today composed of slaves, they might
as well be owned by Ruef as by any
body. In fact, his gang in the last leg
islature made a rather favorable show
ing In comparison with the kept cattlo
of other owners. If the state organiza
tion Is to be run by Herrln, anyway,
In tho Interest of his railroad, Instead
of by genuine party leaders, in the in
terest of the state, the Immediate fore
man might better bo an Intelligent man
Hke» Ituef than some of the mutton
heads wo have been having. It Is the
system that is rotten— Uuef is merely
the most skilled gleaner of Its garbage.
Let tin have a revolt against the whole
system. And If the system shall for
onca bo subservient or impudent
enough to stake Its successs on the
personal victory of its own most typical
product, then let us thank tho system
for making the issue clear.
But there is no half-way method of
reforming the Republican party organ
ization of California possible. Until we
are ready to rout the whole gang of
bosses, with their whole machine, and
invite their uncompromising hostility,
we may well contlnuo to submit to
their dictation and pray that they may
never send us a worse master than Abe
Ituef. : r> ,
A Kitchen Hint
Here Is a little hint for the kitchen;
To clean the Inside of coffee or tea pot,
dampen a cloth, dip In baking soda and
rub on the stained article. It make*
all atalna come off very «aully.
Announcement Extraordinary
We OOW |f\l*
Offer a OO*' \Al\
ON
Victor Records
[J^cfPositively the first discount that has ever been
made on Victor Records.
Beginning today our new prices will be as follows :
7 Inch Records 35c Cut From 50c
10 Inch Records 60c Cut From $1.00
12 Inch Records $1.00 Cut From $1.50
All Red Seal and foreign records same price as before.
Always remember that for anything new and down-to-
date in the Talking Machine line you should look to the Victor
headquarters of Los Angeles.
Geo. J. HirKfil Co.
• 345-347 Steinway, Cccilian
South Spring St. and Victor Dealers
: December 3 in World's History
11 .. * 1
• • 69 B. C. — Tho senate published a general thanksgiving In the name of Cicero
11 for preserving the city from tho CrttallniHn conspiracy.
1 1 1610 — Tho now bell of the cathedral church of Lincoln, called Great Tom,
J placed In tho steeple of fit. Mary's. It is the largest bell in England,.
* being seven feet In diameter at the mouth.
JITFiS — Daring attempt to assassinate Joseph, king of Portugal.
T 1810— The French, under general Decaen, surrendered the islo of Man to
„ the Hrltlsh general Abercromble, with 209 pieces of ordnance.
. 1 1860— The president denied the right of a Ftate to secede and asserted the
•• right of the general government to coerce the seceding state.
"1884 — The presidential electors met in the several states and cast the vote
I which elected Cleveland nnd HendrlckP. ! ■ •
I IPi-Limes mi Mck-llps-
Vox Populi
Strike je the tlmbrlls, the glad news ac-
claim,
McGrwdy has tumbled; ho's out of tho
game;
Ho ftiw what was coming, and snook
while ho could;
Ho wanted to leave us one mcm'ry of
good!
Me.Greedy has quit us; It's up to McGall.
Tho tlnin has arrived, ho should heed tho
recall.
The people havo spoken; their volco is a
shout—
McGreedy has heard it: "McGall, you Bit
out!"
Think of what the czarewitch Is
likely to escape!
Those Santa Barbara musicians who
eloped for the sake of harmony are due
to strike a lot of discord before their
symphony of life Is finished.
It has been decided not to ask Mc-
Call to resign. Maybe it won't be
necessary*
Orange— Pineapple says he is going to
seek oblivion.
Lemon — He won't have to go far.
The fact that the sublime porte only
yielded to the powers when the Rus
sian admiral presented the demands
to him proves either that the porte is
very ignorant of the status of Russian
admirals or that he enjoys a good joke
more than we Christians realize.
The gas rate will be cut after January
1. Look out for extraordinary season
of talk in January.
Boss Shonts doesn't know what klna
of Panama canal we are to have. So
far the only desire has been for one
with water In it.
Whltelaw Reid, our ambassador to
England, has a real son of a real lord
as his secretary. How Waldorf Astor
must envy him!
Perry Leonard fell from a tank at
Petrolio, Kas., the other day and was
badly injured. Often men are injured
by falling from the water wagon, but
where, except In Kansas, could a man
get on a "tank" and hurt himself get
ting off
Plum— He began life by clerking in a
cheap cigar stand.
Prune — Hose from the "ranks," eh?
Los Angeles may have to get along
without those mechanical voting ma
chines. But that won't mean that
there'll be no machines In politics, while
the Republican one lasts.
That woman who took a blind man to
the altar — was that a case of "the blind
leading the blind?"
Mrs. Poppy— Yes, her first husband
eloped with her.
Mrs. Poinsettia— And her second?
Mrs. Poppy— She eloped with him.
