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Daily Honolulu press. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1886, December 19, 1885, Image 2

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DAILY HONOLULU PRESS, SAftJRDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1885.
V" o. I
TUB
MILif HONOLULU PRJESS
IS
EVEUY MOllNlNG
I2xcit. SuiulnyH.
, ,At,theIOfficc,No.29MerchantSt.
TKltMH ' svmonivTios.
Per annum , m .$6.oo
Six months.. , ...... 3.00
Thi-re months , 1, 50
Per month.. ..,.', ...50 els
lostK additional.
S3T Hubnerlptfani I'nuti'lilr nftra In !-
flMCO
llrief communications from all part of the Kingdom
will always be very acceptable.
Matter '.Intended for publication In the editorial
olumns should be addressed to
Kt)jTi)it Daily l'nNni.ui.i; 1'nitM.
Iluslnest communications nnit auveruse ments should
be addressed simply "Business Manager,"
Daily Honolulu I'iikss,
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands,
Advertisements, to ensure prompt Insertion, should
be handed in before 6 r. M.
c
1! JluthoritQ.
NOTICE.
All persons having garbage, etc, for removal by the
City Scavenger, are requested to have the same In
before 8 o'clock A. M. Aflrr that hour the
cartmen are otherwise employed, and Will not call
until the fi lleing morning, thus leaving the un
sightly boxes or barrels in front of your premise nil
day. J. N. KAIA1KAWAIIA,
87.1m Contractor for Cloning Streets.
SATURDAY....... DEC. 19; 1885
It is not often that the Daily Hono-"lulu
Press " blow's its own trumpet,"
but we feel a pardonable pride in calling
attention to the "Grand Offer"
made by us, in another column of this
issue. This is an enterprise which, we
believe, is the first of its kind that lias
ever been attempted in this Kingdom,
and,, we trust, will receive the patronage
it deserves, as it is a bona-fide
arrangement by which .the public can
get a six months' subscription our
paper, and a valuable Holiday Gift, at
club rates, which are much-less than the
regular prices when not combined.
This offer is 'open only until January 1,
1886.
J'ltAVTICAf. KLUVrTOXEEHINa.
Every vote drawn from the support
of the present Administration at the
coming election, is a vote secured for
the cause of future good Government.
The people who pay the bulk of the taxes
are tired of the rule and no-policy of
the present Government. It is useless
to discuss abstract principles of right
and justice with a corrupt Administration,
which fights with the single aim
of .retaining itself in power. What is
needed in the present campaign is
tical campaign work, which wijl carry
the war into .the very camp of those
who are opposed to the cause of the
tax-payers. It will be futile to appeal
to the honor of those in power, and
' beseech them to right the wrongs they
have committed against the country, or
to expect them to perform duties which
they have persistently neglected in the
past. It is the old story of those who,
bear the heat and burden of the day,
fighting alter working hcurs for their
inalienable political rights.
Suppo'se that in the present political
fight, the abstract principles of right and
justice be set forfh against the unscrupi
,u "ulous machinations of the Government
jj; party, which uses everything from a
royal decoration to a bottle ot giiT to
gain its ends.! Suppose that the rights
of taxpayers and the
tionofthe present officials be merely
set forth . in the columns of English
newspapers, which do not reach the
native voters, or which1, reaching them,
they cannot read, while personal
, tioneering is passed by. The result
will inevitably be, at least until the
cumulative force of political wrong at
last breaks through the barriers it has
builded around itself, that the will of
' the people will be defeated, and the
of tfie Kingdom will
continue.
The more intelligent native votdrs
are already becoming dissatisfied with
the present administration of the Kingdom's
affairs. The native newspapers,
which oppose the present Administration,
have brought this about. The
times are now ripening for the taxpayers
to draw votes from tile native
population, not to assist the cause Of
the Opposition as a mere party, but to
upbuild the cause of the natives and
the foreign taxpayers against the common
ruin which is staring the nation in
the face.
