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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, April 25, 1908, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1908-04-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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NEW WITNESSES
AGAINST FORD
MORE EVIDENCE PRODUCED BY
PROSECUTION
RUEF'S SAFETY DEPOSIT VAULT
FIGURES IN CASE
General Counsel of United Railroads
Said to Have Drawn Large
Sum to Pay Former
Boss
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO, April 24.—
prosecution today called two new wit
nesses to the stand In the case of Tirey
L. Ford, general counsel for the United
Railways, on trial for the third time
before Superior Judge I.awlor on the
charge of bribing supervisors during
the Schmita regime. ,-„-„,, v
One of the witnesses was Frank. I.
Morris, a bookkeeper In the Weston
National bank safe deposit vaults. He
testified that Abraham Ruef, on May
25, 1906, rented a third safe deposit box,
coincident with the drawing by Ford of
$50,000 in small Mils at the mint 011
that date, which it la alleged by the
prosecution was the money given to
Ruef as the first payment to the super
visors for the passage of the trolley or
dinance on May 21.
The other ne ,7 witness was State Sen
ator George B. Keane, formerly asso
ciated with Ruef in the practice of
law and clerk of the Doodling board of
supervisors. 1 .cane's memory was
lather vague on some points and por
tions of his testimony were indefinite.
Very little of Importance was elicited
from him. PBfS „,_;
Other witnesses who repeated their
testimony given at the two former
trials of Ford were Charles Haggerty,
Ruef's office boy; W. K. Cole, cashier
at the mint; E. D. Hawkins, book
keeper at the mint, and Nathan Selig,
Hawkins* assistant. Another witness
was William M. Abbott, assistant gen
eral counsel for the United Railways.
Abbott on Stand
r'A. A. Moore, ST., chief counsel for
Ford, brought out that witness (Ab
bott) was jointly Indicted with the de
fendant, and upon this showing ob
jected to Abbott testifying and advised
him not to answer the questions asked
by Assistant District Attorney O Gara.
"When you pleaded to these indict
ments," asked Judge I.awlor, "did you
demand a severance from your co
defendant?"
■ "I did," replied Abbott.
"Objection overruled," said the court.
' Being directed not to answer, Abbott
said: "On advice of counsel 1 refuse
to answer."
Asked if it would incriminate himself,
Abbott declared: "My testimony would
nofiincriminate me or anybody else.
Upon motion of O'Gara this answer
was stricken from the record.
A«bott then proceeded to testify un- j
der protest and told of accompanying
Ford to the mint upon two occasions
to draw n onev, but stated that he did
not know what his chief did with it ,
or what it was intended for.
Abbott admitted that he made the
firs! rough draft of the trolley oral- !
nance, which, with some changes, was
subsequently passed by the supervisors.
Court adjourned to Monday.
Ruef Juror Former Convict
Morris Haas, a liquor dealer, one of.
the accepted jurors in the trial of Abra
ham Ruef, was denounced by Assist- !
ant District Attorney Heney as a for- ■
mer convict, and ho was dismissed to- ,
day by Judge Doollng.
The incident caused quite a sensa
tion In court just before noon adjourn
ment. Heney rose and dramatically
forced Haas to admit that he had
served two years in San Quentin for
embezzlement. Haas was/ sent up from (
this city in IMS and he was pardoned
two' years later by Governor Water
man. Frank J. Murphy of counsel for
Ruef brought out that Haas' accuser
afterward committed suicide. Haas
was deeply affected by the laying bare
of his record In open court.
Following the Haas disclosure Juror
Edwin Mohrig asked permission to ad
dress the court. .He stated that he
wished it understood that Detective
Tom Gibson, in the employment of
Patrick Calhoun, under indictment for
alleged bribery of supervisors in the
overhead trolley franchise' matter,
could not "fix" him. He went on to
state that rumor had come to him
that it had been said he was one of
two jurors sworn to try Ruef who had
been fixed. On being assured by the
court that the statement had never
been mad-, Mohrig became composed.
Mohrig charged the statement to As
sistant District Attorney Heney, but
the latter told Mohrig that all inves
tigations on the part of the prosecu
tion had found him to be an honor
able citizen.
No new jurors were sworn today and,
on account of the elimination of Haas,
the case is further away from trial
than it was yesterday, leaving three
vacancies to be. filled.
