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The Hancock Jeffersonian. (Findlay, Ohio) 1857-1870, October 09, 1868, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042591/1868-10-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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liFPEES
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eK M - J &
E G. DxWOLFE & CO, Proprietots. ; ; ' . '" ' Let us have Faith that Right makes Might and in that Faith let us to' the end dare to do our Duty as we understand it Abraham Lkcolh. . TERMS Two Dollars Per Annum.
VoESWSSXI T: ' HOLB N UMBER 801;
UXJ m- jb er .
- 1
DI1.LERY fc LVDWIti
ARCADIA. OHIO,
At readr to tU all order fur Kind ol
Buildings Lumber,
Detlrered. at the denot at Piadlar. or tm
hoard i can at Arcadia, at reasonable
Millinery!
iilSS 'JUIJA A.TARKER
DESIRES to sail attention to her atoek of
N1LL1VKBY GOODS. BATS. BOTS
aad TaiMMIaUS, juat reoalvod by h-wt VJ
w.al. J. wtiiiif im.-i tore. uriziMvi7
FlArjirJQ ILL.
J. & A. PARKER
Keep oa hand at all Uvea larf quantities of
nam 3BI r, vca u
D0t)ES,
SASH,
vi u !:- ; -"--MOULDING, ' '
PICKETS,
OAK,
SrCAMORE
AND
w-4 V COTTON WOOD
DRESSED' SltJl KG
AND'
Finishing Lumber,
LATH AND, SHINGLES,
' WWlok the j offer raaaonably.
Buckley's . Patent Lumber
-KXi.Asr,
Tfca aat aiide, ia aaad y , and wrth It are
aa aaaaoa, parfaolljr, S5.000 feat per week.
Oraeaj Laaiber aaaeuaad aad worked eev rea
eaaaie teraaaj
Custom Planing -Done Promptly.
Feraoai aeedlaf anythinc In oar line, are
MUM to eail at oar yara. weatot ue free
toyterlaa Caarok 11?-
$10,000 Guarantee.
BUOKLEAD
lei or its Unrivaled Whiteness.
2d. or its Unequal ed Durability.
3d. or its Unsurpassed Cover
ing Property.
lastly, for its ECONOMY.
sa.n COST tEH8-to Paint wrlh Boot
taa taaa aar otber White Lead tan t.
Taeaame arnlgBf oovera MOKE RURFaCK,
s Mora DURABLE and makes Whiter Wotk.
BUCK LEAD
Is the Clieapest& Best
01OCO Guarantee.
BTJOKZIH-C
Excels all ether Zlacs, "
1st For its Unequaled Durability.
2d. For its Unrivalled Whiteness.
3rd. jEor its Unsurpassed Gover
ning Property.' " '
Last), for Ita GBEAT ECOHOVT, being the
Cheaoat. Haadaomea, and moat Durable
While Palata4he World.
. BUY. ONLY - - -
BUCK LEAD
AND
BUCK ZINC,
Try it ind be con vinced.
atisfikoUoa fa a ran teed by the Ifannfac
tares. FRENCH, RICHARDS & CO.,
ST. W. Conor of Tenth aad Market atreets,
PfllLADtXPSlA.
For aala. Wholesale and Betail by.
U.J..IJOBERJCQ.
C FUaAJIpMJiortkAfCoBrtBtouaa, ' '
Dealers In
DRUGS, PAINTS, BRUSHES, Ac.
asra47Am FISDLAT.O. , .
A BK J0ST BECETV1NQ A LARGE ADD1-
J. TIOK to their atoek of goods, and Invite
ao special aiteaUoa of balidors aad moo has
lea to Uahr saUcMea of i -, j ;
ne Trimmings and.
1 :. i iiJl. 1 - -. u. . .-
Wa bay ae second olaaa nods to kln
eaea prtoaa, bat aell work of Ue beat
asaaaraatarora at a living proAu
, t '.' r f 1 T , i . t. ; J
OafljuW gwtSWFrtoM at l . - -
Iron, Nsils, Sash.GIsss, Patty, Doors,
WMMwark,aobs, Spokes, Fel-
loss. Horse and Hand Rakes.
" kaT0oU. Sawsi
f J ST am KUiO VUk-
? . Piad Goods, r
iJllfscBtu ira
Bmkj Covers and Supers,
Saakeye Reapers,
Titfckarrk Steel Hows,
.1 barker's Tateat Horse
ji-v-:; 1. j :-Hay 7erk - v
la abort, ovwrrtaisg kept ht lrst-o
At the Lovrest Casli Prices.'
OajlsMaafubafora baring.
or. si, Uat au -
f
DRAIN TELE !
LEWIS & BRAPHEFl.
1 ' FOSTOKrA, OHIO, ,
are now manufacturing DRAIN TILE of Ibe
beat quality and ol a shape whereby a per
feet joint mar be secured. Ordeta solicited
and promptly filled Addreaa
LEWIS BBAIiNEU. Postorls. O.
. Orders may be left at Ruturaufp
tc CorTX where samples may be
Seen.
jull7no9-lr.
Of sedenUrr habits who reiufre a eentle
yurgatlve arill find UobacK'a liiood filia juat
the medicine iltey want: they are iierieotly
rate and ean be taken at ail Ubmi; they ouu
uln no mercury or mineral poison, but are
rely vegetable.
i 80M by Prey Ettincer. Flndlay, O.
BAILEY, FARRELL & CO.,
mm BJSSRt
BAR LEAD MANUFACTURERS.
AUtO,
fig Iad, Iron Flpe. Uabber Hone, 8team
UauKes. Wbiatlee and nl Tea, Iron and
Copper Binka and Bath Taba,
m . Stem l'aupa, Farm
Pump and Force
Pumpa.