The surest way to accomplish this
is to turn the acta anil neglect 'of
the present Administration against
those in power. Practical electioneering
on the part of the taxpayers will
accomplish this; if not at this election
at the next. For instance, the people,
both whiles and natives, living'on a
certain street in Honolulu, have repeatedly
asked that the street and sanitary
condition of the neighborhood be
improved. The Government has
neglected it. The people who
live on this street, seeing no means of
redress, have gone to' work practically
among the natives,, and out of seventeen
votes in the neighborhood have
secured eight votes for the Opposition
at the coming election. These votes
are not to be cast against the King, but
against his faithless Ministers. Of
course it is at present useless to attempt
to carry all four of the representatives
for Honolulu, owing to the
votes of the police force and the
soldiers (who, by the way, will be mostly
disbanded .after election); but if the
electioneering energy of the Opposition
be practically .expended in the outside
districts of Oahu and in the other
Islands, in the above practical manner,
the result will be the defeat of the
Government party and the advent of
justice and prosperity.
UltATtttt ZAKll.
A Wonderful Natural Curloitty in Ktamath
VunnlitOr.
There can scarcely be as great a
natural wonder within civilization, and
at the same time so little known, close
at hand, as Crater Lake. Being one
the most remarkable freaks of nature,
it lies directly within our midst, and
yet, I think it is safe to say the people
of Oregon generally are utterly ignorant
of its very existence. Situated twenty-two
miles west of north of Fort Klamath,
in Klamath county, directly on the
summit of the Cascade Mountains, and
about ninety miles east of Medford, it
is easily accessible, there being a good
mountain road to the very top of the
walls surrounding it and fine camping
grounds about half a mile distant. The
lake itself is about six by eight miles in
diameter, and ranges from east of north
to west ot soutii. 1 he suriace ot the
water is six thousand three hundred
feel above sea level, and is completely
surrounded by cliffs, or walls, from one
thousand to ngarly three thousand feet
high, which are scantily covered with
fir trefcs. To the southwest is a circu
lar island, which our party named Wiz
ard Island. It is six hundred feet high
and in the top is a circular hole, or ex
tinct crater, four hundred and seventy-five
feet in diairjeter, named by us the
Witch s Cauldron, lhe base of the
island is covered with very heavy and
hard rocks, over which scarcely a score
of human feet have trod. Further up are
deep beds of ashes and cinders, giving
evidence of the most intense heat in
days gone by. Within the crater, as
without, the surface is entirely covered
with volcanic rocks, but here it forms
one of the hottest places on a clear day
in August it has ever been my lot to
witness. Ninety feet below the crater's
rim not a breath of air can penetrate.
while the sun beats down upon the
rocky surface and reflects its rays from
ten thousand upturned stones, forming
a very furnace, and heating it beyond
all endurance ; nevertheless, we sat
within, at the lowest point, and partook
of our Monday meal with one hand,
whije with the other hand great drops
of sweat were brushed from our brows.
we tooK wan us irom 1'ortiana a
light canoe, which was lowered to the
takeby the aid of ropes, and by means
of which we were7 enabled to reach
Wizard Island, and see the surroundings
from a point of observation seldom
attained by visitors. We were also well
paid for thelrouble and expense, for
trie reason that while the view from the
shore is grand beyond description, that
rnlirniiiprt ' frnm flip ic rmrirl.'nlilv
and inspires one . with feelings of awe
and awakens a depth of appreciation
for the sublime unequaled. Portland
Standard,
'lhe Four (treat SIoHtnet,
Moses, the son Amram, he who
brought the children of Israel out of
Egypt, who broke the chains of slavery,
our great lawgiver, was our first great
Moses.
Moses ben Mninman, known as Mai
tuonides, who lived in the twelfth ccn
lury, a scientific investigator, a writer of
puiiosopmc worKS, a siuueni 01 medicine,
and rich in Talmudical learning,
he was our second great Moses.
Moses Mcndclsson, born in 1729, a
modern thinker, and a pursuer of the
philosophy of the former, who was full
of Jewish piety, and yet succeeded, to
raise the social elevation of his Jewish
brethern, he was our third great Moses.
Moses Montefiore, whose death we
now mourn, who was principally known
for his unbounded love for all man
kind, but most particularly for his unlimited
philanthropy toward his
; he put into practice the teachings
of his three great predecessors, and
was our fourth great Moses. Hcbtew
ourial,
Cuban Affair,
Havana, Dec. 3. The civil Governor
has resigned. The Governor-General
has been authorized to draw
on the Spanish Government for
$500,000,
hADT COltRlSSPOSnHXTftr
Xlielr l'oieer fo l'cnetrate Hxeluiilre Cir
clet if Society.