JUDGE CONLEY OF MADERA
TO TRY ACCUSED BANKERS
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO. April Judge
Conley of _-.__.dcr... is to try J. Dalzell
Brown, tho indicted banker, on the
charge of embezzlement in connection
with the Sacramento Electric, Gas and
Railroad company deal. Today Judge
Cook disqualified himself from Bitting
I" the case. The jurist declared he
. had on .' vera] occasions denounced
publicly the officials of the defunct
California Safe Deposit r>nd Trust com
pjpny and believed he had therefore
disqualified himself. He announced
that Judge Conley of Madera would be
ready to tee on with the case next
Monday.
Judge Conley is satisfactory to both
the defense and prosecution.
It is Intimated thai the executive
board disapproved of his activity In
advocacy of Socialistic theories.
—*—-«
TRAIN RUNNING SIXTY MILES
AN HOUR JUMPS THE TRACK]
By Associated Press.
HORNKLL, N. v., April 24.— Running
at the ' rate of sixty miles an hour,
Krie train No. 4, known as the Chi
cago express. Jumped the track direct
ly In front of the station at Canlsteo,
five miles from this city, this morning,
A broken tire on the engine Is be
lieved to have caused the wreck,
The engine and eight cars were de
railed, but remained right side tip. The
passengers were thrown about and
many of them cut and bruised, but
none of them was seriously hurt. The
engineer and fireman, who stuck to
their places, escaped injury.
Do Not Fail- To See
The Starr Wave Motor Plant at Redondo
■st-*a****3iB3jiif'" t^» ''"^ff-'^^a-^^g"^ *^~«<s»»^<'«T^g't-**^
' It is worth seeine-. Nothing; like it. It is the only ocean-ned success.
. ■_----------__.' ..' '. , yyy.yy.. yy-yyyyy '
CLEVELAND SLOWLY
REGAINING HEALTH
Former Presisdent, . Who Is 111 at
Lakewood, N. J., Too Weak
to Return to His
Home
By Associated Press.
LAKEWOOD, N. J., April 24.—Al
though rover Cleveland is said to be
slowly recovering from the attack of
stomach trouble, he has not improved
sufficiently to return to his home in
Princeton, and the date of his leaving
Lakewood is still undecided.
Dr. Joseph D. Bryant, the former
president's physician, arrived from
New York tonight. His coming, how
ever, is'not taken to indicate that there
IS any change for the worse In Mr.
Cleveland's condition, as he has made
frequent trips here to fe' his patient
during the hitter's illness. •
Mrs. Cleveland today authorized the
following statement: - : >-•
"Mr. Cleveland is recovering slowly
but surely from the attack of his old
digestive trouble. As he always has
found the climate at Lakewood very
hdi -.trial, he is to remain there until
he shall have gained his health. It
has not yet been decided when he will
return to Princeton."
DREAMERS SECT WOULD
KILL ALL UNBELIEVERS
Startling Testimony Is Brought Out
at Trial of Incendiary In Man
—Names of Lead
ers Given
By Associated Press.
MEDICINE HAT, Manitoba, April
24.—1n the trial here yesterday of one
of the members en' the dreamers sect
charged with burning homes of unbe
lievers startling evidence was given.
Joseph Belts of Irving, Alberta, stat
ed it was agreed to burn the Baptist
and Lutheran churches. It was not
the result Of a dream, but their creed
was to burn and murder. Letters were
received at a meeting from "God
Jacob," whose headquarters are at
lava 8 D., and whose real name is
Jacob Meckel. sr„ giving instructions
to kill and murder all unbelievers.
The names of several of the leaders
were mentioned.
RAILROAD TO REPLACE
OPERATORS BY TELEPHONE
Rock Island System Announces the
Telegraphers Will Be Dis.
pensed With —Cost Is
Large
i By Associated Press.
TOPEKA, Kan., April 24.—1t was an-
I nounced at Rock Island headquarters
today that telephones will be installed
to displace operators over the entire
system. Dispatchers will be main
i tallied at division points. The Kansas
division will be first equipped by July 1.
The cost on this division will be
I $10,000. .
HAYWOOD DROPPED FROM
FEDERATION'S PAYROLL
By Associated Press.