And every deaorlptioa of gonda for .
WATCIt, GAS Sc. STEAM
:iio. 167 aairariKLB teit,
Sead fur a Prtoa Uat. P1TT8UUAG.
FASHIONABLE
TAILORING!
fl ADAM SOURS,
D WT OIILD reapeouully Inform the
1 f publie that be baa removed bla
Shop to - . -
Ueateraoa'aBWx-k, Up Stalra, 24 Dear
VTbere be la prepared to do Tailoriac ta aM
Its branches. OUTTI Ml ' fH)VK 111 C.itnD
HTXlJt aad warranta ta St. Term reaaon
able, aw Don't furcet the Dlace Header
aea's Hook, p atalra, eecond door from the
- ' - aprl3no47.ly
-Hancock County
PRODUCE HOUSE
: : . OF I ! : 'Ol'
OSBOIUV & "BALDWIN,
v Cot. Mala aa4 Saaitoskr " ' '
Findlav-1 Ohio.
Wa will pay cash for
Hides,
Pelts,"
Dried
Apples,
Clover,
And
Timothy
Seed,
Butter,
Eggs,
Lard,
Tallow,
Poultry,
Feathers,
Beans,
Rags,
And all kinds of
COUNT 11 Y PRODUCE.
aprl2ao47.tr OSBOBH BALDWJJT.
At Cost! At Cost!
.j -
: I now offer my entire Sloak of
m-)mnu
HATS AND CAPS,
CLOTHS,
CASSIMERES,
FURNISHING GOODS,
AT COST, AND LESS TttAH COST
Fer tke IVext 60 days.
am bound to close out my enUre stock of
1 . -. ..i goods.
25 TO SO PER CEAT. SAVED
by baying of me.
COME RIGHT AWAY
aa our stock la getting pretty well broken.
The First Coming
wlU have the
j
BEST ASSORTMENT.
hi-.
J
If yoa want to buy, atop and ask our prioes
u w. wiu vuuvukce yoa that what we say
IS u u..
CHARLIE HALL, '
. Ho. 73 Mala Street.
aepUtf.
If
Is
ANOTHER EXHIBITION
. ;. -. . OF ,
HARDWARE
AT
Farmers' Exchange.
T. Iv. WILX.11A.MS
Having purohaaed the stock of Hardware
formerly owned by Buahon A WiillaniK, will
coaliaaa the basiaeaa at the old stand. Where
he la now makine many addition to the
stock, and baa greallr Increased his stock et
reneral Hardware. coausUug lu part 4
IRON, ..
NAILS,
GLASS,
PUTTY,
SASII.
CHAINS,
S1XJKES,
HUBS, BKNT-WORK, SADDLKRY
UAHUWAUK
TABLE
AND
POCKET - '
CUTLERY,
Ac., 4c., Ac, . - 7
Carpenters.
I would invite Carpenters and builders to
oall and examlae my stock of Tool and build
ing materials, which I aa bound tw sell at
bottom price.
"Farmers
I would call the attention ot Farmers to
my slock f Farming Implements, conflicting
ol Steel Hoes, Cast Plows, Cum Plow, flow
Wings. Cultivators. Patent Bulky Rakes. Re
volving Horse Hakes. Ho vibes and fcnalhs,
Orlnd Stones, spade. Hoes, &o., all of which
I purpose selling at the lowest possible rates.
Give me a call, and remember the place, one
door south ot Frey Kttlnger a Drug More
Mo. Si, West aide Main Ht.
-- T. K. WILLIAMS.
apcI0oo47tA
UAItOK COUNTY
PLANING MILL!
D. C, FISHER & CO.,
West Crawford Street,
1 t ' ' ' 'i
FIXDLA V, OHIO,
Rntnrn ifi.ip k no wladffaments to their
mm rtu.t4it.Ara. ana arotttd male inai in,v
are la better shape te lurnlsh bail Jura wilU
SASH, DOORS,
BLINDS, LATO, "
FLOORING,
PINE AND ASH SHINGLES, AC,
Hanufsetarad from good Umber, than over
before.
ALL KTJTDS Of PLAHIKQ
Dona oa abort aotloo. Oar machinery la
mostly new and of the most Improved kind,
and work done by It may be relied en.
Cash paid for all kinds of Lumber.
Now. H 'ST. lw ".ft FiaRfBAPo
Do You Want to
Make Money
By Saving It ?
If you do call at the
Pittsburg Glass Store
So. OH Mala Mtrcrt. Flndlay.
for nothing else than to get well posted in
Low Prices.
Remember that oar roods are all warran
ted and if not (found as represented, the
money wiH be refunded.
Small Profits and Quick Returns,"
tha only certain, way rto do a suecenfitu
businem, and honest dealing 'such as CM AH
BUYSONM cautious system 01 the " Kimble
Hixpense" is the only richt one. The laws ol
prudence most always he respected, an ur.
mistakable ot which is the advantage llryson
enj-ys br bis
Practical Knowledge
Ot the Glass Businem.
Table-ware ot Lead
Glass,
Table-ware of Lime
Glass,
Bar-Room Ware, Looking Glasses,
Queensware, full sets. Limps,
Bracket, Reflectors, &c.
Country Merchants,
Will do well to call and examine slock and
prtoes.
Hun, Comet and Solar Chimneys and fine
Coal Oil, kept on band: Curtain Fins, plain
and enrraved. all sizes: Splemild tilass
China Ware. Window tilasa of all sizes, etc.
