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The Salt Lake herald. (Salt Lake City [Utah) 1870-1909, June 14, 1891, Image 14

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058130/1891-06-14/ed-1/seq-14/

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I 14 THE SALT ULKE HERALD SUNDAY JTTKB 14 18 1 SIXTEEN PAGES 41
t r
T A MEXICAN RESORT
Pretty Indians Sport in Healing
Waters
PICTURES OF AGUAS CALIESTES
What It Costs to Dress a Mexican Dnde A
Look at the Markets and Curiosities
Aztec Lovers
AGCAS CAIJEXTES June 8 1S91 Spe
cial correspondence of THEHERAXD I am
at Aguas Calientes the famous hot springs
of Mexico It is altogether different from
au American health or pleasure resort and j I
it might be bodily transplanted to the soil
of western India and not seem out of plftce
I am sitting in my long highceilinged
room in the Hotel del Plaza It is like all
the rest of the rooms of the hotel on the
ground floor and I call my boy chamber
man to make up my bed by clapping my I
hands It has no windows and it looks out
on a little garden full of most beautiful
flowers The hotel is built around this
garden It is of one story and it makes me
think of a hotel at which I stopped in one
of the native states of Hindoostan Jeyporc
save that there I had to have my own ser
vant and he slept ail night in front of my
door Aguas Calientes contains about I
forty thousand people and ninetenths of
the houses aro of one story They all have
fiat roofs and the water is drained off
through pipes of clay which jut out about
a foot from the edge of the walls These
walls are very thick They are built of
stone or sundried brick and are stuccoed
where they face the street and this
plasteringlike stucco has been painted
in delicate blues or pinks or yel
lows making the whole town one mass
of rainbow colors which strange to
say does not look out of place under this
bright Mexican sun None of these houses
have gardens in front of them They are
built close up to cobblestone sidewalks
so that in going through the town you
seem to be passing between walls of gaily
colored billboards ready for the posters
each of which has a hole in its center for a
door The poorer houses have doors very
roughly made and In the galloping mule
street car that takes you from the depot to
the center of the town you eee few houses
with windows and many of these doors are
filled with queer looking darkfaced people
The men in their red and gailycolorod
blankets look picturesque and the women
with their dark mahogany faces their long
black hair streaming down their backs
freshly wet from their last bath in the hot
waters are in some cases very pretty and
in others as ugly as the Witch of Endor
after an attack of the smallpox
BIO ONLY IX PBICE
As you leave the station you pass the
public bath houses low Spanish buildings
where you can get for from twenty to
thirty cents a bath of any kind you want
and go on up long dusty thoroughfare un
der widespreading green trees into the
business part of the city The business of
this city of forty thousand people is a fair
sample of that of the interior Mexican
town It is big only in the prices asked for
the articles sold Mexico is not a great
business country The most of the firms
are run on small capital and there are hun
dreds of stores which nave not more than
two hundred dollars worth of stock Many
of these have even less and the store
keeper in the mjority of instances has a
little cave of a store without any windows
opening out on the street and he stands be
hind a counter which runs right across the
store in front of the door and offers his
goods for sale for three times
what he expects to get In
the case of the smaller busness
the trader is generally a Mexican and
there are more peddlers in one city in this
country than you will find in ten cities of
the came size in the United States I have
just come from the market Imagine a long I
tier of stalls arouned two hollow squares
which cover the area of a city block These
stalls are occupied by the butchers and
bakers and the candlestick makers wno
have the biggest stocks and the squares
are tilled with bighatted men in white cot
t ton clothes and by redskirted women in
white waists and red skirts who sit under