DENVER. Colo.. April 24.—Formal
announcement was made in today's is
sue of the Miners' magazine, the of
ficial organ of the Western Fed.-ration
of Miners, over the signature of c. &■
Magoney, first vie president and act
ing president of that organization, that
the executive board has terminated the
services of William D. Haywood as a
representative of the federation in the
Last December, after Haywood's ac
quittal at Boise, Idaho, on the charge
of complicity In the murder of former
Governor Steunenberg, he was super
seded as secretary treasurer of the fed
eration by Ernest Mills on order of the
executive hoard. .
Since that time he has been em
ployed as a lecturer and organiser for
the federation and has made a tour of
the east,
♦-»■-•>
ASSOCIATED PRESS RE-ELECTS
ALL LAST YEARS OFFICERS
By Associates Press.
NEW YORK, April 24.—The hoard
of directors of the Associated Tress,
before their final adjournment yester
day re-elected all the present officers,
as follows:
President—Frank B. Noyes, Chicago
Record-Herald.
First Vice President—Charles Hop
kins Clark, Hartford Courant.
Second Vice President—Ruf us N.
Rhodes, Birmingham News.
Treasurer—Herman Bidder, New
York Staats Zcitung.
Secretary and General Manager—
ville E. Stone. .....
Assistant Secretary and Assistant
General Manager— F. Diehl.
GREAT LAW SCHOOL PLAN
OF BERKELEY MANAGEMENT
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO, April "4. —Plans
for the establishment at Berkeley of
one of the greatest law schools In
America, with an endowment of $1,000,
--000, have been made public for li«;
Aral time by Professor George 11. Poke,
head of the department of jurispru
dence at the state university. it is
not only to be a great training school
for attorneys, but, according to Pro
fessor Broke, its scope will take- the
trend of preparing its graduates for
leadership In civic and public affairs.
' Three Persons Cremated
By Associated PreßS.
CORBY, Pa., April 24.—David Weth
i erbee, aged 78 years, bis wife, aged fin,
an, i their daughter, were cremated, and
I the daughter's husband was probably
I fatally burned early today in a fire
i that destroyed the Wetherbee home at
Centervllle. Mrs. Denim, after rescu
ing her husband, re-entered the build
ins for her parents, when tho roof
collapsed.
■» « e»
I Girls Attacked at Night
By Associated Press.
OAKLAND, April 24.—Anna and
Margaret Butter, aged 18 and 16, re
spectively, were attacked by a well
dressed man as tiny left the train at
Melrose last night. Margaret fled for
help while Anna fought with the man
who tried to drag her to the roadside.
He fled after choking the girl.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 25, 1908.
COUPON
NOT GOOD AFTER MAT. 8. 190*
Good far Ten Votes in Herald's $15,000 Prize Subscription Contest
Name of Contestant i y.
Address of Contestant -.' * ..•-• — )
In Contest No
Cut out this coupon, write in the spaces provided the name and ad
dress of the contestant for whom'you wish to vote or the person
whom you wish to enter as a contestant, designating in either case
the number of contest, and bring or mail the coupon to The Herald
office. Do not fail to fill in the blank provided for the NUMBER
of the contest. If you fail to do so it will be impossible to count the
coupon as a vote. " Information as to the numbers and other details
of the several, contests is published elsewhere in this morning's
Herald. Anyone can vote. --/ y _^^_^
WINDS TAKE
AWfUL TOLL
(Continued from ragn One)
of Natchez Is reported killed by a
storm in Concordia parish. La„ and
Harry Lambind fatally injured. Much
damage was done at Pine Ridge, eight
miles northeast of Natchez. Many ne
goes were injured.
PARENTS AND THEIR BABY
KILLED; HUNDRED INJURED
By Associated Press.
ALEXANDRIA, La., April 24.—
tornado which struck Richland, La.,
sixteen miles south of here today killed
four persons, fatally injured two and
destroyed thousands of dollars' worth
of property. About 100 or more persons
were more or less seriously injured.
Ephraim Pea ices and his wife and
baby were killed when the house was
blown down upon them and a negro
child was killed. Two negroes were
fatally injured. '.- "/':■'
FIFTY SCHOOL CHILDREN
BARELY ESCAPE DEATH
By Associated Tress.
HATTIESBURG. Miss.. April 24.—
Fifty school children had a narrow
escape from death today when a tor
nado that struck Baxter, a town be
tween here and Jackson, demolished
the school house. The children got out
safely, however.