ITIotto Cheap as the
Cheapest.
wovlnolt.tf . CHARLES BBYSOW. ;
K. S. BAKER,
JOS. BTACKHOCSB,
A. FULLHAKD,
GEO. A. CLICK
n MM
SPRING STOCK
' ' JUST RECEIVED AT
K. S. BAKER & Cos
One door North of J, a, Patterson's. ,
X bVm4 aad 8hoo Bhsiaeas was everdoae la
rindiay. ma a ar iaiiih irw,
mat nm u arsons areenieaced in the trade
inolndias Merchants, etc.. bnt bow many of
them kaow anytaing aoa. mot uiurrui
arxiaa of Leather, or are capable f .die-
criminating oeiweoo
. . . vntm C K
etween a good and a poor job
olwork. The firm of el. 8 IlilsSAu), m
asf Uaorakash .
PRACTICAL WORKMEN
Mea who know just what they are doiag,
ooneequenuy umj ua "r j
the public. They have just opened a splen-
Boots, Shoes, Gait
ers, Slippers, &c,
and Invite an to
COME AND SEE THEM.
They keftp tbetr own niuiiifiiotiir on hand
. , . Hi laMamv w wravr
Call and leave your Meas
HE
ure.
K. S. BAKER & CO.
Api2Ano491y
.
MM.GKIBBEX, .
A.ttornev at Law,
Office over Fu inc & Bedick's Shoe Rlore
Main street, rtndlay, O. jxnlOno34.1y
LAW G A 11 13 .
M. B. WALKER,
WlU. continue to practice I mw, atd may
l.e found at the Old Ollice, of Mun.
gen A Walker on Main sircnt.
At. It. WALKKU.
no4!Hf. aKjndlay. Ohio.
H. A. LEASE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AND
EEAL ESTATE AGENT.
I)ROUIT attention paid to all buxineiig en
trusted 10 his care.
OiUce over PosUilKoe, Boaiing Oreen, O.
july3linlltf.
NUT SHOWN. J. SUKKST. A. W . J'KKDKmi K .
Biu v n , in i r k 1 :tt i kijiciik k
Attorney, at Law,
Will attend to all business entrusted to thoir
are in lianoock and adjoining counties.
' OFFICE:
9ocr Ot as'S lru Starr, oppmUe Court otur.
KIN OLA Y, OHIO,
gfirPartioular attention given to Collec-
dons; Koreulosuros of MortKaixes, I'.irtitinninj;
l lands, tluardian and AdminlMtrattnn mat.
rs Jan.
kzsa aaowM.;
us. a. tore
LAW OFFICE.
DROWN A DOPE,
I) llavinc fiirmod a co-partiiflrnlilp. will
rmttly rllftr.d to all busiiiet. in and out ot
Courts, rt.uirniK the Kervicos of an atior-
ey, and t the llnttion of all clalms-
tgaiiuit the liovornmont, or otherwise.
Ollice over "tlend-Quartera," Fiudlay, 0.
Aag.zl, 1KS 1J U Ir.
i. 11. iu;AitisLi: v,
Attorney at Law and
Claim Agent,
XT7II.I. practice Instate and U. R. Court?,
1 T and attend promptly to business en
truxted to his cxre.
Aa Justice of the Peace will' attend te
eonveranniug and taking Itopositions.
Office RiMim No. 1, Melodnon liuildtng.
fmdlav.O. lunrll.lf
Al'IOlCIi:V AT LAW,
SOLICITOR !N BANKRUPTCY
Has superior facilities for conducting cases
in Bankruptcy, in a speedy and proper man
ner. TeHtions may be filed WITHOUT l'AY
mil Aa 1 DIVIWfcMt.
letters of iaqutry prom pi Ij- answered.
0AAH. OKSVKHLIM, U. l. W. W. UKTWILkK, U. P.
OESTERI.I V A- DETWILEIt,
SomoepatMe Physicians Surgeons.
OPFICE A SID RESIDENCE, 1 .
Opposite the Golt IIoar. ' marlS-ly
Dn. i:ntrikin Ac Miller,
Physicians & Surgeons,
FINDI.AV, OHIO. '
KT OFFICE In the room formerly occu
pied by Dr. V. W. Entrlkin.
Surgical and Chronic Canes desiring to con
sult Dr. Entriktn, will find him in the oflicti
onjWedneadaysand (witurdays from loo'clock
ra.io 3 n ciock p. m.
Dr. Miller ran be consulted on Tnesdars
and Fridays from 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock
p.m. aprlOno47.1y
IAHK8 srAwn, M. n.
an4on 111 an, u. n.
H. D. BALL A Sit,
DRS. SPAY1 H,Hl)RD& BALLARD.
Having lorineu a parluerxlnp to practice
JVtoflicine & Surgery ,
Will promptly attend to all ii.
Orvica Over Frey .V Kttintrer's Drug Ktorc
J'KTKK KS-WLKK. U. KKI.PINO.
k iz s s tj 1: it '.s 11 o t 1: li,
KE8.Sl.KK BKMHNii, Proprietors,
Cormtr of Pike mml Frimt Strttt;
I-ltliMOXT, OHIO.
aug21'M-vl3nl4 Ir.
1. O. O. F.
Golden Rule Encampment Ho. 92,
FINDLAV, OHIO.
Xtatnd meetinks on the 8x-ond and fourth
Fridxys, of each month, 7 o'clock, P. M., in
n.
rVrlbe.
n. OBFEN.C. P.
A. P. Sbaac
HANCOCK BANK,
ubnhrkon's BLOCK, MAIN ST..
FINDLAY, OHIO.
SELlJS drafts on
EHGLABD, IRELASD, GERMANY
and all Principal C'ties of Europe, in sums
to suit, and do a
General Ranking ItnsincKS.
U. T. (I AUK 4 CO.
not-ly.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OP FINDLiAT, OHIO.
(Authorized Capital, . - tlOO.OOO.)
