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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 17, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1909-01-17/ed-1/seq-2/

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'ANTI' BILLS TO
SET LEGISLATIVE
KETTLE BOILING
LIVELY LINEUP OF FORCES
DUE THIS WEEK
REPORTS ON VITAL MEASURES
ARE SCHEDULED
Japanese Exclusion and Race Track
Laws Are Those Expected to
Precipitate Bitter Con.
tests
(Continued from Page One)
the State Building Trades council,
will appear for the bill.
Pure Food Bills Approved
The committee on public health and
iiuarantine, of which Senator Rose
berry is chairman, has approved two
bills by Senator McCartney enlarging!
the operation of pure food laws.
The first provides for the sanitation
of food producing establishments, and!
declares politics in violation of this to
be nuisances dangerous to health, and
providing for their abatement. The
other act prevents the manufacture
and sale of spurious food and liquors
and drugs, and makes an appropria
tion to carry out the acts.
The committee on county govern
ment reported favorably upon a sen
ate bill relating to the making of con
tracts by counties. It makes a gen
eral rule to the effect that when
amounts above $500 are involved the
b^ard of supervisors must advertise for
bids and let the contract to the lowest
bidder. At present there are seven
special laws of the kind, but none that
apply generally.
Leeds of Los Angeles has introduced
A bill in the assembly regulating the
pilot charges to be made by regularly
licensed pilots at San Pedro. The bill
substantially makes the charges the
game as those prevailing at San Fran
cisco.
A similar bill will be introduced in a
few days covering the port of San
Diego. Leeds also introduced a bill
that makes it possible for cities acting
under a freeholders' charter to change
their names. Upon petition of 40 per
cent of the qualified voters of a city
the board of trustees or city council
must call an election to pass on the
question of change, and if a majority
Df the electors vote favorably the name
wiir be changed.
measure specifically affects
Ocean Park, Los Angeles county, it
being the wish of certain persons to
change it to Venice. The bill will be
antagonized.
Other bills introduced in the assem
bly were:
By Rutherford—An act to regulate
the hours of labor for underground
miners in mines, making the eight-hour
day prevail.
By Coghlan—An act increasing the
number of notaries public in the state
to eighty-five, giving San Francisco
live more notaries.
Woman Gets Damages
WILLOWS, Cal., Jan. 16.—Mrs. Dil
let of Chico, whose husband was killed
a year ago near Hamilton City by a
wire of the Northern California Power
company which had fallen across the
county road, was awarded damages to
day to the amount of $30,000 by a jury
in the superior court of Glenn county.
The suit was for $50,000.
Report Prince Abdicated
PARIS, Jan. I.—A special dispatch
received here from Vienna says it is
rumored Prince Nicholas of Montene
gro has abdicated in favor of his son,
Prince Mirko.
Pimply Pretty
Faces
May Be Made Clean and Clear by
Using Stuart's Calcium Wafers
Trial Package Sent Free
Pretty faces are dally seen about us
marred and marked with pimples,
blotches and eruptions.
There is absolutely no necessity for
this condition being so exceedingly
prevalent. Pimples and skin troubles
show that the blood is impure, and is
forcing its impurities into the cells
and glands of the skin, there fester
ing and breaking out at last into many
eruptive disorders.
Don't Mar Tour Beauty hy Xejle«t.
Stuart's Calcium Wafers Kent
Free for Trial
Calcium Sulphide is one of the great
est blood purifiers known to science,
and is so powerful that in a few days
dreadful conditions of skin disease are
overcome, and pimples and ordinary
skin troubles have been removed in a
few days.
Stuart's Calcium Wafers contain this
great purifier and preserves its fullest
strength in the peculiar process called
Stuart's. Combined with the Calcium
Sulphide are three other great blood
Invigorators, each doing a special work
intended for rapid and complete mas
tery over blood impurities and skin
diseases.
By using Stuart's Calcium Wafers in
a few days one notices the good effects,
and in a short time the blood responds
quickly and purges itself of its irri
tating and impure parts.