Col. Higginson, writing in the Bazar,
tells of a ladv who said that she should
look forward with perfect satislaction to
the coming Summer, if she knew that
there was not such a thing as a lady
correspondent in the world, and he
himself adds, reckoning up her tribulations,
that she knew that, if there were
a wedding in her house the most inti
mate details of the trousseau would be
sectii and reported, or imagined and reported.
Little docs he, in his masculine
honesty, know of the wiles of the
"lady correspqndent," that is to say,
the "lady'' who feels that she stoops in
becoming n "correspondent." A woman
who by virtue of her family's import
ance and elevation of her own character
leads society in one of the principal
cities ol the country, tells a good story
of ohc of these persons. "I sent her a
card for the church when my daughter
was married," she says, "because, as
Carlyle remarked to Mallock, 'I knew
her mother,' but I stopped there, determined
that she should not enter my
house; but just at the moment when the
very cream of my guests appeared, in,
she walked) cool as an arctic snow,
clung to my best usher's arm and
forced him to show her the presents,
then mercifully sent him off, took notes
of gowns for a time, and then pounced
on the young man of the evening, made
him leave his party'and take her down
to supper, and then, calm as a Summer
zephyr, floated up to me withf 'Good
evening. It has been a beautiful wedding,
and I'm so much obliged to -you
for an opportunity to see everything:'
Lady I Why my laundress would" not
behave so 1 I "would rather starve with
Helen Harkness than succeed like that
woman. And she spoke of. my 'distinguished
doiiftesy' in henlettcr. How I
longed to be without it for two minutes,
to talk to her, and do justice to her I "
Anecdote of Andrew iToltimon.
'Just preceding the war," said a
Tennessee man, "Andrew Johnson had
many enemies in I enncssec, and once
when he was billed for' an. evening
speech at Nashville, the report was
spread thatxif he dared to speak he
would be either mobbed or egged, and
perhaps assassinated. AVhen the hour
lor assembling came the house was already
thronged and Andy Johnson was
on the platform. He promptly arose,
and going to the front took a pistol
from his pocket and cocked it. He
then opened the meeting by saying :
'Gentlemen and fellow-citizens : It is
meet that when free men assembled for
discussi' n of important business interests
everything should be done decently
and in order. Now, I have
been informed that a part, of the proceedings
on the present occasion is the
assassination of the individual addressing
'
you.
"Here he grasped the pistol firmly
with his right hand, threw open his
coat with his left, and continued : 'I
propose that this little matter be the
first business taken up. If any man
comes here to-night for that purpose
let him not speak, but shoot.'
"At this there was a pause, and no
one replied. 'Ah,' said Mr. Johnson,
'I see I have been misinformed. I .will
proceed with the meeting.'
"And there was not a ripple of dis
sent in the hall that night. Johnson
was applauded at every period, and he
had not atneneiny present who dared
to groan above his breath." Cleveland
Leader,
Attcc JtcllcD.
Jacob Z. Davis has enriched the
State Mining Bureau with gifts of
models of the Aztez calendar stone,
the sacrificial stone, and some genuine
obsidian knives, which were once actually'
used by priests in taking the
hearts from the bodies of thos'e sacrificed.
The models are made in plaster,
and colored to resemble the black
basalt of which the originals are made.
The calendar stone at Mexico is seven
feet in diameter. The face is a fac
simile of the mystic symbols or signs
by which periods of time were marked
by the Aztecs, and the sides are elaborately
carved. The stone is circular,
on a squaie base, in which are cut
lines and figures, which doubtless had
an important meaning. The sacrificial
stone possesses a more melancholy in
terest, Uie original js thirteen feet
across its face, which is filled with concentric
channels ciit in circles around
the central bowl. From this bowl a
channel is cut straight across to the
edge of the stone, intersecting the circular
channels and gradually widening
toward the outer edge, to accommodate
and carry off the blood that
flowed from the human sacrifices.
Alta California.
IYeatne of Great Men,
Alexander was toofond of strong
drink.
JuliUs Cnesarwas inordinately vain
and fond of dress.
Demosthenes, was always on the
platform when everything was serene;
and under it when there was, danger.
.Peter the Great was a glutton and a
drunkard.
Napoleon was addicted to lying ; so
much so that the habit became no
torious.
