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The Logan Republican. (Logan, Utah) 1902-1924, December 31, 1921, Image 2

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EH PAGE TWO- THE LO.GAN REPUBLICAN SATURDAY. DECEMBER 31. 1A2T
H9 THE LOGAN REPUBLICAN
H By
HH THE REPUBLICAN PUBLISHING COMPANY
H Logan, Utah
H9 Herschcl Bullen Editor and Manager
H Entered at tbo Post Offlco Evony Tuesday, Thursday
IHf and Saturday, at Logan, Utah, as second-class matter.
i Subscription Rates by Mull
Bj Ono Year 3.0U
R Bix Months 16
Hi Three Months I 7C
m Subscription Rntcs by Carrier
M Ono Year - $3.50
H MAKING OUR DEMOCRACY PRO-
' GRESS
Hji A democracy progresses or it becomes
H a i)oor democracy like most of the South
H' American republics. A democracy de-
H, velops its benefits until All the. people
H are benefited, or it is no democracy at
B
H Since our republic was established, the
H general government has spent untold
H millions and billions of dollars in our cit-
H ies where people arc gathered in the mass
H Carloads of money have gone for million
H dollar postoffices, great harbor iinprove-
H ments and other projects benefiting that
H massed part of the population. Every
H year tens of millions are paid out to the
H employees of Uncle S.am who live and
IB work in the cities.
H Where the government spends five mil-
H ( lion dollars in a city of 100,000 people,
H How much does it spend on an agricultur-
m al county of 100,000 people and in which
Hj 'are located only a few small towns and
H villages?
H Answer: So Small an amount as to be
H absolutely absurd in comparison.
H If it spends the one-hundredth-part of
H that sum, or $50,000, in such a country,
H that country thinks a miracle has happen-
H The government ofught to spend at least
H as much of the public taxes and of the re-
H . ceipts from its bonds where one 50 per
H '' cent of the total population lives as.it
H -' spends where the other 50 per cent lives.
H How?
H To the mind of this editor, the First
H necessity is the paving and 'sewering of
M ,( the streets of community centers, the
M small towns of the nations paying for the
m business prosperity, the convenience, the
H educational advantage and the comfort of
M the whole community, and to advance the
M i civic solidarity of the whole community
m surrounding such towns. Sewering in
H centers as a .national health measure, the
H , sewers to be extended to the farms in
m good time. Small towns cannot afford
m such projects; they will do well to keep
m them up after the improvements are es-
B tablished.
H . The government can and should afford
m it. And for every dollar Uncle Sam
H j spends in such public improvements, he
H will increase the wealth of the nation $10
H up to even $100.
H ) A book could be written on the enorm-
H, ous advantages that would accure to all
H1 1 the people of the United States all of
H, them from such extension of govem-
H; ment attention to our villages and towns.
H It is not a dream; it is plain progress,
H and this newspaper proposes to urge such
H government enterprises from time to time
H in an effort to further democracy in this
H favored land of ours.
H ; HOMEY PHILOSOPHY FOR 1921
H i "What is human conduct but the daily
H and hourly sale of our souls for trifles"
H1 the foregoing is published broadcast as
Hf i an epigram by the "clever" Bernard Shaw
H1 I A lie ! Human people in the mass do not
H hourly, or daily, or even weekly, or yet
' even monthly, sell their souls. Because
H .the human person loves comfort and en-
B1 tertained and solaces himself some-
m times with regrettable little vices and
H- falls into error that flesh is heir to, it does
H ( not mean that he sells his soul. The soul
H is not so easily sold. And mark you, the
H j soul that was made by God is not as eas-
H ily lost a3 some people imagine, either.
B FRIENDLY ENEMIES
H According to newspaper dispatches
H, Chairman John T. Adams "of the Republi-
can National Committee and Chairman
Cordell Hull of the Democratic National
H Committee, recently met at a luncheon ar
! ranged by a anjutual friend and on that
K occasion met for the first time and f orm
K ed a personal acquaintanceship. In one
respect the incident is perhaps of little
importance, and yet it is of considerable
significance as indicative of thp spirit in
which American political contests are con
ducted.
Republicans and Democrats under the
leadership of Mr. Adams on one side and
Mr. Hull on the other, are preparing for
a great political contest in 1922 and again
in 1924. These contests will Jbe fought
out not only nationally but in every State
in every? county, and in every precinct.
It will be a contest of issues, however, and
not of personalities. It .will be a contest
between personal friends who differ in
their views regarding the principles and
policies which are essential for the best
promotion of public welfare.
