OCR Interpretation


The Hancock Jeffersonian. (Findlay, Ohio) 1857-1870, September 25, 1868, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042591/1868-09-25/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

mmr L.j.- U- ; -' - - - J i j " "B",J""" . ; "7. . J f :u..iMw.::1.:.M Ji.-..rfi ?YHilU?. HT lOIi OliV ...-'u,M.!i '.'.. ' .,.;,i..jij,,u: .UiiiUt
: . . i; jy'au...;.....:..,,..c-; .-.;..,wfi.;.L . ;, .; -; ;, , . .. ; ; .
E. G. DeWOLFE & CO., Proprietors.
UOTT
-rrrt-
vol. xy.-no. xvnr.
Let us nave Jtaitn tliat
!
I i-. ' I i . ..... ...... . .. ... i .. . . ..... i -j r n rp
itignt makes Might, and m
F1NDLAY, OHIO,
tnat taitn let usro me eM dare-fordo ourDntv as' we rniderstand it -Abkaham. Lincoln.
FRIDAY MOllNING.
( m, j - - 1 ;
SKPMttKir
. i .i .4
' : "
' w
r
TEEMS Two DoUar3,Per.lmmm.
5 tCwv.Gawh! New Qeedsl
J JL. JLi X IE R Y
Dress - Makiig: !
1 AAf (rcLt Infoi her friends that she! has
TV reoelTad ber - i
SPRINO AITDiSUMMSS STOCK CP
: Mli.HNEIiy goods
i ?sto "&.k"" 10 orter all kind ,f
1 HATS mad BOS3IETK. . .....j. .3
- : TT""" ,e". ""-raw and drvss-
, . -.-w v.oi u. n.-n.-irnsr A
' rfJc V .A, 6i -0"i n door north
I
m vmuuillBUira, m.
Pr8 JTaa. A. C. Linos
& A. PARKER
Esep eahand at ail times larje ai4oljtioi
of
.;.-- - ' HIOUEDING, j
r;"." " PICKETS,
OAK,
ASH,
jCAMORE .
.AND ' - !- j
1 COTTONWOOj)
(v; P K.8 S f D ; S 1 DING
yiLkTE : ND; SHINGLES,
; Which Uey fciler reasonably.
a ' '
t BucHes -Patent Lnmber
Iha bast made-. Is weed r ds, and with it w
1 aaason, pernouy, zs.ooo feet per weoK.
Greea Lam ber seasoned and worked on rea
- aashle tennaj : j
XftaWm" Piaaing Done , Promptly
inninE anniMnz in nip hm . .ri
mniea to call a our yard, west of the Pres;
BjMraar (,-narou.
.-J.4 A.PARKEB.
rltao4Tft.
.$10,000 Guarantee j
- ' ' Excels all other Lead. ' ;
1st or its -Uniivafed Whiteness.
-:-2(Lor4t8 FnequaledDurahility.
: 3d or its Unsurpassed Cover-
- ing Property, .
Lastly, for its ECONOMY.
MT It C0ST8 LBrig to Paint with Buck
Lead than anr other White Lend jruu.t.
The same weight covers MOKE kuKKaUR,
more DURA ULE and makes Whiter Wo:k. i
DUCK LEAD
Is the Cb.eapest& Uest
10,000 Guarantee.
BUG K ZINC
; - Eicels all other Zinrs,
1st.' For its Unequaled Durability.
2d,'For its tJcrivalied Whiteness.
3rd.1 For Tte tTiisurpassed Cover:l
- '.in Property, . . .. -
Lastly, for iUGBK AT ECONOMT, being the
Cbaiest. Baadsomess' and most Durable
White Paint in Ue WorM.
r : BUY ONLY
BtJCK LEAD
.. ... .,, AND : '
' BUCK ZINC, :
Try it and Ve 'convinced. '
lure-s. . . "
FRENCH, RICHARDS & CO., ,
H. W,fnierffen4 slid rS.rkct strets.
:lliJriT4'lrtJfKLMift-'-' "
for sale. Wholesale and Bolail by
U Mr HUBERT CO.
First Door North of Court House,
DBCG3; XAJllTS, J5RUSHES,
apr9oot7.6m FINDLAV,0.
...'rl-'i
if C li a fci
4 wfi v
A. & B. F. Kimmoas &,Co.
A RR JD8B. REnEIVINC, A LAUOE AI)IU
L21b t fhetr aeic ff Kotxht. and vC.;j
thefcpeemiaraeonf baildent An4 macban-3
lMtolhalrpaiaalo U I a 1 . 4
nuf TrimmiugM ami
We bay m second olass foods tn blow '
oa cheap "pHaes, but soil work of tha best
taaafaetareraat a living profit.
.. ...'...:-- .
CajIDdetoux prices of .
Iron,"Nails,Sash,G lass, Tulty, Doors,
Wood work? Hubs,; Rriokses, cl-
loes, Horse anil Hand Rakes,
' t. ". Rubber and .Leather
!. " Bel ing, Saddlery 'r .
i r Goods, Gun . ' r . ..
Trimmings, Median Les' Tools,- Saws,
files, .Forks, hhovels, IJoes,
.1 Scykwts,. Chains, Pnmps,'- - -.
Pocke and Table Cut--ti
- lery.Plaed Goods,
i"'-4 Revolvers, &c .
.... .v.,s, .'
CSlatt,. all. sizes cut to or
!.,- ' dcr-
Bnekeye Kowers and Reapers,
-Baektye Reapers, -
"' Pittsburgh. Steel Plows,
'.,-... Parker's Patent Horse
;r:";:::::Bj f
Ib feert. aTarythinj kept Jn a rtt-ela
Barawara stora. , ....