Sheridan was never able to give up
theJ)o'ttle and the gaming table.
George Washington occasionally
swore -when he was very mad.
Disraeli started out a dandy and re
mained one to the last.
General Santa Ana had n weakness
for cock-fighting.
David Kalakaua ate poi while
foreigners ruled Jiis Kingdom.
dUtctioii! Salts.
ORDER OF SALES
LTONSf & COHEN,
at t'heik salesrooms.
T
Wednesday, December 23d,
At .7 P. M.wiiOLlDAV GOODS.
LYONS 8r COHEN,
88 ' .iMCfonrer.
SPECIAL NOTICE!
, t
Just recclVcd a consignment of
Wax Dolls;
(Dressed and undrcsstu),
Baby Carriages,
Accordeons.
A splendid Jot of
Oil Paintiril s.
And Oleograplts,
EX "JUPITER."
Also n, few cases of
Extra Manija Cigars,
Show pases,
And a small line of Ladies , Misses ,
Men's anilYouths'
Boots, Gaiters & Shoes.
All of which will he1 sold to the Trade at
reasonable prices. I ""
I.XON$C OOUKN,
Auctioneers ,t G'oiiimiJMfoit Sferehant
"ARISTONS"
IMPROVED STYLH OF
HAND ORGANS,
WITH A tARGE' ASSORTMENT OF MUSIC,
" For sale by . "'"V
H. HACKFELD & GO
JT: JT. W illiqums.,
No. 102'FORT STREET. . ,
Leading . Photographer of Honolulu.
WORK FINISHED IN
Water Colors. Crayon,
India Ink or Oil,
Photo. Colored &n.
The only complete collection of
Ialaud Views,
Ferns, Shells.
Gurlositlos. Sea
Charges Moderate.
WRITING PAPER, WRITING PAPER
Now in itodc, with additional Eastern Invojcel
iOute A fine variety of the
CONNECTICUT YAHBY MILLS
rfi,r,,Quilur'
Capj Less), .Letter, Note and Bill Paper, -
T I '
Aisoitcd weights. '.Also Marcus Waid's Itlsh Liner
Flat FoTiu mid Note paper, plain, or can he
ruled up to suit any older,
At xuoH. a, linelM'n
iloticcc. . .
Furnished Rooms.
Conveniently and NEATLY FURNISHED
ROOMS, Single or Double, can be had at
NO. I KUKUI STREET (near Fort).
44- m '''."
.NotloBiv
From and afier this date Mr. C. K. Miller
will attend 10 my subscription book agency.
WILLIAM CLARK.
Furnished Cottage Wanted.
BV A DESIRABLE TENANT.
Address l'lislnflipfltnir Nil. 1(1. ttatintr lo
cation, description:!)!" house and lowest rent.
Removed.
Dr. EmcrSon has removed his residence and
office (o 196 Fort street, lately occupied by
Capt, Hayley. Office hours from 8 to 10 A,
M I to 3 v, M., 6130 to 8 p. it, Telephone
No. 149, both Mutual and Bell Telephones
used.
(SScitcvnl i)bct'tiocmcntf.
Cr'ATTS'
HEADIQUARTER&
is .OrPBKT.
., - , f '1
"With an 'excellent assortment of
New aiid' Seasonable Goods
In keeping with lhe usual extra
quality of novelties and desirable
Books, Toys, Fancy Goods,
Christinas Curds,
Kor which this establishment's -noted.
Special Holiday Editions of Poets,
, In fine bindings, Persian and Turkey
Morrocco, Alligator and Seal Skin,
Tree Calf, Plush and Clotli.
Praag's Prize Cards (plain and fringed),
Xmai Aloha (fringcdllookmarks,
Fine Plush Cools, Celuloid Sets,
, .Brackets,
EBONY FRAMES &CABINETS,
Steam and Electric Toys,
New Tdys and'Games,
PACIFIC COAST DIARIES FOR 1886
(Pocket and Office siies.)
Dreka's Dictionary Blotters, Papeteries,
, Juvenile' Books (i fine assortment),
Etc., Etc., Etc. .
Together with a full and complete
line of Stationcry.and Blank Books.
All orders faithfully attendedo. Prices as
reasonable as good Goods will warrant,, and
cheapest in the long run.
