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The Salt Lake herald. (Salt Lake City [Utah) 1870-1909, July 14, 1896, Image 2

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f 2 THE SALT LAKE HERAM TUESDAY JTTLY 14 1895 I i
SPAIN AND THE
UNI fED STATES
Resume Correspondence Dur
If 4 ing the Year 1895
>
CELEBRATED MORA CASE J
CONCLUSION OF Tins AIAIAXCA IN
CIDENT
T
It Is for the First Time Officially
Pnlilislieil Story of a Diplomatic
Victory of Great Business Vnliie
Another AllesreU American Jailed
in Cuba
I
WASHINGTON July 13It requires
sevcnt one printed pagcs in the volume
of foreign relations to set out the corre
spondence which has passed between the
United States and Spain during th year
1S95 yet In no case were there printed
any matter in the nature of reports from
United States officers touching the re
bellion and its causes progress or pros
pects
The chapter on Spain begins wiih the
celebrated Mora case which having been
settled satisfactorily by the payment Qf
an indemnity by Spain Of a million and
a half dollars is now a closed incident
t Next in order comes the Allianca inci
dent beginning with Secretary Greshams I
vigorous demand upon the Spanish gov
ernment for a prompt disayowal of the
act of the Conde Venadito in firing upon
the American steamship for an expres
sion of regret and the issuance of orders
to Spanish naval commanders to refrain
from interference with legitimate Ameri
can commerce whether within three
miles of the Cuban coast or not
The conclusion this incident is for
the first time told officially in this publi
cation The Spanish government showed
A ITS ENTIRr CADINESS
to do everything that international law
requires to smooth away the bad im
pression made by the incident and after
procuring a report on the subject from
the Cuban officials the Duke of Tetuan
Spanish minister of foreign affairs de
livered to United States Minister Taylor
a statement in which he says that the
Allianca was fired upon with a special
purpose not to hit her she being out
side of the jurisdictiqnal zone of Spain
This was an involuntary error which no
one could lament more than the govern
ment of his majesty whose purpose never
was to set obstacles or hindrances to the
Ii legitimate commerce of the United States
and much less to give the slightest of
fense to
THE FLAG OF A FRIENDLY POWER
He adds that instructions have been
sent to the commanders of the ships of
the navy to avoid a repetition of events
similar to that now in question which is
disavowed by the government of his ma
jesty
Mr Uhl then acting secretary of state
closed the incident by accepting the
dukes communication as sufficient satis
factory explanation without con
ceding that the exact location of the Al
lianca at the time the shot was fired can
be considered as a controlling circum
stance Correspondence passing between I
the state department and the resident
f Spanish minister relative to the enforce
ment of the United States neutrality laws
takes up considerable space It begins
with the cases of the yachts Amadalia <
Lagonda and Naracoa but these have
already been made public through legal
proceedings Half a dozen letters tell the
STORY OF THE FRUITLESS AT
TEMPT
of Marshal Campos then captain general
to prevent United States Consul General
Williams from exercising diplomatic
functions intervening to protect Amer
ican citizens arrested by the Spanish offi
cials in tSuba Secretary Olney acted with
vigor in this action addressing himself
to Minister De Lome here and to the
Spanish government at Madrid at the
same time through Minister Taylor and
in less than a month Consul General Wil
liams was recognized as having full pow
ers to look after such matters being thus
placed on an equality with the German
consuls In Cuba
A short letter from United States Min
ister Taylor to Secretary Gresham in Feb
ruary 1S95 tells the story of a diplomatic
victory that from its business value de
serves prominent place in the volume
This was the final concession by the
Spanish government to the United States
citizensof the right to pay minimum
import dutes of goods sent to Cuba
A PREMONITION OF CLAIMS
to be referred against Spain appears in
Eatkins Co of Bos
several letters of
ton toS Secretary Olney giving notice of
the destruction of their valuable Soledad
sugar estate by the insurgents Inci
dentally they note that the insurgents
are mainly negroes and that the orders
to burntheir property were sent from
Cuban Headquarters in New York with
a purpose of causing trouble between the
United States and Spain The chapter
on Spain ends with correspondence rela
tie to the cases of certain American
citizens arrested and expelled from Cuba
Francis Carnllo John A Somers and the
f
MADRID July HThe Spanish govern
ment in addition to the two ironclads
purchased some time since at Genoa has
decided to buy two other warshipS of
3000 tons each in England and besides
this 10000 Mauser rifles
In the chamber of deputies today Senor
Gosgayon minister of the interior de
clared Spain would not sacrifice any por