At the Lovvest Cash Trices,
Oall aa4 aaa as b.fora bnyinlt.
r - i M. j, B. I". SU1M0H8 4, 0
OT.Siae4 start
i
Pis
Snd
'
any
and
S-Wtl
a
at
AT
I am
35
!
aitrt
Are
best
and
&
set-n.
Of
iub
sle
tain
f 2 an cock County
or'
osbom & BAiajyiaL
Cor. Main and SendcRky Ste.,
We will pa oash for'
Hides, . . j-ttr, -
Dried
Apples,
Cloxcr,
And
Timothy
Seed,
Lard, .
Tallow,
Feathers,
Beans, j
Rags, Anaflklads'. .K 11
P.( TT NT 1 V lTTMTir
l,w ui'i "1 1 liUUU Lth.
liSKKT SCOW
-TnEAV FIEif
SCHWARTZ & KUNZ,
Dealers In
GEOCERLES & PROVISION
TtWrt dn
orsmmthof W.ff.ft J. J: : Wh.:i.
ft Co.'store,i2!xiB treat. Kunfl.v.
PRODUCE
mm
have on bafatjan far, saia caoic, PmITr.
as Pifitt S:t Vi.h-..irJ-
.7 . ' .". lar, nams, o.
C-ub paid for Butter and f'.n
unine and nn r our atnney. Baar29n4
V f i IT
BAILEY, FARRlLF&eo:
mm rim seese
BAR LEAD MANUFACTURERS,
Lead.TfHn Wri.' rihber,"B
Gau gea. i t !e H P-i s I f,
rtiAm I'umt'R. Krm
'lISs,'-'
' add
i'liuips and Force
l'unijis.
And every description of goods for
WATIiK, HAS X, STIi.lITJ
KO. 1U7 EHITURU.L'VtT, - 1
for a Price List. PITTsMJIU:.
Dealers often recommend otlier bitters
TTITHH 1iii... I
ini-T nave noi Kubact'i .w. I
tojaidion the atllicled against i.ur-li.. I
of tiiem;
; buy Kohack's tilnmach Hitters
none other, if you wouid combat disease
atlOCvKKlllllj-,
iiv Frey A Uf lux:,.!. ninaiAv
t 5
- . .
" -a ' - -.' a I -
osu ax ost:
I how offer my entire Stock of ws
READY-MADE CL0TIILG
II ATS-Att D'C A VS,
. t ; ) -'j il
CLOTHS,
Ait
CASSIMERES,
FU RN1S mxG ' ' 6 dODS,
COST. AMI LESS THAU COST
For the ieilCO days'.'
'1
a 6 5 U U 11
bouncto close out my entire slock of
gooos. ,;,(! -J,'
TO 50 ii:h
by bnyins of me.
COME RIGHT AWAY
our AUck. U LLingr pretty we !l broken.
r .- a
The First Comiiisr
A 1 i
ii.
win have the
BEST ASSOi.
If you want X buy, stop and a; k our prices
we will convince you thai what we say
nrue. .
i L 2 M'
CHAKME II 1.1
i Bo. p Saiu tiiree
Ai( J. ) t
epllif.
DRAIN .TILE !
FOSTORIA, OUIO,
now mttnufacturmg DHAIN TILE of the
quality andol a shape whereby a per
leot joint may be secured. Ordeia solicited
prumpllv tilled. Address
L.KW1M JS BliAi'.MiU, rooinna, u.
Orders may be left at EuruKAirK
Cour's, where samples may be
jull7nn9-fy
sedentary habits who reiuire a rentle
purgative will bnd Uoback's lilood Fills just
ujcuiuniB mey want; tney are perleutly
and can be taken at all times: thev con
uo mercury ur mineral poison, but are
purely vngBiauio.
Sold by r'rey A EtUnger, Findlay, O.
I
be-J''M
.
If
Is
1
Will
and
J-
.rr-.nli
of
f?
ANOTHER EXHIBITION
OF
HARDWARE
Its A it r.-. :
Farmers Exchange
T. K. WILLIAMS
i Hitvlng purchased the stock of Hardvare
rormerly owned by Busnon wunaniR win
continue the business at the old Ktand. Where
he ia now making ninny arid. tint a t the
fttocKvjintj ass arfatwry cMiavil his atfflk
i pari oi
Ml.
GLASS,
PUTTY,
SASH,
CHAINS,
SPOKES
HUBS, BENT-WOUK, SADDLERY
iv i J . V 1? il HARDWARE
W jttJ,v-fc TAELE
AND
POCKET
CUTLERY.
tc, kc, &c,
I would incite Caroentera and buildnrs t
call and examine my stock of Tools and huild.
ine materials, which I am bound U sell at
Dfttvim prices. i
Farmers
! would call the attention vt Farmers to
my stocK of Farming Implements, consisting
oiaieei a-ioJi, cast r'lows.Uorn Plows. I'luw
WlnKs,
CuIUvato.s, Patent bulkr Uakes. Ke-
volvme Horse Rates. Hcvthea and hnaths.
"rind Stones, spade. Hoes, Ac, all of wliicb
purpose selllne at the lowest possible rates.
dive me a call, and ranaaibor the place, one
"'""""a ot rrey a HMiger s urug btore
WILLIAMS
IIAIS'COCK COUIVTYi
P L A H I FJ ft .M. I LL!
nC;r t'Tr ifr
,1 T .?
RCO.
West Crawford Street,
FIXDLAY, OHIO.
Return their acknowledgements to their
many customers, and wouid state that they
in neuer soaps to luruisn buuuers witn,
SASH, DOORS,
I
. BLINDS, L
vmui
PINE AVO ASH SHINGLES, &C-i
Sfanulatured from good lumber, than ever
beiore.
f 1 lAWKtNCi OF PLANISQ
Done on short notice. Our machinery is
mostly new and of the most improved kindj
or Unit Of Lnmber.