Heretofore it has not been customarv
for the Republican Chairman and the
Democratic Chairman to get together at
a luncheon. Such social meetings are
quite common in local politics. Democr
ats and Republicans meet in their clubs;
they meet in their homes; they are part
ners or opponents in contests on the golf
links or at card table; and enjov eaclvofclir
er's personal friendship notwithstanding
their political antagonisms.
Amricans fight hard while they are en
gaged in political combat but as soon as
the votes are counted and the result has
been determined, they f orcret he heat of
the battle and resume the even tenor of
their way in business and social affairs.
The meeting of Mr. Hull and Mr. Adams
symbolizes this" American spirit and for
that reason is of more than ordinary
Significance . ..
n IB PR
Dr. Ralph Arnold says that the Ameri
can movement' must favor and encourage
large oil companies which are able to
cope with foreign oil organization, or be
prepared to get along with whatever min
eral oil our competitors conclude to let
us have. In other words we must back
our oil industry or ultimately be at mercy
of foreigners.
mm
The reduction in lumber freights to the
Atlantic coast and points, east of Chicago
to 90 cents from $1.06 1-2, is a source of
satisfaction to the whole Pacific North
west. It will let a lot of high grade lum
ber into that part of the country that for
a couple of years has been barred by the
big rate. Anacorates American.
b. to. hi
r ri r
Ultimately the taxpayer and consume
must nay, in increased cost of service or
products, for all the legislated handicaps
and special tax burdens that are heaped
on industry and business in the political
effort to substitute special taxation as a
means of hiding the "direct tax load the
public must bear. "This from the Indus
trial News Bureau of The Manufacturer.
It would be interesting to know just what
The Manufacturer means. If applied to
Utah it surely would not mean that it was
satisfied with our present system of taxa
tion. H H R
Europe's problems concern not a few
Americans much more than do those of
this country.
Those of Europe are grave, indeed, but
that's no reason why America's prob
lems should not receive earnest attention
also. There are enough of them to .keep
many ablemen busy.
And if America is not kept strong how
is she to lend strength to others ?-Phila-Public
Ledger.
n m R
THE LAS "VEGAS REVIEW declares
a citizen has developed what is called a
strain of "wine" bees. By feeding them
sugar and molasses the busy little bees
manufacture sparkling wine that resemb
les Burgundy. And thus the Volstead act
has been stung?
ft ft ft
WHILE IN A contemplative state of
mind, the late John L. Sullivan remarked
about Grover Cleveland: "A big man is a
big man. It don't matter if he is a prize
fighter or a president"
pj ra n
OUR OWN MARK TWAIN once' said
that a lie can run all the way round the
earth while the truth is putting on its
shoes.
Rl tTl tn
The Republican
For Your
Looal News
French Exempt Football.
Football matches In Franco
henceforth will not come under
tho bending of entertainments,
but within tho category of
"physical and military educa
tion," French courts havo ruled.
Hitherto gate receipts have
been subjected to the entertain
ment tux. A test case, how
ever, hns Just been mado by
the mnnnger of tho Toulouso
club, who refused to turn In tho
usual 10 per cent to the state,
and the court decided that foot
ball was Immune.
HORSEMAN WILL NOT
BET ON HORSE RACE
John Madden, Noted Breeder,
Has Never Made Wager.
For Many Years Kentucklan Has Been
Leader of Trotting and Thor- ,
oughbrcd Ovals Interested In
Every Line of Sport.
Could you practically live on a race
trnck and never bet a single cent
Could you develop nud sell race horses
and never bet a cent to back them up?
Could you nice u race horse and still
never bet on him?
It Is not Impossible. John Edward
Madden, tho most famous and leading
breeder and racer of thoroughbred race
horses on the American continent, docs
all of this, and still more.
lie has a farm at Lexington, 2,000
acres of the finest bluo grass land.
lie has other large Interests and pos
sesses a large fortune but not one
cent of this has ever been made
through betting on race horses, not
withstanding horses he himself had
bred for wTnnfngT "wfc.i.i
Madden as a boy turned bis early
fancy to "the" trotting horse. He came
(p Lexington In 1883, and from that
time to tills has been tho leader of the
trotting and thoroughbred ovals.
Ills first "big" buy was In 1830.
when he paid $10,100 for Sulsan, trot
ting marc, and In 1800 he paid $33,250
for Robert McGregor, famous trotting
Giro.
Madden has a lot of sentiment for
his horses. lie heard that Nancy
Hanks, trotting marc, was for sale.