These wafers are not experimental,
they do their great work so fast and
are so uniformly successful that they
are known in every hamlet and by
every druggist. Physicians will tell
you of Calcium Sulphide, and how
hard it is to prepare it to hold its
full strength. Stuart has solved the
question with Stuart's Calcium Wafers.
They sell at all druggists for 50c, or
send us your name and address and
we will send you a trial package by
mail free. Address F. A. Stuart Co,
175 Stuart Bldg.. Marshall, Mich.
SAYS TEN-YEAR-OLD
CHILDREN CANNOT BE
FIFTY-YEAR-OLD SAINTS
> CHICAGO, Jan. 16.—"The habit of
•> making a flfty-year-old saint out of a
■•> ten-year-old child is wrong," said Her
•> bert W. Gates last night to Evanston
'■> mothers.
•> "This forcing process in religion Is
•> as disastrous as in any line. It in a
•> great mistake to spend the time read
■"> ing the Bible that should be spent
>> talking to our children or playing with
> them.
>> "I will bank more on the children
■> brought up by the parents who are not
>> so pious, but who are able to keep the
•> love and confidence of their children,
•- than I will on those whose parents pay
•> too much attention to piety."
3 BANKERS ARE
SENT TO PRISON
Two Other Men Are Expected to Be
Sentenced Later* —All of Them
Get Five Years in the
Penitentiary *
PITTSBURG, Pa., Jan. 16.—1n the
United States district court today
bankers and a business man were sen
tenced in regard to irregular banking
methods. Two others will be sentenced
later.
William McKee, vice president of the
Farmers' National Bank of Emlenton,
Pa., and director of the First National
bank of Clintonville, Pa,, who was
convicted _of misapplication of funds,
was sentenced to five years in the pen
itentiary.
John M. McKee, brother of William
C. McKee, president of the First Na
tional bank of Clintonville, Pa,, con
victed of misapplication of funds, five
years in the penitentiary.
Charles E. Mullen, cashier of the
Farmers and Merchants' National bank
of Mount Pleasant, Pa., convicted of
misapplication of funds, five years in
the penitentiary.
E. H. Steinman of Mount Pleasant,
president of the Aetna Lumber com
pany, convicted of having aided and
abetted the misapplication of funds
from the Mount Pleasant Farmers and
Merchants' National bank, five years
in the penitentiary.
HARRIMAN HITS
AT COLLEGE MEN
Says Employes Must Start in at the
Bottom, No Matter How Well
Educated They
Are
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Jan. 16.—Ed
ward H. Harriman has written for the
Yale Daily News his views of college
training as preparation for railroad ser
vice. Ho said in part:
"A college education will be a' great
help if the man in going through col
lege has kept the foundations of his
school learning firmly fixed.
"On the other hand, if he has
neglected his handwriting and forgot
ten his arithmetic in the higher mathe
matics, nothing could be worse for him.
"The college education is, in the be
ginning, a real disadvantage, and I
have found that in every case the high
school boy does better work than the
college man for the first few years.
However, as soon as the college man
has gotten back to the first principles
he will go ahead much faster than his
less educated rival.
"No matter how well educated a man
may be he must start in railroading at
the very bottom. It is the hardest life
I know of, and yet one of the most
pleasant. It cultivates an insight. It
teaches a knowledge of men, and in
this way is the best training for any
profession.
" 'Pull' can never carry a man far in
railroading. It is hard work and ap
plication that counts.
"My advice to the college man ex
pert ing to enter railroading and hoping
to have an easy life is DON'T, but to
the man who does not mind the hardest
kind of work, who will not quit under
disappointments and who wishes to
have thfe most interesting sort of a
career is by all means—DO."
TAFT SAYS 'TATERS
AND 'POSSUM MADE
AN EXCELLENT FEAST
ATLANTA, Ga., Jan. 16.—"Did you
see the way the president-elect ate
'possum and 'taters last night?"
This was the prevailing question in
rain-soaked Atlanta today.
Then Mr. Taft said: "Well, I certain
ly like 'possum. I ate very heartily of
it last night and it did not disturb in
the slightest my digestion or my
sleep."
