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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 10, 1906, Image 1

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VOL. XXXIV. NO. 40.
NINE WORKERS KILLED IN HOTEL BIXBY DISASTER
HEARTRENDING SCENES ENACTED WHEN BODIES ARE TAKEN FROM RUINS
POLICE
SLATE
FIXED
Secret Conference Is
Held in Mayor's
Chambers
Messrs. Mason, Sadler,
Kern and Flammer
Talk It Over
During Heart.to.Heart Debate New
Lieutenants and Sergeants and
Future Policy Are
Discussed
Work for the next chief of police and
for hia official family has been mapped
out.
In the mayor's office laet night
Mayor McAleer's cabinet threshed out
details with the assistance of Council
man Ed Kern, the chief-elect, an.i
Capt. Paul Flammer, the acting chief,
and Derhaps Immediately after the
next meeting of the board of police
commissioners the change will be made.
Commissioners Mason and Sadler,
with the city'B executive between them,
sat at one end of the council table In
the mayor's private office, while at
their elbows sat , ; Messrs. ; ; Kern' .'; and
■' Flammer. I */sV^'v* ; i-.t i 'Jr';' <r " / :> • ■.■■■' i-i'i
During «pit <*jg»&,seKßlon the fceftJSJfc
t board occupied an ante room, discussed
public I questions* and adjourned before
■ the destinies of the .'police, department
had -' been '•• adjusted in the adjoining
room. ...*.*'. ',•■ ■: „'■- .;,,.,.,.... t '•„'-, »,
Some' of the commissioners were not
even aware that one of their ex-offloio
members. Mayor McAleer, was within a
few feet of the conference table.
Enter the Conferees
The city hall was deserted, lights
were turned low, the front doors were
locked and janitors had full sway ap
parently when at 7 o'clock the mayor
Wealing an overcoat .entered the muni
cipal building by a side door and hur
ried Into his suite under the tower on
the second floor.
The other members followed by auto
mobile, car and on foot, all headed for
the same corner of the big hall.
Only shadows flickering through the
stained glass doors and sounds of talk
ing apprised those on the outside that
municipal history was being made be
yond the portal.
It is known semi-officially that the
policy of the new administration, the
probable selections for the four lieu
tenants or night captains, and the now
sergeants and the cour.se with respect
to iid. ling the new patrolmen recently
authorized by ordinance by Council
man Item's colleagues In the council
were all discussed.
Discuss Live Topics
I.eileis bearing on the u vailability of
certain condidutes for chtelds and
badges were read, arguments on .the
prospects for promotion of men now In
the ranks, and a general reorganization
of the department were all han-died in
earnest fashion, nil participat
ing iii the debate.
Action by the council in Increasing
the number of mcii has paved the way
for immediate acceptance of the chief
ship by the Kighth ward alderman,
who hiiH hitherto held out for a better
and larger enrollment of peace and
property guardians.
Five footmen will be added to the
department each month for some
monthsunder the original ordinance.
These are In addition to the sixty-eight
men authorized lust week.
Kern's next step will doubtless be to
mount a number of the patrolmen who
now do duty in the hill districts and
find their efficiency In covering beats
largely decreased by the extraordinary
islcal exertion required In covering
n. Kern is known to favor mount
jollce.
one of those who left the confer
; would go Into details for the press,
jgh Mayor McAleer explained that
it had been done and talked about
its office last night was for the good
the city and of the police depart
it.
Flammer Pleased by Increase
ml Flammer. acting chief of the
c department, has expressed hiin
as greatly pleased that the or
inee Increasing the number of pa
men has been passed.
I'his department has been greatly
leed of new men for a long time,"
I ('apt. FUniniei lust night, "and
■ fiat we are allowed to take them
v will lie iihle to patrol the dls
ts which up to this time Imvu been
without police protection.
It will be some time before the new
m linen are added, as we must find
h who are competent, and they
|lt then pa»« civil service examlna
t.
