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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, December 02, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-12-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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SLEEPER RATE CUT
MEETS OPPOSITION
State Officials Say Reduction Not
Enough; Railroads, That
It Is Too Much
COAST SCHEDULE AFFECTED
A
1
Pullman Company Offers Lower
Fares to End Contest Before
Commerce Commission
(Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Dec. I.—An offer of the
Pullman company to reduce the rates
charged for upper berths in sleeping
ears 20 per cent where lower berths
were priced at more than .50, to
make the price of uppers $1.26 as a
minimum and reduce some lower berth
rates, was opposed before the interstate
commerce commission here today by
the attorney generals of four states
and by two railroads.
The Pullman offer left unchanged
Pullmnn seat rates and was to become
effective upon approval by the com
mission.
Opposition to the plan was offered
on the part of the railroads on the
allegation that they would have to
stand part of the brunt of the lessened
price and by the attorney generals on
the claim that the reduction was not
sufficient.
Commissioners Lane and Clark,
therefore, were confronted with an of
fer of voluntary reduction of rates tor
upper berths (also a number of ma
terial reductions on lower berths)
Which the railroads said was too much
and the state officials called too small.
The whole matter came in a com
bining of all complaints against
Sleeper rates in one hearing by the
commission, following an order from
the federal circuit court that previous
cuts ordered by the commission were
not justified.
The Pullman company reduction
schedule included the following cuts on
lower berth rates, upon which, as on
remaining existing rates, the 80 per
cent charge for uppers was proposed to
be applied, the effort being, according
to the company's representatives, to
charge an average of 6 mills a mile:
Chicago to New York, unchanged.
New York to Tampa, 50 cents.
Poughkeepsie to Elkhart and South
Bend, Ind., $1.
New York to St. Augustine, Fla., or
Savannah, Qa., $1.
New York to East St. Louis. 111., 75
cents.
New rates proposed hy the company
include these:
St. Paul or Minneapolis to Seattle
and Pacific coast points, $11.
New York to New Orleans, 18.
Chicago to San Francisco, $13.
The former Minnesota-Pacific coast
rate was $12; that from Chicago to
San Francisco, $14.
The commission will hear further ar
guments and if held advisable will re
ceive . evidence in the specific cases
combined In one hearing.
Legal representatives of the Chicago,
Milwaukee & St. Paul, wnlle express
ing no active opposition today, de
clared they were prepared to combat
the Pullman company In Its offer to
the members of the commission.
CALIFORNIAN IS ELECTED
VICE PRESIDENT OF.A. A. A.
Clubs Are Called on to Encourage
Amateur Contests
NEW YORK, Dee. I.—The ninth an
nual meeting of the American Auto
mobile association closed tonight with
the election of officers, Including:
President, Robert P. Hooper, Penn
sylvania; vice president, F. 1.,. Baker,
California; secretary, John N. Brock,
Connecticut; treasurer, H. A. Bonnell,
New Jersey.
A resolution was adopt, (tilling on
the officers of states issuing registra
tion licenses to inform the executive
officers of the A. A. A. of any viola
tion of state laws by visiting motor
ists, so that the association might
take action.
The association also indorsed the
principle of federal aid in building
highways and called on association
clubs to encourage amateur competi
tion in trail; and road events
CENSUS OF PENNSYLVANIA
INCREASES 21.6 PER CENT
Population of West Virginia Now
Reaches 1,221,119
WASHINGTON, Dec. I.—The popu
lation of Boise, Idaho, is 17.355, com
pared with f.'JJT in 190 , according to
the thirteenth census made public to
night.
The j*jpulation of the state of West
Virginia is 1,221,119, This Is an in
crease of .62,130, or 27.4 per cent over
HuB,SOO in 1900. Tin.- increase from 1890
to 1900 was 196,006, or 25.7 per cent.
The population of the state of Penn
sylvania is 7,665,111. This is an In
crease of 1,362,996, or 21.6 per cent over
6,802,115 in 1900. The Increase from
1890 to 1900 was 1,044,101, or 19.9 pel
cent.
GROWER SAYS TAFT'S WORDS
SWERVED WOOL INDUSTRY
l
Speaker Asserts Billion Dollar
Capital Adrift
SHERIDAN, Wyo., Dec. I.—Hon. J.