tion of her territory for the sake of a
European alliance
1 AllfSeil American in Jail
f HAVANA July 13George A Guierre
an insurgent captain who is said to be
an American citizen is reported to have
been captured in a boat by the gunboat
Antonio Lopez near Bacurano
< r Gulerre is in solitary confinement at the
navy yard He says he was on his way
to surrender with his boatman Guil
Ii F lermo to Colonel Jose Delgado
Guillermo who has also been impris
oned says that before being captured
i > Guierre threw overboard many papers
c4 and a revolver I
jlOGANS HORROR
Inquest fOGANS on the Bodies of the Vic
lit vtfm to Be Heltl Today
LOGIN Ia July 13Logan was
crowded today with visitors from the
surrounding country to see the scene
i of Saturday nights disaster and dis
cuss the details of the disaster
r The coroner Dr McFarland has not
L yet arrived He was reached by tele
phone and said he had not been noti
r fied by anyone of the disaster and received
ceived the news of it only through
f t newspapers He lives at Mondamin
Dr McFarland says he never author
ized the removal of the bodies to
Omaha
At 3 Q lock Sunday morning a meet
ing of the city council was called to
determine whether or not the bodies
should bJ2 removed and it was so or
dered All railroad officials who were
here hav5 left but expect to return to I
morrow morning to attend the inquest
Engineer Montgomery and Conductor J
Reed oftneexcursion train walked to
Missouri Valley after the wreck The I
threats of the crowd they feared might
be carried burand theythought it best
to be distant from the frenzied pick
nickers Both were later taken to
t Boone from Missouri Valley in a car
that was locked and sealed to guard
A against any possible attack that might
Ii be made on them in a moment of
r anger
PAID ONE AT A TIME
Pennies Not Legal Tender in i
Amounts of 3lore Tlian Tvrent >
Five Cents 1
There is a postmaster in a little I
town not far distant who is noted for I
the amount of authority he Is inclined
I
to show in trivial matters A short
time ayo says the Mount Morris Mich
igan Union a business man of the
place appeared befoe the stamp win
dow of the office and demanded 300
onecent stamps for which he laid
down an equal number of pennies
Here was a good chance for the au
thoritative gentleman and with a view
of teaching his importance he picked
pennies from the heap handed out
25 stamps and shoved the rest of the
m rl y t6 the wouldbe buyer with the
remark that pennies were not fegal
tender there in amounts of more than
25 cents
Expostulation was in vain the post
master citeji the law in the case and
j
that seemed to settle it With a ma I
licious gleam in his eye the buyer I
swept the remaining pennies into his I
pocket and mildly inquired T sup I
pose I can get a onecent stamp here
I
for a penny cant I Certainly
said the man at the window Then
give me ajonecent stamp said the
other laying down the money It was
handed to him and he demanded an
other and another after that Sev
eral people had come in in the mean
time and were impatiently waiting I
their turn at the window but the ob II
durate buyer kept on gravely buying I
onecent stamps on the installment
plan Seeing determination in the face I
of the other postmaster offered to
arbitrate but it was of no avail He
continued to buy as long as his money I
lasted and triumphantly departed
amidst the approving smiles of the
crowd
O l PECULIAR ROOSTER
I
He Very Much Resembles iv Bird of
Pamtlise
I
To see a rooster that resembles a
bird of paradise Is a rare sight but I
such a one has recently been a com
mon spectacle in Japan says the New
York World
This particular fowlfwas apart from
his gorgeous appendahge of the ordi
nary type found in Japan except that
he was a little more proud in his bear
ing than his fellows
It may have been his manner that
first led to his selection as the bearer
of a most magnificent tail The brief
history that can be obtained of this
freak rooster is silent on that point It
probab1y waS selected because only an
arr gantordy manner could suppqrt
such a wonderful ana < varigated ap
pendage
Be that as lc may the rooster did
certainly have a tail sixteen feet long
In it were all the bright colors imag
inable The tail was far mor bril
liant in its colorings than the shining
featherfan of a peacock
The neighbors of the Jap displayed
no interest in the freak bird but were
amusedly those who expressed admir
ation and wonder who were invari
ably foreign travelers
Then it was discovered that the
beautiful long tall was hot a freak of
nature but the clever work of the in
genious Jap who had fashioned and
fastened the tail in such a ways as to
defy detection except after the most
minute scrutiny
BALLADE OF OLDTEUE LADIES
From the French of Francois Vilon
Tell me in what forgotten place
Does that fair Roman Flora stay
Hipparchia and Thais fair of face
But neither the fairer where are
they
And Echo that unbeholden fay
Whose voice answers by marlsh and weir
Whose beauty was more than man may
say
But where are the snows that were white