white umbrellas as big as the top of a small
camping tent with little piles of vegetables
and fruit around them I asked as to prices
and found that things were sold in piles
and not by measures So many little pota
toes made up a pile and I was asked two
cents for four potatoes each of which was
as big as a buckeye A pile of four eergs
costs here three cents and a little pile or
tomatoes and peppers were among the
things sold Peppers both green and red
were sold everywhere and I saw that
some of the bigger market men had great
bins of them They form a part of every
Mexican dish and are eaten in great quan
tities The average Mexican however
eats very little in comparison with us His
market bills are not half as heavy as thuse
of his American brother and a sewing i
basket would contain the daily supply for i
a large family The cheapest thing sold I
seems to be fruit which grows in the shape i
of oranges bananas and lemons very abun
dantly about here and I got splendid on n
pes for a cent apiece
i
A SAMPLE MARKET
About this market the Mexican peddlers
bad collected themselves by the dozens
Here was a woman with two great Jars of
what looked like very thin buttermilk be
fore her She was selling it in glasses
which held from a half pint to a pint to
the passers byat one and two cents a glass
I asked what it was and was told it was
pulque the Mexican beer which comes
from a species of cactus and which is
drunk by the barrel every day throughout
Mexico At the corner beside her before
a cue which looked like a bookcase stood
a shoe peddler His stock was made up of
sharp toed gaiters and by actual count he
had only twenty pairs to sell A little
further on a yellowfaced woman in her
bare feet sat with ten pairs of baby shoes
beside her This made up her whole estab
lishment and around the corner I found a
very pretty Aztec maiden sitting on a stool
and rolling black tobacco into cigarettes
The paper she used was thicker than the
newipaper in which this letter will be
printed and she doubled the naper over the
cigarettes at both ends to make it stay to
gether Before she did so however she
moistered the paper with her cherry lips
V and when I smoked a package of her wares
at the cost of two cents it seemed to me
that scent of the cherries lingered there
still It was about 10 oclock at the time I
visited the market and I found but few
buying Two welltodo Mexican ladies
dressed in black passed through giving di
rections to their servants as to what to
buy but I am told that this was contrary
to etiquette and that the ladies of Mexico
= aeldom do their own marketing but leave
it entirely to the servants
STTLE ASD BAGS
Near the market I found a few very fair
stores but they would be small affairs in a
town of forty thousand In New York or
Ohio and a western city of ten thousand
could show many finer Tho counters here
ran across the whole front of the store and
t only the biggest of them had show win
dows The dry goods stores contained
chiefly French goods and the merchants
were In most cases French or German
c though I found some of them Mexicans I
stopped in front of a hat store which had a
most gorgeous display in its windows and
npriced some sombreros They ranged from
a dollar up to 75 apiece and I am told that
some of these Mexican dudes wear hats
55 that cost more than one hundred dollars
Some of the hatswere trimmed with gold
j and silver cord and I looked at a 50 one
which weighed about ten pounds and
which measured eighteen inches from one
side of the brim to the other It had a
crown a foot high and there was a cord of
j geld rope as big around as my wrist about
j b it Many of the hats had gold and silver
letters upon them and I see many worn
1 which have the monograms of their owners j
I
t = I
I
cut out of silver and sewed on to the sides
They are of many colors a delicate cream
a drab and a black being very comnlon and
they are beautifully made and are said to
be just the thing for this hot sun and the
high winds The same firm sold lathes hats
Most of these came from Paris They were
very highpriced and not at all pretty Near
by I stopped at a Mexican clothing store
and looked at some Mexican pantaloons I
here apain found that the dude of our sister
republic has to pay for his style Many of
the pantaloons were made of buckskin and
the nicest pairs which were lined with
solid silver buttons down the sides cost as
high as 50 and 73 and coats are
likewise high It is not hard for a Mexican
country gentleman to spend from 300 to
HOO on his clothes and when you take into
consideration that be has to sport a saddle
spurs and revolver of like gorgeous char
acter you see that if one of these big
farmers has a crowd of grownup boys his
clothing bills amount to something This
however is the case of only the rich The
I poor hero are so poor that they dont know
how poor they are and their clothes cost
I practically nothing A pair of these cast
off buckskin pantaloons will last a long
time and the ordinary cotton suits worn
by the poor though high considering their
character cost but little A blanket costs
from a dollar or two up and the leather
sandals which are worn almost universally
bv the Indians are nothing more than two
pieces of sole leather as bir as your hand
tied to the top and bottom of the feet with
leather strings These cost 25 cents a piece
and last a long time The dress of the
poorer women is even cheaper thanthat of I
the men and Mexicos 9000000 of peasants I
will have to make more money and have
greater needs before the land can become a
greatconBumerof the goods of any nation
Their houses are hovels of mud and their
diet is simpler than their clothes consist
ing of little more than corn cake and red
peppers
5OTHIXG POOR BUT THE PEOPLE
The only poor thing however about this
part of Mexico is the people The land
here is as black as your hat and in coming
to Aguas Calientes on the Mexican Central I
Railroad you ride lor miles through fields
which will vie with their crops with the
Valley of the Nile or the Ganges ana I am
told this is called the Garden of Mexico
It certainly Is a wonderfully rich garden
and crops of all kinds grow here in all the
luxuriance of the guano beds along the
coast It is more than a mile above the I
sea and the air soems to revivify the land
so that it produces two crops a year with
out manure From here almost to the City
of Mexico a full days ride on the cars
you go through a farmers paradise and
plains of rich crops stretch away from each
side of the road until their green fades out
into the hazy blue of the mountains in the
distance This region of Mexico has a good
rainfall during the wet season but this is
also aided by irrigation and I see the
method of raising tne water from one level
to another is the same as that used about
Osaka in western Japan It is by a long
pole with a weight on one end and with a
bucket attached to a rope on the other
which works on a second pole fastened up
right into the grounds You see peons
working this crude well everywhere and
the sparkling water flows like bands of
silver through the green This is a great
wheat region and I see corn stalks in
many of the fields Maize is one of tho
great crops of Mexico It can be raisad in
every part of the country and it consti
tutes eighty per cent of the entire agricul
tural product of the land More than one
hundred million dollars worth of it is
raised every year and it forms the food of I
the common people who pound or grind it
it up and make it into the thin flat
griddlelike cakes known as tortillas The
corn is always sold in a shelled state and
such as I have seen has bean white in color
and large in grain
WiTER IS SCARCE
Up to the present time every Mexican
city I have visited is suffering for lack of
water The greater part of the country I
north of here on tho line of the Mexican
Central road is desert and the big mining
towns of Zacatecas and Guanahuato have
hundreds of men who make water peddling
their profession In Zncatecas the water
with the exception of a little stream that
flowsinto a big fountain in the plaza
comes from a spring up on the mountain
and it is brought down on the backs of
little donkeys in red clay jars These jars
are tied on by ropes and the water man
peddles them from house to house as our
dairymen do tbeir milk In Guanahuato
the people are more enterprising and they
have a system of water works which how
ever by no means supplies the demands of
the city The water peddlers here carry
the water about on their backs in immense
Jars of red pottery about four feet long and
a foot in diameter and they tilt these over
when they want to servo a customer In
Zacatecas I saw soldiers guarding the only
workinc fountain of the city and allowing
only so many men and women to dip up
water out of it at a time and back of these
under the blaze of the hot sun other men
and women squatted with gourds and
crocks or oil cans waiting their turn The
water from the fountain was scooped up
by these people as fast as it flowed out of
the half dozen mouths of the fountain and
men and women bent themselves double in
reaching over and catching the drops in
their gourd as it came or in scooping It up
from the edge of the fountain
MOTLEY BATH
Aguas Calientes means hot water and
the hot springs here are among the finest
in the world There are a number them
and the people come bere by the thousands
to bathe in their health giving waters
There is a big bath house kept up I was
told by the town which has excellent bath
ing arrangements and in which there is a
vat of hot water about fifty feet square
which is used as a swimming bath This
is near the depot on the edge of the town
i but I preferred to po to the old baths at the
springs about a mile out in the country
The road to these baths is one of the finest
in Mexico and the sights along it you will
see nowhere else in the world Picture to
yourself a long avenue of cypress trees
which almost meet far above your head
and shut out the dare of the Mexican sun
andjthe silver of the clear sky Let these
trees be very near together and let them
go on and on until they seem to almost come
together in the distance Along the sides of
the road let there be the greenest of grass
and on the right of you as you walk to
wards the bath place a stream of steel blue
water from which the steam rises as it
flows on towards you Let this
steel blue tream flow through a
little aqueduct of white stone and let
this be about three feet wide and about
four feet deep Here you have the back
ground of the picture Now for the show
itself This atream is the waste of the not
springs It is also the bathing place and
the washing place of the commonpeople of
the Aztecs of Aguas Calientes They are
here by the hundredsmen and women
girls and boys lovers and sweethearts
all bathing together in the warm refresh 1
ing and healthgiving waters Many of
them have washed their clothes while in
the water and these they have spread out
on the green banks to dry Ucder these
great trees as far as your eye can see
there are white waists red skirs and the
other bright bits of color made by many
colored serapes and the gay rebosas which
lie on the green banks while their owners
are splashing and playing and scrubbing
themselves in the little trench below Here
is a man bathing and his wife sits on the
bank and watches him and the sun creeps
through the trees and paints his dark skin
a rich mahogany Here is a halfnude
Venus naked almost to the waist scrub
bing away washing some clothes by rub
bing them on a rough stone and under a
tree lies an Indian halfdressed but fast
asleep I point my camera at him and his
wife springs up from the stone whern she
is washing and stands over him as though
she feared the camera was some newfan
gled gun I press the button however
and the lens and the shutter do the rest
XOTHIKC IMMODEST ABOUT IT
I walk along the stream and amuse my
self by taking note of the bathers They
see nothing wrong in their actions and I
note that there is nothing really immodest
bold or indecent about them They think
nothing wrong in families and friends bath1
ing together and after all I have again
forced upon me the feeling that modesty
and Immodesty are matters of custom and
fashion and am reminded of a little maiden
In Egypt who upon seeing me approach
covered her face with her sKirt that she
might modestly hide it
from the eyes of a
msn The Japanese are In many way I
more modest than we are They are in
most things more modest and refined I
Still until lately the sexes bathed there to I
gether in the very capital Itself and virtue
was not injured nor did prudery raise her I
I voice until the Western world taught her
to do so It is simply a matter of opinion
and the old French saw fits the case well
I Honi soft qui mat y pease
FKAXK G CARPENTER
I
I lederd brought in a verdict of not guilty I
THE fULPT AND THE STAGE
Rev F M Shrout pastor United Breth
ren church Blue Mound Kan says I
feel It my duty to tell what wonders Dr
Kings New Discovery has done for me
i My lungs were badly diseased nd my pa
rishioners thought I could live only a few
i weeks 1 took five bottles of Dr Kings
New Dscovery and am sound and well
j gaining 26 pounds in weight
I Arthur Love manager Loves Funny
Folks Combination write After a thor
ough trial and convincing evidence I am
confident Dr Kings New Discovery for
Consumption beats em all and cures when
I everything else fails The greatest kInd
BMS I can do my many thousand frienda is
to urge them to try it Free trial bottles
at A C Smith Cos drug store Regis
Jar sizes M coats and fL 4
POPULAR REMEDY
Mr Jonn Keown tho worthy postmaster
Keown Allegheny County Penn says
Chamberlains Cough Remedy sells better
than any other The reason of this is be
I cause it can always be depended upon Let
any one troubled with a severe cold give it
I a trial and they will find that the first dose
will relieve the lungs and make breathing
easier and that its continued use will free
the system of all symptoms of the cold
The promutness and certainty of this re
medy in the relief and cure of colds has
won for it many sincere friends and made
it very popular For sale by Z C M L
rinitr dent
Fourth Precinct Mass Meeting
A mass meeting of the Democrats of the
fourth paecinct will be held at the Indt1
peL dent school house in the Eighteenth
ward noxt Monday evening at 830 oclock
to nominate fourteen delegates to the county
convention J L RLIX <
President Jeffersonian Democratic Club
ATTENTION MINERS
Stay away from Eureka Utah This
place is overrun with idle men John Dug
ran corresponding secretary Eureka
Miners Union
Mrs GRAHAMS
FACE BLEACH
4
l >
1Ft 5
1 f d
1
RE OVEIII
Freckles Moth Patches Sun
burn Sallowness Pimples
Blackheads and makes
The Complexion as clear is an infants
MICE 150 IQARANTEEI HARMLESS
ALL DRUIEISTS SELL IT
WnOLESALK AGEXTS A 0 Smith k Co Salt
L3ke A W Boner t Co Denver Myers Bra
Drug Co St Louis i Morrison Plummcr oS Co
ChAalra
of
F AUERBACII BRO
1OUR GREAT SACRIFICE SALE
IS STILL ON
We cannot afford to sell New and Desirable Goods at Less Than Cost and pay for T
more than our usual space in THE HERALD besides
rE1sRoD < 51
v
Come and convince yourself that OUR PRICES ARE LOWER than those adver
tised by our competitors or
BEe A IT S J >
Our Motto We Are Never Ontosold Must Be Maintained
I READ AND PROFIT I I I
yo
India Silk In various grades Black White and Turkey Red Damask Table
Cream and Colored at Sacrifice Prices Cloths and Napkins at Sacrifice Prices
Figured Pongees in five qualities choic New lot of Damask Towels three grades
fst designs at Sacrifice Prices at Sacrifice Prices
Pure Dye Silk Surabs various qualities
1200 Newest and Choicest Parasols and
colors at Sacrifice Prices
sew Sun Umbrellas at Sacrifice Prices
Summer Silks in Checks and Stripes
Ourentiro stock Ladies and Childrens
iplendid styles at Sacrifice Prices
Jackets and Blazers at Sacrifice Prices
Silk and Brocade Remnants at Sacrifice
Prices Our entire stock of Ladies Capes an
inFichu3 at Sacrifice Prices
French Dress Patterns the Cheapest in
the City at Sacrifice Prices Our entire stock of Ladies Lovely Tea
Gowns at Sacrifice Prices
Thirty Styles and Qualities of White
Mulls Indias eta at Sacrifice Prices Our entire stock of Readymade Brasses
Twenty Styles and Qualities of Black and Wrappers at Sacrifice Prices v
Zephyrs Check etc at Sacrifice Prices
Balance of Ladies Muslin Underwear will be sold at Reduced Prices to close
out every article at lOc 20a 35k 6oc POe 110 and upwards Only three Skirts
three Gowns three Chemises etc sold to one customer
Our entire stock of Ladies and Childrens Shoe EYJSRY PAIR WAR
RANTED Sacrifice Prices
Our entire stock of Childrens Kilt Suits Childrens WaIsts Childrens Hats
and Caps at Sacrifice Sale
Our entire stock of Gents Furnishing Goods at Sacrifice Prices
If you want to be astonished price our Black and Colored Chantilly and Pura
Silk All over Laces It will pay you to buy now
Our Pure Linen Laces are selling for less than import cost
Buttons and Trimmings at half price
BARGAINS 1ST
Carpets Rugs Shades Linoleums Curtains by the yard or pair In a hundred pat
terns at prices to distance all competition
Portieres and Chenille Curtains greatly reduced
We cannot mention prices on account of lack of space btit intend to msio It
profitable for you to come and examine goods and prices
Our employees are instructed to treat everybody with ejaal courtesy
We do not know the poor from the rich
Come One Ooxne All 1
F AUERBACH BRO
de 5 TURNERS
FINE SHOES FOR GENTS WEAR
The TURNER SHOE requires no breakinf
k In It leads in Accurate Styl s Firstclass p
Workmanship and Durability These are polati
t which commend themselves to every gentlemaa
wearing a fine shoo
LS Perfect in Style and fforkmansliip V
t JS EASY FITTING
AND DURABLE
z c 1 Sole Ace rx ± si Soi Uteh
T
PA7LO POtYDIITOM 4L
I OftiRfNyq
CUEijPES1 I3
j
r
1 LDWGCO
SALT LAKE BUILDING SMAHOFAGTDRMCO
Lumber Dealers Contractors and Builder
SASH SHINGLES DOORS WINDOWS BLINDS MOULD IN OS FMM3
I BOXES SASH WEIGHTS AND BUILDERS HARDWARE
MJn oL1 in A11 It Bran hes
TELBPHO 1ST 10 845
pea and 111132 to 40 N Second West Sts One Block East of U F Bapot
ye also curry a fall line of
Ready Mixed Paints and Sheet and Plate Sta
DAVID JAMES CO
TINNER89 PLU1tIBER
Gas and Steam Fitters
Dealers in Plumbing Hatarlal pump Pipes and PlttiBga
St am Heating Suppliao Tin and Iron Roofing GalTua
bed Iron Cornice Guttering Gardea Rose aM Laws
Sprinkltrt Water Filter Ite
f
No 6 ld siJra fit t
r
e a
C
MILLIONS IN IT I
31r Weeks Expects to Take a Hundred Mil
lions Out of the Dalton
You will be living pretty high when
you take 30000000 out of tho Dalton I
mine said a HERALD reporter to Mr
Weeks ofWilbur Weeks I
We will be greatly disappointed if we
do not take out four times that amount I
said Mr Weeks disdaining to think of any
thing less than 100OoOOOO I
You have the fever worse than an old
49er said THE HERALD scribe I
No sir wo are going on tho judgment I I
of Hank Smith superintendent of the Bul I
lionBeck and who for many years was
superintendent in one of the Comstock
mines Mr Smith pronounces it a I
genuine Comstock lode Anyway it is free I
milling gold ore and that never runs less
than 2OCO a ton
After talking in the hundred million
strain for some time Weeks pulled out of
his pocket three specimens of ore that he
had just received from the mine taken out
at the face of the 90foot tunnel The gold
was sticking out as thick as the rust ou an
old piece of iron and what is more it is I
clear through the stone in thick seams
To Perpetuate Jlacdonalda Name I I I
MONTREAL June 12Thera Is a move
ment on foot here to perpetuate the name I i
of Sir John Macdonald by establishing an
I
organization to be known as The Maple I
Leaf League of Canada on the same prin
ciple as the Primrose League of GreatS I
Britain namely the maintenance of tho I
integrity of the empire upholding relig
ion etc
Debate on German Grain Duties
I
BERLIX June 12In the lower house of
the Prussian diet today the debate on the
grain duties was resumed Von Caprivi
declared it was impossible for the govern
ment to submit to the house the reports
which had been received from foreign
countries in regard the inquiries made by
the government in regard to grain mat
ters But the chancellor added comment
ing on the Russian report there was dau
ber Russia could not supply sufticientgrain
for the use of Germany In conclusion tho
chancellor strongly protested against the
reproach that the government had not paid
duo consideration to tne welfare of the
working people After considerable addi J
tional debate Rickerf motion that the
government should submit to the house the
material upon which the chancellor bases
his recent speech upon the grain duties
was rejected by a vote of 223 to 20
South Sea Sallns Prohibited
SAX FKAXCISCO June 12The action of
the United States in barring scalers from
Behring sea recently has caused the Tas
manian officials to pass an act prohibiting
seal catching in the South Pacific within
extensive boundaries Sealers found near
tile islands risk the forfeiture of their ves
sels and arrest This is a hard blow to the
sealing fleet of this port
McSlov Refused a Sew Trial I
UXIONTOWX Pa June 12Jude In
graham overruled the application for a
new trial in the case of icSlo ad Mike
Disman labor leaders an 1 sentenced Mc
Sloy to a term of imprisonment of two
years Disman who was out on bail did
not appear in court and it is said has
left the country The jury in the case
acrninst Vise Rae Parker and otltr
The Furniture Manufacturers
BOSTOX June 12The National Furni
ture Manufacturers association closed its
annual session today after the election nf
officers Joseph G Sextro of Cincinnati
was made president
Hanchetto Gone to South rlca
Los ANGELES Gala June iA gentle
man intimately connected with H Jay
Hanchette says the latter announced his irk i
teption of going to South America if the
orange carnival at Chicago proved a failure
Detectives have learned that Hauchette
went to New Yom and is now on his way
to South America
Queen Bees Not Dutiable
WAShINGTON June 12Assistant Secre
tary Spalding has decided that queen bees
are entitled to entry free of duty under the
tariff providing for animals specially im
ported for breeding purpose uotuuhstand
big the requirement that the provision for
a certified pedigree showing pure breed
cannot possibly be complied witn in their
case This is in harmony with the practice
under the old tariff but 6 In conflict wnn
the practice under the present tariff of as I
sessing queen aces at the rate of 20 per
cent ad valorem under the provision for
animals not other ise provided for The I
present ruling is based on the representa
tion that these bees are never imported for
other than breeding purposes and that they I
are always of superior breed
Argentine Gold Bill Heconsidpred
Bucxos Arnrs June 12 Owing to the
public opposition to the measure the senate
has decided to reconsider the passage of the
bill to sussuend gold payments for period
of six months
Escape of a Ball Robber
Tncsox Ariz June 12Henrv Miller
sentenced to ten years in the penitentiary
for robbing the mails escaped from the
guard at Casa Granda last night while being
taken to California
VlllIam lilaier Ilanzed
BALTIMORE June 12 William Blaney
was hanged in the jail yard here this morn
ing for the murder of his grandmother and
aunt the night of May 2 ISLO i
I
Himtins a Murderer
ALBAXT Ga June 12 N C Mercer
white was killed by a negro named Craw
ford In a dispute over payment for services
of the latter as expressman Parties cf
men are hunting for tho negro who if cap
tured undoubtedly will be lynched
A SURE CURE FOR PILES
I Itching Piles are known by moisture like
perspiration causing intense itching when
I warm This form as well as Blind Bleed
ing and protruding yield at onco to Dr
Boaankos Pile Remedy which acts di
rectly on the parts affected absorbs
tumors allays itching and effects a perma
nent cure flOe druggists or mail circu
lars free Dr Bosanko 229 Arch St Phil
adelphia Pa Sold by Z C M L Drug
Store
COUNTY CONVENTION
A Call that All Democrats
Should Heed
MONDAY NEXT FOR PRIMARIES
The County Convention to be Held on Mon
day June 2Let AU
Attend
To the People of Salt Lake County
To all who are willing to abandon their
political affiliations of the past and join
with us as Democrats in organizing a Dem
ocratic party for Salt Lake county we re
spectfully request that you meet in tho
usual meeting places of your respective
precincts on Monday the 15th day of June
1S91 at 730 p m and select delegates to
meet in a county convention to be held at
the Electric Light Hall In Salt Lake city
at 12 oclock m June 22 1891 and we sug
gest as a basis of representation in said
convention that the several precincts of
the county select the following number of
delegates each respectively
First Precinct all of the city south of Third
South cast of Main primary at Exposition
building IS
Second Precinct all south of South Temple
and west of Main primary at Independence
hall 33
Third Precinct all north of South Temple and
West of Main primary at usual place 19
Fourth Precinct all north of Brigham and
east of Main primary at Independent school
house 15
Fifth Precinct all cast of Main between
Brigham and Third South primary at
Federal court room 17
Sugar House 2
Mountain Dell 1
Farmers 2
Mill Creek 4
East Mill Creek 2
Big Cottonwood 3 i
South Cottonwcod 4
Union 2
Butler 1
Silver 1
Granite 1 I 1
Little Cottonwood 2
Sandy 2
Draper 4
Bluff Dale 1
Rherton 1
South Jordan 2
Fort Herriman 1
VestJordan 4
Bicgham 4
North Jordan 2
Granger 1
Brighton 1 1
Xorth Point 1
Hunter 1 i
Pleasant Green 1
Delegates should receive credentials
i 1 h a n a n
1 vi uuu
and secretary of the meeting
J W JUDD
A G NORRELL
S W DARKE
RICHARD H CABELL
J L RAWLINS
SIMON BAMBERGER
M E MEXANY
JOSEPH E CALE
J E BAMBERGER
P L WILLIAMS
WALUEMAR VAN COTT
J G SUTHERLAND
SCHROEDER
a s NICHOLS
P J W DALY
C R BARR T
J H YOUNG
J B WALOEN
W H HODGES
LAURENS L ARCHER
FRANK HARRIS If I
GUSTAVE KROEGER
NAT 31 BRIGHAM
BRGHAM
CYRUS L HAWLEY
I a REICH
0 p GROFF
J W JAMESON
JB I RR
CHAS A CASTLE I
CHAS W COOK
J W DAWSON l I I
T B NEEDHAJ
THOS OMARA
D S GRIFFIN
JOHN B TAYLOR
WH CASADY
WM BURKE
JAMES A WILLIAMS
M B SOWLES
W D WOOD
L H YOUNG
ANDREW L BURT
G E NORTON
OREILLY
E A FISHER
HENRY PUGH
c NELSON
JOHN MONTGOMERY JR
JULIUS MEYER
T J MACKINTOSH
J W SLOAM
J M KENNEDY
CHARLES H SCHREINER
SCHREIXER
G M FREEMAN M D
W C A SMOOT JR
WILLIAM J HALLORAN
ANDREW J WHITE
H C LETT
I
C A VICKHAM
W R GIBBS
JOHXH KEEN
G W CADY
w H ROOT
W F fcEIDERT
R C CHAMBERS
C B GLENN
w T GUNTER
GUXTER
S A MEKIUTT
I TL BOWMAN
MAURICE GRO = SMAN
JAMES W HAMM
I JAMES B NOUNAN
CHARLES HALLOWAY JR
G M WRIGHT
I R 1 LEMON
E C DEWITT
J E SBERLOCIC
W J DIN WOODEY
WILLIAM R WALLACE
JOHN R PRICE
A J TAYSUM JR
JR
GEORGE KKAMER
FRANK EBLIN
F KELLAR
T F THOMAS JR
H W LAISY
HARRY CLARK
j w MCELVINE
I CARLYLE
W l BOYD
CHARLES TPRICE
CHAHLESTPRICE
GEORGE MURRY
H S LANEY
W I tALE
O H PETTIT
I PETIT
J F TAYLOR
BENJAMIN J S BEER
A L BADDLEY
W E WENTtVORTH
WORTH
DAVID B BENNET
C S LOOESY
R B MILLER
D A SANDERS
JOHN R MIDDLEMISS
OJ GREER
GREER
B F McCONVILLE
RS BRADLEY
O E McERLAIN
WILLIAM Jl MOSS
A M CANNON JR
E E SYLVESTER
SYVESTER
S F BROWN
P I TAYLOR
R THOMPSON
O C BROWN
J STOCKDALE
STOCKDALE
FERGUS FERGUSON
HADLEY D JOHNSON
M E CUMMINGS
CMMINGS
D W JAMES
K G TAYSUM
JOHN S LEWIS
JESSIE FOX JR
ELAS A SMITH
4
I F W LITTLE
JOHN CAINE
FRANK W JE SGS
HERBERT PEMBROKE
HRBERTPEMROK
L S HILLS
R S KIM BALL
O I HARDY
THOMAS HULL
H G WHITNEY
FRANK H DYER
JOHN R WINDER
LE GRAND YOUNG
FRANCIS ARMSTRONG
S A K ER
WILLIAM FULLER
W G COLLETT I
J M BENEDICT
DAN H CALDER
CALDER
HYROM GROESBECK1
JOS A JENNINGS
RICHARD HOWE
JOSEPH HYRUM PARR
J I HURD
HENRY TRIBE
E H PIERCE
BYRON GROO
GEORGE F FELT
H P RICHARDS
RCHARDS
C R SAVAGE
RICHARD W YOUNG
JB TORONTO
J I PAUL
W l CUL IER
C J BRAIN
CHARLES SANSOM
JOHN CLARK
ALFALES YOUNG
WILLIAM CALDER
ALONZO YOUNG
AC YOUNG
T G WEBBER
T N OLSON
ROBERr SHERWOOD
NORMAN L HALL
G E
McERLAIN
HENRY E N PHELPS
WILLIAM W PHELPS
w O NORRELL
JOHN MCDONALD JR
w c MCDONALD
JOHN H KEENE
W E 1 BAKNErT
G W PARRS
A J LEWIS
M KENNEDY
WILLIAM CONDON
JAMES W WHITEHEAD JR
E A FRANKS
A FRAlKS
J J KATO
T l BENNETT
H A SLADE
B T HUTCHIN5ON t
I I DANIELS SCHILLING
G BIELICH
U WORTHINGTON
FRED W CLEGHORN
E C LANDER
W WOOD
J A CORRIVEAU
BARKER
F E
BARKER
R J KNIGHT
ISAAC A CLAYTON
THOMAS GOODMAN
DAVID L MURDOCH
MURDOCK
C A CARLQU1ST
C M NEILSON
F S FERNSTROM
H P HANSEN
C P LARSON
F L ERTMANN
ANTON PEDERSEN
C J GYLLENS WON
OSCAR J PETERSON
BERNARD I HANSEN
H P HANSEN
MARVIN LUND
W H PETERSEN
OSCAR F PETERSEN
EMIL JENSEN
E G WOOLLEY JR
GEORGE D PYPER
PYPER
GEGRGE EBLAIR
EBLAIR
NEPHI W CLAYTON
RULON S WELLS
JOHN M CANNON
STANLEY H CLAWSON
OLIVER HODGSON
A T ERICKSON
L W FLETCHER
A S GEDDES
ISAAC M WADDELL
E G HOLDING
J H MOYLE
CHARLES F WILCOX
W C BURTON 1
N V JONES
JOSEPH S RICHARDS
HEBER BENNION
C M NIELSEN
GEORGE W TIMPSON
A M SWAN
THOMAS A HOWE
I S BEATIE
H E CAMPBELL
L J BROWN
JOHN ALFORD
WILLIAM M BROWN
THOMAS E JACOBSEN
HYRUM D SMITH
DANIEL J LANG
A M WOOLLEY
JAMES H POULTON
G E GUSHING
J BULL JK
G H LOVE
I
E G WOOLLEY
TO THE DtJluollATa Oi UTAH
l persons interested in the organiza
tion and success of the Democratic party in
the territory are requested and urged to
form clubs in their respective localities I
the Central Democratic club of Salt Lake
county is advised in time when meetings
for this purpose will be held all the proper
aid will be furnished by this club and able
speakers will be delegated to attend and
speak at such meetings The necessary
blanks for perfecting organizations can be
obtained free upon application to the CtaJi
Democrat this city
FIUXK H DYER
President Central Democratic club

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