This city will need a constant In
ise in the force of patrolmen, as
la growing faster than any other
' In the west. All classes come
c and oui men must be on the alert
ill times."
Los Angeles Herald.
PRICE: !"" M .C;:r r ! 65 CENTS
SHOOTS MAN WHO
WRECKED HIS HOME
By A»«m-lnt<>(! PreM.
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 9.
— Frederick Schaffhauser, a
civil engineer in the bureau of
water, was shot and probably
fatally wounded today by
Frederick Hornberger, a fire
man at a city pumping station.
Schaffhauser for the last year
has been much in the public
eye, principally as a star wit
ness in the proceedings against
John W. Hill, formerly head of
the bureau of filtration.
Schaffhauser was called from
his office in the city hall to the
corridor of the seventh floor on
the pretense that a friend
wish to see him.
He was met by Hornberger,
who shouted "You have killed
my wife, I am going to kill
you."
He had not finished the sen
tence when he fired five shots
at Schaffhauser, two bullets
taking effect.
Hornberger, when arrested,
told the police that Schaffhaus
er had been intimate with his
wife and that her relations with
him had resulted in her death
recently from disease.
GEN. SHAFTER
FAILING
FAST
B y •, Associated. ,Prc«s. ,-.^! .. •.-j'j .. .. ". ... •
liA^JieFIKUD, No*. 9. Major
'aeneral" William: R. ShaKor, U. S. A.,
retired, Ib seriously 111 with pneumonia
at his ranch fourteen 'mile's south .of
Bakersfield.' ;
Local physicians have : been in con
stant attendance during the- past few
days. :
' The old veteran took a bad turn
day • and • telegrams were sent , to Dr.
Morris Herzsteln at San Francisco to
come at once. ,- . , ■
The latter being detained on urgent
ceases,c cases, dispatched Dr. I. W. Thome on
tonight's Owl and tomorrow morning
ji consultation will be held. Dr. Herz
sTein will come to Bakersfield as soon
as possible. ' • . •
ATTORNEYS WILLING
TO. DEFEND THAW
Uy Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Nov. 9.— Clifford W.
Hartridge, counsel for Harry K. Thaw,
denied yesterday that he had expe
rienced any difficulty In retaining as
sociate counsel to assist him at the
coming trial of his client.
"We are ready at any time the dis
trict attorney sees fit to call the case,"
said Mr. Hartridge. "I am not yet
ready to announce the names of my
associates, but I will say one thing-
Mr. Thaw's interests will be carefully
safeguarded."
Mr. Hartridge said that Thaw is ex
ceedingly anxious for his trial to be
called.
PROVE IDENTITY OF
GAS PIPE MURDERER
j-..v Associated Pross.
KAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 9.—lnforma
tion that reached police headquarters
yesterday afternoon dismissed all
doubt as to the identity of John Slem
sen, leader of the gas-pipe murderers.
Sieinsen'ii right name Ib August Drter
and he Is a son of August Drier, a
wealthy retired sugar planter of the
Island of Kauai, who is now a familiar
figure in Honolulu.
Confronted with the salient points of
this Information In his cell at the Bush
street ."tittlon last evening Slemsen ud
mitted that they were facts.
YOUTHFUL CRIMINAL
CONVICTS INSTRUCTOR
H> Ass<K-i;!lBfl ii J rexH.
NKW YORK, Nov. 9.— Henry D.
Stein, charged with being an east
side "Fagln," was convicted yesterday
largely on the testimony of an alleged
pupil, Hyman CromU, a boy of n.
Stein »:i« remanded for sentence.
tjteln in tfukl to have had a school
lr whle+i more than 100 boys were in
structed in the art of picking pockets.
Young Crossman told the court how
the lexKonw were given and showed
the judge the method of stealing a
watch.
Hill.l, Ol' TKMI'KimiIHE!.
City. Mia. Max.
