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The Honolulu republican. (Honolulu, T.H.) 1900-1902, August 07, 1900, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047165/1900-08-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE HONOLULU REPUBLICAN.
Plfihcd Every Morning Except Monday
fcy the RobL Grieve
Company. Limited.
sdwin S. GILL, EDITOR.
TELEPHONES:
Suluess OSee. ........
Bfiltorial Hoosie 123
Entered at the Post OSce at
H. L, as second-class xn&IL
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Per Month, by Carrier 5 75
One Year, by Mall SOO
ii Months, by Mail 4 00
Three Months, by JIail or Carrier. 2 25
HONOLULU, H. T. AUGUST 7, 1900.
WEATHER YESTERDAY.
Utatmam Trro jnunre TJ Jrr-.
Mmsimvm T 4epres.
KnlBtell lcwht
Dew tMnt Ui Day
. UaBitlTe HiwMltr -.
roBcx.r Fo TOBAT.
7wulHr rlonrjjr, mJ bur "wit ohnacor
rate.
If yoo have Oahu stock you can lose
Mining by holding it.
Ten cent cotton was touched under
a Republican administration that
opened the mills.
A Republican surplus of $81,229,776
In time of war is better than a Democratic
deficit of Jl-10,702,915 in time of
peace.
The first grand jury wasted no time
yesterday in getting to work, returning
IU first indictment before adjourning
lor the day.
Receipts of the National Treasury
for the nacal year just ended were
MS,8S,34S. and the expenditures
making a surplus for the year
of JS1.22S.777.
If you want to be naturalized go
Into Judge Estee's court. The requirements
an? harder, perhaps, but the
cost, is less, as no Hawaiian stamps
go in the United States courts.
Exports of provisions from American
farms last year were worth
or S47.0O0.0G0 more than in
1SS5. This sort of expansion is what
the Democrats call "Imperialism."
Eighty-one per cent of the delegates
to the Democratic convention
that 16 to 1 was no longer a live
Issue. Hut Boss Bryan wanted it, and
John H. Wise voted for it; so that settled
It.
One of the ueuificont effects of municipal
government will be to wipe out
the nepotism and favoritism now so
rampant In the government of the city
and Territory. Hence these crocodile
tears.
What with Judge Humphreys hitting
at some of "our cherished institutions"
from the Territorial court and Judge
Estee hurling Americanism at them
from the Federal court certain people
In the family compact will feel badly.
The directors of the Oahu Sugar Company
should hear the stockholders
"kick." The hitter seem to have a good
reason to complain of their treatment
and the ordinary excuses will not make
-thorn uloieve that they haven't been
SKinnod."
The total circulation of national bank
notes, at the close of business June 30
1600. was $309,559,719. an increase for
Hie yonr of ?CS.29l,023. The circulation,
based on United States bonds,
was $274,115,552. an increase for the
year of J6S.S51.4oS.
Quite Amorican. you know, is Judge
Humphreys' address to the grand jurv.
Irwin probably givesome people indigestion,
but it is good American law
and will lmve to go. even here In Hawaii.
The question to settle is. does
tha Judge point the way to the truth?
K. R. Hendry, formerly of the board
of feoaltlt. has become chief deputy
United States Marshal for this district.
Mr. Hendry, who is so widely
known in Hawaii, will be practically
In charge of the office, which will mean
first-class, service in that department.
1Bhj American law, which now happily
prevails here, knows no rich, no
poor: no mighty and no exalted; it is
the deadest loveler of society before
the law. It will be unpleasant for
some reople to recognize this fact, at
first, but they will soon realize the
beauty of its operation.
It is a well known principle In law
that a prosecuting attorney can not
appear in court, save in the capacity
calling for his official duties or in civil
causes. But an Attorney General, representing
a State or Territory,, Is
from all participation in practice
save those of an official nature. He
can authorize proceedings by quo
and all that, but he cannot be a
private practitioner. For the loss of
business the government pays him an
ample salary. Mr. Dole undoubtedly
considers Judge Humphreys' decision
"sensational," but a few hours of study
Tylll show that it is good law.
The croakers who are opposing municipal
government and all other things
that tend to the advancement of Honolulu
should set up another howl se-cause
seven ships came into the harbor
last Saturday. What does Honolulu
want with seven ships coming into
the harbor in one day for anyway, any
more than she wants municipal gov
eminent Why can't she go back to the
SfWT . Jjgjyj OORSJOWiiHy C IJIA ' W
HUE uoUiUJbu tttruBLU&r TUiSOAX, AUGTJbT 7, 190O.
good old days when an occasional
tramp sailor case this way.
