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Iron County record. (Cedar City, Utah) 1893-1982, June 04, 1920, Image 1

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Iron County Record I
EIGHT PAGES ALL HOME PRINT tH
" i i i i """ "T"- . "" ' ' . , . mm
VOLUME XXVII. W.W PK1S YXA. CEDAR CITY, UTAH. FRIDAY, JUNE 4, 1920. 5 CXNTS PER COPY. NUMBER 24. H
MEMORIAL DAY
i omations
Local People Spend Day in Im
proving Cemetery Lots ; 5 : 30
Service Well Attended.
Mcmorinl Day was quito generally
observed in Cedar City last Mondny,
the city cemetery being thronged all
day with busy workers intent upon tho
ornamentation and bcautification of
the various graves and lots in which
they were interested by ties of kind
ship. At 5:30 o'clock, when tho serv
ice, opened, the city of tho dead pre
sented a loving, if not a lovely, ap
pearance.
Diector Frisby and members of tho
choir were present and led in tho sing
ing, in which the congregation joined.
The services wero presided over by
Councilman T. J. Jones of the City
Committee on City Property, and the
speakers wero Bp. W. R. Palmer and
Dr. J. W. Bcrgstrom.
Bp. Palmer discussed the question
of n more beautiful cemetery, and said
that with aprpoximatoly ?200,000.00
worth of monuments and gravestones
in our cemetery the general appear
ance was anything but beautiful. As
an example of what might bo accom
plished at vastly less expense, the
speaker referred to government cem
eteries which he had visited, and which
with a few well selected piccca of
statuary and modest grave markers
for ench mound, presented a much
more pleasing appearance.
I Dr. Mnrfarlane followed along the
same line, and also paid beautiful
tribute to our dead heroes resulting
from the war.
Theso was a largo congregation of
townspeople present, tho services be
ing held near the front entrance to
the enclosure.
V
i Local Wool Situation.
Parowan fared much better than Ce
dar City thia year in the marketing
rv-; of their wool crop. The principal
nr"3"" part of THc growers iKero pooled their
" " wool and sold at 63 or 05 cents. Only
' about one-fourth of the Parowan wool
remains unsold, we aro informed, Mr.
WiLford Day being among the seem
ingly unfortunate minority. In Cedar
City the figures are just about re
versed, hardly more than 25 of the
wool having been sold. The idea seems
to have become current that all the
sheep men might have sold their wool
at prices' from COc. to 65c. per pound
- had they not been holding for nn in
creased price, but this, wo are in
formed, is a mistake; that many of
the sheep men have never had an of
fer for their wool, and could not ob
tain one until it was sheared and op
v tain one until it was sheared and op
en for inspection. Then, before the
sheep could' be sheared, all the buyers
had retired from the field.
OF IMPORTANCE TO
GOV'T BOND HOLDERS
Snn Francisco, May 31 The Fed
eral Reserve Bank of San Francisco
has sent the following notice to all of
its member banks in the Twelfth
Federal Reserve District.
"Tho attention of holders of First
Liberty Loan Converted 4 per cent
Bonds is drawn to the fact that they
have the privilcgo of converting suchj
Bonds into First Liberty Loan Con-'
verted 4V6 per cent Bonds if presented
to reach the Federal Reserve Bank of.
San Francisco on or before June 14, J
1920. This conversion will entitle tho(
bond holder to earn interest at 4 VI per.
ent commencing June 15, 1920. If j
First Liberty Loan Converted 4 per.
cent Bonds are not presented to reach '
the Federal Resorve Bank of San
Francisco on or before Juno 14, 1920,
they will still be convertible into
bonds bearing 4V4 per cent interest,
1 but the increased rate of interest will,
not commence until December 15, i
1920."
1 a ,V The Beehive girls of tho Cedar East
"Ward, which includes all young la
u dies between 14 and 17 years of age,
will hold their next semi-weekly meet
ing next Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'-
' clock sharp, at tho home of Miss Aline
Walker. Mrs. Maggie C. Webster, the
class leader, is very anxious that there
' should bo a large attendance at this
meeting as important problems affect
ing the summer's course of study and
activities are to bo discussed.
Tomorrow (Saturday) in this city,
tho Democrats of Iron county will
hold their county convention for the
purpose of electing delegates to the,
1 state convention, which will meet in.
; Salt Lake City on tho 14th and in't
, i turn elect delegates to tho national
convention at Son Francisco on June'
, , 28th.
COUNTY BOND MONEY HELD I
UP BY A TECHNICALITY
"" "
The money from the sale of county
road and hospital bonds is being held
up we nro informed on account of a
technicality of some kind, and work
on the roads and hospital is retarded.