last year
And where is that learned Heloise
For whose sake Abellard laid aside
Manhood for priesthood at his ease
Such hurt of love at his heart did bide
And where is the queen who bade should
ride
Afloat on the Seine from her palace stair
Buridan sewed in the sack of hide
But where are the snows that were white
last year
Queen Blanche with her face like a lily
white
And her siren voice like music heard
Beatrix Bertha Broadfoot hight
Alys and the lady Ermengarde
Joan the Good and the evilstarred
At Rouen burned by the English there
Mother of God where have they fared
But where are the snows that were white
last year
yearLENVOI
LENVOI
Prince if you ask where these have fared
Of any this week or yet this year
They shall answer this ballades after
word
But where are the snows that were
whitQ last year
Leonard Doughty in the New Bohemian
GAS COMPANIES AT WAR
I
Anti as n Hesnlt the People Will
Come to Their Own
War between the Ogden a Chicago I
suburb Gas company and the established
j
lished gas trust has broken out in earn
est
Two weeks ago the new company
which was believed to have been form
ed for the sole purpose of selling out
to the trust began laying its mains I
The pipes were not yet in the ground
when the trust sent out a host of can I
vassers with offers of unprecedented
liberality Into the North Side district
where the Ogden Gas company has be
I gun operations
The Chicago Gas Light and Coke
I
company of the I orth and South sides
the Suburban Gas company of Lake
view and the Peoples Gas Light com
pany combined in an offer to make i
connections from the street mains into
the houses and to gas stoves free of I
charge They have also withdrawn the
charges for meters and the customary
demand of a deposit amounting to
one months gas bill Furthermore
they are offering to sell gas stoves at
a discount of 40 per cent and 50 per
cent to people using their gas It is
expected that a sweeping reduction in
the price of gas will follow
All these liberal terms are in direct
line of competition with the Ogden
company The latter concern circu
lated blanks stating that all necessary
pipes would be run from the gas main
to the curb line This offer was amply
met by the trusts agreement to extend
pipes Into the building and to make
free connection with gas stoves The
average cost of laying pipe has been
30c per foot while the gas stove con
iiGction consumed am additional 4
In turn this offer of the trust was
promptly met by the Ogden people for
they also promised to exact no deposit
or charges or me er service The
trusts price on gas is now 1 and 150
per 1000 cubic feet as against 90c
demanded by the new company It is
rumored however that the Suburban
Gas company and the Chicago Gas
Light and Coke company are about to
reduce their charges to SOc or at
least meet the cut priceChicago In
terOcean
A JAPANESE LADY POLITICIAN
The most remarkable woman in pol
itics in Japan is Mme Hatoyama
When her husband a leader in the
progressionist party ran for parlia
ment she took the stump and made
speeches in his Interest a very ex
traordinary thing for a Japanese lady
to do She is now a teacher irvthe
academy of which her husband is
principal
THE CHINESE FLAG
The flag of China is one of the gay
est among ensigns The body of the
flag is a pale yellow In the upper left
hand corner is a small red sun Look
ing Intently at the sun is a fierce
Chinese dragon The dragons belly
is a brilliant red and white His green
back is cowered with stiff knobs He
is standing on his two hind paws and
the left forefoot His feet are five
toed and slightly hooked His long
fiveforked tail stretches away in the
rear His mouth is wide open and he
looks as if he were about to try to
swallow the red sun
Saltair Grand Mask Carnival Wed
nesday Special train leaving city at
835 pm returning at midnight
< iI I ih J > 1 > f 7 t
BRYAN HAS But I
ONE DESIRE i
I
f
> Continued from pap 1
enough to legislate for its own people
If so then the people will demanda
financial policy based upon the Amer
dna interest for the caring for An r
ican rights regardless of the aid and
consent of any other nation on earth
Applause It this nation is not great
enough to attend to its own business
then to what nation can we go with
the expectation of aid Do you know
of any nation that sets up the plea
that it cannot take care of its own
people Is it left for the United States
to humbly bow before the foreign na
tions and beg them to do that for
which this nation was instituted to
take care of the people of the United
States Applause But I did not in
tend to make a speech I uimply want
ed to thank you and to come out
here and express my gratitude to you
and to those like vou who have con
ferred upon me this distinguished hon
or I appreciate the honor and appre
ciate the responsibility which that hon
or imposes Whether I shall be elected
or not depends not upon me but upon
the people
But here the time was up for the
train to leave and Mr Bryan was
hustled off through the crowd which
was loth to give way to him Hun