Seven vessels enterinc Honoluli
harbor in one day Is a pretty good record,
thank you. And it mains that
Honolulu is to bensse just what The
Republican has always predicted she
voeid, the Singapore of the PaclSc
The old days are passed and Honolulu
is slowly bet surely awakening to a
new order of things. She must prepare
to meet the growing commerce with
all th requirements of a modern city,
including new wharfs and docks ind
municipal government.
THE FIRST GRAND JTJKY.
The charge of Judge Humphreys to
the grand 'jury yesterday was bold,
fearless and timely. It was a shock to
some people of the community because
of its bluntness and straightforward
ness. It was worded In such good,
plain English that the wayfaring man
e'en though a fool may read. It was
a fitting Introduction to the American
and old English system of grand ju
ries. It struck at many, very many,
of the abuses of power in Hawaii by the
government and was a broad statement
of the fact that in these days the governed,
the people rule. The grand
stands for the governed, not the gov
ernment.
As Judge Humphreys well said, it is
a high duty each and every member
of the grand jury has to perform.
They serve with a grave responsibility,
for on their action depends the rights
of the people, protection from the
vicious and the self-preservation of
the fireside and the sancity of the
home. They sit for the community,
for the whole people.
The jury has a grave duty to perform
In investigating the illegal sale
of liquor at Waikiki, and while about
it, it might with benefit to the community
investigate the illegal sale of
liquor by a King street restaurant. It
is open and notorious and known to
every man who visits the beach on Sunday
that liquors are sold openly at the
hotels, and yet the High Sheriff and
his police force have never been able
to learn the fact, though they have had
no trouble in finding "blind tigers" aut
there which sold liquor.
The statements about police protection
afforded the houses of ill-repute
at Iwilei have been open and notorious.
Even graver charges have been made
against the HIsh Sheriff personally
which the grand jury cannot afford to
ignore. Nor can the jury afford to ignore
the Judge's charges In relation to
Information concerning the pocketing
of money found in Chinese gambling
houses, by officers who raided them.
It would be wise for the grand jury
to select its own officer to summon its
witnesses in examining these cases and
not leave that work in the hands of the
High Sheriff, who is himself virtually
under examination by the grand jury
and who would very naturally not want
the jury to obtain the facts, if they be
true, which affect him personally and
the police department over which ne
presides.
There is much good work,laid out for
the grand jury by the court, and if it
will but follow the court's directions
boldly and fearlessly it will result in
invaluable good to the city and ter
ritory and effect a much needed reformation
in the entire police foice from
top to bottom, and if it does not do
this it will be recreat to its duty and
to its oath.
Effect of Opening the Mills.
The Republican National Committee
sent out blanks to members of the National
Association of Manufacturers,
asking themto furnish the number of
men whom they had employed in each
year from 1S90 to 1S99, inclusive, as
well as the total amount of wages
which they had paid during the same
years.
There were 200 replies. They showed
a steady increase in the number of
hands employed in the 200 factories un
til the year 1S93. There was an immediate
drop of 10,000 men in 1S94,
when they employed 90.4S3 men. But
in 1S97 they employed 109.600: in 1S9S,
131.42S men. and last year 174,645 men.
In short, the number of wage-earners
employed by these same 200 factories
increased from 90.4S3 men in 1S94 up
to 174,645 last year almost doubled.
But the contrast is even more striking
when applied to the amount of
wages paid, and the following table
shows the returns received from the
200 manufacturers:
Year. "Wages Paid.
1590 $45.149,0S1
1591 49.S75.S5S
1592 53.619.41S
1S94 40.S03.S66
1596 5339.420
1597 54.412,771
1S3S 62,247,940
1S99 7S.S35.063
The amount of wages paid by these
same 200 manufacturers increased
steadily from 1S90 to 3S92, then there
was a drop in 1S93 and another drop
a
in 1S94. During the next two years
wages picked up, but it was not until ;
1S97 that these same manufacturers ni
were payia out as much money in '
wages as they had paid in ISM.