Many other buildings in the town
were wrecked and a large number of
persons were slightly injured. y
WORLD BECOMING LESS
WARLIKE. SAYS ROOT
Secretary of State Tells International
Lawyers Public Opinion Is
Becoming More :
Peaceable
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, April 24.—The sec
ond annual meetings of the American
Society of International Law was be
gun at the New Willard hotel here to
day. A program of discussion has
been arranged which will keep the
hundred or more members of the so
ciety engaged until tomorrow night,
when the meeting is to end with a
banquet at which the climax of ora
tory will be reached.
The feature of the session today was
the annual address of Secretary of
State Ellhu Root, president of the so
ciety, in which it was shown that the
world is being governed by public
opinion and that public opinion is be
coming more humane and less war
like.
BIG BROKERAGE FIRM IN
NEW YORK FORCED TO WALL
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, April 24.— suspen
sion of T. A. Me-Int'yre & Co., brokers
and members of the New York stock
exchange and of the New York cot
ton and produce exchanges, was an
nounced today.
The firm did a large business and
had branches In Chicago, Baltimore,
Boston, Hartford, Binghamton, 'Syra
cuse, Rochester and Hot Springs, Va.
ill., members of the firm are Thomas
A. Mclntyre, George C. Ryan, John G.
Mclntyre, Thomas A. Mclntyre, jr., J.
I". Hulshlzer, James M. Hudson and
Edward T. White. •
BRITISH TROOPS ROUT
TRIBESMEN IN BATTLE
By Associate.! Press.
SIMLA, April 24.—1n consequence of
an attempt made by the Mohmand
tribesmen to cut his lines of commu
nication, Sir .lames Wilcox, the Brit
ish commander sent out from Pe
shawaur against the raiding natives,
attacked them this morning with two
columns, comprising all his available
troops.
After a sharp fight the British troops
dislodged the tribesmen. The British
casualties are given at sixty. The
Mohmands' losses are unknown.
FRUIT GROWERS HAVE TWO
YEARS TO CHANGE PLANS
By Associate Preps.
SAN FRANCISCO, April 24—The
California state board of trade re
ceived the following telegram from
Congressman J. C. Needham at Wash
ington today:
"Sulphur question will not bo taken
up till one year from next August. Dr.
Taylor has gone to Europe and this was
agreed upon before he left. Growers
will have two years more before any
finding Is made."
Insurance Companies Get Delay
By Associated Press.
OTTAWA, Ont., April 24.— Cana
dian government has decided not to
press this year the Insurance bill which
was Introduced at the opening of the
session and which would impose strong
restrictions on American life Insurance
companies, which do a large business
in Canada.
Election Contested
II y Associated Press,
MARYSVILLE, April 24.—The elec
tion contest of 11. 11. Dunning vs. John
Q. White fur levee commissioner re
sulted today In an Increase of seven
votes for White, giving him a majority
ot seven. •;,;; ;.-
MUST GUARD
PACIFIC COAST
(Continued from race One)
occurred in the United States, but it
had occurred in British Columbia.
He suggested the possibility that
the Japanese government might be
compelled by popular clamor to make
.1 declaration of war even against its
will, and if the fleet on that coast
should be withdrawn the people there
would, ho said, be powerless In the
face of any attack, because of the un
fortified, undefended conditions ex
isting there. He would vote for four
new ships as a peace measure, and
■would ,ho said, rather be wrong In
voting for four than right in voting
for two. He was applauded.
Must Uphold Nation's Honor
Senator McCreary, in advocating the
four battleships amendment, said the
nations of the world were Increasing
their navies and unless the United
States navy continued to increase it
would find it was not even a second
class naval power.
Senator Beveridge advocated, with
great earnestness, the authorization of
four battleships, declaring that such
a course would favor peace in the fu
ture rather than war. He commented
on the Idea that war was not possible,
saying that if he believed such a doc
trine he would vote against any navy.
He insisted that war sprung up sud
denly, while It must be prepared
against deliberately.
"What Information the executive has
In his possession no man knows," de
clared Mr. Beveridge In referring to
the president's message In favor of four
battleships. An important fact was
that in no other message had the pres
ident made such a recommendation on
his "solemn responsibility."
Mr. Beveridge reminded the senate
that "the president is the greatest
peacemaker in the world."
RICKFY OFFERS TO PAY IF
INDIC TMENTS ARE DROPPED
President of State Bank and Trust
Company in Nevada Makes Prop.
osition for Taking up
Indebtedness
By Associated Press.