dreds of people
SHOOK HIM BY THE HAND
as he came through the assembled
crowd and promised him their support
A short stop was made at Toona
where half the town was out bent on
seeing Mr Bryan The people were
gratified though the stop was Only
momentary i 14 I
Then came Tuscola the ounty seat
of Douglas county At least 2000 peo
ple stood on the platformand around
the depot Colonel William Brinyton
United States district marshal for the
southern district of Illinois was there
and introduced Mr Bryan and his wife
to the crowd As the people ceased to
cheer Mrs Bryan who carried a large
boquet of sweet peas began to scat
ter them over the heads of the throrig
There was a scramble from all direc
tions and everybody wanted to get a
souvenir
At Arcola Mrs Bryalb received the
bulk of attention
Whenever I come to Arcola said
Mr Bryan I travel an my wifes rep
utation because she attended school
with the daughter of your distinguished
citizen Maldon Jones
At Mattoon the crowd was almost as
large as that which assembled at
Champaign The streets were blo ked
with vehicles and men and women
and all the buildings in the vicinity
were decorated with flags in honor of
the passing through of Mr Bryan He
was introduced to the crowd from the
rear platform of the train by Frank
Spitler as the next president of the
United States In addressing the as
semblage Mr Bryan said
We have hardly had time fellow
citizens to discuss the questions which
are the issue in this great campaign
I have been taught that a public ser
vant was but a hired man who was
chosen for a certain time todo a cer
tain work and that those who select
him are the only ones to judge whether
or not he is competent for the place
You cant always tell whether a man
will make a good man or not by the
I way he looks but
WE HAVE A GOOD PLATFORM
I
adopted at Chicago and I believe that
any person who will honestly faith
fully and courageously carry out the
provisions of that platform will make
a good hired man for the people of the
United States Applause TJhis is a
campaign in which there will be much
of feeling more feeling than has ever
been in any campaign in which you or
I < have been engaged since the war
The feeling rises on two sides You
find those who believe the financial
policy which we advocate will be ruin
ous to this country and those who be
lieve that the only salvation to this
country lies in the immediate restora
tion of free and unlimited coinage of
gold and silver at the present ratio of
16 to 1 without the consent of any
other plause nation on earth Great ap I
I believe in that platform I ex
presses that policy which is necessary
to restore parity between money and
property And in this campaign you
will find that those men who are pe I
cuniarily benefitted in the rise in the
value of a dollar will favor that policy I
that will raise the value of that dollar
but THE POOR PEOPLE
I
will not be in favor of such a policy
When these people tell you that they
want good money you tell them that
money may be too good it may be so
good that you may pray for it and
wish for it but you cant get hold of it
Applause We want a dollar that will
be just and not a dollar which will
only reward the men who own money I
As the train proceeded south there
were small bodies of citizens at im
portant stations who had assembled to
see the train drawing the presidential
nominee go through on the fly The
enthusiastic citizens at these places
were gratified in their desire for Mr
and Mrs Bryan at each place walked
onto the rear platform where Mr Bry
an took off his hat and waved i at the
assembled people as the train rushed
through
At Effingham although it was quite
dark there were at least 10000 people
many of whom were woman assembled
to see the Democratic presidential can
didate As the train came to a stand
still there were loud cries for Bryan
Free Silver and Altgald1 and af
ter the mention of each the crowd
gave vent to cheers When quiet was
at length restored Mr Bryan was in
troduced from the rear platform of the
train and said
Fellow citizens I remember that
less than a year ago I stopped off here
for a few hours and spoke at the court
house At that time we wished the
Democratic party would adopt a plat
form
formTAT WAS DEMOCRATIC
Since that time a great struggle has
I been going on and last week that
struggle ended in a national conven
tion and that convention adopted a
I platform which in my judgment nt is
I Democratic The Democratic party
comes before the country now appeal
ing to those who believe in that plat
form
At Effingham Mr Bryan and his
wife were met by Hons L S Dwight
of Centralia and T S Marshal of
Salem both cousins of Mr Bryan who
boarded the train and accompanied
them to the end of their journey South
of Effingham about four miles a large
number of farmers assembled along the
edge of the railroad track and had
I built large bonfires As the train shot
by there was a fusilade of shot guns
I old army muskets and firecrackers
while the assembled countrymen
shouted Hurrah for free silver and