. , ... , 1
Between 1SS4 and 1SS9, the 200
cturers had increased their payrolls 1
by upwards of $SS.OOO,0OQ. In lact, the
amount ot wages which they distributed
last year was almost double wnat
they paid out in 1SS4. Apply this to
the whole country and try to realise
what benefit "opening the mills" has
been to American wage-earners and to
these who feed and clothe them.
Political Things Done.
When Senator Conkllng, twenty.! is
years ago, in 15S0, declared in his nom-
iiuating speech that General Grant
stood for the "arduous greatness of
things," he expressed the position in
e, .
which the Republican party finds itself
In this year's national convention, its
twelfth great assemblage.
It met without contest or
collision or controversy over the platform,
because it has done its work.
presents a complete stewardship to the i the place of its intersection with Mer-voters
of the country In outlining Its . chant asci King streets, commonly
past achievements and proposing its ?ra as TJnion fcqeare. is progressun;
fntnrp. noHrr quite rapidly.
Knet in St. The rush of work has been so mat
four vears ao r
Louis the gold standard needed to oe j ' of ? two qasmes are beinc
asserted, aid disputed even within 0J "?? ., , ,
the party; the national credit was low-
er than for twenty years before, '.ne
JnmMnTr4 v.T4ctn tt C5HT Tn&
- a .itiuiiucu -
the its 'nroirrn
industries of country; iw
trade had sun.c. and its protest again
misgovemment in Cuba, had been con-
temned by Spain. These issues have aJI
been met- They have all been solved.
The arduous labor they demanded las
been done. No differences are left m
the party, and 1fae country stands
ready to approve the success of the
past by the approval of four years
more. Philadelphia Press.
Hawaiians In "Washington.
The following, from the Washington
Post, shows that Hawaii's Republican
delegates did not. fail to attract attention
in the national capital:
"An elaborate dinner was given at
Chamberlain's last evening by Col.
Samuel Parker, the "Cattle King cf
Hawaii," who is well and favorably
known in Washington and who was a
delegate to the recent Republican convention
in Philadelphia. Among Col.
Parker's guests were Gov. Otero of
New Mexico, Senator Clark of Wyoming,
former Chief Justice Smith of
New Mexico, Mr. Charles B. Wilson of
Honolulu, Judge A. N. Kepoikai of Hawaii,
Mr. L. Montgomery Mather of
Philadelphia, Mr. W. H. Mclnerny of
Hawaii, and Mr. E. K. Somborn. During
the day Col. Parker and his colleagues
called upon President
who gave them a most cordial
welcome, and in the course of a long
talk asked many questions relative to
our new insular possessions in the Pacific.
Col. Parker and his colleague.
Judge Kepoikai, are men of the highest
position, and both having native
blood in their veins, their influence
with the Kanakas is unlimited. They
have cast their foftunes with the Republican
party because they believe
that under the administration of Mc-Kinley
the Islanders will be fairly
dealt with, and that a continuation of
the present administration means permanent
prosperity for the the "Paradise
of the Pacific."
A Curious Spectacle.
The spectacle of over 100
on their knees calling upon the Lot J
to protect American missionaries from
the atrocious cruelties of their brothers
the Boxers was witnessed Sunday night
at the Chinese Mission in Race street,
Philadelphia. Old men and young men,
some mere boys, united in this prayer,
all of them knowing that they were
calling down the wrath of God upon
brothers and friends in China. Philadelphia
Record.
SURVEYS IN CHINATOWN.
Old Corners Reestablished, but King
Street not Widened.
The survey of Chinatown aud the
burned district has been completed.
All the old street corners are reestal J
lished and the streets laid out as they
were before the plague. Considerable
iudiguation is expressed at the intention
of the Government to allow rebuilding
on the old lines of King street.
In the burned district King street is
only fifty-six feet wide and the need of
tw o sixty foot roadways clear through
town is felt by everyone. The brick
bnildings standing on King street on
the north of Nuuanu are old and
only good for about ten years more of
occupation. Several citizens have
spoken of the matter but at present no
one setmis able to order any change.
i
RECEPTION TO A RECTOR.
Members of Second Congregation
Greet the Rev. Robert Lee.
A reception was given to the Rev.
Kobert Lee by the Second Congregation
of St. Andrews at the home of Mrs.
Alexander Robertson on Emma Square,
last evening. About forty people were
present. The lauai was very prettyly
decorated with ferns, palms and other
plant
Anionic those present were, tha Rev.