Oesignated Depositiry and Financial Agent
ori lie U. 9. Ivans 01 iMHi-onni, 1'eponu ami
Exchange. Interest paid on Hpecial Deposits
Sankimg Hour 9 lo 12 o'clock A. M., mid 1 to
4 o clock f. pi.
DIRECTORS
K.P.JONVA. W. H. Wukklkr, HsNarBuoWH.
Isaac Davis. ' J. U .Wilson.
r Banting Hous in Crook House Block
CP. JON K8, Pre. ,
OntMMlStf. C. E. NH.E-4, Cashier.
Schwab & Wheeler,
New CiolIiliiK, IIools. MioeM,
Ilals and Caps.
Ton will aavft noney by piirchssinp your
(Uuxto of aprK bCllWAB A WUKKLKIb
J. IT. KIULEll,
ARCADIA, HANCOCK CO., OHIO,
-.' a.tisrFACTrRi!K or ma
Reaction Pine I'nnip
All orders, either verbal or a-rlltc'h. will
be promptly Blind. . All pumps warranted
(o give satisfacliou. Up for to the public
a'he have had his pumps In tM for a number
of years. july31uollni.
. Citizens', Bank.
C ABLINS & Co., BANKERS.
BANKINO HOUSE IN RAW-SON'S BU)CK,
No. CG, Main Klreot, Findlay, Ohio.
Uakkiko Moras mom 9 to 12 O'clock a. m.
M :., :kd raox 1 to A i i;lock r. n..
A general Banking business done. Interest
paid on special deposits "
(Cat and Sawed by Machinery.) .
For ; Building iPurposcs, &c
FREDRICK HARPER,
.:: ' TIFFIN, O.
Orders solicited. Prioes as lew as else
where. For further parUoiil.trs enqdire at
Lai kin's Marble shop, where, also, orders
mar he lett.
Administrator's Notice.
NOTICE is hereby given that the under
signed has been duly appointed ad
mmisirator 01 the estnto of Benjamin Wise
man, late of Hancock county, deceased. -
, ., , ALMA WISEMAN.
E. T. Dean, Att'y.
Sep. 19, iSCSpl3ir3.
,
lulliliOl Every jPriilay.
OFFICE: , 1, ;
Sar.dasky St., First Door East of Post Office.
E. G. DE WOLFE, Editor.
TERMS-$2 00 Per Annum in Advance.
CONNOR.
To the Memory of Patrick Conner.
This stone was erected by his Fellow-
Workmen.
These words you may read any
day upon a white slab in a cemetery
not many miles from New York ; but
you might read them a hundred times
without guessing at the little tragedy
which they indicate, without know
ing tlio humliie romance, which ended
with tho placing of that stone above
the dust of one ioor and humble
man.
Iu his shabby frieze jacket and
mud-laden brogans he was scarcely
an attractive object as lie walked into
Mr. ISawn's great tin and hardware
shop, one day, and presented himself
at the counter with an
'I've been tould yo advertised for
hands, yer honor.
"'Fully supplied, my man said Mr.
Hawn, not lifting Lis head from his
accouut book.
'I'd work faithful, sir, and take low
wages, till I could do lietlcr, and I'd
learn steady I would that
It was an Irish brogue, and Mr,
Bawn always declared that he never
would employ an incompetent hand
Vet the tono attracted him. lie
turned briskly, and with his pen lie-
hind his ear, addressed tho man, who
was the only one of the fifty who had
answered his advertisement for work
men that morning:
What makes you expect to learu
faster than other folks are you any
smarter? .
I'll not say that, said the Irish
man, 'l.ut l a De wishing to; luui uo
make it aisicr. " 1
Arc you used to work?'
'I've done a bit of it.
Much?'
'No. yer honor. I'll tell no lie.
Tim OToolc hadn't the like ot this
place; but I know a bit about tins.'
Y ou are too old for an apprentice,
and you'd lie in the way, I calculate,'
said Mr. l!awn, looking at the brawny
arms and bright eyes that promised
strength and intelliccnce. Besides,
I know your countrymen lszy,
good-for-nothing fellows who never
do their best. No, I've been taking
Irish hands before, and I won't have
another.
The Virgin will have to be after
bringin 'cm over ic her two arms
thin,' said the man, despairingly, 'for
I've tramped all day for the last fort
night, and niver ajob can I get, and
that's the last penny I bavc, yer
honor, and it'a but a half one.' .....
As he spoke he spread his palm
open with an English half penny
upon it.
Bring who over?' asked Mr. Bawn,
arrested by the odd speech, as he
turned upon his heel, and turned
back again.
Jist Nora and Jamesej".'
Who are they?'
'The wan's me wife, the other me
child,' said the man. 'O, masthcr,
jist thry mo. IIow'U I bring 'cm
over to me if no one will give me a
job ? I want to be aiming, and the
whole big city seems against it, and
me with arms like thim.'
lie bared his arms to the shonldcr
as he spoke, and Mr. Bawn looked
at them and then at his face.
I'll hire you for a week,' he said ;
and now as it's noon, go down into
the kitchen and tell the girl to get
you your dinner a hungry man
can't work.'
And with an Irish blessing, the
new hand obeyed, while Mr. Bawn,
untying his apron, went up stairs to
his own meal.
Suspicious as he was of the new
hand's integrity and ability, he was
agreeably disappointed. Connor
worked hard and actually learned
fast. At the end of the week he was
Jengagcd permanently, and boon was
the best workman in the shop.
He was a great talker, but not fond
of drink or wasting money. As his
wages grew Lc hoarded every penny,
and wore the same shabby clothes in
which he made his first appearance.