" " "J "'"J
- I
S E t7. It.
t. a. PISREF! Co.
Do You Want to
' x
Bv Savins It ?
11 s
you do call at the
Pittstmrff Glass
Store
No. H Main Street, Findlay,
Inr nothing else than to got well posted in
Low Prices.
Bemcmbartbal ear catfifci -e all warran
tee! andVr,rotlTrti(r'as re'presenled, the
money will be refunded.
5mall lofitand .Quick Returns,"
the only certain way to do a succesHfu
business. and honest dealing 'such as Cll AS
BirYdoNV cautious system oi the " Nimblo
nixpense" is the only riht one. The laws ol
prudence must alwars be respected, an tic
miHlakable ol which is the advantage Uryson
eciysJbv W
Practical, KjiowIciIsc
TillfeU
hVnss'BntiineM.
Table-waro'ot
Lead
.tic, - lass,
Table-ware of Lime
" Glass,
Bat-Room WarflL Ldokiia: Glasses,
imps.
Brackets, Reflectors, &c.
oiititiV ?Ierclianl,
do well to caU and examine slock and
pnoes.. r '.l i
win, l!amt an(f BolarChimneys and fine
Oil. kent en hand: Curtain Pins, plain
err raved, all sizes: .Vnlenuid Ulass
ri'lifcia Ware. Window Ulasa ot all sizes, etc.
ITIotto-- Cheap as tlic
wvlnn24.tr
OHARI.ra PRYSOV.
AKD,
Aw.'fiTACTlHOUSBr G1TO. A.G1
GLICK
BlifilSliKl
Sprung Stock
JU3T RECEIVED AT
K.S.
OS
,1.r; r'i f. ..
i'""118 I'V8Vl rauersou s.
TT HAS oen tKaKht.br. many that the
Knot ttad t hna Buliaeliswas overdone in
Fitil.v- J'bis akieaeat tstake. True, a
KTeat maji persons an engaged in in. imue
inclnfling Jaercnanis, eic.. uui now many oi
theitf ,knOW anyminn aooui ino uiuerein
r Leather, or are capable f dis
criminating between a good and a poor job
work. The Arm of K. B. BaKEH A Co., Is
composed of thorough
PRACTICAL WORKMEN
u. . hr, know iust what they are doine,
consequently they can be relied upon by
the public, tney nav. jubi upu - -i"""
did stock ot .
Boots, Shoes, Uait
crs, Slippers, fcc.,
and Invite all to
COME AKD SEE THEM.
They keep their own manufacture on hand
BAKErYk
Calfl anl leave your Pleas
ure. K. S. BAKER 4 CO.
In
pled
i
IU
and
iambs
It!
and
e
lio.
Odd
and
I
!
!
i
'
I
'
I
;
I
!
e
to
I
the
I
1
,
t. ti i.. ii v "
a r it
1VM. CiltllUJEX, .
Attorney at Law,
Office over Fwing ft Redick's Phoe Btore'
Min staset..ieiadiaytWk janlOnoSl.ly
A
LAW CAI1D
WALKER,
TTT chf irhUe to JlraortPb and iuy
Y T he found at the Old Otlice, of Mun,
gen ft Walker on Main street.
U. it. WALK Kit,
tw9tr. Findlay. Obio...
H. A. LEASE,
T
ATTORNEY AT LAW
PROMPT attention paid to all business en
trusted to his care.
Office over PostcOics, Bowling Green, O.
itilt-itlnnlllF- . r.i
julySlnolltf.
t... u.. ,.., mill j.nJ 1
KNKT BSOWN. J. P. BtTaCKT. A. W. FHKOKSICr.
B
rou rN,ituKKi:TT & i Rt:i)t:Ki
Altarncy.1 mt Law,
Will .vttftDd to all btuineea enirusied to their
OFFICE:
"oer Gt ay't Drug SUnre, ojipotUt Court Houit-
K1NDLAY, OHIO,
a9-Part!onlar attention eiven to Collae-
4ioa; Faracloaaras f Mortra, PBrtitinfhj
t lands, iiiMrV Vi aud. Administration mat
ers Jan. 24. Kft
KZSA BSOWM. JA8. A. BOFS.
LAW 0FEICE.
Havine formed a co-nartnershin.
will
promptly rttei.d to all business, in and out at
Utiurts, reqmrine the services of an attori
lev, andt tho oollnction of all claims
teamst llie Govornnipnt. or otherwise,
vwee over -nesir-vintTXers," r'uidlay, U."
AUi.il, 113-Ii
II. IS. ISEAIEDSLEY,
Attorney at Law and
Claim A cpnt
TtttiiSstll'ioi iJtaiend RlrU,
T and attend promptlr to business en.
trusted to his care. i
As Justice of the Peace will attend to
oonvevancine and taking Depositions.
Office Room Ko. I, Melodeon Building,
rinuiav.t,. iiineil.l.
ATTORI'Y AT LAW
AND
IlLJCLIHaiN.BAiiiiCRUP-ICY
lias superior facilities for conduoiiue cases
Bankruptcy, in a speedy and proper me
ner. Peiitions may be Died WITHOUT PAY-
I.o Iters of inquiry promptly answered.
IAS. OE-.TKHI.IK, M. D. W. Jl. nSTWILfcS, M. .
OIISTKKI.I.V V l)LTVILi:i:,
Somspathic Physicians & Surgeons.
.OFFKIE AJiDiRESlttENCfi.
JppoHite the Goit Iloae. marlfl-Iy
Drs. liliitrikiii X. .llillcr.
physicians & Surgeons,
FIND LAY, OHIO.