RENO, Nev., April 24— T. B. Rickey,
the indicted president of the State
Bank and Trust company stated
today at Carson that he is willing to
take up his 1000 shares of stock in the
bank at the rate of $100 per share and
open the bank, so that all depositors
will eventually be paid dollar for dollar,
under the following conditions:
First—That the directors of the bank
take up the remaining 100,000 shares of
the bank at the rate of $100 per share,
or pay an assessment equal to that
amount:
Second—That all the indictments filed
against himself, the directors, the cash
iers and assistant cashiers in the vari
ous counties be dismissed and the pros
ecutions stopped.
Third—That all the depositors sign
the agreement some time ago submitted
to them, whereby they must agree to
allow their money to remain in the
hank and withdraw it only in the fol
lowing manner: One-third in three
months, one-third in nine months and
the remaining third at the end of one
year.
SEND BLACK HAND LETTER
TO LOS ANGELES OFFICER
Dr. L. M. Powers, health officer, re
ceived , a black hand card yesterday
from some one who is interested in
heading off prosecution for the quack
doctors which has just been begun in
Los Angeles.
The present war is waged by the fed
eral officials, not by the Los Angeles
health department; but the writer evi
dently holds Dr. Powers responsible.
The letter has been turned over to
Grant Bennett, attorney for the state
board of health.
Dr. Powers does not take the threat
seriously, but department officials con
cluded to file the letter for develop
ments.
EMMA GOLDMAN f-ETS
CITY PERMIT TO LECTURE
On the advice of the city's legal de
partment City Clerk Harry l.elnnde
took Emma. Goldman's $5 and issued a
license to lecture to her. A represen
tative made the arrangements.
She Is billed to speak April 28.
One sentence taken at random from
Emma Goldman's pamphlet is as fol
lows:
"Anarchism, therefore, aims at the
simultaneous overthrow of monopoly
and government." i
,-- a c
Hardware Store Looted
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO, April 24.—Some
time during last night burglars en
tered the hardware store of W. J. Don
nelly on Stockton street and robbed It
Of guns, knives and other articles val
ued at $600. No attempt was made to
open the cash register or safe. i "*...
Heir to Millions Poisoned
By Associated Press.
BRIE, Pa., April 24.—Bernard, the
2-year-old son of Bailey, H. Nagal,
president of thn Pennsylvania boiler
works, and grandson of T. M. Nagal.
a multimillionaire, died last night as
the result of taking medicine prescribed
for his mother, believing It to be candy.
MANY DANCE AT
GAY RECEPTION
OFFICERS ARE GUESTS AT
BRILLIANT FUNCTION
BID FAREWELL TO NEW FOUND
FRIENDS
Ball at Beautiful Hotel Virginia la
, 'One of the Most Notable
Affairs of Fleet
Week
Srirolal to The Herald.
. LONG BEACH, April 24.—Beautiful
women, garbed in gowns so magnificent
as -to make the average beholder fol
low them as they passed, handsome
naval officers garbed in the neat tif
fing uniforms of their rank, together
with the' most prominent business men
of Los Angeles and Ihe surrounding
cities, made the function at the Hotel
Virginia last night one of the most
brilliant of this week of brilliant af
fairs. '777.7 _
From roof to basement the magnifi
cent hotel was decorated' in such a
manner as to draw gasps of amaze
ment from all who saw it.
1). M. Linnard ami Manager Stanley
of the hotel had done their utmost to
make the function a success in every
way, and according to those .who were
present they succeeded even beyond
their greatest expectations.
The great ball room of the hotel had
been decorated for the affair In such
a manner as a ball roc- i has seldom
been decorated before. Masses of beau
tiful flowers arranged In different parts
of the room contrasted strongly with
the red. white and blue of the flags
which floated from wall* to wall.
Th,' room was filled to its capacity
during the evening and from the mo
ment the strains of the first dance
sounded until the ball ended nt mid
night . the floor was thronged with
happy dancers who glided to and fro
in waltz or tWOStep.
Admiral Emory was among those
present and was the guest of honor,
but for that matter every man in blue
was a guest of honor and the sailor's
uniform was sufficient introduction to
every woman present. _, /
The dinner was in every respect a
feast, and had been arranged with the
greatest care as to detail by those in
charge. More than 400 guests sat down
to It and all had words of praise for
those In charge.