A. Di Ifold a president of the AVyom-
Ing V/00l Growers association^ in "d
--dressing the seventh annual meeting
of the association in this city, said:
"When President Taft In his speech
at Winona said hi was not pleased
with the wool schedule In the Payne
bill, as 1.. thought there should have
teen a revision, his unfortunate re
marks caused an Industry that rep
resented an invested capital of over a
lull;..ii dollars. to swerve from Its
prosperous course like a rudderless
I hip in a storm."
TUG% RACE TO SAVE VESSEL
DETROIT, Dec I.—Three tugs and
.•I lighter have been sent to the relief
of the steam, Onoko of Cleveland,
which ran aground on Southeast
shoals, sixty miles below Amherstberg,
last night In a. snowstorm.
WANTS TO BE SENATOR
BATON ROUGE, La., Dei _.—Con
greHsman Brousi of the Third Lou
isiana district today formally an
nounced hie candidacy fox the United
States senate, to biiccmuJ the lute Sen
ator McEncry.
'MOB IS NOT TRYING CASE,'
SAYS JUDGE; CLEARS ROOM
Court Rebukes Spectators Who
Laugh at Japanese
DENVER. Dec. I.— "This man ((ienk
yo Mitsunaga) although a foreigner, is
being tiled by a Jury and not by a
mob.
With Mils rebuke to a laugh that
swept the court room, Judge Hubert L..
Bhattuch ordered the bailiffs to clear
the room of all spectators.
The defense in the trial of Oenkyo
Mltsunaga, the little Japanese house
cleaner charged with the murder of
Mrs Katherine Wilson, failed today in
its attempt to separate the three counts
on which the defendant is being tried,
cm cross-examination the defense en
deavored to undermine Wilson's ablli,
preparatory to laying the foundation
for Its charge that the murder was
committed by some person other than
Mitt unaga.
EASTERN SYSTEMS
AVOID RATE FIGHT
First-Class Passenger Fare Be
tween New York and Chi
cago to Be $20
CHICAGO, Dec. I.—First-class pas
senger fares between Chicago and New
York over the Michigan Central and
the Panhandle route.-: will be $20 after
January 15, according to advices re
ceived here late today, subsequent to
a secret meeting in New York between
representative, of those roads and of
the Brie, Wabash and Grand Trunk.
This lays to rest the specter of
slashed rates and unprofitable compe
tition. The action by the two routes,
which heretofore have enjoyed a dif
ferential rate of $19 for the Michigan
Central and $18 on the Panhandle, fol
lowed open threats of another rate war
Instigated by the Erie, Wabash and
Grand Trunk, such as the Erie used
two years ago to straighten out the
complicated emigrant rats situation.
"Specifically," said an official of one
of the roads Involved, "the Michigan
Central and Panhandle were entitled
to the privilege of lower fares in our
opinion, so long as their service was
curtailed by ferries. When their serv
ice «as as, efficient as the roads charg
ing $20 the three so-called 'insurgents'
claimed they ought to have the added
inducement of low tare removed. This,
our telegrams say. was agreed to. It
merely removes what we claimed was
an unfair advantage. Today's action
means there will be no rate war."
ROADS, MENACED BY EXTREME
REDUCTION IN FARES, YIELD
Ultimatum Threatened $8 Cut in
Gotham-Chicago Rate
NEW YORK, Dec. I.—Final afttton
on New York-to-Chicago passenger
rates was taken today by the roads
Interested at a conference in the rooms
of the Trunk Dine association.
The Erie, Grand Trunk and the
Wabash served notice that unless the
Pennsylvania and the New York Cen
tral Abandoned the differential rates on
the Panhandle and the Michigan Cen
tral routes a rate war would be de
clared.
According to Information here the
threatened cut rate on first-class pas
senger traffic to Chicago was as low
as $S; second class as low as $6.
In' addition the rate to Boston was
to be out and new tariffs were to be
tiled forthwith, unless an adjustment
were reached. In the face of such an
ultimatum the Pennsylvania and New
York Central decided to yield, and
after the conference adjourned an
nounced the rate had been made uni
form.
WRIGHTS MAKE DEMAND
FOR $25,000 GUARANTEE
Dick Ferris Declares That Avia
tors Will Have to Re
duce Figure
Prospects that the aviators representing
the Wright brothers will fly In Los An
gola were not bright yesterday, for the
reason that 126,000 Is demanded by them to
Insure the presence on the aviation field ot
tliree Wright machine!. This sum ia ex
clusive of prizes and cash buiiu.-es offered
winners In the various events. Roy Knaben
shue tuld lJlck Ferris thai these were the
terms the Wrljrhti Insist upon, and Ferris
not only Indicated that he would not pay
that much, but he expressed doubt ihat any
one else Interested in an aviation meat
would.
