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The Hancock Jeffersonian. (Findlay, Ohio) 1857-1870, October 23, 1868, Image 1

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Let us have Faith that Eight makes Might, and in that Faith let us to the end dare to da our Duty as wo understand it. Abraham Lincoln.
TEEMS Two Dollars Per Annum.
E G. DeWOLFE & CO., Proprietors.
Hancock
Xi JlIJjj
VOL. XV.-NO. XXIII.
PINDLAY, OHIO, FRIDAY MORNIN(J, OCTOIiKR 23JS(S.
WHOLE NUMBER S03.
Millinery!
MISS JULIA A. PARKER
T BRIBER to oall attention to her stock ot
U MIlJ.lN'KnV GOOD8. IUT8, BO"T8
Mtfl ruiMMiSitiS, just reoel-ed by lw at W.
II J. J. Whaaiar Oa.'e faw-a. aprlliw.47
PLANING MILL.
J. & A. PARKER
Keep on band at all times large quautillaa of
DOORS,
sash,
moulding, .
PICKETS,
OAK,
ASH,
V SYCAMORE
V -AND
TXONWOOD
DRESSED SIDING
AND '
Finishing Lumber,
LATH AND SHINGLES,
Wklob they offer reasonably.
Buckley's Patent Lumber
K 1 1 1ST ,
The feast made, Is used by us, and with it we
ean aeaaon, perfectly, 25,000 feet por week.
Ureas Lumber seasoned and worked on reaa
nabla term.)
Custom Planing Done Promptly.
Person t needing anything in our line, are
!nited to oall at oar yard, west of the Pres
brtorMMi Charch.
J.i A. PARKEK.
aprlfootTft.
UABDWARE!
A. & B. F. Kimmons&Co.
A BB JUST HECEIV1SQ A LARGE APDI-
TIOl to tbelr stock of goods, and invite
tba apeetai attention of builders ana mecnan
tos to their selection of .
ILonsc Trimmings and
TO
We bar no second class goods to blow
on obHD Drioea, bnt sell work of the best
a-aae-acturers at a llrlng profit.
Oall and get oar prloes of
Iron, Nails, Sash.Glass, Patty, Doors,
Woodwork, Hubs, Spokes, Fel
loes, Horse and Hand Bakes,
Rubber and Leather
Bel ing. Saddlery
Goods, Gun
Trimmings, Mechanics' Tools, Saws,
Files, Forks, Shovels, Hoes,
Scyhes, Chains, Pumps,
Pocke and Table Cut
lery, Plaed Goods,
Revolvers, dec
Glass, all sizes cut to or
der.
Buckeye Mowers and Reapen,
Buckeye Eeapers,
Pittsburgh Steel Flows,
Parker's Patent Horse
Hay Pork
Ie abort, everything kept hi a nrst-elasa
Hardware store.
At the Lowest Cash Prices.
Call and see ns before buying.
A. B. P. KIMMOSB A 0
Mot. U. 186 ar
St. g. BAKER,
JOS. STACKHOCBE,
A. FCLLBARD,
OKO. A. OLICK
SIMMS IS BUSINESS 1
SPRING STOCK
JUST RECEIVED AT
K. S. BAKER & Co's
One door North of J. B. Patterson's.
XT HAS been thnueht br many that the
X Boot and Shoe Business was overdone in
'ndlay. This a great mistake. True, a
great many persona are engaged in the trade
including Merchants, etc.. but bow many of
them know anything about the different
grades of Leather, or are capable f dis
criminating between a good and a poor job
of work. The Arm of K. B. BiKEU Co., U
composed of thorough
PRACTICAL WORKMEN
Hen who know Just what they are doing,
consequently "they can be relied upon by
the publlo . They have just opened a splen
did stook of
Boots, Shoes, Gait
ers, Slippers, &c.,
and Invite all to
COME AND SEE TIIFM.
They keep their own mtwufoetare on band
Call and leave your Meas
ure.
K. S. BAKES 4 CO.
AprllnoiSly
AX OBDLVAXCE.
Be it ordained by .the Council of
the Village of Findlay,
I. That Liberty street in said Village, the
northern terminus of which Is at Uandusky
street, be and tha same is hereby extended
North from Banduaky street to slain Cross
street and there terminate, and that tha
samo be opened np for travel as soon as it
can be done according to law.
1. That the following real estate be and tha
same is hereby appropriated for the use and
purpose ot saia street ana ine extension
tharaof. UvwiU The allev known on tha
record as Eastern Avenue, in Wilson Vaaoe's
addlUon to rindlay, being on a tine 01 con
tinuation uf said Liberty street trom bwd
duskv street to lfaia Cross street; alao the
IraoUons or parcels of land lying west of and
... . . 1 ... ; . m 1 .
anjoiaing tout mo. iiA, li anu at in -iu u
dition to Fiodiay," and between said lots
and said alley.
S. That J. A. Bope, who is hereby appoint
ed special Attorney for said Village tor that
purpose, proceed at once aud prepare the
necessary papers and do whatever may be
necessary In the premises to effect the ob
jeot contemplated by tais Ordinance.
ooUtettw.
IDRAIN TILE!
LEWIS & BRAPKER.
FOSTORIA, OHIO,
Are now manufacturing DRAIBf TILE of the
best quHhty and of a shape whereby a per
fect joint may be secured. Ordeis solicited
and promptly fitted. Address
LKWIrf BUaPNKU, Foatorla.O.
Orders may be left at Kutukalt
& Coki's, where samples may be
seen.
jull7no-Iy.
LADIES
Of sedentary habits who reiulre a gentle
purgative will ftud Itoback's Wood Fllla juai
the medicine ibev want; Ihav are perfect!)
svfe aad eaa be taken at all times; they cob
tain no mercury or mineral poison, but are
purely vegetable.
Bum oy rrey ttunger, r inaiay, u.
BAILEY, FAR R ELL & CO.,
BAR LEAD MANUFACTURERS,
ALSO.
Pig Lead, Iron Pipe, Bubber Hose, Bteam
Uauges. wiiiaties ana v aires, iron ana
Copper Rinks and Bath Tubs,
Steam Pumps, Farm
Pumps and Force
i . ramps.