Beginning his day with a ride to the
chamber of commerce Mr. Taft was
made to know in very certain terms
that his remarks last night, particularly
about the rule that should govern him
as to federal appointments in the
south, to select men of standing in
their own communities—was the most
valued promise which could have been
made. Tha statement met universal
applause.
The day's round of speeches and re
ceptions began early at the Georgia
Technological school. To the students
the president-elect made a characteris
tic speech. Later he spoke at a big
meeting in the Baptist church.
All Sing "America"
The meeeting was opened by the
audience singing "America," Mr. Taft
joining in the singing. University ed
ucation for the leaders of the negro
race, for the physicians and profes
sional men and industrial and primary
education for the b,ody of workers
composing the balance of the race was
the note struck by the president-elect.
MASKED BANDITS IN
OREGON LOOT BANK
KLAMATH FALLS, Ore., Jan. 16.—
The Klamath Falls County bank at
this place was robbed of $3000 by two
masked men, who entered the bank
this afternoon with drawn revolvers,
compelled the cashier to pass over the
counter all money in sight, amounting
to about $3000.
Several citizens who were inside the
bank were held at bay while the rob
bers escaped.
The money was in a sack. The rob
bers separated, one of them going east
of the city and the other sought refuge
in a barn near the bank and was cap
tured.
The robber who took the money was
on foot.
■ Officers are in pursuit
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SUNDAY MORNING, JANUARY 17, 1909.
FIND AMERICANS
DEAD IN MESSINA
BODIES OF CONSUL CHENEY
AND WIFE RECOVERED
WILL BE RETURNED TO UNITED
BTATES FOR BURIAL
Estimate of Number of Killed in
Sicilian City Now Reaches 90,000.
Apparition Frightens
Catania
■$> WASHINGTON, Jan. 16.—An inno- ♦>
9 vation in international relief meat*- •
<*> uren, so far as Kurope is concerned, <♦>
<•> will be undertaken by the American vj>
■;♦> government in expending the $800,000 •
<•» appropriated by congress for the Ital- •♦■
<♦> ian earthquake sufferer*. <$>
•;♦> Realizing that a great need among ■•
<•> the sufferers will be shelter, l'resident ■•;
'•> Roosevelt has decided to wend to Italy ♦>
• > material for the constructiuu of 2500 >♦>
-•> or 3000 substantial, but mwle.st, frame •
r»> houses. <♦>
<$> Kver since the appropriation wm 4|
<•> made serious consideration has been <•>
<§> given by the. president and the utate ♦
•$> department as to the best uses that %
<*> could be made of R in the way of re- $
■♦• lief. A final decision was reached %
<g> yesterday. <§>
[By Associated I*ress.]
WASHINGTON, Jan. 16.—The bodies
of the American consul and Mrs. Che
ney were found in the ruins of the
American consulate at Messina yester
day afternoon by the sailors of the
American battleship Illinois, which ar
rived at Messina yesterday from Suez.
The bodies were prepared for ship
ment and taken aboard the American
supply ship Culgoa, which will carry
them to Naples.
Arrangements are being made for the
shipment of the bodies to the United
States.
Haying accomplished her mission at
Messina, the Illinois has returned to
Malta.
An estimate of the dead in Messina
as a result of the catastrophe ot" De
cember 28, made by Stuart K. Lupton,
the American vice consul, on behalf of
the American embassy at Rome, places
the number at 90,000.
Mr. Lupton estimates also that there
are today still 10,000 people In the city.
The work of getting information
concerning individuals who were in
Messina at the time of the earthquake
is extremely difficult, as there are un
doubtedly tens of thousands under the
ruins and other tens of thousands have
scattered themselves throughout Sicily
and the peninsulai
The people still in Messina are camp
ing out in the outskirts and it has
been impossible to take any census of
them.
Major L&ndis, military attache to the
American embassy at Rome, who is
quartered on board the United States
battleship Illinois, reorganized the
work of searching the ruins of the
American consulate for the bodies of
Consul and Mrs. Cheney.
A number of things which the
Cheney family possessed were found
by the rescuers.
Mr. Lupton left today for Catania
to establish an American consulate
there.