John Usborne and wife. E. W. Jordan
aud wife, Mr. aud Mrs. Keeue, Mr. and
Mrs.Offley.Mr.andMrs. Schaefer Dr.
and Mrs. Mine-. Miss Mist. Miss Ry-croft
Mrs. Glade, Mrs. King. Mrs.
Crabbe, Mrs. Mist, Mrs. Bycroft and
the Messrs. Arthur Jordan. Soper, Voa
Holt and Fitz. Refreshments were
served.
Beat an. Old Man.
J. S. Howard, a young man. appeared
iu the police court charged with assault
and Iwttery on J. Kunst. Kunst is a
very old man and quite feeble. How-
ard claimed that he hit Kunst bv
take, hie was lighting with Mrs Jurat?.
who is at least seventy-five years ot
age, and her husband who is her senior
by several years, interfering in the
scrimmage was beaten by the young
man. Judge Wilcox flnedHoward $10
and costs.
Kuuts is out of jail under suspended
sentence for illegally selling liquor.
SOLD CHICORY FOR COFFEE.
That's -What Sua Did and
- u wiu Chong m oxivi
He Confessed It.
Sui Chong was up before Bfatrirt
Judge Wilcox yesterday morning, for
violation of the law against
latine food. Ohpmtst Stinror nf tl.o
hoard of heMK on hand 'to te5tifv
- ninst Kni fThnncr tn th atr ,w
his coffee contained twenty per cent
?7?0Ain T1 bm
juuuj; uiiw uu recuru 01 mat sort.' -
He nleadei ,niikv took ; 1
tence philosophically. He was fined
$i and costs. .
j j
I -
BUSY ON PUBLIC ROADS
Active "Work in the Streets Under ,
McCandless Administration. l
;
The public roads office has had its
hands full lately, the rush of work
being so great.
The masonry on the Wyllie street
culvert is now completed and the street
once more open, to the public
Work bs commenced on the culvert
atthe intersection of King street and
Waildki road. The old wooden culvert
is being torn oat and will be replaced
by a more substantial one of masonry
Alakea street is beimc macadamized
below Merchant street and Merchant
street 1 beins subjected to the same
treatment between Alakea and awz
streets.
The wideninr of Richards street, at
MJ? TiSrSt of
,M , ,,, Wch
. -a -- e- T.rj, j
oro rm rr& They will
-- " -
j abiy arrive a month, .V hence."
J Koad SnperTi50r Campbell has placed
, on the coonter in !,;,., a complaint
book, and would be xery clad if any
one would take the pains to write in
the book concemins: any of the roads
or streets of Honolulu, so that immediate
attention may be paid to such
matters.
THE IROQUOIS BACK
FROM MIDWAY ISLANDS.
Found a Good Place for tbe
Hsbment of a Cable
Station.
The U. S. S. Iroquois arrived from
Midway Island on Sunday, after an
absence of over two months, surveying
I and hunting for a cable landing. The
Iroquois from the time she left here until
the China spoke her by appointment
on July 3d did not see another vessel
but one, which was hull down on the
horizon.
On arriving at Midway Island the
search for a suitable landing place
for the Pacific cable was begun. Afer
a careful survey Captain Pond will recommend
that the cable station be placed
on Sand Island. It was found to be
practicable to bring the cable from tue
deep water through Welles harbor to
the land.
Water was found on the island at a
depth of about six feet, which when
f tered made good drinking water. The
water on the other island was not so
good.
Some Japanese in the employ of a
Japanese company were found on the
Islands. They were getting birds' skins
and feathers for shipment to Japan.
The climate of the islands was foun 1
to be a good deal cooler than that nf
Honolulu and was very healthful and
pleasant. Birds and fish abound in
great numbers and variety, and the
men of the party had much sport
shooting and fishing.
The bones of the vessels Wanderins
Minstrel and General Siegel, wrecked
on the islands several years ago, are
still to be seen, and the anchor of the
former vessel was recovered and
brought back home.
During the survey a total of 16,192
soundings were made. Inside the reef
surrounding the islands the soundings
were made by the small boat. Outside
the Iroquois did the work.
The reef inclosing the islands is
quite wide in places and the surveyors
were able to work upon it. The entrance
to Wells harbor was found to
have an average width of one hundred
feet and to be very difficult to navi
gate on account of the rocks. Inside
the harbor is full of dangerous rocks
and coral formation, which have all
been charted.
The Iroquois did not use all the coal
she took, as she used her sails to good
advantage on the trip down. Coming
back to Honolulu the trip was made in
eight days.
