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The citizen. (Berea, Ky.) 1899-1958, October 03, 1912, Image 1

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PRES I IDENT ' S OFF I CE
I3FI?EA COLLEGE
I3EKEA KY
COMPJ
Citizen
BER.EA PUBLISHING CO.
(INCOIirollATKII)
J. P. FAULKNER. Mtiuger
Knowledge Is power and the
way to keep up with modern
knowledge la to read a good
newspaper.
Bnltrnt al tSi roM-ojirr ol Berta, .
Horn mnU mntlfr
Devoted to t!b.e Interests of tlci& Mountain IPeopl
Vol. XIV.
Five cents a copy.
DEREA. MADISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, OCTORER 3, 1012
One Dollar a year.
No. 14
9
Money For You In It
When you get a chance like this at
clothes like these you had better take ad
vantage of it. The profit is all yours.
We are willing to give you our profit as
a means of clearing the summer stock.
HART,SCHAFFNER & MARX
Clothes and other good things to wear at
less than they are worth.
R. R. COYLE
BEREA,
KENTUCKY
WHATJOJLIP
Our attention haa been called tlmo
and again to a particular resect In
which The Citizen Is valuable It In
the fact that bo much la found lu
1U columns that people want to kfcp
tho fact that It Is valuable for
clipping. Tho Editor has made It a
practice for many years to clip and
preserve tho beat things that he find
In papers aad magazines. And, Ix-foro
ho took chcrgo of Tho Citizen ho
frequently clipped from Its columns,
and we know that many are doing
likewise
Our farmers page should apical
strongly now to every enterprising
farmer, and It seems. If ho Is really
ercklng Information and wishes to
profit by It, that he could not do bet
ter than .to clip from week to week
the suggestions ho finds on this
pago. Tho artlclo this week will never
grow old "Liming Land.''
And wo frequently publish joe in a
the best In tho language. Ono this
week, entitled '"Our Ilesurrectlon,"
ought to ba preserved In every homo
Into which The Citizen goes.
Tho houao-wlfe. It would seem,
could not afford to let tho various
articles In our Domestic Sclenco De
partment bo loat. There Is some
thing In every ono that she can clip
with great profit. And there Is much
for tho Bchool teacher In our Teach
ers' Columns. And even tho politician
might find something of vnluo theso
days.
Ho reads tho newspapers to llttlo
advantage, who does not clip. Boon
we hope to describe a good method
of preserving clippings.
. CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE
3 VAOE FIRST
Fdltoritls
Kentucky News
World Ntwa
United States News.
A Republican View.
PAUE TWO.
Editorial.
Temperance Notes.
Heart to Heart Talks.
1'ACJE TIIHEE
Our Teachers Department.
Homo Courso In Domestic Science.
Smiion.
Sunday School Lesson.
How Different Insects Mako their
Kunny Noises.
PAUE FOUR
Locals.
Homo Town Helps.
Lincoln Institute Dedicates Main
liulldlng.
PAOE KIVHS
Ucrea's Indian Fort.
Kitchen Cabinet.
I' AO 12 SIX
Announcement of Serial Story.
Chlldrens' Column.
Should Women Vote.
Would Have Profited by Listening to
Women.
I'AOE SEVEN
Intensive Farming
Horticulture
I'AOE EIGHT
ICuiteru Kentucky News,
Poem.
Toft Would Aid Farmers.
WORyjEWS
Balkan Situation Causing Anxiety
Nicarsguan Revolutionists Surren
der. Irish Fight Homo Rule.
English Politics Unsettled. Japan
Swept by Storm.
POWERS BECOME ANXIQUS
European statesmen aro asking
themselves who Is to savo the "Near
Hast" from a great calamity and
probablo destruction, If Uio present
threatened uprising breaks out In
tho Ilalkan Btatcs. Tho ''Towers' aro
supposed to caro fcr those HtUo coun
tries but Jealousy exists as to which
shall act first.
In tho event of war with Turkey
tho smaller Ilalkan states are almost
suro of defeat. Thin would lead to In
terference on tho part of their guard
ian, tho government at St. Petersburg
end other Iowcrs would coma In and
'claim a sharo In tho bpoIIs.
j REVOLUTIONISTS SURRENDER
I General Iena, leader of tho Nlcara
guan revolutionists Is now In tho
hands of Uio United States govern
ment and Is being sent to Panama
under a heavy guard. Ho and 700
followers surrendered to Hear Admir
al Southcriund on the night of Sept.
2t, which act Is taken as an Indica
tion of tho approaching end 'of tho
revolution. It la thought that Gen.
Mena preferred to currender to tho
U. S. authorities rather than risk
,111s fate In tho handc of his enemies.
General Zcledon and his forces will
doubtless attempt to rcstoro the old
order of affairs slnco tho revolution
ists aro disorganized and without n
leader.