And every description of goods for
WATER, GAS &. STEAM
no. 1C7 sajTurista arasn,
Send for a Prloe List. PITTS nUVLG,
" ' .- ' i I i ' I
FASHIONABLE
TAILORING!
sft ADAM SOURS,
f TTTOULD respeotlully Inform the
V Y publie that he has removed his
Shop to
Hendersoa'sBlock, Vp Stairs, 2d Door
Where he is erenared to do Tailoring la all
tt branches. CUTTIKG DONK IN GOOD
STYLE and warranted to fit. Term reason
able. aOon't forget the place Bandar
son's Block, np stairs, second door from the
aorner. sorl2uo47.1y
Hancock County
PRODUCEHOUSE
or
OSBOM & BALDWIN,
Cor.9faia and Sandudty Sis.,
Findlav- Ohio.
We will pay eash for
Uides, Butter,
Pelts, Eggs,
Dried Lard,
Apples, Tallow,
CloTer, Poultry,
And Feathers,
Timothy Beans,
Seed, Rags,
And all kinds of
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
aprllnotf.tf OBBOEH k BALD WIS.
At Cost! At f Cost!
I now offer my entire Stock of
II ATS AND CAPS,
CLOTHS,
1
CASSIMEEES,
. .
AT COST, AND LESS THAN COST
1
FURNISHING GOODS.
For theNfki0
am bound t oloee out my entire stock
S3 TO SO PER CEVT. SATED
hy buying of me.
-li
1
COME RIGHT AWAY
as our stock is getUng pretty well broken.
T?ne First Coming
fl fiihi
-
v -
iJEST A SSnRTjYffilN
'I
t
will have the
war.t tobuy, stop and ask our
If you warAtobuy, stop and ask our
and we (ill ooaviBca you that what we
lru'- -r , r - , C ft
l- CHARLIE HAI.I-
CHARLIE HAIX,
No. Ji MaU Blraat.
MplltC
I jl. i J -1 - ill
Attornov at Law,
Offioe over fwing It Uedlck's Mioe more
Main alreet, Flndlay, O. Janl0nos..lj
M.-B. WALKER,
W1IX "coullnue to practice Law, aud may
be found at the Old Ollloe, of Itun.
gen A Walker on slain street. ;
. . M. B. WALKEK.
nostttf. Findlay, Ohio.
9
LAW
H. A.
ATTORNEYAT
!'ahd
EEAL ESTATE AGENT.
T)UOMPT attention paid to all business en-
Ja. - irusiea to nis care.
Office over Foatoflloe, Bowling ureen, u
julySlnolllf.
SMBT BBOW. J. t. BUSIIT. A. W. raSDKKICK.
ROW K.BTJRhkKTT Ac V EDER1CK
AlWru.jr. ! Law,
Will attend to all business entrustad to their
tare In Hancock and adjoining oountlea.
OFFIOE:
Omt Otay's Drag Start, oppotUt Court lloutt,
riauuti, uuiu,
aa-Partloular attention given to Colleo
Hons; ForeoUsurM of UortgaKes, Partitioning
1 lands, Guardian and Administration maw
rs Jan. 14. 68
HUl BBOWI.
tkt. a. sors.
LAW 0FEICE.
riROWBJ dk BOPK.
13 Having formed a co-partnership, will
sromnllvittend to all business, in and out ot
Courts, requiring the services of an attor
ney, andti lite collection oi an ciaim
gainst the Government, or otherwise.
once ever "tieaa-uuariera, nncuay, w.
Aug. 11. 114-11 U lr. .
D. II. BEAKDSLEY,
Attornev at Law and
Claim Agent,
WILL practice Instate and U. P. Court,
and attend nromntlv to business en
trusted to his care.
As Jastioe of the Pssoe will attend to
donveranoing and taking Depositions.
Umoa uoom no. 1, atsioaaun ounuiug,
Findlay.O. junell.ly
E. T DXJ3STN"
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
AND
SOLICITOR IN BANKRUPTCY
Has suoertor facilities for conducting cases
In Bankruptcy, In a apsedy and proper man
ner. 1'eutlons may ne aiea wimuui ri
1NU AN I UlVIUtNU.
Letters of Inquiry promptly answered.
QAAS. OBSTBBMM, H. . W. M. DSTWILtB, M. D.
OESTEUL1N fc DETWII.F.R,
SomoepatMe Fhyiieiant & Surgeons
OFFICE AND 'BESIDEKCB,
Opposite the Goit IIoae. marie iy
Drs. Entrikin 9c Miller,
Physicians & Surgeons,
FIND LAY, OHIO.
icr OFFICE In the room formerly occu
pied by Dr. r W. Entrikin.
Surgical and Chronic Cases desiring to con
sult Dr. Kntnkls, will And him in the ofllce
onWednesdays and Saturdays iroin IV o'clock
a. ia. to J o'clock p. m.
Dr. Miller can be nonsuited on Tuesdays
and Fridays from 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock
p. ra. apr!0no47.1y
jambs srarra, m. d ansom uubd, m. v.
M. P. SILLABB, M. D.
ORS.SPAYH,HURD&,BiLLrRD.
Having formed a partnarsblp to practice
Medicine & Surgery,
Will promptly altena to ail ciis.
Orncc Over Frey ft Ettinger's Drug Store,
SCHWAB HOUSE.
COBNSB If AIM ANB FSONT 8TBBKS,
FIND LAY, OHIO.
GEOEQE IIOMAIf, Proprietor.
This house has been thoroughly repaired
.nil nawitr fliniHlmd. Kverv attention will
i. id iha comfort of the traveling public
I - . . . II .... ... . b.
I Uood ana spacious siaoung uu.uwi w tun
house.
oot9n21ml.
Fbtbb Kbsslbb. 5S. B. Bblpimo.
M HOTEL.,
KESHLEB & BELDINU, PropHeUrs,
Corutr of Pttt and Front Stiwf ,
FKEMONT, OHIO.
angli'eS-vUnU lr-
82.
1. O. O. F.
! Golden Snla Encampment Jo
PINRLAV. OHIO.
iji maatincs on tha second and
Fridays, ot each montn, I o uiooa, r.:.,
jdd f ellows nan.