Eighty-two persons have been ar
rested up to the present time for steal
ing during the confusion incident to
the earthquake disaster.
They will be trifd by martial law.
GHOST OF ST. AGATHA SAID
TO HAVE BEEN SEEN ON PEAK
CATANIA, Jan. 16.—For two days
the populace of Catania have been in a
state of great excitement over a report
that an apparition of St. Agatha, the
protectoress of the town, had been
seen on the summit of Mount Etna.
Those who say they saw the specter
declared that the vision seemed to
them "like an angelic dream," St.
Agatha being enveloped in thin, vapor
ous clouds, through which shone rays
of dazzling light, while her right hand
was extended as though in a sign of
benediction and protection over Ca
tania.
Because of these reports the belief
has spread that Catania was saved, from
the earthquake only through the in
tercession of St. Agatha.
Great groups of persons assembled
in the square and on roofs of houses,
g zing at Mount Etna, waiting for the
vision to reappear.
Many of them say that when the
smoke from the volcano was densest
and the sun was shining strongly on
the glittering snow they saw St.
Agatha fall upon her knees. The cred
ulous, on hearing these tales, knelt in
prayer and beat their breasts as pen
ance for their sins.
The Duke of Genoa arrived here yes
trrday and visited the hospitals, where
he addressed words of consolation to
the wounded.
SACRAMENTO RIVER
HIGHEST IN HISTORY
(Continued from Pare Ofle)
41 inches for the season. Every
stream in the county is overflowing
and much damage has been done.
Dozens of bridges have been carried
away, including the large steel bridge
across Wolf creek.
Feather River Subsides
OROVILLE, Cal., Jan. 16.—The
Feather river at this point dropped six
feet this afternoon and is continuing
to fall rapidly. The whole country
around Biggs is still under water and
no trains have been run in or out of
Oroville for three days. The damage
by the flood waters around Oroville
is estimated at $12;").000, incluging the
loss of the huge dam on Philbrook
creek .and a gold dredger belonging to
the Inmfana Mining company.
Levee Breaks Near Colusa
COLUSA, Cal., Jan. 16.—Some ex
citement prevails here tonight as a
result of a break in the levee on the
east side of the Sacramento river, half
a mile north of Colusa, which occurred
at 6:30 o'clock. All the levees on tho
Colusa side of the river are still in
tact. The river is slowly rising to
night and the high water mark will
be reached by morning.
All Streams Raging
SUSANVILLE, Cal.. Jan. 16.—Con
tinuous heavy rains for several days
and the melting of snow in the hills
have turned every stream into a tor
rent, flooding the valleys and causing
numerous families to move to higher
ground. No mail has been received for
several days. The storm is now over.
Marysville Escapes Luckily
MARYSVILLE, Jan. 16.—The storm
has cleared and the water in the Tuba
river is receding rapidly. Aside from
the damage sustained by the railroads
the loss by the high water in this
vicinity has been small.
_^__ AMUSEMENTS:" . , .•■'-_;
Hamburger's ; MAJESTIC Theater / ES.* M22SS
Broadway, bet-wean Bth and 9th. - ' '.
All Week l matinee today | All Week
THE CAPTIVATING SINGING COMEDIENNE,
PHD TIVT TVTTZ? "Mary," in Geo. M. Cohan's
'UUiA.IIN JLN d "45 Minutes from Broadway."
IN THE BIG NOVELTY MUSICAL PLAY
I LOLA FROM I
BERLIN
By John J. J^TcNally, William Jerome and Jean Schwartz.
Klaw & Erlanger'a massive Liberty theater, New York, production.
j Matinee Today [ Matinee Wednesday | | Matinee Saturday {
GREAT CAST GIRL CHORUS 15— NEW SONGS—IS
Night prices: 25c, 3."c, 50c, 75c, $1. Box seats $1.50. Matinee prices: 15c, 25c, *45c,
50c, 75c. Box seats $1.