'COVENANT AGAINST HOME RULE
Tho latest development In tho
otrugglo agalnct Homo Rulo In Ire
land Is tho solemn covenant enter
ed Into by tho UlBtcrmcn, Orange
men and others cf tho Protestant
faith to resist It
Tho covenant binds them "to use
all tho means Uiat may bo found
necessary to defeat tho conspiracy to
set up homo rule In Ireland," and
also to refuse to recognize tho author
ity of an Irish Parliament. Tho op
position Is Protestant aud justifies
Itself on the ground that tho govern
ment will bo Catholic, tho Catholics
being In tho majority In Ireland.
ENGLISH POLITICS UNSETTLED
Tho Drltlsh press prophesies that
tho days of Radical Rulo In England
aro numbered. Political rumors fill
tho air but tho government refuses
to bo Interviewed. Parliament will
probably work cn tho Homo Rulo bill
till ChrUtmas but plana aro on foot
among tho oppocltlou to prcclpltato
auothor general clxtlcti.
8T0RM SWEEPS JAPAN
Tho severest ctcrm In tho last CO
years swept over Japan, tho 23th.
Tho entlrvi counliy suffored, tho
damage, bolng estimated at over
120,000,000 whllo tho loss of llfo was
heavy and thousandc are hcmelcos.
At aifu 262 peopla were killed an.l
283 Injured. Twenty thousand build
Inge were demolished at Osaka and
all tho harbors varo badly damaged.
Several vessels woro lost.
THE YELLOW STREAK
Seeing a man wearing a Tuft badge in one of li in audiences in
Missouri last week, Mr. Kooesvelt pointed him out arid, declaring that
the badge was yellow, an appropriate color, raid, "Any msn
who supports Mr. Taft for the presidency lias n jillow rtriak in Mm."
A yellow streak! Any man who stipmrts President Taft for
the prettittency has a yellow streak in him!
Haa it come to tho point in this country, then, that an honeat
difference of opinion cannot be tolerated t If n man does not really
believe as some other men buliero, and would have him believe, hu is
to bo denounced told that there in a yellow at reak in him in other
words that he is corrupt; has not tho interest of his country at heart;
is not a patriot; in an "undersirable citizen."
There are a good many men throughout the country whose in.
telligcnce and integrity have never been questioned, who do not
think that tho time litis come yet to discard the Republican party.
They think it is less corrupt than when Ilnnnn held sway, or than
when Hons I'latt dictated the nomination of Mr. Roosevelt for tho
Vic Presidency, and they are going to vote for President Taft. Rut
they have a yellow streak in them I
There are still a few old soldiera whom the Republican party
and its first president called to the front in defense of the nation,
and to whom their party is a synouvm lioth for liberty and progress,
who might coufesH that it had rnad many mistakes, but who prefer to
seek to purify it rather thnn to desert it, and many of whoso names
will go under the log.cabin for tho last time this "fall. Yet a man
whom they have loved, whom they have praised and whom they have
twice; honored with their votes, ssya that they have n yellow streak in
them. The. old soldiers who (rite their red blood to unite the nation
have a yellow streak in them! .
There are some men a great many honest men who hnve read
and aro still reading both sides of the question, who do not believe
that Col. Roosevelt was robbed of the nomination at Chicago. They
have been waiting for the proof of tho charges aud no proof has been
given only the bare statement of the defeated forces that they were
defrauded. And these statements are not convincing in the face of
the defense offered by the Republican National Committee. These
men aje forced by conviction to cast their votes for the nominee of
the party. And yet, however honorable and honest they may be,
they haven yellow streak in them, for an honorable man has said so!
Tho country is enjoying an unusual degree of prospreity some
thing hardjy ever before known during a presidential campaign.
Labor is employed every day, wages are good and the working
classes are in better circumstances than ever before known. There
are, therefore, many honest people who can't beliere that the present
administration has been quite so bad ns it in said to have been and
who are going to vote for President Taft in recognition of his achieve
ments. These men, nevertheless, have a yelloio streak in them!
Mr. Roosevelt says so and it must be so.
In the pre-nomination campaigns about two huudred and seventy
contests were, instituted by tho Roosevelt organization. More than
two hundred of these were so flimsy that they were never presented
to the committee, their confessed obj'ect being psychological effect.
But has not Mr. Roosevelt forgotten his psychology Possibly the
declaration that every one who honestly opposes him has a yellow
streak in him may win for him support, but we doubt it. Surely
the psychological effect of his method of campaigning ought to be his
undoing.
A CALM DISCUSSION
The Citizen has opened its columns to a calm discussion1 of the
issues that confront the voter ns seen from the three nngles or points
of view the Republican the Democratic and the Progressive. .
It waa hoped to have the three papers for the same issue but only
the one The Republican View which is presented below was re
ceived in time for publication. The others are to follow.
This may seem to be a uovel scheme, but The Citizen stands for
a free, frank, full, fair, aud open discussion of all problems believes
that every phase aud all sides of a question should be seen before a
decision is made, aud, as it has asked every voter to bear all sides and
think calmly before deciding, so it gives its readers that privilege with
in its own pages.
Tho gentlemen who have been selected for this discussion are
conscientious in their views and not given to excitement and each has
been asked to present his party in its best light.
