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Iron County record. (Cedar City, Utah) 1893-1982, October 25, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058259/1912-10-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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I IRON COUWIY RECORD! I
'volumexix ' ' " lag : - : . 11
J CEDAR CITY, UTAHiJpAY, OCTOBER 25, 1912. . NUMBER 45
iW " - i - -'WE' ' ' H
B - ' - M I,, 1m " im - m. i -p- I, ji ii- i i t an i i . . - T1 . . .-.. I II I r II I I BBBBSl
I AN OPEN CHALLENGE!
The Record Extends .n Open Challenge to The Ob-
I rver for an Examination of the Circulation
I ' hS F lt f 'oo. to be Paid to the Bis-
I . mS the WardS f thiS Cit for the Be"e-
I t a th Widows nd the Poor of the City, or
I oJZ?NTynthey may suest-if The Rec-
K - a "
1' The provisions of this being
that such examination be sub-
mitted to a committee of five,
I four of whom Shall be business
If men of the city, two to be se
I. lected by The Record and tw6 by
the Observer, the fifth to be a
government post-office inspector;
and provided further, that the
Observer shall post a like forfeit
of $100 if on examination it h
shown that it does not have as
great a circulation as The
Record.
5 The Record has borne patient-
, ly the misrepresentations to the
J lcjd business men by the man-
I . agement of the Observer that that
j DESERVES UNITED
I PARTY SUPPORT
jS Hnn. J. A. Melville Republican
Nominee for Judge One of
W, Ablest "Attorneys in State
r&" .W(.s.'Withthe''general"election but
r little more than a week distant
those who have the best inter-
I ests of the country at heart
should give the selection of men
. for the various offices careful
I-.- consideration.
rC The office of judge is one of
$ the most, if not the most im-
L portant office to be filled. The
. welfare of the people, the fair
I and equitable adjustment of the
X people's rights, the maintain-
r. ance of law and order, are in
I the harids of the judiciary, and
( it behooves the voter to use his
most serious judgement in cast
s' ing his vote for a man for this
I high office.
; In the honorable J. A. Melville
jL the Republicans of this district
I .. have a man who, from every
possible view, is qualified for
(the office and who merits the
vote of every Republican voter
I in the district.
I Mr. Melville is no stranger to
most of the people of the dis-
1 trict, having been elected dis-
trict attorney in 1904, a posi-
tion which he filled in a most
creditable manner, and demon
s' strating that he stands at the
T forefront in the legal profession,
j and proving beyond any pos-
sibility of doubt his fitness for
judicially determining intricate
I- questions of law, such as are
f constantly arising before the
f judges on the district bench.
He was born and reared at Fill-
' more, in Millard county, attend-
1 ed the public schools, the State
I Normal School, and after finish-
!f ing the latter course, entered
the University of Michigan
law department from which he
graduated in 1898 with signal
honors. In the same year he
was elected prosecuting attorney
of Millard county, and so cap
ably did he fill the office that
s
Ir
J-
paper, almost from its first issue,
had a larger circulation than the
Record, and similar statements
and representations by its paid
hirelings in Salt Lake City to
state officials and others for the
purposeof fraudulently procuring
legal advertising, but since that
organ, in ita blind frenzy at be
ing checkmated, f prints an un
warranted and malicious attack
on this paper, its officers and
stockholders, it is no longer de
serving of any consideration,
and it is now up to its 'launch"
to make good or "forever hold
its peace."
AGED WOMAN
BURNED TO DEATH
A most distresisng accident
occurred at Lund Tuesday even
ing, by which Mrs. Margaret
Pace ot that place lost her ilfe.
Mrs. Pace was the foster
mother of Mrs. J. A. Root, wife
of m postmaster ot LuniL and
agedCanda partial invalid and
becaifee of the care and quiet re
quired for her comfort qhe was
given a room in a building sep
arate and apart from the pre
mises occupied by the family.
On Tuesday evening, about 8
o'clock, Mrs Root left the room
occupied by tha.old lady to pre
pare supper for her. As she
was on the point of returning
she heard the cry of fire, and
rushing to the door of her own
house discovered the room oc
cupied by Mrs. Pace to be on
fire.
Frantic efforts were made to
rescue her but when found she
was dead, death being caused
partially from the effects of
burns received and partially from1
smothering. When Mrs. Root
left the room, as above stated,
there were' a number of quilts
near the stove and by some it
is thought these caught fire, the
flames quickly spreading and
preventing the escape of the un
fortunate woman.
The body was taken to New
Harmony, where funeral ser
vices were held Thursday and
the remains laid to rest. The
sympathy of the community
goes out to Mrs. Root in her
hour of bereavement and distress.
he was twice successively re
elected. Mr. Melville is one of the most
progressive citizens of this sec
tion 'of the state, being interested
in several enterprises that are
doing a vast amount of de
yelopement in the way of open
in thousands of acres of land to
settlement and providing water
for is irrigation.