TltOS. U THRUM,
104 Fort Street.
MELLEE & HALBE'S
Ico Cream JPavlox
AND
COJYFJZCTIOJYfift r.
Lincoln's Blook, King Street,
A. Tlno Assortment 'of
CANDIES AND CAKES,
ALWAYS ON HAND.
PARTIES SUPPLIED.
?43-Yf
WENNEll & 'CO.,
ManufactutlniOnd Importing
JEWELERS,
No. OS Fort, Street
Have Just received per "Mariposa" the mo.t ele
gant assortment ot
FIJNJi JEWliLRY,
SOLID AND 1'I.ATltD SILVER WAKE
Ever brought to this marlae'.
Clocks, AVntolies,
lctB, Pius, Lockets, Gold Cliniiiu
ami Cutmly, Sleeve Buttons
Studs, Etc., Etc.
Anil ornaments of all klmls.
Elogaut Solid Silver Ton Sots,
nd all kinds of silver wars suitable for prosentation.
These goods are all of the finest quality and latest
designs and comprle icomultte stock of all articles In
this branch of bu.lne.s which will be sold at close
figures. .
KUKUI AND SHELL JEWELRY
Made o order.
Vhe repairing branch of our business we regard as an
Important one, and all Jobs entrusted o us will
be executed In a manner second to none.
Ktiyravlny
Of every description done to order, particular iltrji
Slots is paid lo orders and job work from the
other Islands.
(Scitcml ubci'ticcmcntc.
JBUY
Khifs, UndemeaTHosiervTNebkwear
FROM
CHS. :JV
.
' '
, We can salely . guaranteed , saving. of-: a.e;
. ' ' ' "
' '. i
etc." Call and see what we offer.'
CHAS.
S3 tf
. lEMElJCBEl .!
That the undersigned has this
. supply of
Men's & Boy's Custom Made Clothing;
r
Shrunk. Well and carefully made, easy fitting, stylish
cut.and most important,
tjO:"V7"
Every garment warranted as represented.
Also, just opening this day, the finest, neatest, most
stylish, jiobby, well made, flexible
Ever imported here or anywhere else.
FIRST COMB-FIRST SERVED.
f
Large Assortment of Holiday Ms!
WEST, DOW & CO.,
Have on hand, in addition to their usual large stock, a select assortment of
ir'aixcy Goods axidL Toys,
' """ Too numerous to mention.
a,nl Iictis.i'e""loluldiiig'Si,
. . - Also, just receiveil per steamer Alameda, an elegant stock of
' F U; R; N I T U-R-E.::.: :
Consisting in part of .
Light and Dark Cedar and Ash Uedroum Sets, '
. Three Quarter and Full Size Ash Bedsteads,
Dining Room, Cottage, Nurse and'Children's Chairs aud' Rockers, assotted. ,
A Fine Assortment of Holiday Goods to arrive by next Steatne
73-1 m
13.. R DILLINGHAM,
President & Manager.
Pacific Hardware Company
JSTo. 74 and 70 Fort Street.
Successors to Dillingham & Co., and Samuel Nott.
HOLIDAY GOODS !
JUST RECEIVED EX S. S. "ALAMEDA" AND "ST. PAUL."
Xu&TEST DESXQltfS 1ST
Sllrer Elated. T7s7"a,a:e,
01.a.rLd.eliers a,rs.d. Laanpe,
TTTatex filters axxd. Coolers,,
Etc., Etc., Etc. -
H. E. McINTYllE & BR0.9
IMPORTERS AND 0EALER3 IN
Groceries, Provisions. and Feed.
SCijiHt Coriioi' XToi'l
Nrw irnnils received hv everv uacket from
tOtlJR
nSHEL.
lV - "i - 1 ' j -.,
"per cent to purchasers bf'','clothing . f -
.- . . - ,V ' ''
v..
J. FISHEL,
day received an additional
elegant
lasr
M, BffcI3S"DESJRlVV".
JAS. G. SPENCER,
Secretary & Treasurer.
7
iumI JCinK Bti'ootH.
the Eastern States and Europe. Fresh Coli'
fornia Produce hy every steamer. All orders faithfully attended lo, and Goods delivered ta
any patt of the city rce of charge. Island olders solicited. 'Satisfaction guaranteed. Post-office
Uox No. 4S I Telephone No. 92. 21 iy
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