T OFFICE In the wm former!? occni
by Dr. V. W. Entnkin.
bitrgiaal arid i iironio gMsasxirsinnj; to oa
njt j(i-ir,tvikm,jajii m.d Alum isti.o fftiiS,
'c?oiitTmiay Nairn iaiuraays irum luo citcK
m. I" a o CIccK p. m.
Ilr Miller can l.e consulted on Tuesdavs
Fridays from 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock
iUiMM airl(lno47.1y
srirrn, u. p. akson uvuu, m. i.
H. D. BALLlKn, M. D.
ledicino Vs Surgery,
Will pp n-plly attend to ail cn.
Officb Over Vref ATttlncor's lrn Store.
I'KTKR KBWI.KK. S. U. BSLKIKU.
K .S K f K II S HOT K Ii,
Cmntr of Pitt and t font Mrrrtx,
FKKMOXT, OIIH
831'Cfl vI3nI4 IV.
SjdcfaU u House,
Main and Front Streets,
D. D. McCAIIAN, Proprietor.
This house has rocently been repaired
newly furnished. Every attention will
paid to tan. eointon. l uia irav.iiiiff pun-
apr!7no4H
i. o. o. r.
Golden Rule Encampment Bov 02.
pkiii , v tuirt s
tutil mnntines on the second and fourth
Fridavs, C each month, 7 o'ch-ck, 1VM., In
Fellows Uall.
11. i: iii.r r.., j. i .
A.J.SiiACKiJ:fTne, :
HANCOCK BANK,
iikm.'Kkfok's clock, main sr..
F I N D Li 1- OHVO
KKI.I-S PUAFTS ON'
E5GLAHD, IRELAND, GERMANY
all Princtal.Clies of Rnrojie, n sums
to suit, nun do a
fiiciicral
ISaiikintr IShsIiiohm.
CKONINUEIt, ;A;K II CO.
nr.4-ly.
or nNrnr.AY. omo.
(Authorized Capital, - - fKKMMKM
Daaiimalad Dfxoitor rnn. Financial Aeent
ol llie-U.1. vKncot umennnu ieposii ana
Exchange. Interest paid on bipedal Deposits
Smkuig JIourt0 to It o'clock A. M.t and 1 lo
4 o clocK 1. HI.
DIRECTtntS
E.r.JovKS. W. H. Wdkilkr, HkkbtBrowm
Isaac Davis. J. ii.wii.sok.
Km Bansir.K Ilouse in Crook: House Block
B.P.JOHKS, Prefc . L
notiW 1 4 W. fV.Tf'Lt, taslfle'r.
Schwab & Wheeler,
flew tlolliing, ISoot.4. Miocs,
HafM ami Cap.
You will save money by pnrchasinc your
Goods of aprll bUHW AH iiftiu.K.ii:
J. n. KIBLER,
ARCADIA, HANCOCK CO., OHIO,
HAWACMSBJl or JH
Reaction Pine I'uiiip
Ail orders, either verbal or written, will
promptly filled. .All Lumps warranted
rive satistacllou. TOfors 'to the public
ho havo had his pumps in use for a number
Ofyea'8. juiyjinoiimu
&eatMarket
FRED. KltGi'1
ffk ESPECTF'uLLY announces that he '
V preparedto furnish all kinds ot meat at
old stand. Us"-Will pky the highest
aarket price for
ftiose having good beef va'lle should brin
litem aior.g. eauu. KAldj
Mov. J. liM6vl3n24tr.
(Pu,t .pi.Sjiweibi E&oainetj
or Building Purposes, &c,
F R E D R VPJii fctAflr B t
TIFFIX, O.
Orders solicited. Prices as low as else-
vbere. For further usrticuUrs enquire at
Larkin's Marble shop, wher, alio4 orders
mar aa ten. -J
'
.
1
'
-
r
n
Add
"
auu
,
njr-liai.riA
the.
n
ten
30,
t
the
of
be
1
I
!
.
i
l'titliKlied Evcrj- I:i-iljty,
OFFICK;
Saiiiasaj St., First Door East of Post Office
G. DE WOLFE, Editor,
r tt- rrrt :
TERMS-42 00 Per Annum in Advance.
For the Jeffersonian.
FINANCE.
GOVERNMENT DEBT.
.Tho Eepublican party ia responsi
bio for tbAi creation of the National
debt, and they do not only excuse
they t justify its creation,, on the
ground that without spending the
jmonry thuy (ItdTretieTiron wduHLave
been, encueaeful. i The debt is larger
than it would have been had we been
tiDae,.but the party justifioa its de
paxtatej therefron. .on the ground
that it was utterly' impracticable to
pioearegold cnouglito -carry- crri the
war a single year, and therefore if
they paid the soldier at all 'lt must
bo Jin currency other than gold.
Their choice of greenbacks was wise,
fotheif t iue.,created ..a debt on
which interest was not paid. They
were obliged to make them legal
tender, so that the soldier could pay
his tlcbts wfln them
Tha debt creatail nn thin ovafsm
l - ! . i . . '
rata we think it was as good as bu
man wisdom ever invented in such
emergency,), was, on the
1st April, 155, t2,JCG,935,077
In addition, there were claims on
account of the war, which have since
been allowed and paid, np to June
30, 1SC8, as follows:
Pay of army, including subsist
ence and medicine, 4c, up to
Jane 30, 1HG6, e94.S4fi.67B
Pay of Navr,nptoJun30 !a6t, T6,3r,773
Bounties to soldiers, ap to June .