I .on Allllflr- nil Xl
Denver »a . 68,
Omaha • »« . . Kit
I MlUburic KM 64
Halt Lake • HN .v,
St. I'util »* 54
Spoku...- 38 , 4*l
New York 40 00
l.llllr Hock 4« T»
» «... 1....... 1 '.48 60
< 1.1.n H o BO <>**
St. l.uuU 60 ««
Atlaiid. 04 ..TO,
Mao KrnuoUtco ........ 64 . - TO
SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 10, 1906.
WITNESS
EXPOSES
OCTOPUS
Standard Controls the
Entire Market in
Missouri
Each Company Allotted
Certain Territory to
Do Business In
Price Cut, In Many Instances, So
That John D.'s Concern Can
Make the Largest
Showing
By Associated Press.
ST. LOUIS, Nov. 9.— The hearing of
the deposition of the defense In the
ouster suit of the state of Missouri
against the Standard Oil, Waters-
Pierce and Republic OH companies was
resumed today.
L. Eckert, general manager of the
Waters-Pierce company, who was the
sole witness yesterday, was again on
the witness stand today.
Mr. Eckert admitted that the Stan
dard Oil company of Indiana controls
the Waters-Pierce, the Republic and
the St. Louis International Oil com
panies, although the subsidiary com
panies are active competitors for busi
ness In St. Louis.
He admitted that the ngreement had
been made between the Waters-Pierce
and the Standard companies regarding
which territory that company was to
do business in and told of the allot
ment of territory.
He also testified that th» selling
prices of the Waters-Pierce and the
other companies were dictated by the
Standard.
Under further rigid examination of
Attorney General Hadley the wltpes3
testified that the Waters-Pierce, Re
public and St. Louis International
companies often cut the prices so that
the largest showing would be made to
the head company, the Standard.
SAYS CURRENCY SYSTEM
HAS BEEN OUTGROWN
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Nov. 9.— At the meet-
Ing of the New York chapter of the
American Institute of Bank Clerks last
evening the question of currency re
form was discussed by Charles A. Oo
nant, author of "The Principles of
Money and Banking."
Mr. Oonant declared that the coun
try had outgrown the system of bond
secured currency, which was originally
only a war measure, like the issue of
greenbacks. Every other civilized
country had a more scientific banking
system and It was time for the United
States to deal with the question In a
time of general confidence Instead of
waiting for the compulsion of panic
and a period of distrust.
A large stock of paper money, which
did not diminish when the demand for
it declined, might prove a serious men
ace to the security of our monetary
system, he Paid.
Mr. Conant'B remedy for this men
ace was the plan recommended by the
chamber of commerce committee.
OCTOPUS SUDDENLY
BECOMES GENEROUS
By Associated Press.
LIMA, Ohio, Nov. 9.— At 5 and 10 per
cent udvance In the wages of all em
ployes of the reunion branch of the
Standard OH company was announced
here today.
The advance affects Immediately 900
employes of the Solar refinery in this
city and the army of employes nt
Welker. Wood county, Ohio; in Oil
City. Pa.; Whiting, lnd.; Bayonne,
N. J.< and Charleston, S. ( '.
! No notice : of like advance has been
received by the pipe line department,
but rumor has it that the voluntary
advance will extend to every branch of
the company.
« » »
REFUSES TO CONCEDE
HOCH'S ELECTION
By Associated Press.
TOPEKA. Kan.. Nov. I).— The official
count of the vote cast In Kansas at
Tuesday's election was commenced in
each county in the state today and
should be finished by tomorrow morn
ing. . . . *
The official figures from several coun
ties already In show decided gains for
W . A. Harris, the Democratic nominee,
for governor, and Governor's Hoch'a
plurality will be at least' cut, down to
less than 3000. ;••-
The Democratic stale central com
mittee still chili. in the election of Har
ris by less than 2000 plurality.
DEFRAUD GOVERNMENT;
MAY GO TO PRISON
Vy Associated Press.