A. P. Sbaacs. Borihe.
H. B. OttEEN, 0. P.
HANCOCK BANK,
HINDBBSOK'S BLOCK, MAIM ST.,
FIN DL AY, OHI O.
BEU DBAFTS OH
EHQLASD, IRELASD, 0ZRMAHY
and all Principal Cities of Europe, In sums
to suit, and do a
s-3neriil Banking Business.
H. P. UAGK & CO
no lr.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF FIHDI1A1, OHIO.
(Aathoriied Capital, - - SI 00,000.)
Oesignated Depositor and Financial Agent
ef the U. B. Bank of Disoount, Deposit
e.h,nf a. Interest paid on Hpeclal Deposits
M., emUlo
Ssafoag Ioars- to 15 o'clork A.
4 a flora ' ji .
DIRECTORS
JnwM. W. B. W-HLta, Hbmt Bww.
Isaac Davm. J. H.Wilsom.
BanKlng House in Crook House Block
sx.p.JO!IKS,Fras.
OatM U Mtf. C. B. N'LE9, Cashier.
Schwab & Wheeler,
of few
J
Clothing, Boots, Sboof,
Ilatat ana Captt.
Ton will save aener bf purshasing jour
Goods of - aprrr '6UHWAB a n.ti'iK
Citizens' Bank.
C ABLINS & Co., BANKERS.
fANKIN() HUUofi IU HSWHon o nuwa,
13 No. 66, Main btreei, rinaiay, unio.
.vnm Hocas bboh 9 to 11 O'Clock a.
- Ana boh 1 TO 4 O'CLOCK r. .
i I i A general Banking business done. Interest
paia un a.D, u k
la r V.fl ITam. ft
IfJiCW feQH.K 1W AVvtVll
MTLLINERY
Dressp Making
i
Mrs.' A. C. Lindsay
ODLD Inform her friendsi lhattiht
1 WW I BN1II W Wa a m - r - "
1 Jspbiko AWDISMMBB STOCK
MIl.LIN.EEYG.pOD9
I rainrl8in all the Latest oiyies. r-ne
C0Bprins keg to order aji kinds
ana attends to
straw work aud
over . B. Barnev
room door
Comptmngi
aay fjS-Saad
! nideling old styles tra
inyder's Store. .
of Carashaa's Store
Mas. A. C. LnrasAT.
Tfs.
he gaitr Ml; itiitxmm
PnlllMltol Every Friday,
OFPICK:
Sandnskj St, Tint Door East of Post Olce.
TERMS- 2 00 Per Annum in Advance.
E. G. DE WOLFE, Editor.
POETICAL.
POETICAL. TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW.
If fortune with a smiling face
8trew roses on our way,
When shall we stoop to pick them up ?
To-day, my love, to day.
But ahould she frown with face of oaie,
And talk of comng sorrow,
When shall we grieve, if grieve we must ?
To morrow, love, to-morrow.
If those who've wrong'd us own their faults,
And kludly pity pray.
When shall we listen and forgive ?
To-day, my love, to day.
But, it atera Justice urea rebuke.
And warmth Irvm Memory burrow.
When ah ill we chide, if oblde we dare ?
T morrow, love, to-morrow.
If Love, estranged, should onus again
Are harmed unlets we pay,
Whan shall we struggle to be just?
To-day, my love, to-day.
But if our debtor tail our hope
And plead his ruin thorough,
When shall we weigh hit breach of faith
To-morrow, love, to-morrow.
If Love, estranged, should onoe again
Her gentle smile display,
When stall we kiss her proffered lips 1
To-day, my love, to-day.
But, if she would Indulge regret.
Or dwell with by-goue sorrow,
When shall we weep, if weep we must
To-morrow, love, to-morrow.
For virtuous acts and harmless joys
The minutes will not stay ;
We've always time to welcome them,
To-day, my love, to-day.
But care, resentment, angry words.
And unavailing sorrow.
Come lar too soon, it they appear
To-morrow, love, to morrow.
MISCELLANEOUS.
THE THREE CRIMES.
An Eastern Tale.
Ilamet Abtlallah was an inhabitant
of a grotto on one of the shores of
Mount Olympus. When he stood at
the entrance of his humble dwelling,
he conld embrace at one glance all
the territory originally possessed by
Osman, the founder of the Ottoman
Empire ; and, as he fire times a day
offered up his prayers to Allah, he
invoked blessings upon the head of
Solymanthe Nagmncent,the reigning
Sultan in whose time be lived. In
deed, Abdallah was renowned for his
sanctity ; and the inhabitants of the
u" "
vicinity of his dwelling treated him
obi marawi renpeu.
He was not, however, entitled to
: i.;a
hrhthd P.rclv atUined his for-
1
1- i Ui.
father, who was himself a dervise of
Cf- mn. -i,ftB
Cicai auvMi 1 1 ewuv v swww
" a. 1 H;ik
ymif hi 11 lzir vu lUUfBtviVf a coiucu 1 via
him in the same grotto ; and fortu
j 1 .C. :j:.,:.i..-i
naus was ueeuicu uwuumiuuu wiw,
a 1 4K
on uis way .K u
Olympus, was auowea to join in iu
prayers of the two der vises, kneeling
- , 1 . 1;
MCCM UIU HiC.u
. I
Ilamet ADdauau was one morning
rovinsr amidst the craves and woods.
"r1c
the passage in the Koran which he
had been perusing a short time pre-
viously. when his foot suddenly
struck against, somethin. hard upon
the ground, lie .ooaeu uowuwa.u,
and saw an .ro r.u -1
small brass piate, wuicu w jci. iui
to coyer a hollow place or 'well.
Obeying asudden impu.se ot curios-
itv. Hamet applied nis nana 10 me
riband pallet it with all hi. force.
After manr vain exertions uie urass
" aa
nl at wielded to his efforts, and ne
-"- : 1 1.
fell backward wun me suuiien auoca
amine the aperture mus ..u .
dense volume of smoke issued from
the hole, and ueended in the ,a.r to
. , - . .... tlinnaan1 I Pet
VU9 UlgUk ''- .
e nigu 01 ' .ATI"
Hamet gazed wun asion.sumen,
upon uua airango -PP".
ually become more and more paipame
and shapely, and at wngin a.sum
the form of an immense giant, with
a long flowing white beard,
tremendous pine tree in his right
tremendous pine
Hamet fell upon his knees and was
and
... ,
es and was
about to put up a prayer to Heaven,
whentheterribi .pparition rt
d him in a voice of thunder:
Will out
thee into ten thousand
, ntabf irom PI p
ture. .