Bryan
Mr Bryan was taken to the Virginia
hotel at Odin After being inthe hotel
a few minuites Mr Bryan was taken to
the street and mounting a platform
which had been hastily erected ad
dressed the citizens of Odin for five
minutes He said
I dont want to make a speech here
tonight because I have speec for
n ally notified by the notification com
mittee a to my nomination I does
me good tovisit the county of my bIrth
and to meet and greet my olflv friends
of my boyhood days Odin is aRaiiar
a
name to me and many of the faces
here I recognize as those I knoW Fars
ag J i am deeply touched by these
manifestations of ill pYt
statons good wj f
I do not feel ttiafitttS noination
that has been given is thfe resUlt oFany
particular merit Circiinistancesicon
trol our actions andlargely mark 6 t
our course in life That 4s responsible
for the fact that just now I happen to
be the startdatd bearer of
ONE OF THE GREAT PARTIES
In selecting some one to stand upon the
platform and cry out the doctrines
promulgated therein circumstances
pointed to myself and I am but one of
you chosen for a brief time to exercise
a privileged authority if by your suf
frages I am elected to the office I
never think of this office without think
ing of the simplicity of our govern
ment We desire something to be done
and we select someone give him the
I
1 power and the moment the people take i
that power away he takes his place
among other men We know no divine
I rights of kings All power men exer
cise is slmnly fat a purpose and for a
time He returns at purpse the people
themselves jf hy the devotion of my
countrymen I am elected to this office
four years I shall stand as chief ex
ecutive of the greatest nation of the
earth Great applause
There was no ostentation or display
made by W J Bryan the Democratic
presidential nominee on his trip today
from Chicago to Salem the town of his
nativity He bought tickets for himself
and wife at tie Illinois Central depot and
there was no special car provided The
I man upon whom te Democratic party
thrust the greatest honor within its power
rode in a Pullman coach on a regular
train and every passenger on board the
train had access to the car and nearly
every one of them came back and shook
hands with Mr Bryan and his wife and
expressed to then their good wishes and
congratulations There was no demon
stration at the Park Row depot when Mr
Bryan and his wife left Chicago Mr and
Mrs Bryan rede to the depot in a cab a
few minutes before the time for the train
to depart A few people recognized Mr
Bryan and exercised the privilege of all
American citizens toward candidates for
public offices by shaking his hand
A SWOONING GRADUATE
Alarming EJTeet of Overstnily Upon
an American Girl
The daughter of a friend of ours the
president of a college took part in
this commenpement season in an era
tqrical contest of the Ladies Literary
Union for a prize on which six of the
brightest and most popular students
had set their hearts She competed
last year for the prize and secured
second place Her theme was A
Noble Unrest In the middle of the
oration she stopped She had forgotten
A hush fell on the excited audience
A physician present took out his watch
and watched her stand like a statue
for full three minutEs till with a
burning face she turned to leave the
stage roeledi and fell A powerful
student of the other sex caught her in
his arms and bore her off the stage
to the door In the hush that followed
she partially revived from the
partaly rvived swoon
and raising herself on the big seniors
shoulders as he carried her to the door
she struggled to finish her oration
speaking slowly in an unnatural voice
with closed eyes Meanwhile the ex
citement was so great that several
other girls half fainted and one was
carried senseless out of doors
The next speaker overwhelmed the
general tendency to hysterics by deliv
ering a fine oration When the last
of the speeches had been spoken and
the judges were about to retire up the
aisle walked the presidents daughter
supported by her mother She took
her place on the stage began the ora
tion where she had left off and finish
ed in fine style She walked calmly off
but instantly fell into another swoon
from the effect of the strain and had
to be carried out
The judges of course awarded her
the prize but it is a matter of doubt
if they did widely in s doing I she
had died or lost her reason the second
time both of which she must have
risked i the account as communicated
to us be true dreadful responsibility
would have been incurred by all con
cerned It is vquite probable that the
effects of that strain will be the seeds
of an awful harvest The collapse re
sulted from general strain and over
preparation d > I
preparaton I
The girl that stifled her sympathies
marched tb the platform in the midst
of the first crisis and gave an oration
that made the chapel ring with ap
plause change was entitled to the prizeEx I
VICISSITUDES OF LIFE
Sequel to an Experience of n Strug
gling Young Author
You remember my telling you