Prominent Guests Present
Many of the most prominent men and
women in Los Angeles attended. the
reception And scores of automobiles
carrying late arrivals continued to ar
rive at the hotel until the closing hour.
In honor of the function the ships
were illuminated for the last time last
night. Their flashlight:; played about
the water, making everything as light
us day, while the beautiful sight of
four great men-of-war lying as if
ablaze off the shore brought forth
shouts of enthusiasm from the thou
sands who assembled to witness the
sight.
At promptly 12 o'clock the officers
from the different ships withdrew and
were taken to their vessels in the
launches. The fact that the vessels
were to start on their, trip north early
this mornfng made it necessary for
them to go aboard, or many j would
have remained until much later.
When leaving each officer expressed
his gratitude for the regal manner In
'which they had been treated, and all
agreed that the thoughts of their last
night In Long Beach would live long
in their memory.
Among those present were the fol
lowing gentlemen and ladles:
P. I-:. Hatch and wife, W. E. Hin
shaw, <"'. J. Cuprtla, Frank McCutchen,
J. A. Miller, W. J. Home, L. A. Perce,
<;. a. Mohrenstecher. F. M. Cates, a.
<'. Malone, Charles G. Greene, George
C, Flint, R. H. Young, E. C, Denlo, E.
F. Davis, J. W. Hand, B. W. Scheurer,
W. .1. Morrison, W. 11. Wallace, J. J.
Morgan, W. H. Ncilson, S. A. Schill
ing, Jean (*,. Drake. C. L. Day, F. C.
Roberts, E. K. Norton, W. A. Tucker,
A. ,B. Bradford. William M. Cook,
George Bixby, E. N. Grant, Fred Blx
by, Jotham Blxby, jr., Jotham Blxby,
Llewellyn Bixby, H. S. McKee, A. R.
Collins, W. B. Julian, C. R. Drake, F.
R. MeQuigg, G. F. Hirseh, S. O. Stan
en el. J. R. Pickerill, A. M. Goodhue,
W. V. Bartow, Mr. Wright, S. Town
send. C. F. Van De Water, T. M. Todd.
C. <'. Ames of Rodlands, C. Of' Lord,
F. A. Crowe, W. W. Lowe, J. H. Mun
holland, J. G. Munholland, A. L. Parm
ley, J. M. Kean, Harry Barndollar,
E. E. Buffum, C. A. Buffum, F. B.
Butler, H. B. Callahan, Ellis Haley, H.
C. Stuart, G. L. Curtis, A. A. Towne,
A. E. Curtis, E. J. Baldwin, F. A.
Barnes, A. B. Cates, F. E. Shaw, F. J.
Schlnnerer, L. A. Schlnnerer, J. R.
Poor, Herbert C. Morse, Edgar Mc-
Fadyen, A. J. Orelll, Dr. F. C. Don
nell, W. J. Wolff. L. Q. Adams, Wil
liam G. Cowan, F. L. Holmes, S. A.
Warson, W. R. Dickinson (Second and
Spring, Los Angeles), John P. Newell,
E. H. Van Slttert, J. E. Shrewsbury,
R. Loynes, H. M. Blackburn. W. F.
Shields, Mr. Shields, W. T. Nichol, F.
W. Steams, Dr. 11. G. Brown. Dr. W.
T. Huff. G. A. Inman, R. V. Foster, R.
Reynolds. 11.- E. Smith, W. L. Stevens,
Spe hoe Stevens, J. W. Wood, Percy
Hirst Smith, J. E. Foster, J. E. Carter,
jr., E. L. Kennedy, R. It. Staples, E.
Tlsmerat, C. B. Dudderar, A. C.
Walker, c. H. Windham, A. C. Par
sons (002 South Main, Los Angeles'),
A. M Parsons (602 South Main, Los
Angeles), Walter Campbell, secretary
Los Angeles D. and T. Co.
ETHICS OF CHASE IN
SCHOOLS OF FORESTRY
German Reports Methods of Preserv.
ing Game Are Important Parts of
Curriculum in Every School
in the Empire ,
In submitting the following statistics
concerning the community and national
service. Consul George Nicolas Iftt of
Annaberg report* that the laws and
ethics of the chase, as well as the best
methods of preserving game are im
portant part of the curriculum of every
forestry school and academy in the em
pire.