Ferris said that the Wrights would nave,
to come down if they are represented at
the meet he Is planning. It is unde%
stood, un the other hand, that the terms
staled nre final so far as the Wrights are
concerned,
R.IhS LEASES MOTORDROME
With thu leasing of the motordrome by
the Glenn 11. I'uitlss company for testing
and experimental purposes, Cui-rlss has
made known his willingness, through lus
manager, ,11 Young, to Insti a num
ber or army and navy officers. In ■he art
of flying. , -
Sine. r-iirtlßs proposes to bull* several
types of aerial machines at the motordrome,
' ii.l« Is given as a reason why it would bo
.11, Ideal place for training. Tin men will
be Iv direct contact with the machines ln
all stages and understand thoroughly the
mechanism. ' were 11. .1.
Among the arrivals yesterday were I). J.
X H.issaard of New Bedford, Mass.. an.l 11.
1„ Snyder nf Dayton. O. Ilnnzar.l Is ll.ix
sev's assistant, and Snyder Is mechanician
for Brooklns. The men wi re at Denver for
the recent meet there and then came on to
Los Angeles lo await orders.
Archie Hoxsey and Walter Brookins,
Wright aviators, nre still in the ell and
will n main here until further orders.
PLANS TO FLEECE HOTELS
WITH 'COLLECT' PACKAGES
Stranger Introduces New Swin
dling System in East
KANSAS CITY. Dec. I.—A plan to
fleece hotels through the medium of
C, O. D. packages hits been reported to
the federal authorities here. Two Kan
sas City hotels and one at Topeka re
ceived letters from a supposed traveling
man giving orders as to mall arid room
reservation, and .cautioning them to
care for a. watch to be sent him at the
hotel.
Xhe package was later delivered to
each of the hotels by the express com
panion, with Jl.sn due. All three ho
tels failed lo pay, ( and Investigation
showed tb mail accumulating for the
supposed travel man to be blank pa
per.
LOS ANGELES HERALD FRIDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 2. 1910.
8-HOUR LAW BARS
DREADNAUGHT BIDS
Only One Company Willing to Un
dertake Construction of
Monster Battleship
WASHINGTON, IV.-. I.—Absence of
competition marked the opening of
bids at the navy department today for
the construction of one of the great
est dreadnaught. of tin- United States
navy, a first-class battleship of 27.
--000 tons displacement, of two-fleet col
liers and of machinery for a second
new battleship which wit be built at
a government navy yard,
The apathy of the ship-building in
terests is attributed by the department
to the action of congress at its last
session in stipulating that the work
must lie done under the eight-hour
law-.
The department furthermore was un
willing to Interpret definitely the ex
tent to which, within the meaning of
the. naval hill, the eight-hour law
would apply to work, believing that
many of its phases were subjects for
the determination, of tlie courts. This,
it is believed, also had a deferent ef
6fect on prospective bidders.
Tho great battleship, which will be
more powerful than any other afloat
under the American Hag, probably will
be built by the Newport News Ship
building and Dry Dock company of
Newport News, Va. That company
was the only bidder for the vessel,
resenting four proposals, differing be
cause of the machinery to be in
stalled. These ran from $5,760,000 to
$5,830,000. The maximum amount
authorized by congress for this battle
ship was $6,0*00,000.
There probably was no successful
bidder for the two steel fleet colliers,
with a carrying capacity of 12,500
tons. '
!DR. COOK HAS DIFFICULT
TIME SELLING 'CONFESSION'
Explorer Came to America in, No
vember to Negotiate Deal
NEW YORK, Dec. I.—Dr. Frederick
; A. Cook, who now confesses that he
does not know whether he reached the
! north pole, had no easy task in dispos
ing of what he describes as "The Story
of Cook's Trip to the North Pole," ac
. cording to reports reaching New York
from London. The Brooklyn explorer,
j It is stated, is living in seclusion in a
boarding house in Bloomsbury, a Lon
don suburb. •
It appears that for weeks Dr. Cook,
eager to return to his home in Brook
lyn, sought a literary agency to sell his
latest story to London magazine pub
lishers. One thousand dollars, it was
said, was asked for the story.