'Beer costs money,' he said one day,
and ivcry cint I spind puts me oil'
the bringing Nora and Jamescy
over ; and as for clothes, them I have
must do me betther no coat to me
back than no. wife and boy by me
fireside, and anyhow its slow work
saving.'
It was slow work, but he kept at it
all the same. Other men, thought
less and full of fun, tried to make
him drink, made a jest of his saving
habits, coaxed him to accompany
them to places of amusement, or to
share in their Sunday frolics. All in
vain. Connor liked beer, liked fun,
liked companionship, but he would
not delay that long-looked-for bring
in s of Nora over, and was not mean
enough to accept favors ol others.
He kept his way like a martyr to his
great wish living on little, working
at night on an extra job he could
earn a few shillings by; running
errands in his noontide hours of rest,
and talking to any one who would
listen of his great nope, ana or Nora
and little Jamesey. . j
At first the men who prided them
selves on lcinr all Americans, and
on turninsr out the bit work in the
city, made a sort of butt of Connor,
whose wild Irish ways anu verdancy
were indeed often laughable. But
he won their hearts at last, and when,
one day, mounting a work-bench, he
shook his little bundle, wrapped in a
red handkerchief, before their eyes
and shouted 'look, boys, I've eot
the whole at last ; I'm going to bring
Nora and Jamesey over at last!
Whoroo ! I've got it !' all felt a
sympathy in his joy, and each grasped
his great hand in eordial congratula
tions, and one proposed to treat all
around and drink a good voyage lo
Nora.
They parted in a merry mood,
most of the men going to comforta
ble homes. But poor Connor's rest1
ing place was a poor lodging house,
where he shared a crazy garret with
four other men, and in the joy of his
heart, the poor fellow exhibited his
handkerchief, with bis hard-earned
savings tied up in a hard wad in the
middle, before he put it under his
pillow and fell asleep. When he
awakened in the morning he found
his treasure gone. Some villain,
more contemptible than most bad
men are, had robbed him.
At first Connor could not believe
it lost He searched every corner
of the room, shook his quilt and
blanket, and begged those about him
to 'quit joking and give it back.'
But at last he realized the truth.
'Is any man that . bad that it's
thaved from me?' he asked in a
breathless way. . 'Boys, is any man
that bad ?'
And some ono answered
No doubt of it, Connor. It's
stoic.
Then Connor put his head down
on his hands and lifted op his voice
and wept. It was one of those sights
which men never forget. It seemed
more than he could bear, to have
Nora and his child put, as he ex
pressed it. months away from him
again.
But when he went to work that day
it seemed to all who knew him that
he had picked up a new deter
minalion. 11 is hands were never
idle. His face seemed to say 'I'll
bavo Nora with me yet.' At noon
he scratched out a letter, blotted and
very strangely scrawled, telling Nora
what had happened ; and those who
observed him had - noticed that he
had no meat with his dinner. Indeed,
from that moment he lived on bread,
potatoes and cold water, and worked
harder than leforc. It grew to be the
talk of the shop, and now, that sym
pathy was excited, every one want
ed to help Conner. Jobs were thrown
in his way, kind words and friend
ly wishes helped him mightily; but
no power could make him share the
food or Orink of any other workman.
lhat seemed a sort of charity to
him. Still ho was helped along. A
present from Mr. Bawn, at pay-day,
set Nora ; as he said, 'a week nearer,'
and this and that and the other added
to the little hoard. It grew faster
than the first, and Connor's burden
-ai not so heavy. At last, before
he hoped it, he was once more able
to say, 'I'm going to bring them
over,' and to show his handkerchief,
in which, as before, he tied up his
earning this time, however, only
to 'Lis friends. Cautious, among
strangers, he hid his treasure, and
kept his vest buttened over it night
and day until the ticket was bought
and scut Then every man, woman
and child, capable of hearing and
iderstanding, knew that Nora and
her baby were coming.
There was Jcbn Jones, who had
more of the brute in his composition
than usually falls to the lot of men
even he, who "had coolly hurled his
hammer at an offender's Load, miss
ing him by a hair's breadth, would
upend ten minutes in the noon hour
in reading the Irish news to Connor.
There was Tom Barker, the meanest
man among the number, who had
never becu known to give anything
to any one before, actually bartered
an old jacket for a pair of gut vases
which a peddler brought in his
basket to the shop, and presented it
to Connor for his Nora's mantel-piece.
And here was idle Dick, the appren
tice, who actually worked two hours
on Connor's work, when illness kept
the Irishman home one day. Connor
felt his kindness," and returned it
whenever it was in his power, and
the days flew by and brought at last
a letter from his wife.
"She would start as he desired,
and she was well and so was the boy,
and might the Lord bring them safe
to each other's arms and bless those
who bad been so kind to him.'
That was the substance of the epis
tle which Connor proudly assured
his fellow workmen that Nora wrote
herself. Sho had lived at service, as
girl, with a certain good old lady,
who had given her an education, the
items of which Connor told npon his
fingers. The ratlin' that's one, and
the writin. thatts t,wo, and moreover
she knows all a woman can.' Then
he looked at his fellow workmen with
tears in his eyes, and asked :
'Do ye wondhcr the time seems
long between me an' her, boys ?''
So it was Nora at the dawn of
day Nora at noon Nora at night
until the news came that the
Stormy l'etrel had come to port, and
Connor, breathless and pale with ex
citement, flung his cup in the air and
shouted.
It happened on a holiday after
noon, and hall a dozen men were
ready to go with Conner to the steam
er and give his wife a greeting. Her
little home was ready. Mr. Bawn's
own servant had put it in order, and
Connor took one peep at it licfore be
started.
'She had'nt the like of that in the
ould counthry, he said ; but she'll
know how to kape them tidy.
