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The citizen. (Berea, Ky.) 1899-1958, October 10, 1912, Image 1

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PRESIDENT'S OFFICE
I? El? FA COLLEGE
HEP E A KY
The Citizen
MtlUt A PUBUSMNG CO.
(INOORrOBATKDJ
J. P. FAULKf, IteMfw
Xaewle4ce ki fwr wU tlw
way ta keep up wRk as era
kaewkdf e k ta read a (4
Mwiaaper.
MUrt4 i 1 lM-k i Brrtc, ATy., m mrf
chut MtaMir,
Devoted to tifcio Interests of ttie JMtoiaritgiiTi 3?eo;ple
Vol. XIV.
Five cent a copy.
DEKEA. MADISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, OCTOBER 10, 1912
One Dollar a year.
No. 15
Money For You In It
When you get a chance like this at
clothes like these you had better take ad
vantage of it. The profit is all yours.
We are willing to give you our profit as
a means of clearing the summer stock.
HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX
Clothes and other good things to wear at
less than they are worth.
R. R. COYLE
BEREA,
KENTUCKY
INTERESTING FEATURES
Tho new story, "Tho Girl of. Tho
Llinbcrlost," begins this week. Those
Uiat aro following Uio continued Bto
rlca In tho pair of course will not
mtsa this one. And tho first Install
ment should not Uo overlooked. Wo
havo said much In iiralBO of "Freck
les" of which "Tho (ilrl of Tho Llm
lrlost'' Is Uio s-.-qucI, and our rcud
crs havo found that wo did not pralso
"Freckles" too highly. A little Inter
on letters will begin to coiuo In tell
ing ua whnt a treat tho now story Is.
On another pago Uils week wo havo
u letter from a lady In llllnolB who
statcB that sbo aud her children nad
every word of "Freckles" nnd that
they loaned their paper to their neigh
bors. Wo Invito all of cur renders io
do tho samo thing, or something bet
terget their neighbors to subscrlbo
for tho paper.
Two good nrtlclec this week aro
'Tho Selection of Seed Corn" on
jjago 7 and "Suggestions for tho "Oe
, o'graphy Class" on pago 3. Tho farm
er and tho teachev should not omit
An article for everybody, which wo
UtLyv considered of enough linportanco
, to icak of In an editorial, Is from
Jffcejjkato Hoard of Health, "How to
tRfeveot and Curo Diphtheria."
Aaather article that wo call sicclal
Attention to Is by Mr. Chas. II. Llnds
rlrTi "I'rotfrcMlvo Democracy." H
tatke. Bccond of the articles to bo
ifWaJahod us from the view-point jf
tbJJhreo different ionics. Mr.
Llney statca tho cauto of DcmocKu
cJa'tia candid end Uiorough-goliiK
fashion,' and wo thank him for his
prestation.
pMTENTS OF THIS ISSUE
vpagb KinsT
Editorials
KestiM&y News
UaltosfKatts New.
LlneeUjastltuto Dedication.
Progressive Democracy.
"t PAGE TWO.
Editorial ,
TempWaaee Notes.
Prosperity for Terry.
WORLD MEWS'
Peaca Between Italy and Turkey New
Outbreak In Mexico Nlcaraguan
Rebels Captured More Marines and
Blue Jackets Killed.
ITALY AND TURKEY AT PEACE
A dispatch from London, Oct. 4,
states' that Italy aud Turkey havo
negotiated terms for peaco and that
tho pact was signed In Switzerland
last week.
NEW OUTBREAK IN MEXICO
A detachment of rural guards in
cluding a number of women and chil
dren wero almost totally annihilat
ed In a fight with rebels near Sul
tepec on October 0th. Only three men
and ono woman are said to havo
survived out of a detachment of CO
rurales.
NICAItAGUAN REBELS CAPTURED
Tho entlro rebel army In Managua,
together with all Its arms, ammuni
tion and other supplier was captured
at the end of last week after a four
hours' struggle with tho government
troops.
MORE MARINES KILLED
Notwithstanding tho report of tho
capturo of tho ontlro rebel forces
of Nicaragua, later advices recount
an engagement In which two Ameri
can Marines and two 131 uo Jackets
wero killed. Fifty rebels lost Uielr
lives, tho others wero captured and
disarmed.
)
-nI
I' AGE THREE
Our Tattefeeu Department.
Mome Course in Domestic Science.
Bferraoa5fc
BundayiScheoi Lesson.
. J',.PAGK FOUR
Local V 4 . -
HomaTo'wa Helps.
Dlphtkorta.
iaXJJ'AaE K,VB
Chllhya"'4 Column.
KUojMtafCabjntt.
IialkaaiWtuatlon.