It was learned today that Dr. Cook
was in the United States early in No
vember to conclude the arrangements
for the publication of his story. He
came by way of Canada and met the
publishers at Troy, N. Y.
TAFT COMPLETES MESSAGE;
CABINET MAKES REVISIONS
Document Said to Contain from
30,000 to 40,000 Words
WASHINGTON, Dec. President
Taft today completed his message and
sent it to the government printing of
fice in its final form. The document
was laid before the cabinet at a spe
cial session which began at 10 o'clock
this morning and lasted until nearly 3
in the afternoon.
The message is said to be unusually
long, the estimates running from 30,
--000 to 40,000 words. The president went
over every feature 'of the document
with the cabinet members and it is
said that some changes were made at
their suggestion, principally In mat
ters affecting their own departments.
President Taft will send a special
message to congress next week em
bodying the report of the board of
engineers appointed to examine irri
gation and reclamation projects in
the west.
CALIFORNIA EXPOSITION
BOOMERS AT CAPITAL
Delegation Arrives in Washington
and Opens Headquarters
WASHINGTON, Dec, I.—Exposition
boomers from California, seeking to
obtain the government's recognition of
San Francisco as the place for holding
tho Panama-Pacific International fair
In 1916, arrived tonight.
The delegation included R. B. Hale,
acting president of the exposition com
pany: Governor-elect Hiram W, John
son, Benjamin Ide Wheeler, president
of the University of California; former
Congressman Theodore A. Bell and
many others.
The Califorjiians have opened head
quarters and will wage an active cam
paign before congress.
CARNEGIE FIGHTS LIQUOR
WITH 10 PER CENT BONUS
' NEW YORK, Dec, I.— Here Is An
! drew Carnegie's method of fighting In
temperance on his estates In Scotland;
"The rule In Sklbo," he told the din
ers at the banquet of St. Andrews so
ciety last night, "is that any man who
guts to tii.: office January 1 shall have
.i bonus of 1" per cent of his wages If
lie has not tasted liquor during the
year except mi the advice of a phy
sician. That l have found the most
powerful argument of a temperance
! nature ever delivered In Scotland." ,
BRITISH COLUMBIA COAST
WHIPPED BY 88-MILE GALE
VICTORIA, R. '.. Dec. I.— Wireless
reports Hum Triangle Island, north
west of Vancouver, say the hurricane
which started yesterday, blowing sev
enty miles an hour, has Increased In
velocity to eighty-eight miles.
The steamer ' i. agle, which was
due here this afternoon from the
Orient, encountered the storm and re
ported she would not reach port until
tomorrow.
TWO BANDITS ROB MAN;
RETURN $1 TO VICTIM
Within a few minutes alter alight
ing from an East First street car at
the end of tho line in Boyle Heights,
Leslie Rock of llynes station was held
up hy two masked bandits at li oxlock
la.st night and robbed of $37. After
getting the money one of the robbers
returned V to the victim with th. ad
monition to use It for ear lure, a good
supper and a bed.
G. 0. P. BALLINGER PROBERS
MEET TO MAKE REPORT
Republicans and Democrats to
Reach Findings Separately
WASHINGTON, Dec. I.—The Repub
lican member, of the Balllnger-Plnchot
Investigating committee, assembled In
Washington today to begin the final
revision of the majority report on the
Ballinger Inquiry. All Republican
members of the committee with the
exception of Representative Dcnby of
Michigan were closeted in the offices
of Senator Nelson, chairman of the
committee, throughout the afternoon.
The sessions will be resumed tomorrow.
Meantime the Democratic members of
the committee are assembling for a
minority session Saturday afternoon.
Senator Nelson declined to say when
a full meeting of tho committee would
be held, but said that such a meeting
would bo called.
SOU JAPANESE YELL
UNTIL THEY'RE HOARSE
(Continued from rage One)
ciflc coast in the warmth and sincer
ity of the reception tendered.
Although early in the morning: mem
bers of the Japanese colony In-Southern
California began arriving at the Pacific
Electric boat landing, before the fleet
arrived and immediately on its being
sighted, the little brown men and wom
en swarmed into the launches provided
and went out to the big ships.
Utterly careless of how they got
there—just so they did the Japanese
climbed from boat to boat, taking
chances of a. ducking in the chilly wa
ters of the bay, In order to be among
the first to pay tribute to the mikado's
fleet and officers.