"HONESTLY, WHAT ARE YOU RUNNING FOR, THE PRESI
DENCY OR FOR REVENGE?"
-iiii -i
From the New York Herald.
MR. FARMER
Two Car Loads of Globe and Equity
FERTILIZER
For Fall sowing,- just arrived.
Prices interesting and terms liberal.
Sec them bcloreyou buy.
CHRISMAN'S
"THE FURNITURE MAN"
UNITED STATES NEWS
President Asked to Extend Civil Serv
ice Classification. Army Officers
Dropto Death in Aeroplane Roose
velt Contradicts Wilton. To Tes
tify as to Campaign Funds. Wilson
Downs Boss Smith. Conservation
Congress In Session.
' EXTENSION OF CIVIL SERVICE
RECOMMENDED
A monster petition cigncd by 20,000
Iostma8tcrs and p:ecentcd to Pres.
Taft by a delegation from tho Post
masters association, which met at
Richmond, Va., recently, will likely
result in the classification of a
fourth clas3 postmasters under the
Civil Service.
Pres. Taft desires to see tho post
offlco department removed from
political Influence and he has rec
ommended cuch legislation to Con
gress, but final action has not yet
been taken. However, tho President
now has tho authority, under certain
limitations to place tho fourth class
offices under civil cervlce rules.
OFFICERS DASHED TO DEATH
Second Lieutenant Lewis Rockwell
and Corporal Frank F. Scott wero
dashed to death at tho U. S. Army
aviation field, College Park, Md.,
Sept. 28th.
Lieut. Rockwell waa making a test
flight for a military aviation llccua-),
with Scott aa a passenger. They had
been In tho air but a few minutes, not
ascending more than 500 feet, and had
returned almo3t to tho ground when
a sudden turn of tho machine caused
It to fall.
ROOSEVELT CONTRADICTS
WILSON
Col. Roosevelt, speaking at Atlanta,
Ga., on Sept. 28th, took up the state
ments of Gov. Wilson concerning
some of his actions and policies and
denied them flatly aa "not merely an
untruth but tho direct revereo cf
tho truth." In reply to a statement
of Gov. Wilson's questioning tho le
gality of Col. Roosevelt's actions In
the Tennessee Coal Co. case tho
(Continued on Tagt Two)
IN OURJWN STATE
Schools for Farmers Courier's Ed
itor Sick. State Guard to try Ty
phoid Serum. Lexington Banker
Dies Good Roads Congress.
SCHOOLS FOR FARMERS
Under tho Joint supervision of the
U. S. Department of Agriculture and
tho Kentucky Stato government cx-
tension plaus are being formulated
by which a thorough system of Agri
cultural Instruction io to be establish
ed In each of tho cno hundred and
twenty couutlcs of the state.
T. R, Bryant of tho State University
Is to bavo charge of tho work and
Is now In Washington to receive de
tailed Instructions. Upon his return
he Is expected to place superinten
dents in tho various counties and
Inaugurato the scheme. In Madison
and Henderson counties tho work la
now on foot among the farmers.
COLONEL WATTERSON SICK
Col. Henry Wattereon, editor of
tho Louisville. Courier-Journal, who
was taken ill In New York a short
time ago is reported much improved.
There was considerable anxiety over
his condition for a few days but tho
attending physician now thinks ho
will be ablo to return to Loulsvlllo
this week.
SERUM TO PREVENT TYPHOID
Captain J. R. Sams, commander of
Co. C. Kentucky National Guard,
has mado application for a supply
of typhoid fovcr serum with whloh.
ho hopes to vacciuato himself and
tho members of tho Lexington Com
pany to render them Immune from
typhoid. The war department has
been testing tho serum and where
over It has been tried It has proven
very satisfactory In preventing tho
disease.
NOTED KENTUCKIAN DIES
Mr. J. Waller Rhcdes, president of
the Phoenix Third National Bank and
treasurer of Fayette County, died at
tho Capitol Hotel In Frankfort, Thurs
day morning, from a paralytic stroke.
Mr. Rhodes waa widely known and
Coutlnutd on Pge Two
A Republican View
Much to the Credit of the Present Administration Not a Time For
Republicans to Desert Blame for Events at
Chicago to Be Divided.
Time for Reflection
Tho political situation at tho pres
ent time Is complex and confusing.
It Is not a tlmo to call names but
la a fit occasion for reflection un
principles of government and for a
frank and courteouo exchango of
Opinion.
Tho writer haa always acted with
Continued on page Firc
NOW IS THE TIME
to see us about your Rool. Winter will be here
soon. Orders are coming in fast. The price ot
steel is advancing rapidly. The Rest Time is
Right Now. Drop us a card in order to get you
on our list.
Berea School of Roofing
HENRY LENGFELLNER, Mgr.
We have the goods the quality of workman
ship and the right price. $5.00 per square for a
roof worth $6.00 to $7,00 is cheaper than $4.00
for a roof worth only $3,99. Just like your Gal
vanized fence so your Galvanized Roofing will
rust if you get the cheap kind.

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