Then he led the way toward the
dock where the steamer lay, at a pace
which made it hard for the rest to
follow him. The spot was reached
at last; a crowd of vehicles blockaded
the street ; a troop of emigrants came
thronging up; fine cabin passengers
were stepping into cabs, and drivers,
porters and all manner of employes
were shouting ami yelling in the usu
al manner. Nora would wait on
board for her husband he knew that
The little group made their way
into the vessel. at last, ana mere
amidst those who sat watching for
coming friends, Connor searched for
the two so dear to him ; patiently
at first, eagerly but patiently ; but
by-and-by growing anxious and ex
cited. ' " - : 1
She would nivcr go - alone, he
said. 'She'd be lost entirely; I bade
her wait, but I dont see her, boys, I
think she'a not in it.' "
'AVTiy don't yon seethe captain?'
asked one. and Connor jumped at
the suggestion. In a few moments
he stood before a portly, rubicund
man, who nodded to him kindly.
I am lookm for ray wire, yer hon-
. m -m IX SB
or, said uon nor, ;anu a cant nnu
her.
.
'Perhaps she's gone ashore, said
the captain, -'
'I bade her wait said Connor.
Women don't always do as they are
bid, you know said the captain.
Nora would,' said Connor; 'but
may be she was left behind. - Maybe
6he didn t come ; I somehow think
she didn't.1
At the name of Nora the captain
started. In a moment he asked :
What is your name?'
Pat Connor,' says the roan.
'And your wife's was Nora ?
- 'That's her name, and the boy with
her is Jamesey, yer honor,' said Con
nor. The captain looked at Connor's
friends, they looked at the captain.
Then he said, huskily:
Sit down, my man ; I've got some
thing to tell you.' .
She's loft behind, said Connor.
She sailed with us,' said the cap
tain. . . .
Where is she ?' asked Connor.
The captain made no answer.
'My roau,' he said, 'we all have our
trials ; Cod sends thetu.'
Connor, said nothing. He was
looking at the captain, now white to
his lips.
'It's been a sickly season, said
the captain. 'We had illness on
board the cholera. You know that'
'I did'nt,' said Connor; 'I can't
read ; they kept it from me.
'We didn't want to frighten him.'
said one man, in a half whisper.
'You know how long we lay in
quarantine ?
The ship I came in did that' said
Connor.
Did you say Nora went ashore?7
Ought I to be lookin'tor her captain?'
Many died, went on the captain
'many children. When we were
half way here your boy was taken
sick'
'Jamesey ?' gasped Connor. .
'His mother watched him night
and day,' said the captain, and we did
all we could, but at last he died ; only
one of many. But it broke my heart
to see the mother looking out npon
the water. 'It's his father I think
of,' said she; 'he's longing to see
poor Jamesey.'
Connor groaned. :
'Keep up, if you can, my man,
said the captain. 'I wish any on
else hsd it to tell rather than I.
That night Nora was taken suddenly
ill also;; very suddenly. She grew
wrse fast In the morning she called
me to her.'
'Tell Conner I die thinking of him.
she said, 'and tell him to meet me.'
And my man, God help you, she nev
er said any more in aa hour she
was gone.'
Connor bad risen. He stood up
trying to steady himself; looking at
the captain, with his eyes dry as two
stones. - 1 nen he turned to bis
friends.
'I've got my death, boys,' he said,
and then he dropped to the floor ICke
a log.
They raised and bore him awav.
In ah hour he was at home on the
little bed which had been mnde for
Nora, weary with her long vovage.
There, at last he opened his eyes.
Old Mr. Bawn bent over him. He
had been summoned by the news,
and the room was full of Connor's
fellow-workmen.
'Better, said Connor. 'It's aisy
now; ru oe with her soon. And
look ye, master, I've learnt cne thine
God is good ; He wouldat let me
bring Nora over to me, but He's tak
ing me over to her and Jamesey
over the river; don't you see it and
her standing on the other sida to wel
come meV ,
And with these words Connor
stretched out his arms perhaps he
did see Nora Heaven only knows
and so he died.
Many persons in Ohio recollect the
absconding and defaulting banker.
Wm. W. Tread well, of Hudson, in
January, 1864, his arrest soon after,
at Mansfield, Ohio, his trial and coo-'
viction in Juue following, his escape:
from jail within an hour after, and
bis murder three days after, by Cow-1
ell, who escaped with him, and the
trial, conviction, and execution of
Cowell in 1865. Mr. Channcr Tread-
well, of Wheatland, Hillsdale county,
in behalf of the creditors of Tread-
well, took cut letters of administra
tion on his estate in 1865, and com
menced suit against Samuel Hester,
the father-in-law of Treadwell, who
lived near Mansfiold, for the money
with which Treadwell absconded.
Treadwell was known to have taken
with him between 150,00(1 and 60.-
000, and it was claimed aa the part
of the administrator that the greater
share or this money it'll into the
hands of Hester at tho time of Tread
well's arrest. The suit was tried in
the United States District Court at
Cleveland, Justice Swayne presiding,
and resulted in a verdict against
Hestei of 4C8.416. The trial lasted
the whole week, and was one of the
most closely contested cases ever
tried at Cleveland. The jury were
out only fifteen minutes. Witnesses
were in attendance from Ohio, Indi
ana, Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa.
Hester is a very wealthy man, and
the judgment can be collected unless
bis property is put under rover, which
it will be a hard matter, for him to
do successfully.' Tread well'a indebt
edness amounted to something over
7 ... .
Moce . Democratic Ecoomi.