A - few minutes after they anchored
the cruisers were alive with visitors,
and every Pacific Electric train—even
the steam train—added more and more
until it was nearly impossible to.move
about on the decks of the vessels. It
is estimated that fully 5000 Japanese
living in Southern California went
aboard the ships during the afternoon.
BEAM SCARS OF BATTLE
Both cruisers of the fleet are modern
fighting machines, the Asama, the ad
miral's flagship, having seen service
during the war between Russia and
Japan.
This vessel's plates show dents mado
by shells tired from Russian guns.
Above each of these shell marks on the
vessel are inscriptions, cut in the solid
steel plates in Japanese, telling the his
tory of that particular dent. The vis
itors yesterday found much pleasure in
inspecting these battle scars. /
Admiral Yashlro, like his flagship, has
seen much service, having won a name
for himself while captain of the Asama
in the battle of the sea of Japan, when
with the vessel's afterdeck shot away
by shells he kept his ship in the fight
on learning that it was still water
tight. He also was engaged In several
other naval battles and in all conducted
himself with the utmost bravery. For
this reason, as well as because he Is in
command of his imperial majesty's
fleet, the admiral will be especially fet
ed during his stay here by the local
Nipponese colony.
"This is a beautiful country—one of
Which I have heard much," said Admi
ral Yashiro in his cabin after the first
formalities were over. "I am extreme
ly glad the young men in training un
der my charge can have an opportunity
to see California and have an oppor
tunity to see what their fellow country
men are doing here. It Is a most grat
ifying reception you have given us, and
I thank you for the men and for my
self."
TO REPEAT PROGRAM
The officers and men of the fleet,
with the exception of a few, remained
on board yesterday and last evening. i
This morning one-half of them will be
taken in special cars from San Pedro
to Ascot park, where an all day garden |
party has been arranged for their en
tertainment. Those unable, on account
of their duties, to attend the affair to
day will attend tomorrow, the same
program being presented each day.
The ships have been in San Francis
co and on leaving that port proceeded
down the coast under slow speed. They
are on their way to South America.
Among the Japanese who extended a
welcome to Admiral Yashlro and his
men were the Rev. T. Komuro, presi
dent of -the Japanese association; D.
Nino, secretary; the Rev. K. Inasana,
pastor of the Congregational mission;
G. Yusada, editor of the Japanese-
American; I. Oura, contracting agent
for the Salt Lake road, and R. Tsucbl
va, a Japanese merchant. Today Mat
suzo Magal, Japanese consul general at
San Francisco, will arrive here to take
part in the entertainment of the officers
and men.
The chamber of commecre will have
charge of the entertainment planned
for the visitors for next Tuesday. A
reception committee, consisting of Wal
ter Raymond, acting president of the
chamber; George E. Rittinger and H.
Z. Osborne, visited the flagship yester
day and welcomed Admiral Yashiio
and the officers and men of the ships.
Tuesday afternoon a special car will
bring the officers of the cruisers to Los
Angeles. Here they will enter auto
mobiles and a ride about the city, to
Pasadena and through several orange
groves will follow.
_, _ .
ANTARCTIC TRIP PLANNED
BERLIN, Dec. I.Lieutenant W. F.
Pitcher of the general staff of the
army and leader of the projected Ger
man Antarctic expedition, says that
{175,000 has been contributed toward
the enterprise and that.he Is arranging
to sail next spring.
REWARD FOR PEARY URGED
WASHINGTON, Dec. President
Tart Is being urged dally to recom
mend to congress some favorable recog
nition of Captain Robert E. Peary of
the navy for his Polar discovery. Va
rious forms of reward have been sug
gested.
AMUSEMENTS
THE STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE.
Jo^%.' ■ LIONEL BARRYMORE i^^k '
$f '/,% MckEE RANKIN & CO. Jjp'llSk '
§ LIONEL White a playlet M^^^^Sl .
McitEE RANKIN & CO. \
Presenting -"rhc White Slaver," a playlet ■Bps! J?
[A '**(_? THAT MAKES YOU THINK, __W^|Hi^l
jtf-'^'■*•"§» together with eight other superb acts, in- GmmSffc}:''*: 'aW_V
Jt ' **^fir eluding that dainty star of vaudeville, __H _■__.
■■2a AUGUSTA GLOSE . _*__________________
And Moving Pictures of the Dethroning of King Manuel.
EVERY NIGHT—IOc. 850, BOc, 7oc. MATINEE 2:15 DAILY—IOc, 25c, 50c.
Lttma r.Anv Coraer Washington and Main SU.