PITTSBURG, Nov. 9.—ln
dictments were returned by
the federal grand jury in this
city today against J. Jay Dunn,
Charles L. Close and Frank T.
Emmett, officials and em
ployes of the Shelby Steel
Tube company, charging them
with conspiracy to defraud the
government in connection with
the boiler tubes furnished a
number of battleships.
There are thirty specific
counts against the men and it
is alleged the conspiracy was
in operation during a period
from 1892 to 1905. The in
dictments further assert that
the defective tubes were placed
in boilers that were used on
twelve war vessels, among
them being the Louisiana, up
on which President Roosevelt
is now making his trip to
Panama.
The other vessels named in
the indictment as having de
fective tubes alleged to have
been furnished are the Maine,
Pennsylvania, Georgia, Colo
rado, Vermont, Maryland,
Tennessee, Washington, Min
nesota, Nebraska and Charles
ton.
LEGISLATURE
STILL IN
DOUBT
By Associated Pros* •' . '-' ! ''
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. .9.— The .re
turns on the legislative ticket received
at the Republican headquarters have
been so meager that It la not yet fully
known as to who will constitute, the
legislative branch of the state govern
ment next January. 'It is apparent,
however, that both senate and assem
bly will be Republican, notwithstand
ing the Democrats have made consider
able inroads. I . • ■ •'_
The election of Wood for congress in
the Second district is doubtful. C. M.
Haminon, President Roosevelt's rela
tive in Upper Lake. !?■ defeated, as also
are C. H. McKenny In the Tenth dis
trict: H. J. Ostrander, in the Twelfth;
Frank French, in the Twentieth; Frank
Short, in the Twenty-first; Truxtun
Beale, In the Thirty-second, and B. W.
Hahn, in the Thirty-sixth.
As all these have been "hold-over"
senators their defeat will cut a con
siderable figure In the next contest for
United States senator.
RUSSIA TO REORGANIZE
HER MAIL SERVICE
By Associated Press.
ST. PETERSBURG, Nov. ».— The
minister of communications, M. Neme
chaeff, has introduced to the council of
ministers a plan for the entire re
organization of the system for the
transportation of mails.
According to this plan the malls will
hereafter be carried exclusively on
trains running in the daytime. These
trains will consist of a mall enr be
tween five cars rilled with soldiers.
This project Imposes an additional
burden on the budget of $16,500,000.
Secures Fishing Monopoly
By Associated Press,
EL PASO, Tex.. Nov. ».— Perhaps the
greatest monopoly of Its kind in the
world has been acquired by John
C. Miller, a mining engineer of El
Paso, through a concession just
granted by the government of the Re
public of Mexico, to the exclusive tisli-
Ing rights on the west coast of Mexico
from fjuaymas on the north to Man
zanllla on the south, on the east coast
from parallel 24 on the north to the
Huy of campeche on the south, Includ
ing all the rivers, bays, inlets mid also
the lakes for twenty miles Inland.
This covers, perhaps, the finest fishing
and oyster territory in the world.
Bhoots Girl He Loved
By Assoclutec: Pres«.
CHICAGO, Nov. !».— The woman who
was last nlfcht shot in Lincoln park
was today identified us Augustu Ray,
a domestic-. The man who shot hel
ls said to be Charles (limit, who was
in love with the Ruy girl. The shoot
ing Is believed to have been due to
the girl's refusal to marry (Irani im
mediately.
MOUNT CULEBRA IN A
STATE OF ERUPTION
By Associated Press.
TRINIDAD, Colo., Nov. 9.
— Mount Culebra, which is lo
cated forty miles west of Trini
dad, is reported in a state of
eruption.
Postmaster Adolph Storz of
Stonewall, who lives within
twelve miles of the peak, has
sent word here that smoke and
vapor can be seen issuing from
the mountain.