Taft'Oafckmpalgn Iocuce.
t. x'' '
V PAOE SIX
SorlalikHary Tho Girl of tho Llraber-
gSPAOK SEVEN
lateajjrSlWrmlng
Hi?iOK EIGHT
EastSrtftKastucky News.
roes; ' "
LINCOLN INSTITUTE DEDICATION
Lincoln Institute of Kentucky open
ed Its doors for students October
first and will dedlcato Its grounds nnd
buildings to the work, of Negro educa
tion on Wednesday, October ICth,
with npproprlato exercises, from 9:00
a. m. to 4:00 p. ni. A general Invita
tion Is extended to all who aro In
terested In this great enterprlso to bo
present, enjoy tho exercises, and assist
In making tho occasion a memorable
ono. A very attractive program has
boon prepared. Many "people, prom
inent In educational and other circles,
will speak, and music, especially pre
pared for tho occaclon, will add o
tho enjoyment. We want a host of
peoplo to seo our buildings and
grounds, and become acquainted with
this great educational plant. As dor
mitory accommodations aro limited,
there will ho no night service, thus
Iiormlttlng thco in attendanco to
return homo.
It will bo well to bring basket
lunches, but sandwiches and coffee
will bo sold on the grounds.
Tho Louisville and Interurban Hall
way will run extra cars to accommo
date tho largo number whom wo ex
pect. It will bo well for people at a
distance to make up parties, and so
obtain special rates from tho railroad.
L. and I. cars leavo tho Louisville
station on Jefferson St., between
Third and Fourth, hourly, at fifteen
minutes after tho hour, and arrive
at Lincoln at twenty minutes after
tho following hour, They leave
Sheibyvllle, going west, at ton min
utes beforo the hour, and reach Lin-
Continued on Pb Five
DID YOU GET OUR LETTER?
We sent out, this week, a letter to every subscriber whose sub
scription is overdue. In some cases this is a "socond call" or pla.
The letter recounts many of the Rood thjnga said about The Cit
izen by those who hare recently renewed. It also showa how easily
remittance can be made through the use of the coin card which was
enclosed. It shows further how every one who pajs up and keeps
paid up contributes to the success of the paper aud thus not only
benefits himself but benefits every othor subscriber.
The publishers of The Citizen are seriously considering the adop
tion of a cash basis for all subscriptions and tho prompt stopping of
every subscription at expiration. There is much to be said both for and
against this proposition. A letter on tho Editor's desk now is full of
thanks for the fact that the paper was allowed to go on after expira
tion, thus giving tho writer, who happened to be hard pressed, on
opportunity to pay when it was a. littlo easier to do so. On the other
hand, we occasionally hear from people who complain that we should
have stopped their paper at expiration. Of course, if we should do
that, we should hava to stop crediting anybody and refuse to take ad
vantage of a legal right to continue subscriptions unless notified to
stop.
We hope that every letter sent out will receive the attention that
is due it and that the returns may be such as to make our subscrip
tion list, that is now a more than half paid up list, altogether so.
WARNING AGAINST DIPHTHERIA
Reports from the State Board of Health, based upon information
in the hands of the Bureau of Vital Statistics, deciaro that Diphtheria
exsists in more than twenty counties of tho state and that the death
rato is high.
Diphtheria is a preventable disease and if recognized in time is
easily cured by the antitoxin treatment, and its spread can then be pre
vented by the isolation of tho patient and other sanitary and precau
tionary measures.
We are publishing, on page 5 of this issue, a bulletin issued by
the Board of Health and sent to every paper in the state in an effort
to check the spread of the disease and also to acquaint the people
with methods of prevention, and improved methods of treatment.
There is no subject just now that ahould be studied with any greater
care, and, since the knowledge is definite and ready at hand, we trust
that every reader of The Citizen will take advantage of the opportu
nity to equip himself so as to be' able to help in the warfare against
one of tho hitherto most dreaded diseases of childhood.
A CLEAN FACE
Any one who can remember back twenty-five years cannot fail
to be impressed with the fact that fewer men now wear whiskers a
mustache, burn-sides or a full beard than formerly. And there are
but few who would not agree that this accounts for the fact that men
look neater than formerly, and that it is also conducive to health, in
asmuch as n man with a heavy beard or mustache finds it difficult to
eat and drink in a very decent or sanitary fashion.
A few months ago we saw a picture of one of the most important
committees of Congress iu which there were about twenty-five faces
and only two or three of those had even a mustache. A littlo later,
on a trip into tho mountains, we were impressed by the fact that in
tho promiscuous crowd, that chanced to nearly fill a railway coach
between two stations tho men being farmers, merchants, doctors,
teachers aud general business men only one had a full beard and a
half dozen or so a mustache.
Observation will perhaps verify the statement that, as the ten
dency grows to discard A beard, men are less inclined to bo filthy
with the use of tobacco and to spit promiscuously. Of course the
oue may not follow the othor necessarily, but both apriug from a
common impulse. Certainly iu the lessening of the spitting habit tho
public health is conserved.
If a man will look at a picture he had made fifteen or twenty
years ago with a mustache nearly reaching to his ears or drooping
over hia lips so that it is impossible for him to drink without drink
ing through it, theu will glauce at another mado more recently wb'eu
he was absolutely clean shaven or had his mustache clipped, "ho may
not be willing to agree that the olean shave has been conducive to
his own or the public health, but he will be able to see the improve
ment in his looks.