UNA PARK I
NOW OPEN— Hungarian Han .1 Concerts twice dally; the Diving Venus;
Carousal; Hyman's V»u_«»lll« Theater (with Ladles' Orchestra of 7 pieces—four
acts of Vaudeville and two reels of Plottires). ».,_,,_
\TTR I ions Miniature Railway, Aerial Swing, Open Air Skating Rink, Hgure
Blent The Zoo, Shooting Gallery. ■ Temple of Palmistry, Refreshments. NO LIQUORS
SOLD ON THE GROUNDS. ADMISSION inc. -.'*. V
m , 11 i in f ' ' ——— "' ' ' . ""'
Purchase and Sale Real oa___»_cr Browns* m. »o_h ho*-- w-m
Irish Crochet Laces -L Off /9 V -_^_> --*
Prices 35c to $10 Yard at ... 4 via (/m**7S J > A_£-__T_W_^Z_r
EXTRA fine thread, hand-mad., Irish crochet laces, Jmm*"Vm?/£r*-<^mmr ££r <_-^'G_*'j_r _>^ <■> .
Including edge., Insertion., medallion., yoking* . —»*** ._pr^
roses, bands, beading, and button.. .lust tho correct A^OST J9_»lK# V_____\ \\__________\
things for trimming Waist.,,; Jabots; and Novelty «—"^ Wi-JAWJOC _*■____■ _HvU-W-_T
Neckwear, etc. Ilegular price. sr.c to I /J Off wnannran unr HrmT Ml
_tIQ per yard. Today, .pedal7v7 ■••■/4v»J \^ . lIOM-rrHrWO WBW HVMIII Pax. J
ALL MILLINERY HALF PRICE
i i|j^Sll Today, Second Day of the Most Wonderful
jlf|'&BB IL of Millinery Values in Our History
jd_W^r*^it '" 'W*- You Cant Afford to Miss Tnis Sa,e =
VM^^'.^^ All Trimmed Hats Half Original Price
! 0.53.75 Sir .$5.00 s_?, 00.57.50
\JJV- ' s?s°°slo.oo 0512.50 5r.517.50
rs3 wuiowette Ostrich Plumes $1.25 Y| $i2.so and $15 J [ Val. to $3 Fancy Feathers 95c
I COMK In black, white and practically I Imported French Hat I | m BBAUTIFUt, assortment .if Kanoy
I *_• every one of the leading new fall ami I i_.- A/ __ r\ I I A Feathers, Wings and Breast., etc., In nil
I winter .hades. Nothing gui so attractive I anapei Jkfj^ill I colors, worth up to »3. tlnre- QC
IIn Millinery Trimming at twice £1 35 I at ... . V V,*' VI I strlcted choice la this .ale at VJC .
I the money. Second floor ....<•»•*'"' . • J V ■_____________■_ ■*
y: Swell Untrimmed Hats HALF and Less g^ " ■ :jfF^\ 'S?
Value, to *$ In- I Value, to »S Un-,j Regular «5 In- I fiM ami *'° »""" I J? .^, t
;__«$1.001 __«.$--» I «$2.391 luu"!.? $3.75 rf^ „ A
Hats at.**«»'U I Hals at.**•«>» I Hat. ut **"«" I "»«» «•▼ Jp.
All Fur Millinery Exactly HALF Price . |S|»
woo i *i«<H> I sisoo I s-JO.oo ijso.oo iWMi_s^T~€S»S___d_l_?»
£$3.951;,^ .$s $61,^....5i01r.„; $is
Daylight Basement-New White Waist 7C r Jo_mr^Wm
Patterns Worth to $1.25. Today ...» *'*' Sv^J^
m ATFRIALS ar. Madras, Jacquards. Fancy Percales, Pernang. and Flax {imBsß2Jm*^^^£ s
M AFairic„ p" up in neat boxe. for Chri.tma. gift. t*_jSO_*»^
Value, to 0 Jje. Remnant, .o '..ioc| V^^^,».^"*;g.f*S_..9C L *'*v^ L
H»nnanVs"^tlngri^nel,yar,l ,V.c I k1»I. Cllnghi.ms & Ch-.11,. yd. »ej l^ .J^T rr TU )
WENDLING'S OWN WORDS
ARE USED AGAINST HIM
Prosecution Closes Case Against
Man Accused of Murder
of Alma Kellner
LOUISVILLE. Dec. 1.-"If I W"ed
the little girl, no one saw me but God,
and He can't come down and testify,
said Joseph Wendling when arrested in
San Francisco for the murder of Alma
Kellner, aged 8 years, according to tes
timony thief of Detectives Carney gave
at Wendllng's trial today.