THE NUMBERING OF
HOUSES PROGRESSING.
Enamel Numbers of Uncertain Color
Coming Over by Sailing
Boat.
W". A. Wall, the assistant in charge of
the surveying department, explained
the numbering of the houses along the
streets yesterday. "The numbers that
we have ordered will be quite plain;
they are about two inches high, quite
plain and the department did the best
for the people, as it is believed. Uniformity
aud expediency were considered.
The plan for the numbering is
all considered and arranged. It is all
completed.
'What is it? It is not wholly on the
mxndred system. We have 100 for
tain spaces. The 100 system is not
wholly adaptable here. In the citv
proper we have taken fifteen feet of
space for a number. Of course, we
have adopted the system of putting
odd numbers ou one side and even
numbers on the other.
"We have surveyed and mapped the
city from Diamond Head to Kahaui Ki
on the one side and from the waterfront
to the government electric light
plant.
"The numbers which the department
has ordered to place on the houses are
on the way. They were ordered in
good time, but on a sailing vessel, which
it was hoped would get in. here before
this time, but has failed to come.'
It ij understood that the survey de-
partment is now ahead of the postal
department, wnicn doesnt appear to
be ready yet, either with boxes or carriers
to collect the mail.
NEW ORLEANS AND THE CANAL.
Mr. Hester of New Orleans, the cotton
expert, cites the exports of cotton
to Japan as an argument for the construction
of the Nicaragua canal, always
assuming that the said canal is
pracucame ana pracucai imng. inis
cpnsnn save f Hptpr. we navp sent
to Japan 300,000 bales of cotton, of
7"?!
ocean. S7.000 bales went from Gulf
ports and 44,000 bales went from New
Torlr and Savnnnah hr wav of the Su"Z
canal. If the canal were open and tolls
were low it would cheapen
tJoa to JaPan ae thinks, and develop
" l"u" '
"T fc" f .
"" ul um wut. ..o 7 -.-
comment: "The interest of New Or-
leans in this matter is much greater
than that of New To;k. which is nearer
Suez and farther from Nicaragua than
Ttvv vjneans ana uaiuiu u.c tun
the canal would he of irreat value to
the Gulf norts is evident enough, and
that it would promote our Orient trade
. . T".i f -n t4 mpirt
la not less certain, cul h. iiiwucuus
to notice that a good deal more than
half of our cotton export to Japan was
able to bear the cost of land transportation
from the fields to Pacific ports."
Baltimore Sun,
Ex-Governor George W. Pa-k of
TYisconsin finds It impossible to live
down his reDutatioa as the author of
cfcT -n- v --. f ,3 a TAmn I
I
the bik of umn.
LDUTED
Incorporated Under the Laws of the f
Republic of Hawaii.
CAPITAL '
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:
Charles JL Cooke President
P. C Jona Vice-President
C. H. Cooke Cashier
F. C. Alberto:; Assistant Cashier i
Directors: Henry Waterhoase, Tost
May. F. W. Macfariane, E. D. Tenney, i
J. A. McCandless. j
Solicits the Accounts of Firms, Cor- j
poratlons. Trusts, Individuals and will t
promptly and carefully attend to all
business connected with banking entrusted
to it. Sell and purchase Foreign
Exchange, Issue Letters of Credit.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT.
Ordinary and Term Deposits received
and Interest allowed in accordance
with rules and conditions printed In
passbooks, copies of which may be had
on application.
Judd building. Fort street
We are showing the Largest
Assortment of
European Rugs
We have ever handled at
prices that cannot be' repeated,
as the present
Duty, on these lines is
prohibitive. They comprise:
TAPESTRY, oXMINSTER, KIDDERMINSTER,
VELVET PILE, KINGS-WOOD,
D4G DAG, and BODY
BRUSSELS in CENTER, SOFA and
DOOR MATS, HALL and STAIR
CARPET In Tapestry, VELVET
PILE and BODY BRUSSELS, in
Great Variety.
JAPANESE JUTE RUGS, STRAW MATS
and MATTING, LINOLEUM, OILCLOTH,
COCOA FIBRE MATTING, DOOR
MATS always on hand at
LWJ0RMN
HO. 1 0 FORT ST.
FINANCIAL.
BISHOP & CO.
BANKERS.
TRANSACT A GENERAL BANK
ING AND EXCHANGE
BUSINESS.