-Iam Kala,an evil Genii, whom
. .-. l.i
avictonoui power iou. up m u
accursed hoe, where thav l-ng-
ed for two thousand year.
evil dsr lor thee that brought thee
hither."
x.
. . -i -::
"And wuereioro, j.uu ucu.. .
demanded Hamet.
"Because I am aoou vo am vnec,
in oTder to avenge myself upon some
one for this long captivity." . .
At these words Hamet tremoieo
very much, and besought the Genii
rVnara bia life. For a long time
the Genii was inexorable and ordered
mt
!
has
OP
aeeps
of
re
dress-
north
o-KT.-. .MMfrlvn nAt thA I lAlTlf- f
T'lBT , iUCUUVU SMUW sw ovjj
mm wpiF".' 7 7
a a A. 1 . A BIlIlHrMI IIIIIIHHI I 1-f
be moved by the prayers and entrea-
pemovcu uj r j
tea oi me .
.Tt-i- -a ae hi in a ivftnii. "i
conditioa.
"Name it, said Hamet, ms neart
leaping with joy. .
.fr :n - tr -a-npat. I sav
proceeded the Genii, "on condition
that you perpetrate some crime which
J "7 r. . :
f Himinun villi r ovflrwueuiuiE
--mo-;r.n virtue. Do
priuu ui
interrupt me, or a wu. a.u juu
titn I five vou vour
choice of three of the most heinous
. . i
aarrtt .! I iJn UUMlflUlla . JL
AaUeither violate the law of
n 1 . l-infa- VOIir nil Of 000(1
wine ; or you shall murder your ven-
arable old father ; or you shall curse
the name of Deity whom yoa worship,
Choose between these tnree crimes."
T .
i Then tlamet waa very
and he endeavored to melt the heart
of the evil Genii ; but all his prayer
and entreaties were unavailing. He
accordingly went to reason wilhiu
himself.
'If,'' said he, "i assassinate my
father, no contrition can wipe away
mv crime, and moreover the law will
r!bmwith Ha vengeance. If
I curse the name of the groat Allah,
I mav sigh iu vain for future happi
naaa in tl. o-ardens of faradise Liut
if I Wnmft inebriated with the iui. e
of the grape, I can expiate that fault
by severe nioriiHc""i i'vum.ui.i.-,
and renewed prayer.''
Then turning his countenance up
ward toward the Genii, he said, "O
fountain of all evil ! I have made my
choice, since thou art determined up-
nn ttiia ininrv
Name the object of that choice,"
aaiit ttin OcniL
"I will get drunk with wine, as the
least of the crimes wuicu you pro-
nae." uwwi)4 tbodcrvise
Bo it so,'' cried the Genii; "this
vninir. after the hour of prayer,
thou wilt find a jar of Cyprus wine
upon thy table, when thy father has
retired to rest in hit own cell. Thou
, .mat fulfill thv nromiao: but woe
mtn time if thou deceiveth me!
The Genii gradually became less
palpable as he spoke these words ;
and, by the time me conciumng mcu
spa issued from his lins. ho had van-
UhMl aJtooether. Hamct retraced
i.;. itmn tnwanl the orotto. with a
sorrowful heart; but ho would not
confide his anticipated disgrace to
to the affectionate parent who wel
corned his return.
The day passed rapidly away ; and
in the evening Ilamet and his sire
knelt down as usual at the door of the
grotto, with their faces toward the
south, to raise their voices in prayer.
When their vespers were concluded,
the old man embraced the son tender
ly, and retired to the inner part of
the grotto. ....
As soon as Ilamet knew that his
father slept, he lighted the lamp; and
as the Genii had told him, he saw a
large moasure of wine standing upon
the table. The unhappy dervise
raised it to his lips, and drank deeply
fo the lntoxicatine draught. A glow
of fire seemed to electrify his frame,
and he laughed as he sat the vessel
down upon the table. Again he
drank; he felt reckless and careless
of the consequences. He drank a
third time; and, when hs hah emptied
thA measure, ha ran out to the door
' .u I .1 tha
oi me grouo, an., turcw
olnnn of tha mountain: then, as He
" , - ... ,,a i,110ri,n,l
nearuw uuuuumg ". -- -.7 , "
I Willi lnacscnuBDtti uiuiu.
turned 10 enter me " -
1 UM latuc d
I - j-. aa il l.l ai
I "Bon. nam iuo ""
noise of revelry -woke me from my
slumbers, ana 1 rise w ,UJ
-at. ... ; si
unveil iiAinei aruniicn wnu wiuc
i s . . .
aim, is iu .u. vu, u,.u,
nrries: and nave 1 now
--. . t,.in(s imr,iotv
LIIH UrUIUI - ... .
"rtnr tha firBt time?
;t heB u,)on the gray head of thy
K"" 8" ul,ou luv J
1 utj via ntuoiuuK." o
... ,.- .,!.. ,.t Ha filtBUd
I aV II IIM 1 1 I Bl 1 BLI1IT1 DILI'.
- nf . ,...,, of
u'Jf ..t,..,.": ,n,.r
Thou knVwest
fS w.KU he
And, intrt
u5" :LfZi and
"w GTmrnei:
---. . ftf ... BO wa3 confused
... ftnd a 8uddcn dread of
-- , , , .-
r.,linnnhif. Lomrv.i.0adcd sire.
. fartufilv -rrainstlhe
- - ...
-rS,a?KS: aoainsf
. " .
lKalSBra
f
flint one groan emanated
from his bosomand his spirit Hod
forAVtr.
Suddenlv conscious onuts hottttt
r " f bicU Le La(, bcea glluty,
cnm or wuicu h
, 1 ft .na And. In
.. ,
Uh midst of his ravines, he lifted up
----- - - . t of
Rnd rsed the Deity whom
Md fervenUy wor-
yr' ... tcrriblo dia echo
-aboutlho tUunder rolled
d round T ,B earth.