The prosecution rested its case at the
end of the day. „: .
The words attributed to Wendling by
the Louisville . officer had previously
been testified to by Detective Sergeant
Thomas F. Burke of San Francisco,
who assisted in the capture of Wend-
Another witness who aroused great
interest was Mrs. Cora Munea, a mil
liner of Hume, Mo., to whom Wendling
paid court while sho was visiting rela
tives at Houston, Texas.
Mrs. Munea testified that Wendling
represented himself to be a rich
Frenchman, and showed her a wound
on his hand which he claimed to have
sustained during the Boer war.
Wendling displayed no emotion dur
ing the examination of the three
strongest witnesses against him.
The defense will offer Its opening
statement tomorrow, and testimony in
Wendllng's behalf is expected to occu
.py at least a day and a half.
FORMER BANKER ON TRIAL
FOR FALSIFYING RECORDS
Prominent Arizona Man Faces a
Dozen Federal Indictments
BISBEE. Ariz., Dec. What Is ex
pected to prove one of the most no
table trials in the history of the fed
eral court of Arizona opened today at
Tombstone, when the case of L. C.
Hanks of Douglas was called. Hanks,
one of the most prominent residents
of the smelter city, was former csahier
of the First National bank of Douglas.
He is under a dozen indictments
charging him with falsifying the rec
ords of the bank.
Edward Lanier, a juror in the case,
was given a severe reprimand and
dismissed by Judge Doan this morn
ing for. indiscreet remarks he is re
ported to have made concerning what
he intended doing In the case.
NICARAGUA NAMES DIPLOMAT
MANAGUA, Nic, Dec. I.—Dr. Sal
vadore Castrillo, who formerly looked
alter the Interests of the Estrada In
surgents in America, will return there
at Nicaraguan minister at Washing
ton. David Arellano, who was sent
to the American capital on a special
mission, will return home. A rumor
was current today that the cabinet
would resign and that General Mena
would become prime minister.
FAMOUS TOPSY IS DEAD
NEW HAVEN, Conn* 'Dee. I.— Mrs.
Julia Wyatt, famous in her day as
an actress and particularly in the part
of "Topsy" in "Uncle Tom's Cabin,"
... dead at her home here at the age
of 87 years.
■ AIVIUSEMENTS ;
B** l_i _E° A C if* t% THE. FOREMOST STOCK I
9L LMd W W company Of America I
MATINEES TOMORROW AND SUNDAY. |
, TONIGHT AND ALL THIS WEEK I
I LEWIS S. STONE and tho Belasco / I **"¥ T I .** T^"T_p C_''| ? I
theater company present Jules Eckert I 1 \ f^-* 1 JL JL-VV^ J
Goodman's powerful play, v^
COMMENCING NEXT MONDAY NIGHT
FIRST production by LEWIS 8. STONE and the Belasco company of William
Gillette's famous detective play,
SHERLOCK HOLMES
With Mr. Stone ln the role of the famous detective.
BEAT- NOW ON SALE. REGULAR BELASCO^RICES^ \
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER __\\T*3£k
LOS ANGHLE3 LEADING PLAY HOUSEOliver Morosco, Manager.
William Faversham -_==n
Supported by JULIE OCT and bis company In TOMORROW |
THE WORLD AND HIS WIFE
NIGHTS AND SATURDAY MATINEE 500 TO 12.00.
BEGINNING NEXT MONDAY NlGlV?! SEATS ON SALE TODAY.
First Time at Such Prices— to $1. Bargain Matinee Wednes
day, 25c, 50c, 75c. Regular Matinee Saturday
MRS. WIGGS $ CABBAGE PATCH
GREAT ALL-AMERICAN CAST—LIEBLER & CO., Managers.
The auditorium' "THEATER fc E. BEHYMER,
-li- AUJJ--U.K.UM BEAUTIFUL." MANAGER.
Only Chances Tonight — Mat. Tomorrow and Tomorrow Night
The Acme of Terpsichorean Art
(Mil Acme of Terpsichorean Art
I Anna Pavlowa
mm Mikail Mordkin
and the Imperial Russian Ballet.