He Immediately bought her and gave
her a homo on the blue grass of his
farm, and tho day she arrived Madden
Issued Invitations to numerous friends
for a reception In honor of Nancy
Hanks.
Madden, has established a cemetery
on his farm for horses that have be
longed to him. It Is arranged within
a stono wall built In tho form of a
horseshoe.
Within tho lnclosuro are monuments
to Nancy Hanks, Hamburg and others
whose deeds have added luster to tho
annals of tho turf.
" Madden always sells a horso when
his price is met He loves tbo fleet
animals, but selling horses that he has
developed Is his business. He does not
like to sec them leave him, but as he
has always said: "I had rather sell
and regret than keep and regret."
He retains his Interest in every line
of sport, and no ovent of unusual in
terest In sports has been missed bj
him In 40 years. Hut still he will not
bet on a race horse.
JOHNSTON IS GREAT PLAYER
Midget Net 6tar Has Way of Beating
Opponents Before They Get
Fairly Started.
William Johnston, tho California
midget net stnr, Is n greater player for
his Inches than William Tilden, world
champion.
Tilden Is a head taller than thp
William Johnston.
westerner. But Johnston Is a fighter
onkthe courts.
Ho hns n way of getting Tho Jump
on his opponents and bentlng them bc
foro they get started. Many of his
victories aro one-sided, owing to his
dynamic attack.
LE.GAL NOTICES
Consult The County Clerk
Or The Respective Sign
ers For Further Informa
tion. Probate And Guardianship
Notice
NOTICE TO CKKDITORS
In tho Matter of tho Estate of,
Willard S. Baxter, Deceased,
Creditors will present claims with
'ouchers to tho undersigned at
Is placo of resldenco in Wellsville,
Jacho County, UtalC on or before tho
19th day of February, A. D. 1922.
Dato of First Publication December
Gth, 1921.
ROBEItT L. BAXTER,
Administrator of tho Estato of
tho Said Dccendcnt.
C. W. DUNN, Attorney for Estate,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In tho Matter of tho estate of Jos
nh Faylor, Deceased.
Creditors will presont claims with
yoiichors attached to tho undersign
ed at nor resldenco at 342 N. 5th E.
-ogan, Utah, on or before tho 2nd
lay of April, 1922.
Dato of first Publication Novombor
29th, 1921. ,
MARY J. FAYLOR,
Executrix.
Arthus W. Hart,
Jesso P. Rich.
Attorneys.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the Matter of tho Estato of,
tobert Lester Layno, Deceased,
Creditors will present claims with
ouchers to tho underaignod at
ier place of residence, in Lowlston,
2acho County, Utah, on or before tho
19th day of February, A. D. 1922.
Sato of First Publication December
15th, 1921.
ELIZABETH LAYNE,
Administratrix of said Estato
C. W. DUNN, Attornoy for Estate,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In tho District Court of Cache Conn
y, State of Utah.
Estate of Christian Lundberg Jr.
deceased.
Creditors will present claims with
rouchers to tho, undersigned at his
esldcnco No. 156 West, Fifth North
Street, in Logan City, in Cacho Coun
ty, Stato of Utah on or before the
20th day of February A. D. 1922.
pato of first publication Dec 17th A.
D. 1921.
Aaron Lundberg,
Administrator.
Dato of Inst publication Jan. 17,
1922.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Estate of Julia Peteroit, Deceased
Creditors will prosent claims with
vouchers to tho undorsigned, at Tho
First National Bank, Logan, Utah,
m or boforo tho 20th day of January,
1921. Dato of First publication Nov.
19th 1921.
Alma Sonno, Administrator.
Walters and Harris, Attornoys.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In tho District Court of tho First
Judicial District.
Stato of Utah in and for tho Coun
y of Cacho.
In tho matter of tho estato of,
Janno Nlelson, deceased.
Creditors will present claims with
youchers, to tho undersigned at his
csldenco in Mlllvilie, Cacho County,
Dtah, on or beforo tho 28th day of
Fobruary 1922.
' Dato of first publication Doc. 22,
1921.
Orson A. Nellson ,
Administrator.
Q. S. Chambers,
Attorney.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In tho District Court of Cache
bounty, Stato of Utah.
Estato of Robert Pearco, deceased.
Creditors vrl presont Claims with
ouchers to tho undersigned at his
csldenco in Hyrum City, in Cache
Dounty, Stato of Utah, on or boforo
ho 25th day of Febuary A. D. 1922.
Dato of first publication Dec 20th
A. D. 1921.
Joseph A. Pearco,
Administrator.
AT. W. Maughan, Attornoy.