The Interior Department lately ad
vertised ' for bids for the stationary
contract for its offices.'- The lowest
bid was that of Blanchard 4c Mohan,
of Washington, for $3,604,28. One
of the highest, if not the highest, was
that of Dempsey Sc O'Toole for 32,-
728. YetSecretary Browning ace pl
ed the latter, although 124,000, the
highest. Senator Patterson, of New
Hampshire, called the attention of
the Senate to this fact, and a bill was
passed at once ordering Secretary
Browning to reject the highest and
accept the lowest It reached the
House on the last day or the session,
and being objected to by Mr. Van
Trnmp, of Ohio (Democrat,) it had
to lie over. A prominent Senator
remarked that Van Tramp's objection
cost the country $25,000.
GRANT AND SEYMOUR.
GRANT AND SEYMOUR. Look on this Picture then on
That—Hyperion to Satyr—A
Striking Contrast.
[From the New York Evening Post.]
Grant's father removed from Penn
sylvania into Ohio, where Grant was
born; Seymour's father removed
from Connecticut into New York,
where Seymour was born. Both are
therefore the sons of carpet-baggers.
Grant was once defeated in an at
tempt to get office; Seymour has
been several times defeated in simi
lar attempts, and commonly runs be
hind his ticket
Grant is a soldier; Seymour is a
lawyer. Grant has never served in
Congress, neither has Seymour;
Grant has held no ievil .office under
the Federal Government, neither has
Seymour. Neither ot the two men
was conspicuous in National politics
before the war. Each really began
in 1661 the career by which he is
known to the public. Grant was
then a book-keeper in a Galena leath
er store, and Seymour was traveling
in Wisconsin. Both were Demo
crats.
When the retals fired on Sumpter
Grant went to Springfield to serve in
the State Adjutant-General's office,
and help to equip trooiie. Seymour,
being at Milwaukee, refused to speak
for the war ; and it is asaterted and
not contradicted, expressed his sym
pathy with "the South. At this
point the career of the two men di
verge. It may be useful to follow
them through the trying scenes of
war. Grant's weapon was the sword;
Sevmour s his tongue; let us see
how each served his country.
Grant entered the army as colonel;
Sevmour remained silent Bull Sun
came. G rant quietly drilled bis men;
Seymour quietly sucked his thumb
But events called Seymour out first.
On the 2Sth of October, 1861, Sey
mour broke ground at Utica. He
saidi "If it is true that slavery must
be abolished to save this Union, then
the people of the South should be
allowed to withdraw themselves.'
There was at that time general cry
that party lines should be broken
down, and all men should unite, re
gardless of party, for the defence ol
the Government, under the name or
a Union party. For this end Demo
crats and Republicans were nomina
ted together npon ticket, and War
Democrats and Republicans joined, in
its support Bnt Mr. Seymour said :
UI appeal to the conservative and
Datriotic men who have jotneu inu
organization if they are acting wisely
and weu in auuuauns wiut uiuse
whose principles and ptLrpotet they
detest, or in placing in office men
whom they believe to have been in
strumental in causing this war."
While Seymour wss thus attacking
the party which by the choice of the
American people represented the
government. Grant was preparing to
attack the rebels ; and on the 1st of
November, ten days after Seymour s
Utica speech, Grant led his troops to
battle at Belmont, where he so crip
pled the enemy as to prevent an in
tended invasion of Missouri.
In February, 1862, Grant captured
Fort Donelson," which filled Union
men with joy, and caused consterna
tion in the rebel ranks. Nashville
fell, Kentucky was relieved from in
vasion, Columbus, on the Mississppi,
wss evacuated, and the rebel armies
rapidly retreated to Corinth." It is not
recorded that Mr. Seymour took part
by voice in any of the joyful demon
strations consequent upon this event
The official report of his speeches is
a blank during this period. But on
the 10th of September, 1862, Sey
mour received the Democratic nom
ination for Governor in New York.
Grant had once more beaten the reb
els at Shiloh, and was now thinking
of Vicksburg, when Seymour rose in
the Convention at Albany, and thank
ing the delegates for his nomination,
lamented that no compromise had
been made with the rebels. Mc-
Clellan bad been defeated, the coun
try was gloomy, and Seymour thought
rt a proper occasion, for what ? for
encouragement ? for cheering words?
fog urging men to stand by the gov
ernment ? No ; he said : "From the
dragon's teeth sown broadcast by
Congress have sprung the armies
which have drive back our forces,
and which now beleaguer the eapitol
of oar country. The acts of the na
tional legislature have givea pleasure
to the abolitionists, victories ta .site
secessionists. loose in power
have done much to justify this rebell
ion ia the eyes of the world." "Re
bellion is not necessarily wrong. .
Bebel forces, as he said, were "be
leagurmg the eapitol," where Con
greas was in session. Seymour
tiaerefore thought it a proper occv
siott to say "the assemblage of Con
gress throws gloom over the nation ;
its continuance in session is more
dseaatrous than defeat on the field of
(Mettle. It excites alike alarm and
disgust. He added, "this war can
not be brought to a successful con
sluaion. or on country restored to
an honorable ptace under Republi
can leaders." Ikisapprehensions of
the Norta with regard to the South
have drenebed the lauul with blood.''
And then he came urvm his favorite
theme, the dreadful am1 unbearable
burden of taxation, "repudiation, dec.
Meantime Grant was at work be
fore Vicksburg. The countr
impatient, lacked confidence" it
generals, and was cast down at .tae
slowness of military operations. A.1
was the part of wise and true states
men to inspire the people with cour
age and patience ; to show then the
neoeaity of a Arm and determined
attitude towards the enemy ; to urge
them to uphold the authority of the
administration, regardless of pacta es.