-V-d. tmUlVt the roar of the
"arli'"wl warA heard
conuichiuK
Lkft,,- f infernal Uuorter. AH hell
----- f u of tbe
" 5,. T.1
pai,
Iv,os. presented
itaolf TheraceoftheBtormincreas-
d the trees were torn up by their
Mil with ,i;'r v ol Al,.i. ...
, . c,i.ii .hnfienn appear-
.c y. r", ,iB11t. 'Hnd
n iuinra iub vreKiio
F by choosing
ett J which seemed
" " ht committed the
thee least, .
VrVll V a etvew
than
For
svlmnrn danger in lim w.uw-vu
--.rD r tAmntation nre
oy o ner 'Z 4
n, tha nonV.
And tue w wu.-- rr
I mmgied w un .-
i . . ...
down the mounta Wljjg
ma", "1 dashed to pieces at the
bottom. ..
IT I V 11 kuo
I
T u Albert Rurns
1 I;l- 1MPI.IJ Ikv
.ays : "It is tbe bubbling'stream
L. ,.w the little rivulet that
. niaht hv tU fArm
m piim mncf uv muvi-c j -
iwouen uwu , -
Niagara excites ou " -'
stand amazed -u Bi
" Lwr Ood there, as He pours
out from the hollow of His hand;
one Niagara is enough for the conti
. .u . --l,l. whilA tha same
nenL. or uio nuMt
notlwr.rU rennires thousands and tens
i oilver fountains
uu oi iuuua- : V . .1 V .
Lantlv flowine rivuleU that waters
Lvery farm and meadow, and every
I i . i .i.ol1 flnw nn pvatv
UU I aT&TIlt?ll. -UIU U " " ' J
the Ld night with their gentle, quiet
1 ruaaritV OWlkU iu.iouiui
it is not by great deeds, like those
the martyrs, that good is to be done,
but by the daily and quiet virtues
ure, tue tunu e
..t I n.i f -olativp.B and friends "
Bvrrvwiiu,auauu- wt i - ---- -
A DETECTIVE'S EXPERIENCE.
A Touch of Romance.
the detective, "that a queer trick was ;
playttlinehyayoiiiigiirtiowai-ciiswi,
"It was just lH'fore the war,' snid!
of forgery
'Ifowwaaitr I-ct luo hear Vic
story."
W11. T have no obiei lion. but
, . i. " !
uon l interrupt me wiut iiuuin.
"The Chief culled me into the oili. e
ono morning, and told me that a check
for $1.000 had leii drawn by the
confldeutinl clerk of well-known coin
mercial house, and had been cashed
at the bank where their fund were
deposited. It was n forgery, mid
the clerk had left as soon as llicnioii
ey was obtained. His name was Hen
ry Harding, hU parents lived in one
of the interior parishes, and it v-.n
supposed ho had gone there before
setting out elsewhere. 1 could only
learn thnt he wasi very young tu.l o:'
rather effeminato appearance. This
was all tho description I could ascer
tain. The alhiir had not been blown
abroad, and tho Chief directed me 'to
work up tho case.' You kno w that
S and I always work together.
I called him and wc had a couaulia
tion. He proaecutod researches here,
while I went to the country. Thin
arranged I wan soon on my way. I
had found out where the family of
young Harding lived, which I had
hoped to reach before niht, but in
this I was disappointed. Long be
fore duak, dark clouds began to form
I
along the edge of the horizon ami ;
climb rapidly to the zenith. . 1 he
thunder and lightning came at inter-
I was soon assured Uat
one of those semi-tropic storms,,
.
which arc so Irequent niucsunimoi,
wnnld pr lono- burst UD011 Lie in its
fury. I hastened forward, therefore,
looking eagerly arouud for some
place of shelter. I had proceeded
but a short distance, before I saw
just ahead, a wood-man's hut I got
into this as soon as possible. I mui
hardly got comlortably sheltered, lie
fore a gentleman and la.ly dashed up
to the door and dismounted. Like
myself they were seeking shelter
from the storm. The man was middle-aged,
and exhibited in his person
tho strou" aud athletic frame, the
open brow, and genial, pleasant face
of the Southern planter; but there
was in his countenance now and then
innrli nf sadness, a seemingly tx-
. - -
quisite senso or sorrow, strangely
out of keeping with what the m:;nj
should have been. II: companion
was a young girl of exquisite beauty,
with dark, soulful eyes, and hair
black as night. She looked, indeed,
lUnrrMftr of the troiucs. and the
tall, splendid form was regal 111 it
nmiestv. She was sucu a woman a
a man could wish to live for, and. it
ueod be, die for. They were both in
traveling costume, and from their
convcruation. I judged they were fa
ther and daughter, just netting out
011 a journey, and endeavoring to
reach the river in tune lor an tip-go
ing steamer. Shortly after their ar
rival a negro boy drove up iu a curt
containing trunks, tin 0110 01 liiese
was the numn of Mr. Harding, La.
You may readily conceive that my
eyes wero wide open, and my earn
too. Hero was something mat 1
must neods observe. 1 walked out
of the hut and went round to where
the negro was standing. M.oy,
where's vour young master V I ask
ed the question abruptly, looking the
negro in tho eye.
"'Uolly, Masaa, ms ciuio uunnn;
hain't seen him for mos' a year.
Mv resolution was taken on Uio in
stant. I would follow these ieopie.
I was satisfied they wero in search of
Henry. He could not come to them,
and thav wero going to him. The
whole mattor was as clear as day.
I did follow them to the river, where
the daughter embarked on an upward
TBIIH 1 vua a .
to
to
is
-
home. I took passage on the same
alpnmor. 1 WOUl.t IlOl lOSO HlIlt Ol
tho cirl. ' I was satisfied she was go-
in; to her brother. I insinuated my
self into her presence, and at last got
into conversation. 1 was nan m love
with her already ; before wo got to
St, Louis I was wholly so. I learned
she waa going to New York for some
roYixt she did not reveal. I thought
I knew what tho object was; but it
had becomo of secondary importance
now, for I was deeply, unmistakably
in lovo. Had her brother stood
before rac, and she had asked me to
forbear, it is doubtful it I should
have arrested him. I could not exist
out of her presence. She had Income
the one object necessary to my hap
piness. ' At last we readied xcw
York.- I could no longer contain
mvself. I sought an opportunity and
told her my love told my name, oc-
cunatioii and present opjcc.i. i ro
. . .r i ..r--. l
vealed evcryuung; a omjr v..
share her adections. I would leave
her until the next day. This was the
rorenoon of Monday. Tuesday fore
noon I called ior an answer. The
servant who answered my summons
informed me that the young lady had
left the nrevious evening on a steam-
r for the West Indies ; but she Ha
iof a not- 1 tore open tue idler
eagerly. It contained these words
"bin: for your prcicrence,
am much obliged ; bnt the laws ior
bid gentlemen marrying each other.