Recent statistics gathered and com
piled from the several German states
and other official sources give an inter
esting view of the chase as a national
asset. There arc issued every year In
Germany 360,000 annual hunting per
mits; 180,000 permits for shorter periods,
and 60,000 free permits to gamekeepers,
foresters, etc. This means that 600,000
men—one In every 100 of the population
—go hunting occasionally. While the
price of hunting' permits In the different
German states varies from $1.50 to $6.25,
the average is about $3.7.".. The German
devotees of the- chase thus pay In round
figures $1,600,000 annually Into the state
treasuries for hunting licenses. t • .
The annual "kill" Is anoroximately
... J ,^ AMUSEMENTS^.
RP**EUM THEATER / B.!L nV.;.7m».
- VAUDEVILLE
MMlerHSrr_r,L?. Co. -frfW-Jg* Doreto ,
Daisy llarcourt Brown * Nevarn, [
Ida O'Day, i At •, t **** *••""**»
.■■ ; .. Orpheum Motion Picture*. ' .*•- -■• - ■• s.
Remember the Managers' Monster Ben.nt Friday afternoon. May 1. at the Mason. t
G DAMn /->t.t-<oa TJer-TTCK* ■ Matinee* Sunday, Tueaday, Saturday.
RAND OPERA HOUoii* phone*: Asm.- Main ltd
7 The Family Theater
The irLRICH STOCK COMPANY presenting the great naval romance.
The White Squadron
An unparalleled production of this great play. ' - Ne-t week—"FORGIVEN."
LOS ANGELES THEATER r^V_.\i?«7.. Bim£
LAST TIME—THIS AFTERNOON AND TONIGHT
MISS MARY SHAW
PRESENTS
:: IPBCIAL CANDIDA <*E<>R<iK BERNARD
REQUEST. LAW XJ XXJ /\ BHAWS GREAT PLAT.
TRICES, $1.50, $1.00, -fie. BOc; MATINEE, It.oo, 75c, BOc, JBc.
REMEMBER THE MANAGERS' BENEFIT FRIDAY MATINEE, MAY 1.
All Next Week—Matinees Wednesday and Saturday
SEATS John Cort Present*
™w MAX FIGMAN in
balk ' THE cTMAN ON THE BOX
, ' ' ■ -^—^^ —i^^^^^^— —. mmmxxxxxxxxxxxt
VENICE AUDITORIUM
OPEN NOW, EVERY DAY AND NIGHT
ATI.'.-* rmr no rtuprof wand"ful LIONS
D Ll I Ej troupe of J-> 1 U IM 3
■-I;.— ('■ Frank Hall, the English Lion Tamer, with
A J TT* T" T T 11
And His Lion VV 3.113.06
Untamable Lion VV dllClL/C
Mon. Herr and his BOXING KANGAROO, champion boxer of the world.
Music by the Auditorium Orchestra.
. . . v
Admission 10 cent.-.. High class family entertainment.
TUTT ATTnTTr-PTTTM Phones: F2367, SPARKS M. BERRY, Mgr.
tit* AUUIIUKIUIH Maln o ig,, Flfth and OMv , itt .
"Theater Beautiful"
Tonight* Last Time FLOROijOJR A. .
'. '."'':- EDGAR TEMPLE OPERA CO.
Prices — ISO, BOc, Ties, Matinees Wednesday and Saturday, Slo, BOc. Remember tho
Managers' Association benefit, Mason opera house. Friday afternoon, May 1.
BELASCO THEATER matinee today at 2 BHARP.
__-_/-->*wU IHHiaHiR Tonight, all next week at 8.
' The one big show In town— supreme hit of nil time, the only one,
y -'.■■■ y'- ■
The Girl £ Golden West
Remember the Managers' Monster Benefit. Mason opera house, Friday afternoon. May 1.
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER L ._ ain _ &£%*£
Matinee today, toulshtThe Jolliest show in town— Hoyt's
A TRIP TO CHINATOWN
*^V musical farce comedy in three side-splitting acts, tilled to the brim with clever songs
and real fun. Second week begins tomorrow afternoon.
In preparation— JANE." Don't forget Monster Managers' Association
Benefit at the Mason Friday. May 1.
MASON OPERA HOUSE L .„..H_-£ 235
MATINEE TODAY—LAST TIME TONIGHT
MR. WM. A. BRADY ANNOUNCES **
«MR. WILTON LACKAYE %*H™"''
THE BONDMAN
PRICESSOc. Trie. 11.00. eI.BO,
NEW THEATER ROYAL home phoneATto"'.