An option had been taken for the hos
pital on some lots in tho southern part
of town from Mr. C. C. Bladen, and
this week when Mr. Bladen demnnded
his money or the termination of the j
option, Dr. Macfarlanc, L. W. Jones j
and Lafe McConnell stepped into the
gap and bought tho property person- j
ally, to be turned over for tho hospital
as soon as tho money is ready to pay
for it. If for any reason, the bond
money should not become available,
the individuals named would retain
ownership of tho lots. Tho amount
involved is approximately $1700.
v
Among tho road workers scheduled
to take part in the Zion Park-Grand
Canyon Road Convention at Hurri
cane, Juno 19th, aro at least one rep
resentative from tho state road com
mission, the chairmen of tho road com
mission of Mohave county, Ariz., J. H.
Mnndcrficld of Snlt Lake City, Pres
ident of tho Arowhead Trails Asso
ciation, C. II. Bigclgow, Arrowhead
Trail Engineer, Stato Senator U. T.
Jones and Stato Road Engineer, Ira
R. Browning.
V
VALUABLE ADDITION
TO EXTENSION FORCE
Iron County Fortunate in Securing
Services of A. L. Price as
County Club Leader.
A valuable addition has been made
to tho Agricultural extension force
of Iron County in tho person of A. L.
Price, recently appointed Club Leader.
This is the first year that Iron County
has had a club leader as a permanent
member of the extension force and we
have not as yet. had any boys' nor
girls' - clubs, ".althougli-Tioiuc-rwurk
along that line has been done in the
past.
I Mr. Price is a graduate of tho Ag
ricultural College, and comes to hi3
now post with tho highest recommend
ations, having been lender of the Sen
ior clnss this year, and a winner of
the "A" pin for scolarship. His par
ticular job is the organization of
boys' or girls' agricultural clubs, such
as potato, corn, pig or calf clubs for
boys and baking, sewing, canning
gardening or poultry-raising clubs for
girls. It is expected that tho work
will be taken up by the young people
with enthusiasm, since there is al
ready much interest in such lines as
evidenced by the fact that at tho
state fair two years ago two Iron
County boys, Henry Webster and Will
Hunter won prizes on samples of po
tatoes. A petition from Iron county signed
(Continued on last page.)
MiintiitmMHntMtnmiiHmMt.4MHMitmitHUNimHnimmwiMfliMMmtNmmntttwtm
HMHHBHnHaMlanMMUHeHnaMHaNMNMMaBHBMWMiMMMMBHMMaWliMNHBn0
G. 0. P. National Chairman
i
WILL H. HAYS.
j As head of tho party organization of tho country, Chairman Ilays
will call to order tho Republican National Convention In tho Coliseum
at Chicago, on Juno 8th. It 1b expected that this will bo ono of Uio
greatest political gatherings In history and tho demand for scats la
I unprecedented. Mr. Hays has boon chairman of tho committee ttuicu
i February 18. 1918, and slnco then has devoted his wholo tim to orgim- I
Izatlon work, with tho rosult that tho party Is admlttodly in bettor 1
shape than ovor boforo at convention tlmo In a presidential your.
Whoever tho nominee It Is taken for grautod that Chairman Hays 1
will manage tho campaign, as all of tho candidates havo so anuouncuci. 1
j 1
.,... m
BHIniMUlMIUIM11IUMIIMIfIIIMIIHIMHMMMItMHIIM1MIIMIlllHIIMMMMH Mill!
R. T. FORBES HONORED
BY AMERICAN LEGION
R. T. Forbes, secretary of tho Ce
dar Post of the American Legion, re
turned u few days since from the
pdconntlontTaycpoto J2Jthil
a five1y""time. He "states that a few
of the outlying posts "got their heads
together" and brought to the atten
tion of the convention that there wero
members outside of Snlt Lake and
Ogden. A motion that the executive
committee of the American Legion
should consist of 7 members all of
whom should reside within a radius
of 50 miles from Salt Lake, was
quickly amended so thnt the commit
tee consists of one member from ench
judicial district of the state. The Ce
dar Post was mentioned for its effic
ient organization and good work, nnd
Mr. Forbes was elected First Vice
Commander of the state organization.
t There were near n hundred delegates
present at the convention.
Charlie Bechtol Still Elated
Charley Bechtol, discoverer and pro
moter of the Mastodon mino in Gold
strike District of Washington county,
was in town last Tuesday conferring
CALL FOR REPUBLICAN
CONVENTION WITHDRAWN
It now appears that tho call for
tho Republican Judicial District Con
ventian was not authoritatively is
.wwd, jyd,,;has 'been,j3vlthdrwn,'CJt
ftenrtha't lliero was nmistakirtisto
who wa3 the legally constituted dis
trict chairman, nnd a difference of
opinion as to theh proper dnto of hold
ing the convention. It now dovclops
that Attorney E. II, Ryan of this
place, and not attorney Burton of
Nephi, is tho chairman, and Mr. Ryan
is not in favor of early conventions.