CROWDB VIEW WRECKED CENTER SECTION OF HOTEL BIXBY
AND THE WORK OF RESCUE
* LOOKING INTO ANGLE IN COURTYARD, NEAR NORTH WING, t
% WHERE COLLAPSE TOOK PLACE $
■& A .t. .t, ,t. it. ,t. .t, .«. .t. .t. ,«i it .<.A.J.A.^JCA.J-J.J..<- ■». -». .t. .». .«■ ■«- .«. .». .». .». ■♦. .«. .. «. ». ... ... ... .«. ... .. .. ♦■ .. .». .». .». J. .«.
THE DEAD:
RICHARD PERKINS, aged 40, unmarried. : f
ALBERT HARTLE, Long Beach ; mother lives at Compton.
BERT HUBBARD, 621 2 !! # East ! First street, Long Beach;
married, and leaves wife and mother. -• • \'i ' . •
ANTON BEZANSO, Long Beach. ■'" '. '.I >: ■■
LOUIS FELKER. - ; .. - -
CARLTON BRASHEAR, aged 18, Long Bcacli.
L . N. PHILLIPS. '
ALVIN DESHAZER.
FRED NORTON.
The injured men who were taken to the Long Beach hospital
are as follows: ' . . '
F..W. Shields, will probably die. A. B. Dicwash, slightly injured.
C . H. Chilson, seriously injured. J. Welch, carpenter. '
James Parker, mason ; seriously J. Boine, serious. . .
.injured. . " '* G. Reinberger, badly injured.
'G. A. Brashear. „•"■■:/ .;• F. W. Sulde, internal injuries.
H . Hink. :■/■.■ George Parker. •
W.B.Willis. " F. H. Imlay.
Ira Caldwell. . . - Alexander Bovey.
Ira Colwell, seriously injured. ' E. C. Watson. ,
G . Bernberger, condition critical. F. W. Schulte.
S . W. Schultz. ". , G. H. Rinabarger. :
Alex Beauvais. • • J. J. Walsh. .
Ed. Nicholson. L. N. Phillips. ■■'■'. ..;'.' „
R . D. Cunningham. Ira Zea, injuries only slight.
Those still missing up to a late hour last night were :
A. Long. ' ■ . J. Kopp. ■
Ed. Watson. Sv??^is?^'^
Ed. Watson. £ % az ;
Foreman Ross. W - J- Wilson.
C. Johnson. P. Vanders.
A. D. Shager.- Warner Jansen.
GAS PIPE THUGS
TO BE ARRAIGNED
By Associated Praia.
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 9.— John
Slemsen, , alias - Simpson, and Louis
■Dabner, his companion In a series of
crimes, were formally charged with
murder today. ' ."'»'
■ j It Is for the murder of M Mukata, the
Japanose banker, that both men will
bc arraigned In the police court to
morrow.
The authorities took- the first step to
day to secure the release of Dowdell,
alias Button, who was sent to the peni
tentiary for fifty years ■on conviction
of the' holding up of Dr^T.'B.'W.' L»e-
Unit, a crime to which Slemßen and
Dabner have both confessed. - ■
PRICE: SINGLE COPY 5 CENTS
JCDGK GBAHAM
INSTRUCTS JUEY
Uy Asßoclßtfd PrenK.
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 9.— 8. P.
Oliver waß today chosen foreman 'if
the new grand Jury.
ln his instructions to the newly im
paneled body today Judge Graham said
that they ■ must find Indictments
against all men when competent ' evi
dence Is presented.
He read those sections of the code
referring to the duties of the grand
Jury and the methods of procedure and
explained to them that the grand jury
ls not bound to examine the. evidence
of a defendant, but' may do so before
returning. an , Indictment.' ,
li. 1". Oliver, the foreman of the
grand jury, Is a business man of this
city.