30, IflK.' 43 ISIAM
renNinns to soldiers, up to June
C2 S2S.9SS
State war expenses reimbursed. 12,330,It
Claims of loyal men lor losses, ,
fca,oiMtcialf the-war, 1I.MI.300
reonmen uureau, from April
f . Imcs to June 3o. IAcs. Kcnrmn
Prize money, expenses of recon-
Btrucuon. cemeteries, Ac, 4,C42,099
Total debt-, as It would" now
viand tut for parmuuts niado
since Mil I. 2.247;33.32i
hi ma fguci aeoi as it
stood JuneJ; 18i8, - - 2,5ll,O0O,OO
Leaves for amount actually paid
In three and one fourth rears, 77fi,7S3,Jl
to these pavmenU for bonds
advanced to the I'acino K. II.. ifi.Ooe 00ft
interest pata from April
e,-fTW; - 458.W.8S3
Total payments on aocount of
aeui iu mrto ana oue-fourtU
years, . 1.241.21S.212
Since June 30, 18GS ' ih ALiafca
....
iy,yyu,yy.vurru.i;y , uu a lurtnar
advance of bonds has been made to
Pacific Railroad, and now the
debt stands on' these accounts about
$$,000,000 larger than June 30. 'G8,
round numbers, the debt is about
S'J,50,000,000 an enormous debt,
truly 1 But it is gratifying to note
under . such revenue laws as
those of 18G6, wc could pay it in
of
INCOMEOF THE NATION.
Since April 1st, 186."). np to June
1SCH, the following .as been the
income of the nation:
From fiuKUim, , - '
. C4R,97.R4S
From Internal Revenue...
rom aniBceflanBOiis sourets,
such arf direct .taxes, pu U&
lands, sals ot stores, and (re
nt ratu on gold,- . - --1 .-
i70,T43,769
Totsl incoma lor three and one- '
loarln years, .- -. I,a40,oo5!ra
Tlio internal revenut receipts for
year ending June SO, 18GG, was
near thece hundred anl eleven mil
lions, for the -year ending June0,
lbfjS, it was only one hundred and
ninety-three'millionsT
This was caused by Uie reduction
.income tax, so.thafcvcry few. far
mers, or persons in middling circum.
slancesliay anv incomi-tax. and by
droppi'rfg'thb' 'tax' 6n''iist manufac
tures. . . i . .ij.t:ti
This reduction was justified, for
under the laws of 1865 -we should
have got money to pay bonds faster
than they will mature, and it would
folly to continue oppressive tax
laws to gratify 'national vanity, or
for any other purpose than to main
tain national economy and good
faith. .
a
EXPENDITURES.
We have come to that part of the
financo administration which tests the
honesty and economy of the Repub
lioanf'pftTty.- Any party ' f n power
can make debts and levy taxes ifin
addition,- the Republican party can
be, and have been, frugal and eco
nomical, they have fair claims t
further trust . ; ; .1
TbWltisoW'e'waii Tor'lhree aiiif
onnourth veara as ws aava
soea. . . SU10.05.W9S
WMh this ainnev ther paid debts
-as shown above, 7iO,3J,3J-j
They paid Interest on me pun-
Thar advanced to the Pacific
Kallroad, - zo.uw.w
:t
Total payments, ' " $l Jj3,5ia,S12
This subtracted front the in-
come, leaves, 193,840,371
for the ordinary expenses of the
Government for four and one-fourth
years, being not quite ' ninety two
millions a year. These ordinary ex
penses, embrace all salaries to inter
nal revenue officers, as well as very
large-expenditures lorrrver and-har-
bor improvement, and for Indian
wars, and all other army' expenses
since June 30. 1S66. And it must
........... ...
bo remembered that the expenses'are
shown iu currency, not gold. ..
James Buchanan's, administration
covered .a population some millions
smaller, we had a smaller army, made
less improvements, and wero less
vexed with Indian wars; yet the year
ly expenses of his administration in
gold,' was 870,000,000,' which is
equivalent 'in our currency to 8 107,-
000,000. -
When we consider the host of of
ficers of internal revenue that now
have to be paid,' arid which were un
known eight years ago',' 'it 'Is 'gratify
ing to know that a Republican Con
gress has got 'along with such limited
expenditures," 'arid in ' spite ' of ; the
frauds perpetrated "by, 'and under the
coiner of a corrupt Executive."
Our expenses,' reduced to' gold,
would bew less than . 860,000,000
year, or ten millions less than under
Buchanan' b administration."' In this
view; can Democracy complain of our
housekeeping? ' I think notl '
EXPENDITURES. FUTURE POLICY.
' The Republican party desires to
improve the credit of tho Govern
ment by honestly paying dues as
they maturo, and funding the debt at
about four per cent' as Boon as prac
ticable. This may be done, we know,
for within' the current quarter Cana
da issued a four per cent, bond to the
amount of about twenty millions, and
sold it all to the Rothchilds for five
per cent, above par. This is because
business' men know that Canada will
never, repudiate. So British three
per cent, stocks sell at 94 1 per cent,
for British faith will endure while
her rocks rise above the sea. Mean
while we proud Republicans of Amer
icap because we are under jtho iijle
of the people, and because capital
ists of the world say men' are inca
pable qf self-government. are offer
ing our six per cent bonds, and can
get but seventy-one cents on the dol
lar for them. " This is not the fault
of the Republican party,' for , they
have never talked repudiation. ; It is
chargeable in a large .part;.oa the
Democratic party, who want to make
our bonds worthless by issuing a
thousand millions of greenbacks, and
forcing 'them, or nothing, on the
bond - holders ; ' and. what is not
chargeable .to the Democratic mob
spirit Is chargeable to ian over eati
mata of the power of that mob over
our politics.. 'Every man whose heart
beats for the "honor ofhis country
character and manliness in the Dem
ocratic masses to sustain a policy
which disgraces the nation, and
shames the very name of a republic.
As sure as there ia honor in a free
people, eo sure will our country
throw aside the vile politicians who
tamper with our faith, and so surely
will the time come when the world's
capitalists will believe that the bond
a republic- is as good as that of a
monarchy. " Hitherto we have' had
proud record. We' have' not as a
nation shrank from the payment of
the last cent, and for! all time to
come, we shall keep our record so.