Commercial and Travelers" Letters of
Credis issued, available in all the
Principal Cities of the World.
INTEREST allowed on fixed deposit
Three Months 3 per cent. j?r an
num;
Six Months 3t per cent, per annum:
Twelve Months 4 per cent. i
annum.
BISHOP & CO.,
SAVINGS MM
Office at banking buildinjr 011 Merchant
street.
Savings Deposits will be received
and interest allowed by this Bank at
4 k per cent, per annum.
Printed copies of the Rules and Emulations
maybe obtained on application.
BISHOP & CO,
GLACS SPKECKELS. YM. G. IRWIN.
claus Sprockets & Co.,
Bankers.
HONOLULU. - - - H.T.
San Francisco Agents The Nevada
National Bank of San Francisco.
DRA-W EXCHANGE Olf
SAN FRANCISCO The Nevada National
Bank of San Francisco.
IiONDON The Union Bank ofLon
don, Ltd.
NEW YORK Exchange
National Bank.
CHICAGO National
Bank.
PARIS Credit Lyoiutais.
BERLIN Dresner tfsk.
HONGKONG AND VOKOHAMA
The Hongkong and SI anghai Banking
Corporation.
NEW ZEALAND ND AUSTRA
LIA Bank of New Zea.::tnd.
VICTORH. AND VANCOUVER
Bank of British North A merit.
TBAKSACT A GENXXAl? BAXKT2fJ 1
A2TD EXCHANGE BUSINESS.
Deposits Received. Loans Made oi:
Approved Security. Commercial an4
Travelers Credit Issued. Bills of Exchange
Bought and Sold.
PHOXPTI.X AC.
COrrXTED JOB.
FREQERiGK V. HMKEY.
Corporation and Maritime Law,
Campbell Buildin
K3Sffi"g88SF8'
JS. 4 .
'$&$& & T'aifci
j jsSSl? Accidents
' s fl at &,
c57yKiaE5iSPiL i?r if
' tKV"'' You
SKFO v Use -
,m$gm a
1900 Electro Gas Lamp
OX YOUR
Bicycle or Carriage.
PACIFIC
FORT STREET.
Just Received
Bv the "AUSTRALIA."
Fresh. Applef
Naval Oranpres
Lemons
Grapes
Celerv
Turnips
Eefripreratetl
Frozon
Gruenhaoens' Ghocolates.
(WW THE nwV,
UM PEERLESS YaA
WA PRESERVING r 1 !
M: PAINT k,gi
HENRY MAY
TWO BIG
THE WATERH0USE STORE,
Bethel Street, Telephone 24
THE TREADING
Hair Dressing anil Manicuring
Parlors.
Hotel Street, next to Y. 31. C.
Shampooing anil
Scalp Treatment
IALTY.
Engagements made
by PHONE 343.
THE HISSES de LARTI&OE.
REMOVAL.
J. ALFRED ilAGOON, Attorney at
Law, Removed to Magoon Building,
corner Alakea and Merchant Streets,
Up stairs, bmtes 1-2-3 .t 4. 37-lm
REMOVAL.
OFFICE OF JOHN n Estate, LtL,
Removed to Mkgoon -Building, corner
Merchant and Alakea Streets, np stairs.
37-lm
CYCLE CO.,
SOLE AGENT0.
'.
fAsstd. varfoiias)
3?lutu3 fAsttl. varfQiios)
Pfiacbos
Apricots.
Poultrv
Ovsters antl Fish
Fancy Cream Cliaoso (iu foil)
Smoked Salmon ami Halibut
Cervolnt Sausage.
& CO., LTD.
STOR
THE MclNTYRE STORE.
Cor King and Fort Sts. Tel 22
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MjitfS
Chocolate BonBons
" Name on Every Piece."
FOR SALE BV
LEWIS & CO.,
Grocers, Sole Agents.
Ill FOBT ST. TEL. 240.
THE YOKOHAMA SPECIE BANK
LIMITED
SultocrltxHl Capital - iYeu 21,000,000
Paid XJp Oipltal -"Reserved - ien j5,OOO.ooo
Fund - . - Yea $3,000,000
HEAD OFF-1?
- - - Yokohama
The bank mys and receives
B'As of Exchange, iues
Draf u and or Credit and trau?
acts a general banking business.
Agency Yokohama Specie Bank.
New Republic BuIIdiHS, Honolulu, H.T.
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V
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