awhile ago when we were talking
about the vicissitudes of life said a
struggling young author according to
the New York Sun about an experi
ence that I had once I had a number
of manuscripts you remember which
I desired to sell and which I sent out
to the publications I thought them best
suited for One after another they came
back until they had all come back but
one That one in my own judgment
was much the best of the lot and I had
built strong hopes upon it and when
so to speak i still didnt come back I
felt sure that it had been accepted But
after waiting awhile longer and not
Hearing from i I wrote asking about I
it and the publisher wrote me a polite
note saying they had no record of i
it had never been received
I That was the story as I told it to
you and I supposed that that v the
end of it But now let me tell you the
sequel
Of course I wrote a polite note In
reply to the publisher and in that note
I described the manuscript and said
that perhaps it might yet be found
and later i was found and by snakes
they returned it
I That was solemn but it was one of
I those things that are so everlastingly
j goshblastedly solemn that you have to
I j laugh over em and there cant be
I I anything very terrible in anything that
you can laugh over so you see come
I to take i altogether that experience
was not very distressing after all
A ItiEftUElST
When I 0 Death shall have been claimed
by thee
I power to grant a favor with thee lies
Spread not Oblivions mantle oer my
eyes
Nor seal my consciousness with lock and
key
When we journey together I would see
The way Trust me Nerved Ill prove
for surprise
Thee will I not betray by speech or
cries
In silence meek Ill learn thy mystery
Learp what the earthborn spirit passes
through
Explore the channel in which travels
breath
And feel the hand of Time touch me
anew
Nay think me not too boldbear with
me Death
I I into thy kinship with Life pry
And dying learn just what it is to die
Jane Ellis Joy in New Bohemian
I CLVVALRY HORSES
Army Boards Kigitl Inspection Dis
courages South Dakotn Breeders
John D Hale of Tilford one of the
most prominent stockmen in South Da
kota some months ago received the
I contract for furnishing the Eighth
I cavalry at Fort Meade with some 70
j or 80 horses Notwithstanding that lie
j visited practically every prominent
horse ranch in western South Dakota
i eastern Wyoming and southeastern
Montana in the effort to secure horses
that would pass the rigid inspection
every horse so far turned in for in
spection has been rejected The horses
were the very best that could be pro
cured experience having shown them
i to be the hardiest animals to be found
in the United States Some of the
I horses could not be purchased on the
range or in the markets of Chicago
and New York for 250 each Mr
Hale says he Offered one man 300 for
a team of handsome grays provided
they passed the inspection The ani
mals were submitted but while the
board admitted that they were a fine
looking pair they were declared not
declaed no
suitable for cavalry Horse raisers
i r
c <
c
are discouraged at the result and say
that any board that holds strictly to
the requirements of the government in
the selection of cavalry horse would
not be able to get enough horses in
the whole United States to mount one
cavalry regiment
A SPORTSMAN TO THE BACKBONE
The late duke of Hamilton who was
nothing if not a sportsman had a cur
ous way of remembering events He
coupled the thing he wished to bear in
mind with turf occurrences of the same
year This habit once led to a curious
admission He was making a large
claim against the estate of Mr Pad
wick and there was a preliminary
I hearing in one of the rooms of the
court
The questions and answers were sus
tained on the following lines through
out What year did your graces mother
dieI dont remember the date but it
was Bluegowns year
Do you remember the month
Well the weights were just out for
the Lincoln handicap London An
swers
NOTES OF THE DAY
The East London Water Company
has Elt a notice forbidding the use
of garden sprinklers and all similar
apparatus A drouth London is im
minent
In some parts of England when you
haul a drowning man out of the water
you get nothing but if you let him
down and then haul him out you get
5 shillings
More than 10000 persons are engaged
In the manufacture of explosives in
England Last year forty persons in
the business were Killed and 167 injur
ed by accidents
Lifeboaits are now being made in
some quarters out of pumicestone
This i a material of great lightness
and strength and a boat made thereof
will support a considerable load even
when full of water
Madrid schools are so bad that Ger
man residents the city have united
to establish a school where their children
bIsh
dren may obtain as good an education
as in may civilized parts of Europe
for a reasonable outlay of money
A penny was recently sold at auction
in England for 1000 I was of gold
worth 20 pence 40 cents and was
coined in 1257 by order of Henry III
But two specimens are known to be in