Tho only difference between the Los
Angeles man who found his lawyer in
jail and the average client is that some
lawyers are luckier than others. Eh?
In a midland town in England har
vest thanksgiving services were con
ducted in two churches on the same
day— in one by the Rev. J. E. Flower
and in the other by tho Rev. W, Leafe.
Yen, best beloved, a IS to 1 shot at
Ascot means thnt fifteen logo to one
who wins.
Russia
I'rouct, nrrogant, alone, nh« stood,
1 "ptlant of them all;
Unheedful of her peoplo's good,
Unhearlng of their call.
The waves of war lapped at her shore;
Bhe scorned their warning note,
And snarled, as battles by tho sroro
Were lost, ashore, alloat.
Theu came the liigh tide of revolt.
Amazed, all unprepared.
Her abject rulers feared the bolt.
And cowed, where onoe they dared!
Ilent by their bloody hand;
Torn by the B»iock, revolt and raid,
Helpless, scorned, wracked und sore
afraid—
Kusslu, the wretched land!
— W. IL C.
SCHOOLBOYS HAZE A GIRL
Young Hopefuls ■ Narrowly Eacapo
Being Tarred and Feathered
as a Result
BpwiaJ to The Herald.
STAMFORD, Conn., Dec. I.— James
Schantz, Thomas Hickey aiid Charles.
Pugley, boys ranging In age from
twelve to fifteen years, were punished
for hazing in tho police court here to
day. ■ , • '';'. ,•'.-.
The three decided a. few days ago
that Lucllla Parker, the twelve-year
old daughter of Clark W. Parker, man
ager of the Monarch Machine company
at Park avenue and 129 th street, New
York, was "stuck up."
The Parkers used to live a.t,l2Sth
street and Fifth avenue, Manhattan,
but have been here two months.
Schantz tossed a lasso about Lucilla,
got a tight hold around her waist an*
dragged her about tbe school ground*.
Her clothing was torn and she . was
scratched and • bruised. She reported i
the matter to Principal O'Neill and
Schantz was kept in school during the
noon hour. When school reconvened
Schantz whispered to the girl. "I will
fix you after school."
The Parker girl was accompanied
home by two or three girl friends.
Some distance from the school Schantz,
Hickey and Pugley appeared and
struck her with cudgels. She fell,
dazed, and the boys walked . away.
Presently she arose and started off to
ward home. Schantz caught her by the
throat and started to drag her toward
a clump of bushes where Hickey and
Pugley stood. -V' ■
"Now we will show you how to be
proud," said Schantz. "We are going
to take that pretty dress and send you
home without It."
Schantz was beginning to fulfill the
threat, when one of Miss Parker's girl
friends struck him a blow In the face.
This enabled the little captive to arise.
Just at that moment her twenty-one
year-old brother Wyman drove up, and
Schantz and his comrades ran off •
through the fields. "\
The story of the affair spread through
Sprlngdale quickly and the settlement
was highly indignant. According to
the police, some of the Springdale peo
ple wanted to get together in a body
and seize the boys and tar and feather
them.
This morning each of the boys was
fined ten dollars.
WHITE BOY OSAGE CHIEF
Special to The Herald.
GUTHRIB, O. ■ T.. Dec. I.—Accord
ing to an old custom among the Osage
Indians, and followed by them for
centuries, • the tiUe of Baby Chief has
been handed around every third year.
This title puts the bearer second In
power and Influence to the principal
chief of the tribe, and the boy holding
this honor Is ever afterward promi
nent among his tribesmen. Thls v tltle
was . recently bestowed . upon the, ten
year-old eon of Emery Gibson, an In
termarried white man. the ceremony
being conducted by Tom Tall Chief,
bearer of tbe title during the last, three
years. Hereafter the new recipient of
the title will be known as Baby Chief
Sklnk-kah-kah-he-he, and at the ex
piration of the three years he will, be
allowed to bestow the title upon some,
other youthful member of the tribe. *
In appreciation of this honor given
his son Mr. Olbson presented the donor
with thirty-five head of horses, worth
$500; 100 Indian blankets, worth $450;
five head of steers, worth $450; one new
harness, worth $40, and served a feast
lasting live days. '■• t. >■■'■■
Forty Years Ago
IJB-T^tfiril OMKN hf »<l little bußi-
Ry/fr/H i neBH of v financial na -
Bf B§3 | turn to transact. To-
aX N ! t)li y thoir business <Is .
BLTlk^fS of sufficient prupor-
lSHHS!=3!J Uons to dem a n d
special attention.
Our Woman's Department is, in;'
charge of a skilled pftlcer, horself, '
v woman, who will ■ bo glad to
assist and advise in ■ all matters
pertaining to the bank.
j^w MERCHANTS TRUST
Jgj> COMPANY
§Mm Ca P ltal -' : • $350,000.00
"^^ M 9 209 SO. BROADWAY I

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