A cnll for the district convention nnd
tho dependent county conventions will
be issued later.
with co-owners here, and apparently
wns greatly pleased over the present
showing in the mine.
It had been rumored in advance of
his coming that ho had struck a rich
deposit of ore in the shaft ho is sink
ing, and while this report wns not ex
actly justified by tho facts. Mr. Bech
tol states that ho is in what ho con
fidently believes to be the capping of
the ore vein, nnd thnt when this is
(Continued on pngo five.)
Wreckers at Work Near Latimer.
V ,
' " 1
The above picture of the wreckers at work after the accident which occurred last week on the
Salt Lake Route at the Latimer siding, is one of a collection taken by Photographer J. C. Houghton
of the California Ranch, and shows the two derricks attached to the demolished locomotive and draw
ing it into position for loading, parallel to the track. The main line was opened in less than 24 hrs.
v ,
i
FEDERAL PROHIBITION
OFFICERS IN SOUTH
Federal Prohibition Director Ma
thonihnh Thomas nnd Federal Pro
hibition agent, J. A. Shields nro in
Cedar City today. They aro on an
inspection tour of tho south nnd havo
been as far as St. George, where they
held conference with resident pcaco
officers. Owing-to a confusion of
dates resulting in a call for pcaco
officers of this county to convene in
this city on tho 5th instead of tho
4th, and both tho federal men having
appointments ahead they wore obliged
to leave after an informal talk with
peace officers of this placo and Com
missioners Lund nnd Sheriff Froyd.
Various features of the illicit liquor
traffic were reviewed and discussed,
tho visitors giving mnny helpful sug
gestions and particularly urging tho
justices of tho penco to imposo jail
sentences on offenders in lieu of fines,
ns the punishment is much moro ef
fective. Everything containing moro than
one-half of ono per cent of alcohol
nnd used for beverngo purposes comes
under tho ban of tho fcdoral as well
as the stato law, nnd thcro will bo n
determined effort to stamp out abuses
and infractions of tho Inw.
Mr. Thomas nnd Mr. Shield loft on
lodny's stage for tho northorn pnrt of
the stnto, but except to mako another
visit to tho southern counties soon.
NAME FARMS URGES
AGRICULTURAL MAN
Dr. M. C. Merrill, Professor of Hor
ticulture, U. A. C, Points Out
Benefits Winch Accrue.
Some fnrms are knojn to thousands
of people while others .aro hardly
known beyond the fence that encloses
them. For this there must be a rea
son. What is it? Every year your
attention is no doubt directed to cer
tain farms that aro so popular; Jthey
f eft'difyv.sell slthey - pmWcbS' while
Ticighborim'fnrmr find Mt difficult -to
dispose of nil their products. Let us
sec if we can name Bomo of tho fac
tors responsible for the difference.
If a farm is to become popular and
its fruit sought after there must bo
something distinctive about tho place.
As you think over tho proposition you
will probnbly agree that the following
rensons have an important relation
to the distinction a certain placo at
tains: 1. The farm lias n definite and dis
tinctive nnme by which it is known.
2. Tho owner is genial, fnir nnd
squnre and welcomes people to his
place of business.
3. Grcut care is taken to produce
products of high quality thnt will
give satisfaction to the purchaser.
I. On thnt farm may be found tho
kinds nnd varieties of products thnt
people want.
Tho first point may not be first in
importance but it is tho one I wish to
emphnsize now nnd that should most
nsuredly be given positive and active
attention on every farm. No farm
should be so utterly disregarded long
er as to be left without a name. A
farm without a namo is in about the
snmc deplorable condition ns a man
without a country. It is rather par
adoxical that the crops and the an
imuls grow upon tho farm are given
names and yet the farm itself which
produces them lncks such distinction.
It is in the snmc category ns the
man who buys a car nnd then can't
use it because tho children have com
clete monopoly of it.
The moro you think about it, tho
more you will be convinced that giv
ing your farm a nnme will be ono of
the best ways in tho world of putting
it on the map. Just tho moment thnt
is done you instinctively tako more
, pride in it nnd you can't help it. In
I Utah we havo a law upon" our stat
utes providing the machinery for reg
istering distinctive names for our
I forms, thus preventing the snmo nnme
being given to two fnrms. As yet
'only very few fnrmers havo availed
themselves of that opportunity, a
fnct which is exceedingly regrettable.