Dato of last publication Jan. 21st
19?2, adv
CHICHESTER S PILLS
A 19 VMnkaoiuBfM,S4bit.AInrlttIlat
S-r r SOLO BY DRUGGISTS BHWaEWS
... STOCKHOLDERS ..MEETING ....
Tho regular annual meeting of tho
stockholders of tho First National
Bank of Logan, Utah,. will bo hold
in its banking roomB on tho 10th day
of January, 1922, at four o'clock p.
M. for tho election of directors and
ho transaction of such other business
as may ho proper,
A. SONNE, Cashlor.
Dated at Logan, Utah, Dec. 12, 1921.
na 1-10
SUMMONS fl
n The District Court of Cache
bounty, Stato of Utah. H
Arta Rcnfroo, Plaintiff, vs. Ash- I
&l P. Rcnfroo, Defendant. Summons, I
Tho Stato of Utah to said defond- I
nt: You aro hereby summoned to I
ippcar within twenty days after ser- I
vico of this summons upon you, If
erved within tho county in which I
his action is brought, otherwise I
vlthln thirty days after sorvlco, and H
lefond tho abovo entitled notion; and I
n caso of your failuro so to do 9
udgement will bo rendered against I
'ou according to tho demand of tho I
complaint, which has been filed with I
ho Court. This action is brought to I
lecover a Judgomont-dlssolvlng thp
bonds of matrimony heretofore ox- I
istlng between you and tho plaintiff. I
Dated this 2nd day of Nov. A. D. I
.921.
L. E. NELSON, I
dv." Attornoy for Pialntirf.
NOTICE OP SHERDTF'S SALE I
i H
N THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE I
FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF I
THE STATE OF UTAH IN AND
FOR THE COUNTY OF CACHE.
Utah Mortgago Loan Corporation, H
" corporation, Plaintiff, ' '' ', I
vs. H
C. C. Cressall and wife, Mary A I
Cressall, Carl Poulter and wife, I
Mary J. Poulter, and Cordon Com- I
pany, a corporation of Cache County. H
Jtah, Defendants, H
To be Bold at Sheriffs- sale on the H
9th day of January. A. D. 1922 at H
Two o'clock P. M. on said day at H
he front door of the County Court B
House- ia Logan City, Cacho County, jfl
Utah, ts- tho property of said dofen- VJBrj
dants, the following described real USv
Jid personal property situated in Ki
Cache County, Utah, towit: H
Tho west ono-rourth or Lots four S
(4) and five (5) In Block Eight
(8) of Plat "A" Logan City Sur-
ey, and further described as being H
ltuatcd in Section thlrty-threo (33)
n Township Twelve (12) North,
Range Ono (1) East of tho Salt
Jako Meridian, together with tho I
one ments, hereditaments, and ap-
urtenances and any and all water I
Ights and Irrigating ditches thereto I
Jelonglng or in anywise appertaining.
Dated December 14th, 1921,
M. L. PETERSON,
Sheriff of Cacho County, Utah.
C. W. DUNN,
ttornoy for Plaintiff,
SHERIFF'S SALE
n Tho District Court of tho First
Judical Dlstrcit of tho Stato of
Utah In nnd for tho County of
Cnclio.
L. L. Lounsbury, PlainUff,
VB
Thomas Smith, Mrs. Thomas
Smith Abraham Smith and Laura M.
Smith, Defendants.
To bo sold at Sheriff's salo on tho
12th day of January 1922., at 12
o'clock noon of said day at tho front
door of tho County Court House at
Logan City, Cacho County, Utah, all
of tho right, tltlo and Interest of the
defendants Thomas Smith and Mrs.
Thomas Smith, In and to tho follow
ing described property situated it
Smthfield, Cacho County, Utah:
Beginning at tho Southeast cornor
of lot 1, block 22 Plat "A"' Smlth
flold City Survoy, and running thenco
West nino (9) rdB olovon 11) feet;
thenco North olght (8) rds; thenco
East nino 9) rods olovon (11) feot; I
thonco South olght (8) rods, to tho I
placo of boglnning, containing 1-2 f
aero, and sltuato in section 27. tp. IS JJ
North Range ono E. Salt Lake Meri- IP I
dlam I
Dated this 12th day of December 1
1921.
M. L. Poterson
Shorlff.
IR. H. JACKBON
PALMER I
GRADUATE CinROPRAOTOn
PHONE 181 OFFICE
First National Dank Dldg
Hours: 10-13; 2-4; 0.00-7.80 I
HOUSE OAIXH jj I
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