WORKERS
HEAR NO
WARNING
Lives Crushed Out by
Falling Walls
and Floors
Awful Scenes Witnessed
When Women S#ek ,
Dear Ones
Architects Give Opinions as to Cause
of Collapse — Directors Order
Immediate Rebuilding
of Hostelry
Nine workmen were hurled to death
and scores were Injured yesterday
morning at Long Beach when the cen
tral spans of five stories of the Btxby
hotel, In course of construction, col
lapsed, burying the men beneath an
avalanche of crumbled concrete, tile
and twisted steel.
The damage done as estimated In
cash approximates $15,000. The hotel
when completed was to cost $760,000.
. The collapse of the < structure. Is • be- i\
li'eted to' have been 1 due to the perma- f
, tur'e j removal of '} the , ■wooden; ' forms I
from concrete columns on v the Bouth
l'weat j corner of the. south wing of . the \
building. Workmen who Were tn the
JmiJimij* at the » time state that ftnrne
di.-Hely ; following- . the removal of 'these \
'forms .the ■ collapse ,'. came.'. | The form* >
fafsi'sald; to' have ' been ■ taken away
■ within, a few hours after the concrete '"
mixture had been : poured " into them,
whereas at least six days are necessary '
for the proper hardening, of the con
crete. • ''.• '-'■■'■ „■•.■ "■;••• ,' ; •'■■..; ■:
As the mighty column tumbled to
the panels of the fifth story the hol
low tiling floor, which was still
"green,'" heaved beneath the tremen
dous weight of the debris and crashed
downward with the roar of a deluge.
The next floor below gave way be
neath the burden of concrete and steel
and the whole central span collapsed
with an awful crash of down rushing
concrete and metal.
In the basement at least fifty men
wpre working and the rnasa ol ruins
came upon them in an irresistible ava
lanche, carrying death and destruction.
Father R: M. Ferrer of St. An
thony's church of Long Beach was the
first upon the scene of the disaster,
and vainly he wandered among the,
debris hearing the plaintive cries of
the living victims as they lay pinned
beneath the ruins, yet unable to render
them aid, except in solace of words.
Within less than a half hour a large
force of men composed of laborers and
volunteer business men were working
valiantly to rescue the perishing beings
beneath the debris. Hundreds of
brawny ;:rms pulled at long ropes at
tached to heavy Iron beams and eon*
crete boulders th«t covered the knot
of human forms benath, and with a
united heave and a lusty ho the for
(Contlnuril UB l'a«<- Two.)
THE DAY'S NEWS
FORECABT
For Southern California: Fair
Saturday; light northeast wind.
Maximum temperature in Los An.
geles yesterday, 83 degrees; mini,
mum, 53 degrees.
I —P olice slate fixed. -
2 — President now on his way.
3 — Murders woman to secure gold. l
— May yet vote by machine. f '^ •
— Besold faces deserted wife. : '
6 — Editorial.
7 — City news.
B—Sports.8 — Sports.
9 — Southern California news.
— Classified advertisements.. .
1— Markets.
1 2 — Railroad news. k3S
E ABTERN
Wireless message received at Washing- , ■>
l on conveys intelligence that presidents
trip bo far has been a pleasant one. ■ .j i-
ask is torn from Octopus during in
vestigation at St. Louis. ■ ' ti»- ft «Mj»«M'»<Ba
Series of incendiary fires in New York _ ,
cause panic. ,
V '„ . . COAST ,'. .'; ';, *..V-
Names of several candidates for* th»
state legislature still in doubt, owing to
belated election returns. >• •;;, •*¥?
General Shatter > critically ill at his
country home.
!->n Francisco's gas-pipe thugs to be
arraigned today.
LOCAL
Nine workmen killed and many Injured
byicollupite of. Hotel Hix, at Long \
Beach. .jMP><tIMMOfMB M tMNawNf I *')MMMBB
■ Het'i'o t conference . to > discuss police re- *
organisation hold In mayor's office.
> Storm ■ drains .*.- promised '■ for Boyle
Height*.

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