A man more completely fitted
for the office of district
judge is not to be found in all
this district, and Republicans
should, and all others could
with a certainty that their judg
ment would not be misplaced
cast their vote for him.
imiiiiiiiiih ii.iSlwPM, ii n 'Hrr-wii-db i i '
tfEWSPAPER'MpWHO HELPS DlflECT CHlNAS DESTOIES '
PROBABLY thn moat powerful ncwHimiicr corrcHpomlciit of hlHtory
is now the olUclul polltlciil mlvlscr of (ho pit'sidfiU of tli Ubl o
republic. For Ufteen yours lila (llHpatchcH from lcklu to i '0
Lomlon TIiiich linvo lurKi'ly fortued we.slorn public opli Ion t . :o
the workings of lnternnl nnd lntcrnniloiml Intrigues In Clilnn, nnd la
causo ho knows so much oortnln BtroiiK Interests broiiRht pressuro to
bear, but vnlnly, to bloi'lr his rccont appointment Dr. George lfl. Jlorrl
son la nn Austrullan who hnB hnd stirring experiences In many pnrts of
the world. Ho haw explored the desert Interior of Australia, has been
loft for dend after a battlo with Now (Juineu natives, has traveled 8,000
miles on foot across China and In said to know the country bolter than
any natlvu statesman In tho course of his adventurous life ho has found I
tlmo to uuallfy aa a practicing physician. J
YOUNG MAN DESERVES
SUPPORT OF PEOPLE
There is, perhaps, no county
office to which more careful con
sideration should be given than
that of county attorney, for it is
upon the officer in this position
that the peace and welfare of the
people of the county largely
depends.
To be best fitted for the posi
tion the candidate for county
ttorney should be by natural
inclination a believer in law
enforcment. He should be honor
able, honest, upright and con
scientious in his own affairs, for
such a one is almost certain to
exhibit these qualties in the ex
erecise of the duties of his
publicfoffice.
The nominee for county at
torney on the Democratic ticket
is a young man who is a member
of one of the best families in
this part of the state, and who
stands in the forefront of the
young men of the county. Henry
Jones, the nominee of 'the Demo
crats, is an of former bishop,
Lehi W. Jones. He was born
and reared in this city, has al
ways led a cleai, upirght life,
and in every wi i'3 a man of
unimpeachable cpcter
Mr. Jones , attorney,
having been adrrl1 10 ,the b
of the supreraejrt of .this-
1
state some Iwo years since,
after graduating from tho law
department of the state uni
versity. At present he is city
attorney of this city.
If elected, it goes without
saying that he would . guard
zealously the interests of the
people in the discharge of his
duties as county attorney. Crime
would not bo condoned, and
criminals would have good
reason for giving Iron county a
wide berth.
(AilvertlKcmeul)
Republican County Ticket
Representative
WILFORD DAY
Commissioner, Four Year Term
WM. A EVANS
Commissioner, Two Year Term
JAMES WALLACE WILLIAMS
Sheriff
JOHN II. CORRY
County Attorney
JOHN FIFE
County Clerk
CHAS. D. ADAMS
Recorder
s MARY A. GUNN
Treasurer
MORGAN RICHARDS
Assessor and Surveyor
Wm. HOUCHEN
Superintendent of Schools
RANDALL L. JONES.
Justice of Peace, Cedar Precinct
JOHN DUTTON
Constable, Cedar Precinct
WM. MACFARLANE
WAB CENTERS j I
A! VERA CM ; I
at H
Felix Pixz Gives CevwwacHt Cause M
ferAIara "& ' H
t'OKGIGNERS mTECTES) BY I), Sv3 'B
;;-: I V
Cruiser D Mointw ki Harbor I ijl
15,000 Refugee Aboard" 'J -i H
Boats Battlo Expected ti l
Mexico City, Oct. 22. Infor.. .M
mation m from government' '
sources tonight was-that federal H
troops had occupied a part Pf& I )H
Vera Cruz, including tho nuinfrf . ' ,H
cipal palace. It is reported' I - "'' H
that a truce has been signed H
until G o'clock to-morrow morn- H
ing. H
Vera Cruz, Moxico, Oct. 22 ' H
Tho federal forces began their"' lH
advance on V era Cruz at noon - H
today. Tho rebels under Gen- ' ' 'H
oral Felix Diaz, who occupy'' ,H
the city, calmly awaited their ,flH
approach. H
General Belt ran, commander , H
of tho federals, previously had H
informed the city council thai; v'
the. battle was about to begifif '41
He declined to -allow more time . H
for the removal of nbh-combat- "
ants to the neutral zone. . ,"? ' !
Tho boats in the harbor haxslf -ssi
on board' more.thep .OOOfiforflig'm ,l -T".tB
Tho United States cruiser Des ' B
Moines is about 500 yards from" j
the American .consulate. The ' ;B
'space between is neutral, and fH
many of the refugee crafts havo i
have takon up position there "' 'H
Only thiry-two Americans re-! ;M
main within tho town. Tho . f
foreign consuls have gone aT l
board the boats. The Amor ican; rH
consul, William W. Canada,.; J
has assumed leadership of tho,
situation. Rain threatens to'-
drench tho refugees and fighters.' ' 'iM
Within an hour or two the " ItH
federals were only seven miles S
from the city. '-M
General Diaz says that tho,, H
artillery on tho heights in the -H
outskirts will fire on the loyal ,H
troops. Only if his. outposts are H
driven back will he fight in tho 'H
city. M
Promiscuous fighting seemed 'H
to indicate' that the battle had H
started. It was a false alarm, H
however, as General Beltran H
sent an emissary offering a truce ; 'M
until daybreak tomorrow. This : H
is takon .hero to mean that ; H
Beltran probably will join the ' H
revolution. H
The troops under General Diaz H
were sent back to barracks H
and.conditions became quiet. w H
Thirty sailors escaped from H
the fleet and joined Diaz. A H
few of the federals from General
Beltran's outposts also came H
over to the Diaz cause. H
The advance posts of both il
federals and revolutionists still
occupy their positions. General fcfl
Beltran has 600 federals within H
sight of the city, and General 1H
Zelaya commancls artillery ' 1H
about a mile and a half to the wl
west. H
Ma and Mrs. Chas. Green are . M
the proud parents of a baby son M
who put in his appearance last H
Sunday morning. H

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