existence They are in the British mu
seum
A feather bed on which they were
sleeping saved the lives of two women
at Bonne Terre Md last week Light
ning struck the house hit the bed set
the shuck mattress in a blaze but the
feathers diverted the electricity from
the women
te
According to a Swiss contemporary
an engineer named Tauxe has just In
vented a new process of tempering
steel by electricity which not only
lakes the steel much harder but at
the sametime gives it the proper elas
ticity that is it is not brittle like steel
made very hard by the usual process
Visitors to the Derby race course this
year say that the gypsy fortune tellers
who always have been very prominent
there have received a unusual
amount of patronage from fashionable
people and this is regarded as addi
tional proof of increased superstition
amrang the British upper classes
Librarians are alt work cataloguing
the Indian library of the British India
office and when finished the library
will be the most complete for oriental
scholars probably in the world There
are now seven miles of book shelves
and when the new floor is completed
there will be nearly fifteen miles of
shelving
A nonpoisonous match has been de
vised by a French chemist potassium
permanganate and amyl acetate be
ing among the inoffensive ingredients
The matches are made easily and with
out danger ignite readily are not lia
ble to explosion when stored in quan I
tity and have an odor said to be posi II I
tively agreeable
At a recent meeting of the Paris
academy of medicine M Guinkoff
stated that he ha successfully photo
graphed the interior of the eye The
advantages of this method are im
portant since it enables actual pic
tures of the disease of the retina to be
secured and compared from time to
time to determine whether disease pro
cesses of the eye progress or not The
picture i made in two seconds The
apparatus can thus serve a an ophth
almoscope and any number of persons
can thus observe the results
There are many authenticated ex
amples 0 increased power o mind
during sleep One of the best known
Is that in which the great naturalist
reconstructed
Agassiz successfully
from certain remains the skeleton O a
fossil fish at which he had been work
Ing unsuccessfully in his waking mo
ments for several hours
A recent isue of LEnergde Electri
que gives the following mixture for
cleaning the parts o machinery
which it states attacks the hardest
crust o hardened oil Boil the parts
for thre minutes in a solution of 150
parts of sodium carbonate and 15 parts
of caustic in soda in 1000 of water af
ter which rinse and dry the metal
A statistician who has been interest
ing himself In the population of the
earth says that 32214000 die annually
that is an average of 98840 a day 4010
an hour and 67 a minute The annual
number of births on the other hand
is estimated at 36792000 an average
of 100800 a day 4200 an hour and 70 a
minute s that the population is in
creasing at the rate of three to the
minute
A sensational discovery has been
made by tate appeals and transfers
committee of the city council of Cum
berland Md which involves the tax
ation of over 70000 worth of property
in South Cumberland I appears that
a boundary stone has been moved in
and for some years property owners
have been evading taxation The city
engineer has ascertained the true line
and the property above named has
been included in the city limits
A druggist Winnimac Ind receiv
ed another order the other day from
e orer
President Cleveland for three boxes of
fishhooks for bass fishing in the se
With the order is a letter from the
president stating that the lat order
had been received and used by him
self and Secretary Thurber with good
results This is the third order for
fishing tackle that the druggist ha
received from the president and he is
proud of his ability to please
I A curious instance of the redtapeism
of the English postoffice comes from
Norfolk A letter carrier with a long
country round recently purchased a
tricycle which enabled him to get
over his district with greater ease and
a more convenient promptness to the
public In some way or other the de
partment became aware of this fact
and sent dawn an official censure to
him for having dared to buy his ma
chine without having received permis
sion from headquarters
The Orange Free State is > very nearly
as large as England and just as large
a the state of New York It lies from
4000 to 5000 feet above the sea and Is
mostly level with some low ranges
of hills The surface Is bare of wood
except in a few sheltered spots along
the streams but is well covered with
herbage The air is pure and bracing
much like that of Colorado or Wyo
ming There are happily no blizzards
but violent thunder storms are not un
common and the hailstones which fall
during such storms sometimes kill the
I smaller animals and even men
Wake up Jacob day is breaking
so said DeWitts Little Early Risers to
the man who had taken them to arouse
his sluggjsh liver NeldenJudsonDrug
company
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