By the time this reaches you, I will
be on board the West India steamer.
Very respectfully,
HENRY HARDING."
"It took no more to show what
trick had been played me. You may
believe I have seldom told that love
New Orleans Picayune.
it
but
and
n&v
J
of
of
A -rpnt email. It IB ikmi
put on one part of ns . land ou w h.ch
UwTitten,"Iwiil give this held
any one who ia really coiiien e.
and when an aiplicant came he always
said, "Are you contented The gen
eral reply was, "I am." "Then"
joined tire gentleman,
want with iiiy field ?''
"what do
Brick Tomcroy is in New York
lecturing on temperance. His
aitd abandoaed wifo and child
are Btaying with her irents in Mil-
Janesville Gazette.
Brazilians and their Habits.
The person who meets with a sod
den or violent death in Brazil, either
13' accident or murder, ia buried by
the way-Ride, r.onr where the event
li-ii,irrit-l niiil fi rrnn i- set III) ill
Ui(; lh.u, of Ui) To thU etOBgf
t. ;n,lK.lu r f:lilh
as the emblem of hi faith every
where, the P.rn;'.iiian lift hit hat in
pxssing, and it is a beautiful custom
of the people to Jiang this lovo luft
inento witli llowers and garlands. 1
frequently pass kihIi a cross near
liiis city, where a man was murdered
so lon-c ago that but few reiiieinb r
tho circumstances, yet pious and un
seen handd are always decking this
way side cross with wreaths and
roses.
Sundays Domingos or Lord's
d-tv, as the r.ra;:iliniis call them
with many of them almost like any
other day, occupying them in usual
avocations. H is I rue that there is
always church service, and the Cath
olic treed recognizes Suu.lays as
sacred days Hut it would be pain
ful to many persons in the United
States to seethe little regard which i3
paid by ths common run of persons,
many of whom never attend church
except on sonic great occasion.
There r.rc not wanting individuals,
however, who deplore this state of
things, and write and talk on the
subject, in the hope of teaching a
better state of affairs.
The Brazilians have their super
stitions about the moon and its influ
ence liKe many juiuicuh iwuuuj.
Many sgiiculural operations arc
rooHnf iil l.v the lurht or the uarK oi
Kllt i ilftVe been amused
,0 (inii 80111C 0 the best families, who
,VUeve str0udy in a vermifuge nos
vals,and lnuu wLicU f-.n-narc them for their
.... . nrft,.a . h,,t thev delav
U ileal 11 VJii aA l v.1 a-i- J J J
. iU the (,ocay oftbc moon
i" . .. in..., ;,.n, na t,n
1
,
,
Inn .oin.-rrwnta. hat lDflUCIiCe IUC
moon can have on intestinal worms
passes my comprehension; but they
wait till the moon i on the wane, so
that tho w orms will be weaker and
the remedy "push down mais forte!''
When the lirazilians riJe ando a
eavallo, or walk a horseback, a3 they
say they gallop. It i the only con
.lir.nn in wlJdi thev seem to be in a
liuri v. The stately gait of our road
jsters is disgustful to them too much
like the laborious tread ot tropeiros.
Or. tho campoo grounds on the route
to the country church, the only gait
which uleascs tho cavaleiros is an
Indian lope, in which the horse does
nit. ort river the cround fast, but
n - - - o
makes creat pretensions.
In u i;rx:ili:m primary schools,
Thiirsdav. instead of Saturday, as
with us, i the day ot rest, so that
the days of study are more equally
,!;,;,!.. !i i,i thn weuk. The whole
school generally "ohidy loud'' du
rin" school hours, so that it reaeni.
bits a Label of confusion ; but tue
scholars seem to learn with facility
M..ndav the teacliinir is oral ; and
many times I notice monitors at the
head of the classes, like the Laneas
teriau system. The sexes arc taught
in separate schools, with male and fe-
taale teachers, who are pai.I ly the
government, so that education is free.
Teachers hold a responsible rank in
the community, and a a reward for
a well earned reputation, at the ciul
of some twenty years service, they
are apocenlado or pensioned Tor the
rest of their lives.
A "Stunning" Love Letter.
The following is sublimely splen
diferous, and we rccomeiid it as a
model to letter w riters :
My Deai: Miss C. Kvery time I
think of you my heart flops up and
down like a churn dasher. Sensa
tions of unutterable joy caper over
it like young goaU over a stable roof,
and thrill through it like Spanish
needles through a pair of tow linen
trowsers. As a gosling swimmeth
.
l
:
i
a
swiiu I iu a nea f glory. Yimous of
ecstatic rapture, thicker than the
liair in a blacking brush, and bright
er than tho hues of a humming bird's
pinious, visit me in my slumbers, and
home on their visible wings, your
image blands before me, and I reach
out to grasp it, like a pointer sna
ping at a blue bottle lly. When 1
first beheld your angelic perfections,
I was bewildered, and my brain
whirled around like a bumble bee
under a glass tumbler. My cj'es
btood open like seller doors iu a
country town, and I lifted np my
ears to catch the silvery accents of
your voice. My tongue refused to
wag, and in silent adoration I drank
iu the sweet infection of love as a
thirsty man swallowcth a tumbler of
hot whisky punch. Since tho licrht
of vour face fell upon my life,
sometimes feel as if I could lift myself
up by my boot strap3 to the top of
the I'rtshvleri.in steeple, and pull the
bell rope for a singing school. Day
and night you are in my thoughts.