Tonight N"_ia. at- "The Legend of Ayziade"
* Saturday* La a«°Tlrae GISELLE" Beautiful.
SEAT SALE NOW ON. GOOD -.EATS LEFT. PRICES: jI.OO, $1.50. >2.00. 13.60. 18.00.
Special! Grand Opening
Hotel Maryland Tennis Courts (Finest West of Chicago^ >-
PASADENA TENNIS CLUB
Tennis Tournament, Pasadena, Dec. 1, 2,3
EVENTS: GENTLEMEN'S OPEN .SINGLES.
LADIES' OPEN SINGLES.
GENTLEMEN'S INVITATION DOUBLES. . „„-„„.»
MATCH BETWEEN THOMAS C. BUNIJJ' AND MAURICE McLOUGnLI.-.
Single*, mornings at 9 o'clock. Doubles, afternoons at 2.
May Sutton. Florence Button and Mary Brown, some of the notable players.
Special service on Pacific Electric between Los Angeles and the Maryland during;
Tournament.
Special Tennis Luncheons and Dinners
Informal Tennis Dance Saturday evening. Maryland Music Room.
r-JTirrwiirirrfaiifrT— "-■l""f™i--iiin'-sn" hi-_ in "■■■ i mi iiiiiTmrrrnrinnTrl
j p RAND OPERA HOUSE "Ig^.^l^
I p£ RT c; I THE SEASON'S BIGGESI FIN HIT The office
1 Pr,KRW I_- J And his superb company present Frank ROY '
1 HARTMAN I 3__l*l. greatest musical comedy success, "-'1
| NEXT MEEK: Ham Bernard's NEARLY A HERO. Heals on sale this morning.
""ejßflßJ-aVnBJMBH New, Cozy, Absolutely Fireproof
J FSlliif'lflS] Matinees Daily, 2:30 -,
I W^ -fcTll l-Wm- J-Jftl Twice Nightly—7 and 9, .'
SS. -il MR Hfl 1 * tt! II 3.1 I'HICES lOC, '"' 30C.
|yW^. ||) rtjf^mS____B____B--l-sMM (I Silienk Troupe, .Sophia Tinker, Charles
I^J^n'al'rJlVfTX^ffl'SsSl-^ Burke & company, Andy McLeod, London
_________L___________________\ tjuarlel, Ulograph.
QROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Main st.. Near sixth.
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Maln st- *"■ suth'
LOS ANGELES' LEADING STOCK COMPANY.
I'resentlng for the first limn In Los An- r 1 l__i"^ "XT' /V C =
geles the thrilling drama of llfo on tim , I M « t_\ —^ . , =
plains, a romance of trigger, stirrup and . J_ ,____/ X __^ _->K_# ' ' "
Nights !6c. 00c. 75c. Matinees Saturday and Sunday, 10c. 2&c, IM
Next weak—"AN AMERICAN WIDOW." ■
I //ie _if __//•!?/ J7CSULLIVANBrCOnSIDin_:
I #tsr«_f MnU-ÜbLmJ vaudeville
1 ANOTHER GREAT. 8 ACT SHOW
I MATINEE EVERY DAY— 20c. .-Of. TWO SHOWS EVERY NIGHT.
»amT___w^_^_smm__w^____________________________^QL_^_\tm
t vrx*TiTr> irurATr. Main, Between Fifth and Sixth
LYMPIC TntiAlbr. Cool—Commodious—Comfortable
SSS THE FOLLIES OF 1911 .^{fc^Sg
. SHOWS TONIGHT. 7:45 and 9:15. Mat. Mon. Med., Sal., Sun.. 10., 2Ue, 28c.
LEVY'S CAFE CHANTANT .^"sTa^io^da.lT:
Tim MARIMBA BAND, from the Amazon; JACK HENDERSON, Comedy Singer;
POLK the Banjo King; THE COSMOPOLITAN TRIO, Orand Opera Artists. ..
Have Veil ' Reserved Your New Year's Table? A SWAGGER PROGRAM,
_ | _ ■ mm*. ' f. Under Mew Management.
B a *-. - Atmm. a-. +*j m r\Trt_m Hungarian Cooking. 7hhE
r%Z _-_ 1 TllCr I .__LI6 Rainier Boot on Draught. !-
X\ fc *-*'*'*'V''1' V-/ »»'*>■»■ |). O'LKABY & U. E. MOORE, I'HOTS.
1 r _, — Broadway. Near Second, .-' f*st'i-.

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