NEXT WEEK— Mats. Wednesday and Saturday—NEXT WEEK
The eminent Shakespearean actor,
MR. CHARLES B. HANFORD
Ae.ii.Mnm MISS MAR ie DROFNAH
In elaborate scenic productions of the classic drama,
fat n urday"SKf* THE WINTER'S TALE
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE EJSS'LS'SS
" n Ta eun:f ay MUCH ADO AEOUT NOTHING
THE TAMING OF THE SHREW TS t *
Tuesday night OTHELLO Friday night.
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER T^ccE?SES° r
LOS ANGELES' LEADING STOCK HOUSE
ALL WEEK MATINEE TOI>AY > MATINEE SATUDAY
The tenderly pathetic Japanese love tragedy,
"THE HEART OF A GEISHA" \
I r,,r> c ..^v-t . i All the favorites of the incomparable Bur- I c- T aroratf i
| g^D^TVoW I -;£eV OBPanT in the cast" Many 1 COST AE 1
Regular Burbank prices—loc, 25c. 35c, 50c.
I oMason Opera House j
ffl ■ H. C. Wyatt, Less*© and Mgr. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^^~~' i
M " *Tho Wolf is di- " 'The. Wolf is a j
I T&rissrsL ATT. wonderf vi m c 10- |
H free from conven- ' * m J m m drama wonderful- |
B tional *^£aS!I& i%td* tx TT^T^TT' ly acted."—Ashton |
|| of Broadway melo- \/\/ Hi fT^j X Stevens in the N. I
M dramatic work." — » ▼ * " ■ »-*»^» Y. Evening Jour- E
H Alan Dale in the . . , E
H New York American. StSXtino' I
Monday, January 18th |
1 ONLY MATINEE SATURDAY j. \
The Lyric Theater \ "17k \ Success |
p A PLAY OF THE CANADIAN WOODS fe
"The Wolf"
I By EUGENE WALTER, Author of PAID IN FULL, I
I With an Excellent Cast, Headed by ANDREW ROBSON. I
H "It stands re- == « < The Wo ] nag |
R vealed as the ---^ . . the virtue of.be- |
|| work of a sud- JtrriCCS* lnfr untrammeled 1
m denly famous and w by the shallow I
B splendidly equip- CO, 7q c *1 rift «1 50 laws of conven- I
@ ped genius."— DUC» ' DC > H>x'> i?I"JU tion." — Burns §
E Amy Leslie in the Q#.ot«j "NTnw Sl«»llin£r Mantle in the Chi- g
H Chicago News. owtb INOW OClimg caRO Tribune |
I WEEK JANUARY 25: MATINEE SATURDAY |
I A Stubborn Cinderella I
H The Quality Musical Play with a California Plot. B|
B Lovers of musical comedy with pretty girls and catchy music can't afford to 11
R miss it. ffl
I Notable Cast with HOMER B. MASON |
I 60 SINGING AND DANCING GIRLS |
H -?• Prices—soc to $1.50. |
O Next attraction— TVIGGS OF THE CABBAGE PATCH." |
ORPHEUM THEATER Matinee Every Day
—— • Both phones 1447.
VAUDEVII/LE
Eva Tnj-lor ft Co. Blonde Typewriters
Edwin Latell Harry Tate's Motoring
Four Franklins Castellane & B^her
„.,■..:,. Trio Mason, 'Wilbur & Jordan
Majestic Trio OKPHEUM MOTION I>ICTCKES.
Klghts—loc, 25c. 50c. 75c. Matinees daily—loc, 25c, 50c.
GRAND OPERA HOUSE Matinees Sunday. Tuesday. Saturday.
RAND UFbKA nuuaa Both phones 1987
BEGINNING SUNDAY MATINEE, JAN. 17, ONE WEEK ONLY,
TTtT^-^ RICHARD CARLE'S
XjL Jht Hp Most Successful
-*— * I TVT Musical Comedy
FERRIS HARTM AN "^•^Ff >\
and His U( jHp
Superb Company V-/ J[
A superb production In every detail, with loads of pretty girls.
Matinees 10c. 25c. Nights^—l3c, 25c, 35c, 50c.
Next week—"THE WIZARD OF THE NILE." ■ ■ '
BTTT A«irn TH^ATEP - Phones Main S3BO
ij.i^AbV^U inwAxar. Home A3glo
I BIG MATINEE TODAY AT 2:15 |
Tonight—"HEARTSEASE"I,a«t Time.