When Aurora, blushing like a bride,
rises from her sail'ron couch ; when
the jay bird pip.es his tuneful lay in
the apple tree, by the spring house;
when the chanticleer's shrill clarion
heralds the coming morn; when the
awakened pig ariseth. from his bed
und grunteth, and goeth for his morn-
io' retresuments ; wnen me drowsy
Lcctlc wheels his droning llight,
sultry noontide, and when the lowing
cows come home at milking time,
think of thee; and like a piece
punt clastic, mv heart seems to stretch
clean across my bosom. Your hair
is like the mane of a sorrel horse,
powdered vith gold ; and the brass
pin, skewered through your water
fall, fills me with unbounded awe.
Your forehead is smoother than the
elbow of an old coat, lour eyes
i a. i i. t.i t ai
V i... t l.,-,;- .. i;m!.
. M l &
to 'l When their
, me ;on my -anl . breasti
re
oenetrated my entire anatomy like
load of bird-shot would go through
rotten apple, lour noso is from
chunk of Parian marble, and your
mouth puckered like sweetness..
NeeUr linircra on your lips like hon
ey on a bear's paw, and myriads
uafledgcd kisses are there ready
iiirrmt and liirht somcwheie,
1,1 ue birds out of the parent's nest
Your laugh riugs on my ears like
wind-harp's strains, on the bleak
hillside. The dimples in your cfieeks
are like lowers in beds or roses, or
hollows in cakes of home made su
gar.
I am dying to fly to your presence
and our out tho burning eloquence
of my love, as thrifty housewives
nour hot coiree. Away irom ou, 1
am as melancholy as a sick rat. Some
times I can hear the Juue bugs 01
despondency buzzing in my ears
and reel the col.l Iizani 01 uespmr
crawling down my back, rncoiith
fear, like a thousand minnows, nil
ble at my spirits, and my soul is
pierced through with doubts, tt an
old cheese in lored with sk"qqHrt.
My love for you is stronger than
the smell of Coiry's patent butter, or
the kick of a young cow, and more
unselfish than a kitten's first cater
waul. As the song bird hankers for
tho liht of day, th- caution. mouse
for tho fresh bacon in the trap, a a
lean pup hankers after new milk, so
I long tor thee.
You are fairer than a speckled pul
let, sweeter than a Yankee doughnut
fried in sorghum molasses, brighter
than tho topknot plumage in ine
head of a muscovy duck. You arc
candy kisses, raisins, pound cake,
and sweetened toddy altogether.
If those few romarks will cuawe
you to sec the inside of my soul, and
me to win your airections, 1 suau tie
as happy as a woodpecker on a cherry
tree, or a stage horse m green pas
ture. If you cannot reciprocate my
thrilling passion, I will pine away
like a poisoned bedbug, and fi.ll
away from the flourishing vine 01
life, an untimely branch ; and in the
cominr years,- wneu uiu bu-mwo
grow from the hills, and the philo
sophic frog sings his cheerful even
ing hymns, you, happy in another's
love, can come aud drop a tear and
catch a cold upon the resting place
of
JULIUS EPAMINONDAS MUGGINS.
[From the Detroit Post, Sept. 29.—Radical.]
A Democratic Candidate for Governor
Comes Out for Grant.
General A. S. Yilliams was
Democratic candidate for Governor of
Michigan in ltGG. General Williams
is now United States Minister at aan
Salvador, South America. The fol
lowing extract from a private letter
written by General Williams to a
triend in this city, in which the Gen
eral declares himself in lavor 01 tue
election of Grant and Colfax, will be
found interesting reading, particular
ly by the Democrats who voica ior
General Williams lor uovcrnoc :u
1SCG :
SAN SALVADOR, July 21, 1868.
MvDeau : I like tbe
nomination of Grant. I believe he is
radical enough to resist the return of
the old fogy copperhead doctrines.
I don't see whom the Democratic
uartv can nominate who can or ougut
to beat him. If Fendleton, then cop-
perheadism and repudiation arc 111
the ascendant, anil all Union and
and honest men will light against the
ticket. If a military man I cannot
fancy who can be selected that could
enter the rate with Graot with the
hope of success.
It (the Democratic National Con
vention) will be a mongrel conven
tion, in wliich the old, ante-rebellion,
nullifying, states-rights politicians of
Carolina Wade Hampton and the
like will lio contending agaiu for
their old fogy and rotten notions
against the progressive doctrines of
universal suil'rage, regardless of race
or color, as represented by the Chase
men of that body. Can anything be
more prophetic of the certain coming
of negro suHragc all over the repub
lic than the expressive fact that so
many old fashioned Democrats arc
found ready to take Chase, dyed all
over with what they have heretofore
regarded as tha chief of all political
-uit1i flaara -vl-n t a.O. t i Til 1 Ifl-rP.
. as) . Ill t,IO BH.-a-.-
to learn who wva w tu i;.i.,t., tir
the Ntvr YrL- '-.v-uli(
of next
evr York V.nvciilion
will cet hero atWHi-Ute !
month. I conceive their only hope
is in a new man, whosa political an
tccedents are bub little known, and
who mav lie thus able to play the
popular cards, nk-llfully hintci
lillcrciit sections.
to
Faithfully vonrs,
A. S. WILLIAMS.
Grant's Farewell Address to His Army.
The ccneral order of General
Orant. aildressed to the soldiers
the United States when tho war was
over, will now be read with interest.
Here it is:
at
I
of
it
a
a
a
of
to
the
SoMUrsvf the Armies of tie
St,ths P. y your patriotic devotion
to your country in the hour of di
and alarm, your magnificaut fight
ing, bravery ami ciuiuraiicc, jvu
hxte maintained tho supremacy
the Union and the Constitution, over
thrown all opposition to the enforce
ment of the laws and tho proclama
tion forever abolishing slavery the
cause and pretext of the rebellion
and opened the way to ngir.iui au
thorities to restore order and inaug
urate peace on a permanent a;id en
during basis on every foot of Ameri
can soil. Your marches, sieges and
battles, in distance, duration, resoiu-
... . V
tion aud brilliancy oi icsuiis.uim
lustre of the world s past military
achievements, and will be the patri
ot's precedent in defense of liberty
and right in all time to come,
obedience to your country's call, you
left your homes and families,
volunteered in her defense. Victory
has crowned your valor, and secured
the purpose of your patriotic hearts
and with the gratitude of your coun
trymen, and "the highest honors
great and free nation can accord, you
will soon be permitted to return
vour homes and families, conscious
of having uncharged tue nigueau
duty of American, citizens.
achieve these glorious triumphs,
secure to yourselves, fellow-c ountry-
nipn. ami nosteritv. tue uiessinps
free institutions, tens of thousands
your gallant comrades have iailen,
and sealed the priceless legacy
their blood. The graves of these
grateful nation bedews with tears,
honors their memories, and' will
cherish and support their stricken
families.