He Wants No Such Assistance.
a
News Item, Bacon Intimated in the senate that the Republican chance
In the campaign would be enhanced ihould the country be plunged into war
a the result of the disturbance in Nicaragua -or Mexico.
PROGRESSIVE DEMOCRACY
THE NEED
Progressive Age
Wo aro today living in an ago of
progress, an ago of readjustments,
or tho shaping of new policies. We
aro hearing a great deal of the
word "progressive" but progresslv
lom is confined tq no ono class or
party.
History io not a smoothly unroll
ing scroll of monotonous regularity,
but la mado by vast forces, working
for tho moet part slowly, but now and
then with great rapidity and resist
less power, whoso graph is traced ll
gtcat undulating lines. We find such
periods in tho French Rovolutlon, In
tho Oerman Reformation and In the
wondorful reorganization now tak-
Continued on pg Ptoc
MR. FARMER
Two Car Loads of Globe and Equity
FERTILIZER
For Fall sowing, just arrived.
Prices interesting and terms liberal.
See them before you buy.
CHRISMAN'S
"THE FURNITURE MAN"
UHIIED STATES MEWS
Hopefulness in Taft Ranks New
York Democrats Nominate Sulzer
Hadley Stands by Taft Dixon Tells
About Campaign Funds Patterson
Wants to be Senator Rear Admiral
Young Dead.
HOPEFULNESS AMONG TAFT SUP
PORTERS Reports reaching Pres. Toft from
all sections of the country assure him
of victory at the coming election. A
letter from a Chicago man states that
two of tho koenest politicians in that
section who aro associated with tho
present campaign, ono for Wilson and
the other for Roosevelt, admit that
unless something Is dono to check the
tide back to the Republican party,
Toff will surely bo victorious.
Republicans In California send as
surance that they will stand by the
President and support his policies.
Reports from 'Minnesota say "TIw
situation in Minnesota is steadily Im
proving and tho Republicans In this
stale will give a good account of
themselves on election day'
Representative Knapp, a member of
tho LaFollette faction, declares that
Wisconsin Is going for Taft,
SULZER FOR GOVERNOR OF N. Y
Tho New York Democratic State
convention, which began its sessions
ot Syracuse, Oct. 2, nominated Rep
resentative Sulzer to head tho Stato
ticket In tho raco for Governor.
Representative Sulzer Is from
York City and has seven times
a candidate for this nomination.
Dix was also a candidate for
nomination to succeed himself
withdrew beforo the final ballot.
HADLEY SUPPORTS TAFT
In a speech at St. Louis, the Jat
ter part of September, Gov. Hadley
of (Missouri stated that if Pres. Taft
would declare himself In favor of
presidential preference primaries and
nonboss controlled delegations from
tho Southern States to National con
ventions he would give the President
his support.
Now
been
Gov.
tho
but
(Continued on J.tH rage)
IN OURJWN STATE
How White Got on the Ticket Whitley
City the County Seat Prison Com
mission Enforces Law Frankfort's
Mayor Shot Fire at Carlisle Kill
ing In Breathitt Discrepancies in
Insurance Accounts.
WHITE FOR APPELLATE JUDGE
The petition filed by Hon. John D.
Wblto. as the Progressive candidate
for Judgo of the Court ot Appeals In
tho Seventh District was presented
to tho Secretary ot State to be filed
on Oct. 4th, but It was turned down
for tho reason that T. D. Blakey ot
Beattyvillo had a petition already on
fllo for the candidacy.
There was a question as to which
should go on the ticket but It re
sulted in the withdrawal of Blakey
and White is given a clear way.
The petition of J. E. Jones, as tho
Progressive candidate for Congress
from tho 7th District, was reject
ed also because it contained only
seventy of tho 400 names required 'by
law. ' t,
WHITLEY CITY WINS f
In tho election held recently in
tho now county of McCreary to chooso
tho stto for a county seat a dispute
arose as to tho power of tho Board
of Canvassers to pass on tho-legality,
of the votes cast in the election.
Whitley City and Pino Knot wero
tho places being considered in tho
election and tho contest waa so hot
that tho matter was carried before
the Court ot Appeals. Those in favor
of Pino Knot hoped that the court
would approve tho action ot tho
Board but it failed to do so, thus
giving Whitley City the county seat.
PRISON COMMISSION ENFORCES
LAW
Tho Stato Prison Commission is
putting into effect tho law providing
against political assessments, contri
butions or interference in politics by
employees of tho State prison or
houses of reform. Tho following or
der has been Issued:
'Any warden, deputy warden, guard
(Continued 6n-rgc lilght)
NOW IS THE TIME
to see us about your Roof. Winter will -be here
soon. Orders are coming in fast. The price ol
steel is advancing rapidly.- The Best Time is
Right Now. Drop us a card in qrder to get you
on our list.
e
Berea School of Roofing
HENRY LENGFELLNER, Mgr.
We have the goods the quality of workman
ship and the right price. $5.00 per square for a
roof worth $6.00 to $7.00 is cheaper than $4.00
for a roof worth only $3.99. Just like your Gal
vanized fence so your Galvanized Roofing will
rust if you get the cheap kind.

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