COMMENCING TOMORROW NIGHT
THE BEL.ASCO THEATER COMPANY PRESENTS THE FUNNIEST FARCE EVER
WRITTEN. —'
Charley's Aunt
THE GREATEST LAtJGH PRODUCER OF TWO CONTINENTS.
The world's famous creator of hilarity, the dispenser of gloom, the abolisher of worry
just the play you want to see. ' .
" Regular matinees every Thursday, Saturday and Sunday.
Next week's great announcement—David Belascos masterpiece, "THE GIRL OF
THE GOLDEN WEST." One week only. Seats on sale tomorrow.
EMPIRE THEATER EaBt Third street, between
The Best VA. U l-/11/ \TJT JL/11/ Ten Seat
The Best V I\ LJ 3IJX2j V LL^l-jLZj Ten Cents.
Change of bill and Free Matinee every Monday 2:45. Evening: shows 7:30 and 9.
Souvenir matinees Wednesday and Saturday. Extra matinee Sunday.
TOS ANGELES THEATER " *£&?»£*£&£%£
Wonderful Vaudeville
, EVERT DAY BABGAIN MAIINEE. 100 AND 20c. EVERY NIGHT 10c, 20c, 30c.
_„... AMUSEMENTS
THE AUDITORIUM Theater Beautiful
— —. Ernest Crawford, Manager
Phones: Main 5186, Home F2367.
GRAND OPENING TOMORROW EVENING *
————— ———■—^——
MR. ERNEST CRAWFORD Presents
The Beautiful Fairy Spectacular Fantasy
CINDERELLA
or, The Fairy Queen and
The Silver Slipper
As produced for the first time in the Theatre Royal, Covent Gar
dens, London, England.
A Company of Recognized Artists, Beautiful Singers and
Comedians, Ensemble Chorus, Show Girls and Ponies.
A myriad of Sylphs, Fairies and Grand Corps de Ballet.
The magnificent $30,000 Pipe, Organ used at every perform
ance.
RAILWAY TIME TABLE TO CINDERELLA
Passing Through
EXPECTATION, REALIZATION AND ENDING THE TRIP
TO FAIRYLAND ON ARRIVAL AT SATISFACTION
Train Leaves Auditorium —Expectation Depot
8:15 p. m. —Overture "Cinderella"
8:20 p. m.— Nightingale song ; "Fairy Queen"
8:24 p. m.—Grand chorus and solo "Fairy Queen"
8:28 p.m.—Grand chorus
8:31 p. m. —Dream music
8:35 p. m.—Enrance of. hunters
, 8:40 p.m. —Jungle Town .* "Huldbrand"
8:46 p. m. —l Love You (duet) "Huldbrand"
8:48 p. m.— Some Day When Dreams ome True "Cinderella" ?*■•-•
8:52 p. m. l'm So Lazy "Pedro"
8:55 p. m.—Gavotte, sword dance Miss Swan Wood
8:59 p. m. —10 minutes for refreshments.
9:02 p. m.—l Like You "Prince"
9:12 p.m. Nonsense (duet) "Glorinda and Thisbe"
9:17 p. m. — I've a Heart To Let...... „ "Cinderella"
9:22 p. m.—Did You Ever Go Ballooni n g? "Cinderella"
9:24 p. m.—Piff! Pan". ..." "Baxon and Chorus"
9:27 p. m.—He Went A'hunting "Dandini"
9:29 p. m. When the Band Begins to pj a "Prince"
9:36 p. m. —Because I Love You, Dear. .Y'."!.. '.'...'. '.'. "Huldbrand"
9:41 p. m.—Are You Sincere?......./]] ...!... "Huldbrand"
9:47 p. —Glow Worm ." ....'...'..'............'... ! "Fairy Queen"
9:52 p. —Grand Corps dp Ballet _
9:58 p. m.—Rose solo, premier danseuse _ \ .**.,."! Miss Swan Wood .