What did Air. Seymour say about
this time? He was then Governor of
New York ; and in his first mtasage
he took occasion to speak once more
of "Northern disuMonuts, to com
plain that "the laws, courts and offi
cers of New York' had been "t reeled
with marked and public cont empf
by the 'administration, and that its
"social order and sacred righ Is had
been violated." He said : "Th is war
should have been averted ; but, when
its flood-gates were opened, the ad
ministration could not grasp its iH
t
mensions nor control its sweep.'
Nowhere did he blame the rebels,
without at the same time blaming the
administration and the party in pow
er as equally disunionists.
While Seymour thus uses ms in
fluence as Governor to bring the Gov
ernment into contempt, and to stir
op in the North hatred and suspicion
toward it. Grant was seeking to
beat the enemy, and about this tame
said : "I shall take no step back
ward ; it would seem to the country.
. -s a..a T
now discouragea, use arerek.
have considered the plan, , and have
determined to carry it out
A crisis in the affairs of the nation
and of the war came on in July,
1863. Grant had been for several
months beleaguering Vicksburg ; no
one knew with what success. Lee
hsd invaded Pennsylvania, and was
opposed by the Army of the Fotomac
under Meade. The peopie were
anxious, excited, fearful of disaster.
Seymour was then Governor; and it
was in his power, by cheering and
hopeful words, to animate the down
cast, to rally the people for s determ
ined effort, to unite all men for the
salvation of the Union. Is that what
he did? On the 4th of July head
dressed the people of the Academy of
Music ta New York. He begun with
a sneer, well calculated to delightt the
enemies of the Union. "When I
accepted the invitation to speak
with othera at this meeting, we were
promised the downfall of Vicksburg,
the opening or the Mississppi, the
probable capture of the Confederate
eapitol, and the exhaustion 01 tue
rebellion. But in the moment of ex
pected victory there came the mid
night cry for help from Pennsylva
nia, dec It was the key-note of his
peecb it v3 one Jong and bitter,
philipie against the administration.
But while Seymour was still railing
and complaining, delighting all who
wished the war to fail and Jeff. Davis
to win. Grant was receiving the sur ¬
render of Pemberton and his army,
and of Vicksburg, and Meade was
defeating Lee in a bloody battle at
Gettysburg.
No sooner bad Vicksburg fallen
than Grant sent a force to overtake
and defeat Johnson, and another to .
help Banks against Port Hudson.
Port Hudson fell, and Johnson was
defeated about the time the New York
riot broke out That riot, the result
to a large extent of the Fourth of
July speech of Seymour,, was anima
ted by the most cruel ana mean spir
it. Yet Seymour addressed the men
who had burned an orphan asylum
and killed defenceless and harmless
men and women and children, in lan
guage which could not fail to encour
age them, and persuade them that
they were right He said, according
to tho WorLT report, "On Saturday
last I sent the Adjutant-General of
the State to Washington fop the pur
pose of requesting that the draft be
postponed; and I had every reason
to believe that the request would be
com plied with." It will be seen that
he still spoke, even to rioters, in a
tone of complaint Not only this.
he further gratified the rioters by
ursine the withdrawal of troops from
one of the most disorderly wards.
The next year, in pursuance of the
same policy of gratifying the law
less, he subscribed to the Chicago
platform, which urged the cessation '
of hostilities against the rebel rioters
in the south.
Seymour's .language and cenduct
gave great hopes to the rebels. His
Feurth of July speech was reprinted
at Richmond, and regarded by all
the enemies of the Union as a prom
ise of help from the isorth. But .
Grant's efforts and victories cast
down the rebels, and broke the pow
er of their riotous organization.
Rosecranswas defeated at Chics
manga, and once more Seymour lifted a
up his voice on the hopelessness of
the war. On the 31st of Oclobor,
1863. at the Cooper Institute, he
spoke of the probable exhaustion of
the country, of the enormous debt,
of the hopelessness of the struggle,
and urged "conciliation." A few days
after Grant defeated Bragg at ioofc-
out Mountain.
In August 1864, Seymour was
President of that Chicago Convention
which, under his inspiration and that
ot Yallandigham, again denounced
the war as a failure, and demanded
an Immediate cessation of hostilities.
Unluckily for him, who was so often
unlucky, Atlanta was captured by
Grant's lieutenant and friend, Sher
man, only a few days alter this plat
form xt submission to rebellion was
adopted.
It would aerra no -useiul .end to
carry the comparison further. All
through we see Seymour advocating
a poliey which would have divided
the North and given the victory to
Jeff.- Davis; although, at the same
time, we see Grant carrying the flag
of his country from victory to victo
ry. Who was the wisest statesman
ot the two? . Who the most patnotjc
man ? Who the best, most useful
citizen ? He who from the beginning -
called the war a failure, and endeav- .
ored to stir up hatred and suspicion
against the chosen government of ,
the people? or he who met the rebels
and defeated them in battle, till at
last the rebel leaders fled, and their
armies were disbanded ? Who was .
the worthiest and wisest- he. who j
paltered with rioters, and encour
aged them with promises that their
lawless demands should be granted ? ,
or he who, in the face of a far more
rnnwiahlA riot, reouired the "uncon
ditional surrender" of wrong doers?
Who now most deserves tue conn-
denb r tLe American people he ,
who froui beginning to end foretold
defeat dishonor and destruction ? or
he who duYing me same prioi car
ried the country nsg to honor and
ami fal-wfied every evil proph-
!er of his present competitor ?
Finally, wuo ju wuiyio
keads the spirit of the American peo
ple, and is thererore most capable 01
expressing it in the Presidential
chair he who, with faint heart, ei
ther hid himseinn silence, or m me
boor of defeat came forth to foretell
disaster and ruin? or he who. with
unfailing courage struggled on u
victory, and saved tne union irom
the disgrace and dishonor which the
other wss so ready meekly to accept

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