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Iron County record. (Cedar City, Utah) 1893-1982, May 07, 1920, Image 1

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EIGHT PAGES ALL HOME PRINT M
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- VOLUME XXVIL $2.00 PEK TRAIL CEDAR CITY, UTAH. FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1920. 5 CENTS PER COPY. NUMBER 20 H
i
i
A VOLUME XXVIL
REPUBLICAN STATE
PLATFORMADOPTED
Fall Text of Document Announcing '
Stand on Political Issues By
State Convention.
Vi
Following is the platform adopted
at the Utah Republican state conven
tion held in Price, May 3, 1920.
Utah Republicans through their
chosen representatives in convention
assembled, onco again declare their
abiding faith in the manifest destiny
of the great republic, .pledge them
selves nnew to the cause of preserv
ing and perpetuating the established
institutions of government peculiar to
American soil and the inherent spirit
of its people, and renew their allegi
ance to the time-honored principles
Congressmen Endorsed
We endorse without qualification
the courage of the Republican mem
bers of Congress who refused to com
promise the honor and integrity of
our country by agreeing to the pro
posal to subject it without rocourse to
the will of tho composite foreign sov
ereignty and congratulate ourselves
and fellow countrymen upon the fact
r that because these certain men stood
true to the best traditions of the rc-
l .public, no foreign fetters bind this
nation to any uncertain or ignoble ob
I ligations, nnd the choice of its future
course of action in nil international
affairs still resides in and rests with
the sober judgment and clear con
science of the American people them
selves. 4
4 To the end thnt all existing inter
national complications and controver
sies may be honorably adjusted in
so far at lenst, as our own country
is concerned, we urge speedy declara-
I lion of pence with the certain nations
against whom we are in fact no long
er nt war, and the immediate resump
tion of friendly nnd helpful relations
with all deserving peoples, regard
less of post differences or associa
tions. Mexican Policy Scored
In this connection we do not hes
itnte to charge tho outrageous loss of
American lives and property in Mex
ico to the weak and vascillating poli
cy of the Democratic administration,
and demand of it that henceforth no
effort shall be omitted to safeguard
the personal and property rights of
American citizens in that country nnd
to secure full reparation for such
losses already suffered.
i Wo view with grave concern the
aduto nnd widespread state of do
Jfcv mestic disorder into which we have
drifted, and charge no sjnnll measure
of the responsibility for this unpre
1 cedented nnd unsafe situation to the
dereliction of duty nnd a policy of
manifest duplicity on tho pnrt of the
nntionnl Democratic administration.
American Safety Overlooked
t' In its somewhat fanciful nnd fur-
' fetched nttempt to make the whole
world snfe for democracy, it seems to
J hnve altogether overlooked the urgent
; v necessity of first mnking America
safe for Americans.
We demand, therefore, thnt the nn
tionnl authorities direct their immedi
ate and entire nttcntion for n time to
the internal ills and evils which now
beset the country, and spnro no time
I or effort in the promotion of such
mensures nnd the creating of such
agencies ns will effectually curb alike
the greed of the profiteers, the graft
of the office holders and those other
! sinister influences nnd organizations
that would openly violate nil personal
' nnd property rights nnd which seek,
in fact, the very overthrow of the
government itself.
I To end this we demand the speedy
5 deportation of undesirable aliens
I within our borders nnd swift and se-
l J vere punishment for such of our own
; j citizens ns arc found to bo conspir
"l i ft ' ing against the government. And
ft moreover, we demand thnt admission
1 be henceforth denied to immigrants
' who arc unworthy to share in the op-
I portunitics which this country affords
I or are incnpablc of assuming nnd cx-
1 ercising the obligations of good Am-
erienn citizenship.
K We urge the necessity of providing
I by law for the satisfactory solution
X of differences arising between capital
nnd labor, such ns will furnish a reli
m able bnsis of settlement for both par-
ties to the controversy nnd protect
the vital interests of the general pub
ijB lie. At the same time we recognize
tho fact that poorly paid, underfed
nnd overworked labor becomes n lin-
bility to the community nnd thnt the
M man who works with his hands is en-
titled to a fair sharo of what he pro
; ( duces. Capital must also be assured of
.HP
DEPEW AT 86 AW&ITS c. O. P. CALL TO SPEAK
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----tllkV ' 11 "flrst national Ro-
IZ-Z----VWu ! PubHcnn convention
'- i 1W':" H In 1856 'and every
"Br5 H four years Blnco he
. - B:-. .. uns appeared "tho
E5CZBBiQl jiH dean of spellbind-
---E-E--Akl ors" An(1 today
BK -r----l at 86 years ago
1 ' ::TvWW Ji ho sits In his of-
jpWMBPP'jjjW flco ns president of
ve::H Ewi vf ! tno Now York Cen-
fe "I-! tral Railway
H k1i awaiting tho call to
h KH appear boforo tho
,HHRv&m'H O, O. P. convention
'IHB&vStffXH in Chicago in Juno.
Hi&' ikVV Ho s Chauncoy M.
HEk ksv?ol Dopow, nationally
HHH Wk' known as an after-
KVblli dinner spoakor and W
KWki Republican leado-
ISKUu
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DANCING REVIEW
BY YOUNfi LADIES
Physical Education Department of
B. A. C. Under Direction of
Miss Buys Has Treat.
What promises to be an entertain
ing social features is the dancing re
view to be given by the Physical Ed
ucation department of the 13. A. C.
on Saturday, May 15th, under the di
rection of Miss Buys.
The very pretty and fantastic exhi
bition of this kind given last year by
Miss Jacobson and Miss Buys will be
recalled byCedar people with pleasure
as being something a little out of the
ordinary in local amusements. And
tho coming dancing review will be
looked forward to with anticipation.
Following is n program of the fea
tures which the review will introduce:
PART I. Character Dancing. ,
1. Tambourine Spanish.
2. Red Rose Mnzurkn Spanish
Lillis Jones, Wilmn Leigh, Esther
Tollestrup, Ermn Perry, Mary Dallcy
Maxine Pnrry.
3. Snilors Hornpipe Three Man's
Dance Leo Palmer, Will Hunter, Le
land Perry.
4. Czardas' Russian.
5. Irish Washerwoman Thelma
Brown.
G. Ozdnnscn Swedish Wilmn
Leigh, Esther Tollestrup.
7. Pastoral French Frieda Rob
inson, Helen Pace, Ramonn Parry.
INTERLUDE.
PART 2. Interperative Dancing.
1. Egyptain Slave Lucille Kunz.
A young Egyptinn girl has been n
captive of the Persians for several
years. One dny while dnncing for the
king she sees that ho is very well
pleased with her. She then reminds
him of her yenrs of faithful service
nnd asks if she might return to her
own people, but he says "No."
2. Reconciliation Polka Louise
Whittnker.
Pierot is out serenading his lady,
Pierotte. Some of his friends, who
are evesdropping, disturb his wooing
nnd finnlly frighten him nwuy.
a. The Voice of Spring (a) Mu
sette (Thelma Williams) is a sky
fairy who appears in tho early morn
to play with tho clouds, disappearing
at tho first brpak of day.
(b) The wood nymphs awake, dance
among the trees and play n call on
their little silver pipes to awaken the
birds.
(c) Tho awakening nnd mating of
the birds.
steady and dependable service and be
allowed to operato without unwarran
ted interruption; otherwise tho whole
fabric of our industrial system will
come apart. Tho only fair exchange
in the field of American industry is
an honest day's pay for an honest
day's work.
We urge the enactment of such fed
eral legislation as will improve nnd
make more wholesome the field for
child labor and recommend a enreful
investigation on the part of the fed
eral government of the necessity for
the possible benefits to be derived
from nn nctunl maternity insurance
act.
Service Men's Aid Urged.
Wo profoundly sense the country's
obligations to the service men and
women of the great war, and urgo up
on congress thnt it manifest its grat
itude in part at least by immediately
reestablishing a sound nnd perman
ent reclamation policy and appropri
ating sufficient funds for the speedy
completion of the government pro
jects nlrendy proposed or now under
way; such legislation to guarantee
(Continued on last page.)
UNIVERSITY HAS FULL
FLEDGED ART SCHOOL
Few people in the state realize that
the University of Utah tins a full
fledged art school and the cxibition
held in connection with State High
School day was a revelation to many
who saw it for the first time. Tho
art department of the state school
sopcializcs on beginning nnd practical
work, and according to several noted
artists who hnve recently visited tho
studios, the progress 'being made is
remarkable. Twenty courses arc
given, the instruction being under the
direction of Miss Evelyn Mayer, Miso
Florence Ware, and Mr. Jack Scars,
the noted Utah cartoonist. The Uni
versity owns n number of fine origin
nl paintings by Utah artists, besides
ninny copies of noted works of art.
Theso latter are mostly used in' tho
sketching classes.
In the advanced classes, Mr. Sears
is doing considerable work in cartoon
ing, poster designing nnd practical
advertising. Other practical courses
arc the scene painting classes undor
Miss Mayer and tho home decoration
course given by Miss Ware. For the
last a special room is used to show
the students how a room diould be
furnished and decorated.
At the present time all the posters
needed nround school for nny purpose
nre made by the art students nnd the
scenery for the school plays is de
signed by those tnking scene pnint
ing classes. Tho Humbug, tho school
humor magazine, uses only drawings
mnde by students, andwhon it is put
on tho city news stands sells very
rapidly. There arc sixty students reg
istered in the art school this year.
TWO MOTHERS' DAY
PROGRAMS SUNDAY
Sabbath Schools and M. I. A. Pre
pare Special Rites in Honor
of the Occasion.
i
The following program for Moth
er's Day will be presented in the Tab
ernacle Sunday evening, May 0, nt
8:30. This meeting will be under the
auspices of tho conjoint wards Mu
tual Improvement Associations.
Vocal Duct Helen Nelson nnd Mrs.
Lelaud Bcttenson.
Prayer.
Violin Selection Mr. II. P. John
son. Talk Mrs. E. Crane Watson.
Vocal Solo Otto Fife.
Rending Mrs. G. L. Jnnson.
Vocnl Solo Lehi M. Jones.
Benediction.
The M. I. A. extends to you a cor
dial invitation to nttend this meeting,
nnd especinlly urges parents to be
present.
Next Sundny, May 9, the Sunday
Schools of both wards will hold a con
joint session in the tabernacle nt
10J30 at which the following program
will be rendered:
Song "Como Join Our Celebra
tion," Congregation.
Opening Prayer.
Song "Love At Home," Congrega
tion. Administering of Sacrament.
Concert recitntion.
Talk Ray Lunt.
Song Ladies Trio.
Sentiments Members of Theolog
ical Class.
Solo Thelma Williams.
Presentation of enmntions to nil
Mothers.
Orchestra Music.
Benediction. .
A specinl invitation is extended to
nil. pnrents to bo present.
ZION PARK OPENS
ON MAY FIFTEENTH
Mr. Wylic on Ground Making Prep
arations for Opening Camps
Prior to That Date.
Zion Canyon Nntionnl Pnrk will be
formnlly opened to tourist travel on
tho 15th of the present month, when .
tho Wylic camp will bo in operation
nnd everything in readiness to receive
tho heavy tourist trade that is prom
ised ns a result of the extensive nation-wide
advertising campaign that'
has been conducted during the pnst'
winter. '
Mr. nnd Mrs. Wylio nnd their
cousin, Miss Clark, who has been with
them nt the camp for the pnst two
seasons, arc in town today on their
way to the Canyon. They nre nlso
expecting to meet here n pnrty of peo-1
pic from the East, including n cook
and other functionaries.
A trip from Mnrysvnle on tho D.
& R. G. rnilrond is being advertised
to tho Wylio Camp at the brink of
tho Grand Canyon nt a cost of $100,
and Mr. Wylio is advertising a trip
of similar length, nnd including the
namo attractions (Bryco Canyon nnd
tho Grand Canyon) from Lund at $00
for the round trip, which includes nil
meals, lodgings, etc.
From all parts of tho country, even
as far distant ns Now York, comes in
quiries ns to the nccommodntions and
arrangements for tourist travel to
Zion Park, nnd everything indicates
that not only tho Wylio Camps will bo
crowded nil this season, but that the
towns along the Arrowhead Trail and
other approaches to this great scenic
attraction, of which Cedar City occu
pies the most unique position nnd con
sequently will be most soverly taxed
to supply accommodations. To meet
the situation, the citizens hnve a large
modern hotel under way and the city
is preparing to provide and equip the
finest modern tourist enmping pnrk
yet nttempted in this Btate, with am
ple shade, tents, running tap water,
electric lights and hent for cooking,
shoVer bath, .tennis, courts, etc.
Tho early tourist travel to the Can
yon may find us unprepnred to handle
large parties, but n little Inter in the
senson we expect to be in n position
to take care ' of the travel in good
' shape.
Mr. Wylie's service at the camps is
too widely known to need comment
here. He has done considerable pio
neering of nn unrcmunntivc charac
I ter to get Zion Canyon established ns
in nntionnl attraction, just ns ho did
in the Yellowstone Park before com
ing here, but it seems thnt ho is now
about to reap the fruits of his indus
try and vision.
'MAN FOUND DEAD
i NEAR LUND, UTAH!
i Body of Unknown Laborer Discov
ered Yesterday Sheriff and
Doctor Investigate.
Sheriff Froyd nnd Dr. Bergstrom
I were called to Lund early this morn
,' ing by n man named Kesslcr, who had
I found the body of n man on the Ho
mer Green homestead about n mile
and a half west of Lund. Mr. Kesslcr!
is a cnttle mnn from Beaver and was
' out after stock when the discovery
Iwns mnde.
' On nrriving nt the spot Sheriff ,
Froyd and Dr. Bergstrom found the
body to bo in a very advnnced stage!
of decomposition, hnving npparently
' Inin there for more thnn a year pos- j
sibly eighteen months. The remnins(
were lying in n nntural position with I
a blue serge cont folded under the'
head; shoes and clothes were in good,
condition, nppnrently, at the time of,
death, consisting of striped bib over-,
i nils, work shirt, and other things in '
, keoping. A slip of pnpor was found,
in n pocket with a name written on
it which appeared to be, "F, Pome,
Thistle, Utnh;" nlso a little small,
chnnge. There was a money belt
nround the waist, but no money in it
A 32 calibre Colt revolver was lying
nt his feet, but it could not be nscer-
tnined whether it was a ense of homi-'
cide, or whether death had been from
i natural causes. The body was taken
to the Rnilrond compnny's ground nnd
i buried ns it nppcared that the man '
' was an employee of the railroad. '
The regular session of the City
' Council wns. held in the Library audi
torium last evening, but wo nre un
nblc on account of the lateness of the
time nnd the many demnnds upon our
space to publish the proceedings this
i issue. They will therefore nppear
next week.
TO PRESIDE AS DEMS
OPEN CONVENTION
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This man will handle the gavel
whon tho Democratic national
convention Is called to ordor at
San Francisco In Juno. He Is
Hornet S. Cummins, chairman of
tho National Democratic Commit
too, who has boon named tempo
rary chairman of tho presidential
convontlon.
SALVATION ARMY'S
HOME SERVICE PLAN
Calculated to Benefit Every Com
munity in Utah, However
Isolated It May Be.
Every community in Utnh, no mat
ter how small or how isolated, will be
benefited by the Salvation Army's
home service program which will be
launchtd thruout tho United States
during the week of Mny 12 to 20. This
expnnsivo movement aims at a cur
tailment of those evils, the results of
which tho Snlvntion Army hns been
correcting in city slums over n period
of more thnn fifty years. The great
mnjority of underworld recruits aro
lured from smnll towns by the -bright
lights, of the city, nnd the present
movement is aimed as a preventative
of that supply.
Tho most representative men in this
country , regardless of religious or po
litical creed, have instigated' and arc
sponsoring this movement, becnuso of
the recognized ability of tho Salva
tion Army to cope with certnin social
phases.
Vice-President Marshall in a re
cent address at Phoenix, Ariz., snid:
"I myself nm an old-fashioned, blue
stocking Presbyterian, but I nm a far
better Presbyterian than I nm a
Christian, nnd there are a lot of
others in the same boat Is is my
deliberate judgment thnt there is
I not anything in the world today thnt
is comparable to what the Salvation
Army is doing. I do not want you
to think that I nm disloynl to my
own church, nnd I do not mean this
should lessen your zeal for your var
ious church denominations, but I do
.mean that this organization fills n
,grent need in the world todny."
j In currying on its vice proventntivc
program tho Salvntion Army will rely
for guidance on ndvisory boards so.
lectcd from the best elements in ench
community public spirited citizens
jwho will co-operate with the central
organization in this importnnt work.
Hamilton Gnrdner, Commnndcr of
I the American Legion in Utnh, is
t chairman of the Stnte Advisory
Bonrd; nnd John E. Holdcn, Stnte
Adjutant, will shortly enrry the Sal
tation Army's message to every Le
gion post in tho stnte, nccording to
! announcement mnde nt Snlt Lnko
hendqunrtcrs.
"Holdcn, like every other Utahn
who was overseas, has an intimate
(Personal knowledge of that wonder
ful organization which is the Snlvn
Ition Army," said Mr. Gnrdner.
"Utah's service men nre supporting
jthe present movement ns one of in
( calculable vnlue to the community."
This homo service program will be
come a permanent feature of tho Sal-1
,vation Army's future. By co-ordinnt-j
i ing this work of aid and comfort with
, existing institutions through tho lo
cal ndvisory boards, a great service ,
i will be done the country, declare
those who are behind tho movement '
EMIL HANSEN AND COUNCIL !
COMMITTEE WORK AT PARK
1 Emil Hnnsen, landscape gnrdner
.and public grounds plnnner for tho
Agricultural College, nnd also con
nected with tho extension division of
thnt institution, is in Cedar City for
the purpose of laying out nnd plnnt
ing the trees for tho public pnrk and
tounst enmping ground on lower Mnin
street. Tho City Council committee
on public grounds and city property
is cooperating with Mr. Hnnsen, nnd
n number of the boys from the Junior
I High School arc digging holes and
. otherwise assisting with the work. We
I have a photo of the blue prints for
ST. GEORGE OIL I
& GASJO. IN GAP
Comes to Assistance of the Virgia M
Dome Company to Test Value M
of the Dixie Field. M
A deal has been mnde by which tho " H
St. Gqorgo Oil & Gas Co. takes ov- H
cr the operating of tho Virgin Domo H
Oil compnny's well on Purgatory H
Flat. H
The Virgin Dome drillers had H
passed through thirty feet of paraf- , H
fin wnx sand nnd hnd entered a hard H
white sand. After penetrating this H
snnd n few feet the cable become so H
worn ns to be nlmost useless nnd it H
wns decided to close down rather than . H
have n fishing job cnuscd by a brok- H
on cubic, nnd W. J. Graham, tho prcs- H
ident of tho company hnd been put- H
ting up considerable private money H
for some time to continue operations, H
ho did not feel disposed to continue H
nnd decided to close down the well H
for an indefinite period. H
' Thcro wns probably a feeling also H
that tho other companies should do H
something towards testing out tho H
field nnd not bo content to let tho Vir- H
gin Domo company do the wholo H
thing. M
When Mr. Graham's intentions be- , H
como known, the officers of the St. H
Gcorgo Oil & Gas Co. got together H
and met with Mr. Graham and others H
of tho V. D. Oil Cp. Inst Saturday H
and talked the whole matter over. H
The well hns been visited by Geo. F. H
Whitchend, the president of the St. H
George Oil & Gas Co., and won H
proved to be down 2004 feet, after H
which it wns sealed. i H
The result of the meeting between H
the officers of tho two companies was H
that the St. George Oil & Gas Co. H
takes over the property for working H
purposes entirely on the understand- H
ing thnt it puts in n new cnblc and , H
continues drilling for thirty days un-
less oil is struck sooner. Four thoun- , M
nnd dollars will be put into it by tho , M
new company unless oil is found bo- M
foro that, amount is oxnnmlnrl. ., ,.n ll h .j, , B
Tho Virgin Domo officers will hnvo' ' H
nothing to do. with the well whila ' H
this money is being expended nnd all . . M
checks will be signed and counter- M
signed by the president and sccretnry M
of the St. George Oil & Gas Co. H
Should oil be struck in commercial M
quantity by the St. George Oil & Gan H
Co., they turn the well back to tho H
Virgin Dome pcoplo and receive cither
stock nt par vnlue for tiic money in- M
vested by them, or tho cash will be re- M
turned, whichever they prefer. 'H
The drilling crew Imn Agreed to M
stay with the woll, and any they be- M
llcvo )hcy cun put the well down be- H
tween GOO nnd 000 feet within 30 H
dnys when they have n new cable to , H
work with. 1 H
Owen Mny, the superintendent at H
tho woll, left Sundny for Salt Lake H
City to get a new cnblc, on arrival H
of which work will be at once return- H
lite St. George- Oil & Gns Co. hoa H
a well spotted on the name formation M
as the Virgin Dome well, so the value H
of one will decide that of another on H
tho same formation. Anyway, it is a H
cheap way for the St. George Oil & H
Gas Co. to prove the value of the H
ground, cheaper thnn putting in a H
rig and starting afresh. H
Mr. Mny the Supt, nnd Claud Hcg- H
ler, chief driller, both of whom liavo H
hnd much experience in drilling oil H
wells, nre .sanguine regarding the H
outlook for bringing in a good well, H
and nre more sanguine now they H
hnve gone so far thnn ever before. H
The editor talked to both Mr. Gra- jH
ham nnd Mr. Whitehead concerning H
the denl Tuesday morning and found H
them optomistie concerning the fu- H
I turc of the field. jH
I A telegram wns received Tuesday H
I by Mr. Whitehead from Mr. May; .. H
stating he would leave Salt Lake City" H
I with the new cubic loaded on trucks H
on tho 5th inst. Washinton County H
News. M
1 In Beaver County they are utilizing 9
I the labor of a lot of the boys in their H
I teens, nnd some possibly younger, in jH
raking the loose cobble stones off tho H
stnte highway. The boys go in gangH H
of about ten or n dozen nnd aro in H
, charge of the supervisor or somo other H
matured person, and nre certainly do- H
ing good work. Wo hnve a lot of this H
class of labor going to waste in this H
county, thnt could be utilized to ad- H
vnntnge in this wny tho pay being H
mnde commensurate with the labor H
performed. It is a great saving to H
automobile tires to have theso looso H
stones removed. H
the improvement, from which we will
hnve a cut prepared for use in our , H
columns next week, and which will bo t H
accompanied by further descriptive 9H
matter. ' HP
HUM
' ' ' ' "?- 5 S
r jiH
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