The villainy of a corrupt party may
make it more dilllcult lo do this, but
the body. of the people will sustain
the nation's credit. '
The Springfield ItspuNimn says:
"The gossips are right at last in mak
ing a matrimonial - connection for
Speaker. Colfax.- He " engaged' to
Miss Nellie Wade, a niece of Senator
Wade of Ohio, and one of the fami
ly party that accompanied the Speak
er on bis - late ;trip to the Rocky
Mountains. She is a sweet, sensible
acqompl.iBhed Jady . of 30 years, an
Ohio farmer's daughter, quite worthy
the place she has won in the heart of
Uie seconi man .in puoim um
nation, and of the position I by his
side in home and .' in society she. is
destined soon to take. Her father,
the brother of the Ohio Senator, died
several vears asro. and she spent part
of a Winter, in Washington wiin ner
uncle two years since, when .the ac
quaintance. began with Mr. Colfax
and his family, which has ripened
into this interesting relationship, so
pleasant for all the Speaker's friends
to know, and so promising to his
happiness for the future. I lie uocKy
Mountains 'whispered' the sweet se
cret to the world, and congratula
tions- are echoed back from all quar
ters to both parties!" Mr. Bowles
was of Speaker Colfax's party in his
recent trip to the Mountains.
"I see the Republicans are trying
tododge "the financial issue," wrote
Gov. Seymour to - Mr. Ingcrsoll,
"and sink the election- into a "mere
personal contest. Our papers must
not -allow this. They must push
the debt and- taxation upon public
attention." Well, the' Democrats
have begun the pushing process, and ,
a pretty fist they are making of it
The Massachusetts State Convention
unanimously , resolves that "the De
mocracy of Massachusetts, now as in
the oast, arc true to their "old faith
in Hard money. iue iew a ora.
Convention,- on .' the contrary, puts
itself squarely on record as in a fa
vor of irredeemable paper." Where
udou The . World pooh-poohs ' the
whole question, uiiuks "aeos anu
taxation'' not of much consequence,
and recognizes no issue' but Recon
struction. ""Let the poor cat "alone."
Neva York TYioune. '
End or Eakth. The first day of
October next has been decided on by
the Second Adventists, lately as
sembled at Janes vile, Wisconsin, for
the ending of earthly things.
For the Jeffersonian.
TAXES AND TAXATION.
THE STATE OF OHIO AND
HANCOCK COUNTY.
Republicanism and Democracy.
i It is a significant fact that all our
Democratic speakers persistently
ignore the great and really only issue
of the campaign, to wit-: Reconstruc
tion. They never refer to Blair's
"Broadkead" letter, or the speech of
Wade Hampton whereia he unwiting
ly gave us . the secret history of the
New York, Convention. ...They talk
pnly, In order to blind . their hearers,
of taxation, and say the Republicans
are afraid to meet the issue on finance,
and this, too, in the face of the fact
that the Republican Central Commit
tee, of Hancock, county, have chal
Ienged them: to a joint discussion, a
challenge they have refused to accept
They say. that the people of Hancock
county are oppressively . and enor
mously taxed. This is true. They
also 'say'1 that' the" 'amount'' of taxes
collected in Hancock county for the
General Gjovernnicnt under the Unit
ed States Revenue laws la scarcely
sufficient to pay the few hundred
dollars' salary paid to the Revenue
officers. This, too. is true. But it
proves, if anything, that the people
of Hancock county, with all their
wealth, do not pay as much tax to
the United States as will pay the pal
try few hundreds necessary to pay
our Collector and Assessor. Where,
then, does the enormous amount of
taxes paid by eur people go, and who
is responsible - for' these immense
sums so oppressively levied upon our
people ? -: This question we propose
to answer. - -'
It will be admitted by all, that the
Bepublican party is responsible for
all the taxes levied upon, and paid by
our county, - for - State purposed. It
will be equally admitted by all, that
the Democratic party is responsible
for all the taxes assessed upon, and
paid by our people for Couuty pur
poses as they have controlled the
county from' time immemorial. In
order to avoid repetition of authori
ties, I cite my 'readers and the tax
payers of Hancock county,' to the
following authorities and beg them
to get them' at the office of the Clerk
of the Court, and read and - examine
for , themselves, to-wit!- Executive
Documents of 1855, report of Wm.
Medill, Governor of Ohio, .pages GO
and 64 ; also, report of the State
Auditor of Ohio, for 1866, pages 53,
r6 and 60 ; ' also, report of Auditor.
it
the
the
up
the
the
ty
as
of State, for. 1807, pages 30, 32 and
36 ; also, Hancock Courier, of Oct
31, 1807.
From these official records, we find
that in 1SI5, upon a total valuation
of the taxable property of Hancock
county, of five and a half millions,
the eounty paid a total State lax of
17,77i36:. . In 1866, upon a total
valuation of over - seven and a half
million ' of dollars,' we ' find a total
State tax' of 6,58l5: In 1867,
upon a valuation of aeven and a half
millions, we. find a total State tax of
826,213.19.