10:15 p. m.—Grand finale, "A Shower of 'RoVeV'* •"•*."."."•*.'...... ■
10:30 p. m.—Arrive Satisfaction .'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.' Y. ...Y.
SPECIAL AUDITORIUM REGULAR MATINEES
PRICES WEDNESDAYS AND '
Proscenium boxes $1.00
i^es 1.00 SATURDAYS
Mezzanine boxes .«»
Orchestra boxes 50 Proscenium boxes .50
Horseshoe mezzanine 50 X,oges B0
Mezzanine balcony ".. .25 Mezzanine boxes 35
Balcony '. 35 Orchestra * 25
Balcony ; 25 Balcony .35
: Family circle 15 Family circle .13
Family circle 10 Family circle 10
, ATX SEATS RESERVED. ■
SIMPSON AUDITORIUM . ho7Ttr E e?s
A MOST UNIQUE ENTERTAINMENT
Tuesday evening, Jan. 19, 8:15 o'clock
GERMAIN—THE WIZARD
Auspices LADIES' AUXILIARY IT. S. C.
Seat sal© at Bartlett Music Co. Prices $1.00, 75c, 50c. Special rates to students.
IMPSON AUDITORIUM The One Big Fun Maker
SIMPSON AUDITORIUM The One Big Fun Maker
~~~ FRIDAY EVENING, JAN. 22,
£t beLns RAG TIME PIANO CONTEST S2S?
For Championship of the World and a Purse of $1000.00
Six Contests—Buck and Wing Dancing and Coon Shouting
Seat sale at BARTLETT'S MUSIC CO. PRICE Sl.OO.
WAT V"PP T'WTT' ATPT? Phones F-5634 Grand ay.. between 7th and St*.
ALJSJ3.X itl&A LX.& Maln 4400 x Harry pleper Lessee and Mgr
SPECIAL SUNDAY MATINEE, 3 P. M.
TKK BEST . THE 5 PATTERSONS—PREMIER ACT OF THE SEASON
VAUDEVII/LE BEAUTIFUL BRONZE LIFE POSING . . /
"^™"T^T^™* "Sylvestro," aerialist; "The Two El woods." and Harry M. O'Connor,
Created for Alice Saunders with Fred Elliott in a roaring rural comedy. All seats
Man, Woman reserved. Full orchestra. Prices: lOc, 20c, 35c. Curtain 8:15. First
and Child. run motion pictures.
THE ONE BIG EVENT COMING.
The Auto Show
January 23 to 30
HAMBURGER'S NEW BUILDING
This exhibition in beauty, art and magnificence will eclipse even the New York and
Chicago shows. Every prominent American car will be there, and foreign cars as well.
ADMISSION
50 Cents That's All
T OS ANGELES RACING ASSOCIATION
6 RACES EVERY WEEK DAY
Rain or Shine Q
First Race at 1:50 P. M. |
Santa Anita Park
Pacific Electric and Southern Pad fie Race Trains direct to grand stand.
ROUND TRIP 25c ADMISSION $1.00
!T)L~-*.~ !Tl«>n*-»— - f*^ Photos made anywhere. Architectural work, copying, en-
I nOTO nniSuinn \)Cl+ Iar SlnS- KODAK FINISHING, first class work, reasonable
■ lIUIU I IlllOllltlij v\» p rices . 143 S. Broadway, opposite Herald. Phone A 2295. '■
Shortest and JP%
Quickest Line %Wm
to the Ocean \§^
Take a Trolley Ride to
Venice, Ocean Park or Santa Monica
REDONDO— Delightful 9-Mile Ride Along the Ocean.
FISH AT LONG WHARF— Port Los Angeles or Playa del Rey.
Los Angeles-Pacific Railway"
HILL STREET STATION. BET. FOURTH AND FIFTH.
MOUNT g&k Saturday
LOWE lIP and Sunday
• $2.00 ROUND TRIP
Direct Cars Leave at 8, 9 and 10 a. m., 1:15 and 3 :45 p. m.
CASA VERDUGO— Spanish Dinner.
THE BEACH RESORTS—Bathing and Real Fish Dinners.
The Pacific Electric Railway Company
Terminal Station Sixth and Main Streets.

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