Big eastern burlesque company of —mostly pretty girls—clever comed
ians, all this week the bis New York success,
Sold to the Sultan
Remember only one show each night. Matinees Dally during Fleet Week. Two hours
and a half of solid fun and music, Get your seats early for fleet week.
UNIQUE THEATER hentz *"zallee. Prop..
Our two stock companies appear at each performance.
FARCE COMEDY COMPANY MUSICAL COMEDY COMPANY
Under Direction of Richard Cummlngs. Under Direction of C. T. Wlppern.
Illustrated songs. Latest Moving picture*. Ladles' souvenir matinee Wednesday.
Children* souvenir and ladles' surprise matinee Saturday. "The Amateur*" Thursday
evening. Matinee* Mon.. Wed.. Sat, and Bun. Evenings continuous. Popular priest.
I"} ASEBALL —Chutes Park— Coast League '
San Francisco vs. Angels
Two Games— 25 and 26
GENERAL ADMISSION ZSc— GAMES CALLED AT 2:30.
If You Are All Tired
Out After Fleet Week
TAKE THE GREAT TRIP UP MOUNT LOWE
IT'S A REST AND A TONIC «
$2.00 Saturday and Sunday
THROUGH CARS AT 8, 9, 10 A. M. AND 1:30 AND 4P. M.
The Pacific Electric Ry
BIMINI HOT SPRINGS BATH AND PLUNGE
~ Qo to Blmlnl for your outing. FT-* table, for private plcale parti.*
Open evening. Great free exhibition Friday night. __________
LOS ANGELES OSTRICH FARM BA P B A r R-_ _>#£BJ}L
Take any city line. 26a round irip. Including admission. Tickets
CITY SALESROOM 324 SOUTH BROADWAY T_WS!w
CITY SALESROOM 324 SOUTH BROADWAY W
55,000,000 pounds, of which 44,000,000
pounds are game, with a market value
of $6,500,000. Most of this Is venison,
wild bear, rabbit, grouse, quail, etc.
These are large figures, but considered
in connection with the fact that the an
nual consumption of meat by the Gor
man people Is 7,700,000,000 pounds, the
product of the chase becomes an insig
nificant factor in the meat supply of the
nation. WKj&fmElfrSm
Tha money paid for hunting Permits
and the cash value of the game killed
are, however, not the largest item when
the chase is viewed from the economic
standpoint. The sum annually Pal<1 0"
--game preserve leases Is still larger. The
entire area of the empire is more or
less a game preserve, for the privilege
of shooting over some part of wnicn
some one is paying an annual rental-it
may be In state, city or community for
est preserve, where sometimes larger
game Is found, or only over the farms
which surround every village and offer
nothing better than rabbits and quail.
The average price for yearly leases of
game preserves is about 8 cents per
acre and the 135,000,000 acres of German
area thus . bring In from this source
more titan ' $10,000,000 per year. The
greater part of this sum Is paid directly
Into the community treasuries, and is
thence,: directly or Indirectly, dlstrlb-
uted for the benefit of the people inter
ested. \
Any estimate of the, economic value
of the chase would be Incomplete
which, In addition to the Item of direct
income mentioned, did not take * Into
account the value of the incidental In
terests, such as the manufacture; of
arms and ammunition and other hunt
ing paraphernalia, game bags, hunting
outfits, etc., for it is the fashion hero to
hunt in uniform—l. c., hunting jacket,
jaeger hat, leggings, game' bag ' and ■
belt. Considering these Incidentals, lt
Is estimated that the chase means an
nually the distribution of about $32,600,
--000, more or less, directly among all tho
people of Germany.
••* . ., —' "•'
Appointed Swedish Consul
By Associated Press, -
SAN FRANCISCO, April 24.—Captain
William Matson of the Matson Naviga
tion company has been appointed con
sul for Sweden at San Francisco, with
jurisdiction of territory of the Pacifio
coast, comprising. California; Oregon.
Washington! and Alaska.
♦ . -
WHAT ci-RKs heahachk .
From October to May colds are the most fre
quent'cause of headache. LAXATIVE BHOMO
I.NINE removes cause. E. W. Grove on box,
tto. 111 WllllJl'llllllfill-1.111-!l UH I

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