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Pages Available: 11,865,420

Title:
The Ekalaka eagle. : (Ekalaka, Mont.) 1909-1920
Place of publication:
Ekalaka, Mont.
Geographic coverage:
  • Ekalaka, Carter, Montana  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
Publisher:
O.A. Dahl
Dates of publication:
1909-1920
Description:
  • Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1909)-v. 12, no. 26 (June 25, 1920).
Frequency:
Weekly
Language:
  • English
Subjects:
  • Ekalaka (Mont.)--Newspapers.
  • Montana--Ekalaka.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01254800
Notes:
  • "Independent in politics," 1912-1913; "a Democratic weekly," 1914-1920.
  • "The official paper of Fallon County," Dec. 19, 1913-Dec. 31, 1915; "the official newspaper of Carter County," May 24, 1918-<May 1919>.
  • Archived issues are available in digital format from the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.
LCCN:
sn 85053090
OCLC:
11887636
ISSN:
2378-8283
Succeeding Titles:
Related Links:
Holdings:
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The Ekalaka eagle. April 2, 1909, Image 1

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The Ekalaka Eagle

Oscar Dahl began publishing the five-column, eight-page weekly, the Ekalaka [Montana] Eagle on January 1, 1909, and continued doing so until he sold the newspaper to Tom and Gladys Taylor in 1946. Shortly after opening, a fire destroyed part of the newspaper office, but that did not deter the publisher. The Eagle is the oldest newspaper in Carter County, Montana, and in fact the oldest business in Ekalaka. The publisher Dahl started with South Dakota newspapers, working at age ten as a "printer's devil" and later as a pressman and editor.

During World War I, the Ekalaka Eagle lobbied for the Red Cross and against the "Kaiser." To cater to the many immigrants in the region, the newspaper ran a weekly column featuring important news from Norway, Sweden, and Denmark entitled, "In the Scandinavian North." Ekalaka became the seat of Carter County in 1917 and served the commercial needs of far-flung cattle and sheep ranches. To accommodate local ranchers, the Eagle published a two-column feature each week with pictures of local cattle brands.

Provided by: Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT