OCR Interpretation


The Salt Lake herald. (Salt Lake City [Utah) 1870-1909, March 08, 1896, Image 12

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058130/1896-03-08/ed-1/seq-12/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 12

2 1 W
U 12 THE SALT LAKE HERAld SUNDAY MARCH 8 lS96SCSTEEilir PAGES
ATHLETICS AND
I
f EASTERN COLLEGES
I I
Preparations on Foot for the
Coming Season
PROFESSIONALS BARRED
YLES PROPOSAL TO ROW IN THE
If
HEIJEn REGATTA
J The Four Cornered Content on Hie
t Water Detween Harvard Cornell
f Columbia and Pennsylvania Tlie
t Base Dull Team
Copyright 1S96 toy S S McClure
Limited
At this season of the year the ath
letes at the various eastern colleges are
Setting ready for the contests that will
r come off In June There appears to be
less wrangling than usual though
doubtless as the spring advances the
smart alecks and the embryo lawyers
in the various colleges will manage to I
t up some pretty little disputes so I
that they may have an opportunity to I
t show how unsportsmanlike a sports
t man can be when he tries with all his
might The professors at the various
L colleges have of late been discussing
f what on amateur athlete is The defi
E nition which has been agreed upon is
F quite satisfactory and if the under
i graduates are compelled to live up to
r it strictly we shall this season escape
many of the scandals which have been
BO common In former years
1 These professors say that an ama
teur is one who takes part in any sport
for the love of the sport When he is
Influenced by any other consideration
vtnan love tnen ue ceases to oe an ama
teur and has no right to participate in
college sports This debarring of pro
I fessionals would include any man who
ihad accepted any kind of compensa
tion even for coaching Some of the
colleges have recognized that su
I premacy on the water the track the
baseball diamond or the football field
was the best possible advertisement for
the college that won and the authori
ties have ignored practices dishonora
ble In themselves In the hope that
these practices would contribute to this
end If the writers on amateur ath
letics will tell the plain truth about
t such practices they cannot continue
much longer The difficulty is that
most of these writers are themselves
college men and are so partisan this
one for Yale that for Harvard and
another for Princeton that each takes
the ground that his college can do no
wrong This Is absurd to be sure
They all do wrong of one kind and an
other every year In boating which
is freer from professionalism than any
other college sport one college Penn
< sylvania has been accused and with
good reason aft least for suspicion of
employing men to row for the honor
of the Quaker university A victory in
such conditions would be more dis
honorable than defeat
CONTESTS ON THE WATER
The water contests between the east
ern colleges promise to be very lively
in June Harvard and Yale are on
bad terms and no race between these
r colleges will come off this year This
Interruption of a long series of races
races which excited more public inter
est than any others In America Is be
cause the birch is sadly needed both
at New Haven and at Cambridge
i
This it Is thought will make < a very
strong crew and of course a number of
substitutes will have to be taken along
Of course the crew that finally gets
into the boat in England may be quite
different from this The Cook stroke
it has been suggested by some may
not prove as fine over the shorter Hen
ley courseone mile five hundred and
fifty yardsbut the Yale men are not
In the least doubtful They will have
ifcwo courses of this lengthone on Lake
Whitney and one on Lake Saltonstall
and over these they will do their
trials
THE BIG UNIVERSITY RACE
The great college boating event in
June on this side will be the University
race between Harvard Cornell Colum
bia and Pennsylvania It has not been
decided yet where this will be but the
place to select from are reduced to two
the lake at Saratoga and the Hudson
river at Poughkeepsie It is quite like
ly that Saratoga will be selected as here
there would be a chance of an uninter
rupted course something Impossible
on the Hudson on account of the hun
dreds of excursion boats which would
go up the river from New York On
the same day and preceeding the uni
versity race there will be a four cor
nered contest between the freshmen of
the colleges mentioned Mr George L
Rives has consented to be the referee of
these races
At Cornell Courtney the coach has
twentysix candidates at work all of
them ambitious to have a place in the
boat Hitherto Courtney has been a
dictator at Cornell in all boating mat
ters and has done quite as he chose
New rules have been laid doWn by the
council of the athletic club and ac
cording to these Courtneys decisions
may be overruled at any time It
would seem that this was a wise and
Judicious reservation for Mr Courtney
never achieved much distinction as a
prudent man either in his professional
career as an oarsman or since he took
to coaching for a living The Columbia
candidates are hard at work and are
enjoying at present the hospitality of
the gymnasium of the new Manhattan
Athletic club
COLLEGE BASEBALL
The baseball clubs are arranging
their schedules and the first game an
nounced Is March 2S between Pril1p
I ton and Rutgers Last year Princeton
was thought to have the strongest nine
in the field but by bad luck she lost to
Yale which also beat Harvard Yale
therefore carried off the honors of
games won This year Princeton will
have the same pitchers as last year
Altman Wilson and Easton This will
be a great advantage and as the sup
port Is quite strong the New Jersey ti
gers may be classed at this date as
prospectively very formidable In the
Yale nine the famous Carter no longer
an undergraduate will be replaced by
Trudeau and Greenway the latter a
Brother of the Greenway who caught
last year At Harvard the prospects are
that Highlands of last year will con
tinue in the box and that he will be as
sisted by Cozzens and Paine If the
Harvard field is strong these pitchers
will make the games very lively for the
other colleges Lewis will be the chief
pitcher at Williams Of Pennslyvanla
I can make no announcement as the
faculty has taken a hand in athlevic
affairs and has declared that none save
bona fide students shall belong to nine
crew or team that represents Penn
sylvania This is admirable and will
be heard of with pleasure by all who
take a real interest in the athletic
contests between colleges
It is too early to speak of track ath
letIcs but the young men are busy at
all the colleges preparing for the games
which will come off about commence
ment time And it f < = srratlfying to be
able to say that the prospects are quite
good that college sports this year will
be cleaner than for ten years and more
passed PHILIP POINDEXTER
I a
1 L
I
o ii cw ff I
When lads act as the leaders of Yale
and Harvard have acted in the dispute
which has ended in estrangement they
filmply need to be switched as other
unreasonable and unruly children are
switched Talking to them doesnt do
any good indeed talking does harm or
rather it is the harm They have all
talked too much and they now de
serve the corrective and curative kind
of punishment which made the parrot
In the story change her opinion as to
the value of her own loquacity
Ttle not being able to have a contest
on tthe yankee Thames has decided to
go to England and take part in the
Henley regatta Her crew is now get
ting into preliminary shape and Bob
Cook lias been requested to try all he
knows to arrange his business so that
ns coach he can put the finishing
touches on the crew before the young
gentlemen sail and then also go with
them to England The idea among
Yale < men is that if only Bob Cook can
do this much then Yale will be in
vincible Tale bad a fine crew last
ear tout three of the best men Cap
tain Armstrong and Messrs Holcomb
and Dater were graduated In June and
are no longer available Five of the
t others are still eligible but itwo of
these Messrs Beard and Cross will
probably decline to train as they feel
that they have done enough of that
dnd of thing and should devote this
tielr last year exclusively to their
books
This leaves only three of the last
r years crew Messrs Treadway Long
acre and Lang ord for the venture on
the English Thames and makes it
necessary to select five new men
These five new men promise to be
Bailey Rodgers Marsh Brown and
Whitney As at present arranged the
veterans will occupy the first three
eats In the bQat Langford being
stroke Captain Treadway No 1 and
Longacre No 6 Of the new men
Bailey is something of a veteran He
was to have been stroke last year
I when he was taken 111 and had to re
tire Rodgers played tackle in the foot
ball team last year Brown Is a famous
shot and hammer thrower and rowed
at St Pauls school before entering
college Whitney a son of exSecre
Aary Whitney rowed in last years
jFreshman crew aa did also Marsh
i J a cj
> >
THE SALOX AND ITS DEC VI
M Edpuard Rod draws attention to
the decline and disappearance of the
salon both in France and in England
where it had its existence although it
Tvas never the literary and political
power that it was abroad The decay
is of course mainly attributable to
the fact that society is no longer the
exclusive thing it was In France in the
early part of this century when ad
mittance to a salon meant not neces I
sarily high birth but the possession
of some Intellectual distinction Nor
j was it enough for a woman Jo be rich
and wellborn and fashionable to be
tthe star of the salon indeed the most
successful among them Madame de
Stael Madame Recamier Madame Def
fand Mademoiselle LEspinasse Mad
ame Girardin and others belonged to
the middle class and lived in very mod
est apartments But the whole secret
of the triumphant social intercourse
of those days lay in the fact that the
hostess circle was confined to a cer
tain number of intimate friends who
knew one another and between whom
EVERY YOUNG MAN
should be possessed of certain informa
tion without which millions contract
pernicious and most destructive habits
> habits which make young men
pre
maturely aged pale haggard listless
devoid of ambition easily tired lan
guid forgetful and incapable fill mad
houses and swell the lists of suicides
separate husbands and wives bring
untold suffering to millions even unto
the third and fourth generations Pa
rents guardians and philanthropists
can do no better service to the rising
generation than to place in their hands
the information and warnings contain
ed in a little book carefully prepared by
on association of medical men who
have had vast experience in dealing
with the grave maladies here hinted
at and who feel that they owe it to
humanity to warn the young of the
land against certain destructive hab
its which are for more prevalent than
any layman can imagine and which > if
persisted in gradually underminei the
constitution and health and destroy the
future happiness of the victim Cut
out this notice and enclose it with ten
cents in stamps to pay postage to
worlds Dispensary Medical Associa
Hon Invalids Hotel and Surgical In
stitute Buffalo N Y and the book
will be sent secure from observation
in a plain scaled envelope
r
k > r >
I NOW WATCH
I FOR THE CLASH
Comet is Due I to Hit us on the
Fourteenth
IT MAY KINDLY GO BY
IT IS ONLY NINE HUNDRED MIL
LION MILES LONG
Various Ideas as to What Would
I
Be the Result Were the Monster
to Come Into Contact with the
Eartli Comet Is 1 Great Dig Sand
Bank Moving at the Rate of
1700000 Miles a Day
Astronomers and scientists in general
aro trying to ligure out what will happen
to this little earth of ours Saturday i
March 14 next If they know what they
are talking about that day should be a i
red letter one In the worlds history They
claim that a great big comet is going to I
smash Into us Whether it will knock
knockj I
g
c
t i t s 7J 4
iT
I r r et if e i
7
ti fT 44 <
X k
I 1
in t
cCVr
I t
L t
h
1 iA ii lit g > t
4 i1d r I
WHAT THE AiSTROXOIIEKS SAY IS APPROACHING VS
poor Mother Earth completely into smith
ereens or merely push her Into another
part or the universe is a question
This comet Is estimated to be nine hun
dred million or miles long The exact
number of millions has not been figured
out yet but even if it were only one hun
dred millions In length it is sufficient to
appal any one who has been in a rail
road collision where the contending trains
were only one hundred yards long What
chance this little earth which Is only
about eight thousand miles thick at the
biggest part will stand against a monster
whose length Is measured by hundreds of
millions or miles Is too severe for the
imagination to picture
A RARE PRIVILEGE
Besides some scentists claim that a
comet only hits the earth once in fifteen
hundred million years If that is so no
one else will enjoy the sensation until the
year 15000018 Some ancient histories
go back a few thousand years but none
of them attempt to cover the period when
the last comet hit the earth So the peo I
ple or this generation are absolutely with
out any precedent as to how they shall
act when the comet comes booming along
What to do and how to do it must be
formulated by the individual jot of hu
manity at the critical time
The exact hour of the day on which the
comet is to crash Into us has not yet been
determined for the reason that it is trav
eling toward us at the rate of 1700000
miles a day This means that it is flying
through space at the rate of 72000 miles
an hour or 1200 miles a minute or twenty
miles a second Under these conditions it I
Is quite Impossible for even the most
learned scentlst to aetermino the exact
hour of Its arrival
For the same reason no one knows
whether It will hit us in Africa Eu
rope Asia or America But that does
not matter much because comets have a
habit of looping around everything they
hit like a big boa constrictor encircles
Its victim The comet keeps on coiling
and coiling until its hundreds of millions
of miles or length are all wrapped around
whatever It hits
ASTRONOMERS EXCITED
Professor Perrine or the famous Lick
observatory Is responsible for this comet
that Is he discovered It and it will go I
down to posterity If it does not annihilate I
all chance of their being any posterity as
Perrines comet Since Professor Perrine I
I
J
1
WHAT THE COMET OF 18G1 IS SAID TO HAVE DONE
made the discovery astronomers In all
parts of the world have been in a feverish I
state or excitement S W Burnham of
the Lick observatory famous as the
greatest observer and discoverer of double I
stars that the world has yet known Is
excited So is E 25 Barrtard the renown
ed discoverer of the firth satellite of Ju
piter and of Innumerable comets and
whoso planetary observations and photo
graphs of nebulae and stars are of un
> < <
j fl J
I
rivaled excellence The same can be salt
I or J IS Keeler who stands at the front
In astronomical spectroscopy
It Is not orten that the mental balance
of these weighty scientists Is moved suffi
ciently to allow or the emotion or excite
ment but at this time It Is nevertheless
true Of course all these men differ as to
what will happen when the comet hits us
Some of Stem are kind enough to say
that there is a possibility of the comet
sheering away and not hitting us at all
or If it does It may be only a glancing
blow which may shake us a bit but do
no serious damage
ANOTHER DANGER
But therels still another danger even if
It does not hit us and It Is more unnerv
Ing to contemplate it than the original
Professor C A Young of Princeton is
well Informed on comets and he avers
that there Is some danger of the Perrine
comet slipping by us and falling into the
sun This would be a reolcatastrophe
I for all learned astronomers acknowledge
that ir a comet fell Into the sun it would
produce such an increase of solar heat
i that we would all be broiled or frizzled
or Tried up With this danger staring the
world In the face It seems that if the
matter were left to a popular vote the
people of the earth would elect to have
the comet hit us and take the attending
chances rather than have it fall into the
sun and burn iis up
Other astronomers who wish evidently
to reassure the public claim that in 1S5
a comet several times larger than the one
now heading for us hit the earth while
traveling at the rate of 10000000000 miles
a day and nobody knew It How they dis
covered it so many years after they re
fuse to make plain But if these astron
omers are telling the truth it places the
other astronomers who say that a comet
hundred mil
only hits us once In fifteen
lion years in an awkward position Clear
ly either one set of astronomers pr the
other Is making a terrible blunder
WHAT A COMET IS
Few people have a clear Idea as to
what a comet really Is and for their ben
efit the opinion ofprofessor Young is set
forth as follows A comet is nothing but
a sand bank that is It is a swarm of
I
solid particles of unknown size and widely
i separate say pin heads several hundred
I feet apart each particle carrying with it
i I an envelop of gas largely hydrocarbon
1 in which gaslight Is produced either by
electrical discharges between the particles I
i or by some other light the evolving action
due to the suns Influence This hypothesis
I derives Its chief plausibility from the
modern discovery of the close relationship
between meteors and comets
Another astronomer on the subject of
the makeup of comets says
It Is not a solid bcdy like the earth
It Is made up of minute bodies We might
I compare It with a dust cloud While in
size It compares with the earth there is
no comparison In the solidity of the two
So far as we have been able to learn
there are no large pc rtlcles of matter in
a oomet They are made up of atoms of
dust of Iron nickel or some other metal
Our atmosphere Is practically impervious
to such a body Seventy or eighty miles
above the earth where the atmosphere is
so rare that the vacuum Is almost as
good as that of a Crookes tube there is
still enough resistance to disintegrate and
destroy a body like a comet traveling
with the swiftness with which a comet
travels Tho particles would become in
finitely fine no larger than the ultimate
atom of matter They would ultimately
reach the earth
There Is certainly much difference In
ppinions regarding comets by comet ex
perts but if this one should hit us it
will probably result in great popular In
terest being taken in the subject of as
tronomy on and after Saturday March
14 next GRANTLAND GRIEVE
MERELY AN OPINION
During tho war a soldier who took part
In a foraging expedition found a bottle
of whisky and proceeded forthwith to
console himself for the hardships he had
endured during the campaign On return
Ing to camp he was placed In the guard
house and his condition reported to tho
captain
How did you get into that condition
asked the captain
He captued a bottle of whisky
How did he manage to do that
I am not sure sIr said the sergeant
but I think ho surrounded itHarpers
Magazine
If you want a man to think you are
smart you have only to make him Imag 1
ine that you think he IB smart
r w r
I
FRAGRANT
VANFIY FAIR
ci ARETT
ISt4EV THE FINEST
VIRGINIA 1VRKI5f
ToBACCQ b ThE HIGHEST SKILLED
WORKMEN EMPIPED w MAKING
THE5E CIGARETTES
W fjj 5KlMBALLC
TRe American Tobacco 9 Successor
NOw Is
Th Time
To have healthful sport and were the
people to furnish you the requisite stuff
to have It with How does a Bicycle
strike you say When you come right
down to It the Rambler is what you
want Its the only high grade wheel
made and runs lighter than any other
Come and see them and get a compli
mentary ticket to the cycle show
We have others that we would like
you to see The Tribune Remington
and 8 models in Featherstone line
We have a superb line of Ladies and
Gents Sweaters Leggings etc
Bttmnning Eros
353 Main St Salt Lake City Utah
241 Washington Ave Ogden Utah
I
tlurrahl
Papa has found the proper place to
buy Just look at these Half Hose
with double heels and toes they were
bought at Gardners where you can
find all the latest styles and the most
extensive variety in the city All sizes
and colors at prices ranging from lOc
to 50c a pair these goods were selected
with great care and are the highest
I
quality for the money Although only
i
half hose they are whole hose in every
desirable quality seamless and fast
colors These are the points always
found In our half hose
Shirts Made to Order
Strictly One Price
Jfl Gardne
136 and 188 MAIN STREET
I THE
I
STATE BANK OF UTAH
I
Capital fully paid 500000
SnrplnB j 5OOOa
Cor Main and South Temple streets
SALT LAKE CITY UTAH
HBBER J GRANT President
WM B PRESTON VicePresident
HBB3R M WELLS Cashier
RECTORS
Heber J Grant Isaac Barton
William B Preston Charles S Burton
Joseph F Smith Philo T Farnsworth
Abraham H Cannon Heber M Wells
Spencer Clatvcon
General Banking Business
Accounts solicited large and small
Special attention to country trade
Collections a specialty Correspondence
Invited
G Coop Furnitnre GO
11 AND 13 MAIN STREET
Furniture Carpets Lace Curta Inn
ladies and Gents Rockers Couches
led Lounge Chamber Suits La
dles Combination Dcslca Folding
Beda 4 Sideboard Wardrobes Safe
Tables etc
ALL NEW FINE GOODS
Cheapest Houao in Our Line
lla Trouble to Show Goods
GOOP Furnitnro GO
11 AND 13 MALV STUESJ5T
v 1 W i
> ir
J
r i I BANK OF5ALT ItKE
234 SOUTH MAD STREET SALT LAKE CITY UTAH
JJAMES H BACOPT Preaidcat I F L HOLLAND Cnahl 4
H JJI BACONVice President I W B HOLLAND Asslfltas Caahie
General Banking BnaincBB Transacted Sate Deposit Boxes 1 e Renti
Intercut paid on Time nnd Savings Deposits
4
National Bank of tho RODUblic
Frank Knox President 1
Geo A Lowe VIcePresident i
Ed W Duncan Cashier
E O Gates Assistant Cashier
Capital paid in 30OOOO
Surplus t 120000
Banking in all Its branches transacted
Exchange drawn on the principal cities
of Europe Interest paid on time depos
its
flcCornick Co
BANKERS
SALT LAKE CrT UTAH
Established 1870
Transact a General Banking fineness
Xi S XTTLJLS President
MOSES THATCHER VlcePreaideat
H S YOUNG Cashier i
U S > e ositoiry
BERET NATIONAL BAM
SALT LAKE CITY UTAH I
CAPITAL1 55000OO
Bimriua t 500000
Safety Deposit Boxco far Beat
BH SCHETTLER
Banking Srokeiags I
23 SOUTH EAST TEMPLE STHS3irA
Real Estate Stocks and Bonds Bought
and Sold Notary work
THE DESERET
SAVINGS BANK
SALT LAKE CITY UTAh
Capital J1WOOO pIgEC70RS Surplus 40000
amss T Little resident
Moses Thatcher VicfPresldent
Ellas A SmltU Cashier
Henry Dlnwoodey
James Sharp
John R Barnes
John C Cutler
Frank W Jennings
George Romney
W W Riter
John R Winder
D H Peery
E R Eldredge 7
Four per cent Interest palfl on savings
deposits compounded semIannually Ac
counts solicited ftom 1 upward
WEllS FARGO COoS BANK
r tlbUlibed 1852
I SALT LAKE CITS CTAU
I Transacts s General Banking Business
J E EOOLY Cshle
TR0 JONES
AND COlPANr
+ BANKERS +
SALT LAKE CITY UTAH
I
i
WALKER
vv BROTHERS
BANKERS
KBtnbllsliea 1S50 Successors to
THE UWIOW NATIONAL BASK
Of Salt Jjalfc Cilty
A General Banklsjr Business Trans
acted
Cofflrci National Bank
Capital 300000 Surplus JoPOOP
or Salt Lake City corn r of Second
South and Commercial Streets
General Banking in All Its Branches
DIRECTORS
S M Downey Prest
W P Noble VPrest
John J Dalv O J Salisbury
Movlan C Fox F H Auerbach
Newell Beman T MarsnalUnd VP
Z W Donnellan Cashier
Cstabllhed 1841
150 Offices
The Oldest and Largest
RG DUN COo
I k1
THE
MERCANTILE ACEWCY
GEORGE OS3IOn
General ainnncrer Utah and Idaho
Offices in Progress Building Salt
Lake City Utah
THE
Santa FB e Prescott Ptenix Ry
in connecuuu with Ue iaauijL tfe route
is the shortest and quiuxebc route to
Prescott Phoenix and all interior Arizona
Doaita rue scenic line ot AriZona jia j
only north and south line of the terri
tory to the Grand Canyon of the Colo
rado Petrified Forest Great Pine For
ests Cliff Dwellings Great Salt River
I I Valley and numerous other points of in
terest Beautifully Illustrated book frea
on application giving lull information
I regarding Arizonas wonderful mining
developments and prospects and the as
cultural resources of the Great Salt
I Sfr Valley which yields all semltropl
cal products and is the tinest climatic
minter resort In the world For further
nfonnntfon apply to any Santa Fe routa
agent or GEORGE M SARGENT
iernger Agent Prescot Ariz
Patronize Qui Want Column
BEST RESULTS
MOST RESULTS
SUREST RESULT I
QUICKEST RESULTS J
A d
r I Hotel Knutsford
New and elegant In all Its appoInt
meats 250 rooms single or on suit 75
rooms with bath
WIthGbS HOLLIES Proprietor
UNION
1 I PACIFIC I
r1 0 W SYSTEM
4ii
09
o THE THROUGH
PICTa CAR LI1E
Trains arrive and depart at Sal
Lake City daily as follows
dn Effect November 17 hIS
ARRiVE
I From Chicago Omaha St
I LouIs Kansas City Denver
Park City and
I Ogden 310 p me
From
Helena Butte Portland
I San Francisco and Ogden 900
a 11
rom San
Francisco Cache
Valley Jgden and Interme
dlat points
From 725 p m
ChIcago
Omaha 5t
Louis
and Ogden Kansas City Denver
From Frisco IJIord 330 a m
Sanpete
Valley Nepl Provo
Mercur
and Eureka
1I Mixed train 550 p ID
from Terminus
Tooele and Garfield Beach 4OOp me
For DEPART
ChIcago
Kansas City Omaha Denver
St
For anti lark City LouIs Ogden
San Francisco 600 a a 10
Cache Valley sf Ogden
Doints and intermediate
For Ogden d SOOarn
t
mints nn i1i i
For ncthsi 400
cago p a1
Omaha
lCansas Denver
i > ortIand City SI Louis Butte
For and San Francisco
r Eurela 700 p m
lIercur
Nephi Provo
Prisco Sanpete Valley and
JfIxed t int 743 a m
Beach Tooele rG riI id
Tralns and Terminus 745 a m
S south
iu flday ot JUab run dally except
nally
Clry exrent SunrJay
TICKET OFFICE 201 MAIN ST
Telephone No 250
rhrough ImDrnA PUllman L Palace Sleepers Latrt
dining Chair L P5eep58 Free Re
Coaches Cars Elegeant I > ay
D E
General S H R Agt CLARK Passenger BURLEY Dept
OLIVER w MINK
E ELLERY ANDERSON
JOHN W DOANE
FREDERIC R COTTDERT
a EL LOMAX G P Recelvers T Agt
DICIa
DICItXNEON Qen Manager
e
GREAT
SALT LAKE
ROUTE
r
Current Tlruo Table
IN EFFECT NOVEMBER 18 1833 b
Mo 1fE LAELK Provo CITY
Grand Junction and all points
No east 4For Prove Grand June 505am
tIon and all points east
740 Po m
NS 5For Ogden and interme
diate points 5 20 P m
Ng GFor Mt Pleasant Manti
SaUna and all Intermediate
No points SFoi Eureka PayVon 130 P m
Provo and all Intermediate
points 500 p m
No 3For Ogden end the westh4o mi
No ARRIVES 1For Ogden SALT and LAKE the vestl2 CITY 15 o mT
No 1 From novo Grand
Junction and the
east 120St
P m
No
3From Provo Grand
Junction and the eas 1133 > m
No 5 From Provo Blngham C
SaUna Mantl Eureka and all
Intermediate points
525 m
p m
No 6 From Ogden ana inter
mediate points 940 a
m
No 7 From Eureka and PaysonS a m
No 2 From Ogden ana the west755 a m
No 4 From Ogden and the vest730
Nsntyf g rnndt p m
Only line running through Pullman
Palace sleeping cars Salt Lake City to
San Francisco Salt Lake City to Den
ver via Grand Junction and Salt Lake
City to Kansas City and Chicago via
Colorado points
Through tourist or family sleepers
without change to Kansas City Chicago
and Boston
Free reclining chair cars Salt Lake to
Denver
Ticket Office 15 West Second South
> Street
D C Dodge S H Babcook
General Algr Traffic Mgr
F A Wadleigh General Passenger Agt
1
THE
n Beilver r Rio rade
The Scenic lina of the World
The only line running two thronclj < I
fast Trains daily to Lcndvllle As
pen Pueblo Colorado Springs and
Denver
EFFEGTIVE APRIL SO 1894
Train No2 leaves Ogden 700 a m Salt
Lake 805 a m arrives at Pueblo 610
a m Colorado Springs 715 a m Den
ver 1030 a m Crpple Creek 9 50 a m
Train No 4 leaves Ogaen at 635 p m
Salt Lake 740 p m arrives at Pu
eblo 520 p m Colorado Springs 653 p
m Denver 925 p m
Connections made at Pueblo Colorado
Springs and Denver with all lines east
Elegant day coaches chair cars and
Pullman sleepers on all train Take the
D R G and have a comfortable trip
and enjoy the finest scenery on the con
tinent Shortest line to Cripple Creek
Colorados great gold camp
A S HUGHES Traffic Mgr Denver
Cot
S K HOOPER G P T A Denver
1
Col
B F NEVINS General Agent
H M CUSHING T P A
SALT LAKE CITY
UTAH SHORT
LINE TORY
CENTRAL J
PARK
RY CITY
General Office 202 Whlttlngham Building
DAILY TRAINS AS FOLLOWS
No 2 leaves Salt Lake 800 a m
No Z arrives Park City 1020 a m
No1 leaves Park City 300 p m
No1 arrives Salt Lake fiE p m
Depot Main and Eighth South Sta
J ilcGRFGOR I H BURGOON
CLARENCE CARY Gen Supt Fr1
Receivers nd as Aaent

xml | txt