Gold and Greenbacks.
A good sailor at t'allao had sent
home money b his wile by lue a
double eagle and a tweuty dollar
greenbackl While I was writing a
letter to send with them, by express
to the good woman, the gold . lay on
the greenback, and, being on top,
looked down and muttered something
which I did not hear. Clreenbatk
llultered and answered :
" Yes, you're on top of me. You
are heavy you keep ine down. Tley
say you are worth eight dollars more
than I am. Hut, after all, I do more
ork than you do, and make moro
H-opIo happy ! I don'f care it you
are solid gold. I'd rather be busy
than precious, like you.''
Said gold, contemptuously, ' You
are not money at all nwt at all. You
are only paper, with a promise written
on you. Hut I am money. I am.
twenty dollar. Anybody that gets
ine gets money. l'ut vou what art
you worth." 1011 uuiu 1, toai iu
cents. It's a li:une, shamu 10 caa
you twenty dollars."
I stopjH'd writing the letter and
began to think. Which is worth the
more, ola or croenbacks ? money or
1 good, true promise? aid I.
" W hat is your promise, green
back?"
" I do not promise anything. 1
inst run around and tell people, that
the United Mates will pay tno nearer
(of me) twenty dollar at the treasury
iu New Y'ork. And people believe tho
promise. And so they are willing to
work hard and take me for pay."
" Hut how happened the United
States to make Mich a promise ? " I
asked.
Greenbacks replied, ''I remember
well w hat the promise on me was
given for. In 105 I was young and
new, and nobody had ever owned me.
One day I was taken out of a little iron
box by a man called the paymaster
sometimes they called him major. Ho
took the little bundle I was in. and
came to a little led in a large room,
and put me and four like me into a sick
man's hands, Baying, 'There corporal,
there's vour pay in full !' The sick
man took ns, but did not look at u
nor read the promise. He held us in
hi. hand till the major went away.
j'flien he sent lor the hospital chaplain,
of
n
ger or
- I
tuej;
in
;
a
He came and asked what was wanting-
i . . . . , '
I want you to write a icuc. iu-
said the corporal. 'I can t see. 1
reckon I never shall see any more.
Tell mo what w on these new tius wia-
the paymaster gave me. l.ead ineni
to inc. So tho chaplain read, 'The
United States will pay the bearer
twenty dollars at the treasury in New
York.' 'Well,' said the corporal, 'you
put all live of them into a letter,
and send them to my wifo. She's a
nke little woman as ever you saw; and
if I don't get back to her, tell her to
pay oj? the debt on our house, and
"ood people will be good friends to
her, and help her to fand work to Keep
the children together. 'Oh, coTOral,
said tho chaplain, 'you'll go home
vourselt and see her, by aud by. 111
write your letter, though, just as you
ruiy.' "
"I hardly want to go home, an
swered tho for Knil. "A blind man
can't do much, you know. I'd rather
finish up here at Lity 1 omt, and lei
Uncle Sam bury mo with the 1mvs.
They'll pay my little wile a pension,
won't thiy '
" Certainly, certainly," said the
chuphun. "They promised to, and
the United States never break their
promise.''
So the chaplain took us five new
and clean promises, and put us in a
letter, and wrote to the cororal s
wife, and read to linn what he had
written, and then asked, '-Shall I writo
my thing More lor you "
"X o no," said the corporal,
slowly, "I may think ot something-
t mo kei the letter till to-morrow."
So he put it under his pillow and fell
Asleep. Py and by he woke, and took
ail iiveol us out of tho envclje, and
counted us over "one, two, mree,
TlTe torAeySt'rW'. " j 1 1 KtVtr It
hundred dollars, and she will give the
United States her husband. 1 Wish 1
was worth more." Aud he put us all
back into ties envelope, and sealed it
with a kiss, and we could see no inoro.
In the morning we heard tho chap
lain come again. He tHk the sealed
letter but did not ojK.-n it. Ho wrote
a litwtscript on a iuw half sheet, and
wc heard the corporal's w ii'e read it to
her children a week afterward :
1 S. Mv Dkak Mks. G. I send
you the sealed letter which 1 took
Irom the lips ot your dear husiiami.
Corporal G., aim died unexctedly
hist iii-iit- He. was a brave man. Ho
didhisdiilV. Ib'jovcd yon and the chil
dren G.hl will comfort you, good
le will love you, and the in lieu
ixoiie vt u
States will care tir you.' .
'Ami that's the way." continued
-rwiiback, altera p:inc, "that s how
itic United St:ites ciiine to make that
promise written on me; ami l say u is
w "d -as gold any day. 1 don't
know where gold was all those days
when we were so busy. I bn t know
what he was doing. Perhaps ho
dws'
Gold, a little red in tho lace, re
plied, "I was reserved."
IJesorved V said greenback, "that .
means hid, don't it ?"
"Well, yes usefully hid. 1 he cur
rency disturbed, and coin retired.
SjKcie payments were biisjended,"
.said srohl with dignity.
"That means," sid greenback,
"that von were so precious, that when
our country was in danger, and good
men were dying to save her, you hid
away and b it us greenbacks to do tho
work. And now you sneer at us, mid
call in paper promises! I tell you a
promise well kept is better than gold.''
to
To
and
oi
of
a
ever
Elliott two or three ycaia ago re
ceived a commission from a political
club to paint a portrait ot President
Johnson. Ho was urged to accept
the commission and complete tho
picture at once. Ho hesitated, and
4 . . i i i 1.. li. isrili.r Tim
said lie wount -
along for a year or two, "and then
perhaps they will no. want the por
trait as much as they do now."
Mr. John Parton says he is going
to vote "for the party that promises
to tax him most for the maintenance
of the public credit."

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