Thus we see that our State taxes
trary, are being slowly diminished
year by year. This is ' the "result of
Republican rule, and this, too, not
withstanding the immense burden
thrown upon them, by the increased
expenditure caused by the Democrat
ic rebellion. But, let us examine
this State; tax. It. i-made up of
three items, to-wit i The Sinking
Fund, the School Fund, and the Gen
eral Revenue for the support of the
State Government, Legislature, Char
itable Institutions, fcc The levy
for the Sinking Fund .is' made pur
suant to on express provision of the
Constitutlan of the State, for the
liquidation of the State debt. The
debt is of long standing, created un
der former Democratic rule. The
Constitution was framed by a Demo
cratic Constitutional Convention, and
adopted by the people of the State
when the Democratic party were in
the ascendancy. The levy is obliga
tory and fixed no difference what
party is in power. The county is
taxed for "this fund about $9,000.00,
and for this the Republican party, is
clearly not responsible. Hancock
county is taxed for the School Fund
19,747.00 ; but, upon tho redistribu
tion of the fund we get over $13,000,
or over $4,000. more than we pay,
and for this, fund, which any party
in power must levy, the Republican
party cannot be said to be responsi
hie. ; Of the $26,243, therefore, ot
State taxes, there yet remains but the
third sum paid by our county, viz
$7,498 paid by us to. the" General
Fund, for support of the Slate Gov.
ernmenf, and for this small sum only
is the Republican party in Ohio real
ly responsible.
Let us now look at Democratic
rule in Hancock county. Upon the
valuation 1 above given, the taxes
levied in this county ior county and
local purposes were as follows: In
1855, the amount was 32,G7 1.98.
In 1866, it increased to $108,439.22
and in ISG7, it again increased to the)
enormous sum of $128,871.11. Of
these sum's the county taxes, proper,
were, in 1855, about 9,301,.00. In
I860, over 840,589,00, and ia 18C7,
over $62,417.00. ... This shows a reck
lessness and extravagance in. the ad
ministration by. the Democratic par
ty of the allairs of the county that
Is amazing. Tet, astounding- as all
this is, it - is surpassed if . such a
thing be possible by another fact :
The County Expense Fund, is the
fund levied for running the' Count'
Government. " In 1S5.", the amount
levied for . this fund, was 5,553X6.1
In 1866, it had increased to 17,y00.-
32; and in' 1867, to the cnoraou3
sum of 33,741.24. Where has al
una money gone, lirore are in
Ohio eighty-eight counties. Hancock
ia less than an average county in
wealth, territory, and population.
There should be at least sixty coun
ties in the State. whose county cxpen
sea should be. greater tban those of
Hancock ; yet, amazing as -it may
seem, in 1866, there were but twelve
counties in the State whoso county
expense fund was as great as ours ;
and in 1867, there were but five
counties whose expenses were as
great as ours. ' . .
, Tax-payers of Hancock county
I
I
hat think you of this? What say
you to Democratic rule ? Think ot
! What is your remedy ? What
will you do ? The above statements
are hard to , believe ! . Are you in
credulous ? Then get the bocks, of
ficial reports, and authorities, I have
cited above, and examine for your
selves. , .... i
How long will you submit to this
reckless extravagance;. to. this utt;r
disregard for, your interests, and fo
economy ? How long .will, you sub
mit thus to . be plundered ? Look at
repeated defalcations of, your
Democratic office-holders I Lcok at
unwarranted, useless and illegal
expenditures and allowances! Con
sider all these things welL Tell
them to your neighbors and friends;
talk them over "together ; c-xaiaine
authorities r investigate pake,
your minds, and. then act; tact
boldly, firmly, unitedly,, and. on. the
second Tuesday pf October, redeem
county from such .misrule ; place
candidates of the Bepublican par
in the offices now so unworthily
filled, and we will venture the asser
tion that upon an investigation of
fifteen pird.records for Jtheast
will be unearthed and made publir
will astonish alt. . '.
id
for
so
TAX—PAYER.
PRIVATE LETTER FROM GENERAL
GRANT TO HIS FATHER.
The following letter has been
placed in our hands by a gentleman
who famishes it from a collection of
General Grant. . to bis fatIior from !
Milliken's Bend. La., ,iurin lhc on
campaign. Wc print it
just as it is, word' for-word. Wc
have no hesitation in saying Uiata
more remarkable document, and one
. a-. , .
that reflects more credit upon the
illustrious writer, has not before besn
been given to the American people :
of
GEN. GRANT'S LETTER.
MILLIKEN'S BEND, La.,
April 21, 1863.
Dear Fa-tuek: Your le.lcr of
Til. nT
reached 1111'. X na-sivn w :iiihwiu y utn
interrogations. When I left Mem
phis, with my past experience, 1 pro
lubited trado below Helena. Trade
to that point had previously been
opened by the 1 rea-sury 1 lepartmeiit.
sivc no permits to luiy i-ution, anu
if I find any one engaged in the bus
iness, I send them out of the Depart
ment and seize their cotton lor tiie
Government. I have given :t low
families permission to le-.ive the
country ami to take wjtii theiu so far
as Memphis their cotton. In diug
this I have been deceived by unprin
cipled speculators, who have success
fully smuggled ttiemsei ves along wud
the army iu spite of orders prohibit
in" them, anil have bo'eu compelled
to suspend this favor to persons
anxious to get out 01 Dixie.
1 understand that the Government
has adopted sonic plan to regulate
getting the cotton outot the country.'
I do not know what plan tiioy have
adopted, but am satisfied that any
thatcan be adopted, except for Gov-ju
ernment to take the cotton useu, ami
rule out speculators altogether, will
be a bail one. I feel tuat all army
followers who are engaged in specu-.
lating Off the misfortunes of their
country, and really aiding the enemy
more than they could posi!Iy do by
open treason, should bo drafted at
once and put iu the first torloru
hope.
I move - my neauquariers- 10 iev
Carthage lo-morrow. this whole
country is under water, except sti-ips!3i),
of lands behind the levees, along the
river and bayous, and makes opera-
tions. almost Impossible. 1 struck
upon a plan which I thought would
give me a foot-hold on tlic cost bans
of the Mississippi before the enemy I
offer any great resistance. But'gress,
the difficulty of the last ouo and a-
half miles next to CartLaye luakps il
so tedious that the enemy cannot f;.il
discover my plans. I am doing
my best, and am full ot hope lor com -
plete success, i ime lias been consiiiu-
ed, but it was absolutely impossible;
to avoid it.
An attack upon the rebel works a'.!
anv lime since I arrived here rn'u'stlaoW
inevitably have resulted in the loss of
a lartre portion of my army, if not in
an entire defeat. There were but
two points of land, Haines Bluff and
Vicksburg itself", out of water at any
place from which troops could march.
ami
but
a
of
on
j
tn
1
These are thoroughly fortified, and it
would petoyy o.ttaxlr. them as long
as there is a prospect o turning their
position! r never expect to have an
army under my command whipped
unless .it is very badly whipped
and can't help it, but I have no idea
of being driven to do a desperate or
foolish, act by the hpwlings ot tha
press. ' Tt is painful to me, as a mat
ter of course, to see the course pur
sued' by 'some 'of "the "papers. But
there is no one less disturbed by them
than myself.' I have never sought a
large command, and have no ambi
tious ends to accomplish.
Were it not for the very natural
desire of 'proving' 'myself equal to
anything expected of me", and tha
evidence my removal would afford
that I was not thought 'e'qual to it, I
would gladly accept- a less responsi
ble position. I have no desire to be
an-object of envy or jealousy, nor to
have this war continue. . I wast, and
will do my part toward it, to put
down; the .rebellion .ia. the shortest
possible time, without expecting or
desiring any other recognition than a
quiet approval 6f toy course.
I beg that you . will destroy this
letter ;,ar leasVdp.npt show it.
Julia and the children are here,
but will go np br the first good boat.
sent for her to come down aBd get
her instructions about some business
want attended to, and see no im
mediate of to ¬
ULYSSES.
[From the Ohio State Journal.]
DECREASE OF THE NATIONAL
DEBT.
tue dwks oi tne xreasury iwpart
Vicksburg April 1 I860, thatis, the debt
'inexpedient on the other.
In addition to this, then," must be
included, as a part of the war debt.
1S08, and we find that the war
(debt-has leen reduced S802.733.329
wl-ieh is not satisfied with this pro
could should : favor wiping out the
idcbt iu 0:1c year by the grecubacK
system of repudiation,
The other point to which the at
to toution of every voter should be
Kxueutive, has been cheaper by 151;
millions pcr'annum than the Admin-
Utration of James Buchanan. It is
about time that the stpff and
In Edward Atkinson's able and ad
mirable Ainme of the' 'financial histo
ry of our Government for the last
three years,' which, we publishetfyes-
terday,'we desire to call attention to
two pomts : 1 ;
..What, was the .actual, amount of
the national debt incurred in conse
quence of the Davis "rebellion ? This
the important fact first' to know.
It n evident that if a man is build
ing a houso and has employed work
men by the job or month, and has or
dered and made use of materials lor
construction, that the eost of the
house is not the actual amount paid
cut on the day of its completion, no
less all the bills for work done and
materials furnished' 'have been
presented for payment. - The house
may be finished, and yet a month or
three, mouths' wages may be due the
workman, and the amount due for
lumber and brick and 'glass may be
cot even known. '-This illustration is
simple that no one need be told
what the cost of the house would .be -in
such a case.
Now what was' the cost of the slave
holders' rebellion ? - - ; ----- i
Is it estimated by the cash actually
paid out, and the claims duly present
ed and audited on the day that John
son's army surrendered, or must we
take into account in addition to this
LUicJjaluliUesUncjirredJrteGor:
this time, in consequence ol this re
bellion ?' Unliquidated ctaims, laims
snpplics and materials -furnished,
yet presented, compensation to a
army in the shape of, monthly
wages, pensions, bounties, fcc, are
just as much a part of the cost of put.
ting uown- the' rebellion as the
amount paid for gunpowder and can
non balls used at Gettysburg.
1 he apparent debt as it stood up-
" 1 . T
IrttAnt urn. iO 7f f? OK JC fTf XT. . a-
r' " w
the actual debt or cost of the
rebellion we must add to this, dis
bursements made under the direction
the War and Navy Departments
duricg the months succeeding April
IStia, 0.1 account of Uie rtbdlion.
disbursements ' amounted to
774,865 S5! They were for pay of
a:lV faltOfp TTlf ''1? "l' millinnn 1
parUnout, 60 millions ; medical and
hospital department, 17 millions,
for other similar purposes.
It is therefore not only legitimate,
strictly in accordance with the
facts, to assume that this large ex
penditure of nearly eight hundred
millions of dollars' from April 1,
1S65 to:June30, 1S66, was in every
sense a war expenditure, and that it
vras a liability on the 1st of August,
ISO.", the date on which our debt arv
lcard to lie 'at its maximum 'by the
Treasury books, as much as if 7 3-101
uotes or 5 20 bonds has leen issued
aud entered upon the ledger; and
this expenditure is to be measured
and 'estimated by tlic same standards
those by which the expenditures
the artivc war arc adjudged to
have been necessary and unavoidable
the one hand, or unnecessary and
pensions, bounties, ic, amounting
1,5,912,101, which liabilities
have been recognized anrt paw.' Ada-
ing these two classes ot expend!
res together, and we have the to
tal amount of the war debt which did
not appear on the books of the Treas
ury at the close of the war, 1923.778,
232. This sum added to the amount
the debt audited for payment
April 1, 165, before stated, makes
tha a-rogate cost of Jhe Davis re
beliion, 'J,;? 7, 733,329.
Suiitrnct from this the debt of June
an actual payment ot more than
one fourth the entire amount in three
years :
It is not Strange mat
the party
called is thi3, that a Republican Ad-
inint.r.i.jon. i.nmt-r.i t.y t.sin
nonsense uttered about Republican
extravagance should cease. -
Rain w ate u wassix cents a bucke
in Holland last month.

xml | txt