But giving the farm a name and
registering it is not sufficient. That
' is surely a start in the right direction.
but it is only a start. Tho next thing
is to let others know about it. Ono of
tho elements of your success will bo
your ability to advertise your placo
,and its products. One of tho most
'effective ways to do this, especially
,if you live along a much travelled
roadway, will bo to hnvo n neat yet
I prominent signboard displayed nour or
nt the entrance to your fnrm. This
I signboard should be carefully and nr
, tisticnlly prepared by n competent
person and should bear the namo of
tho farm in an attractive and pleasing
fashion.
As part of this signboard should
ANNOUNCEMENT I
OF CHAUTAUQUA 1
Ellison-White Corporation FutbUIh IH
es Additional Details of Next rl
Summer's Attraction. iH
Tho opening announcement of tho' il
Ellison-Whlto Chautauqua program il
for this year scms to asuro music, jH
lecture and entertainment "fans" fl
week of thorough enjoyment. Tho fl
dates havo been definitely nnnouncod JH
ns July C, 7, 8, 0, and 10.
A musical event of outstanding in- 91
tcrcst is scheduled in the coming of jH
Josephine Mnrtino, noted New York H
prima donnn, on the last ntght. Miaa H
Mnrtino is one of the most promising iH
singers of the younger generation. H
Sho is one of the new Edison artistn H
nnd her work has attracted tho nttcn- H
tion and won the approval of Enrico H
Cnrouso and ho has coached her in. jH
the operatic selections sho will uso on H
this Chautauqua tour. In company H
with Miss Mnrtino on tho last night H
appears tho Stearns-Gregg' Concert H
Company, a splendid musicnl organ- lH
ization, with tho talented Fay Ep- H
person ns an entertainer. H
Other musical features of note nro: H
The MacGrcgogr Singers, headed by H
Vawter MncGregor, Scotch baritono fjl
and entertainer; the Fenwick Newoll LH
Concert Company under the leader- l lll
ship of Fenwick Newell, tenor, who 11
hns won honors in both Europe and 11
tho Antipodes with his splendid 3
voice; nnd the Rcigners, two musical HH
entertainers of rare ability. H
The third day brings tho Overscan JH
Orchestra, eight charming, talented lil
and vivacious young ladies who havo H
been enthusiastically received by tho H
bqys of tho A. E. F., Jn Franco and M
by Eustcrn Chautauqua audiences. jH
A lecture of decided interest and H
novelty is to be presented on the rH
fourth night vhen Dr. C. S, Price tritoHfe i."H
bring hb'UurttAto-HB .
ingiEifc .Gaim3ritf"?AlBka7wir''7j? mr,,t H
lecture of thrilling- interest, lllustrat- 11
cd with n remarkable series of big jH
gnme pictures, including views of 11
whale harpooning nnd of tho great f'l
seal herds of the Arctic seas. 11
Other lecture events of value nro fH
scheduled in tho nppenrance of tho M
following well-known people: M 'H
Plrio Beyen, first volunteer American ':M
Bed Cross nurse, lecturer on commun- tH
ity health; Joel "W". Enstman, with a M
constructive lecture built for these HH
uncertnin days "The Unfolding of De- il
mocracy;" and Marion Ballou Fisk, " PH
noted cartoonist-lecturer, who comes fH
tho first night with a highly interest- iH
mg lccturc-cntcrtninmcnt. H
The dramatic reading of "Green 'H
Stockings," the delightful comedy by 11
A. E. W. Mason, will be a delight for
nil entertainment lovers. Ruby Pago 1
Ferguson, head of the Department l
of Oratory at the Women's Collcgo H
of Alabama, portrays every charac- M
tor of the play with consumntc ar- fH
tistry. .H
The Board of County Commissioners t
met at Parowan the first three days H
of this week as a Bonrd of Equaliza- H
tion, hearing rtnd adjusting complaints H
in relation to assessments. Rather H
fewer complaints wero made thnn us- M
unl of erroneous or inequitable assess- H
ments, nnd the princlpnl changes wero H
made in the Kamirrn district, which H
resulted from n misunderstanding on 'H
the part of the appraisal committee. 'H
be spneo for a "For Sale" sign and
one for "Wanted." Undcrnenth theso M
should bo a neatly printed list in -1
Inrge letters of tho products for salo '1
and those things the owner wants to H
buy from his neighbors. Ho would H
find this signboard a most affective ad- H
vertising medium. H
All too frequently we see a crude H
shingle or board nniied to n tree and M
trying to snrve this important func- fl
Hon. Oftentimes the information is
scrawled on this shingle in a very H
poor hand and mnny times the worda M
nro misspelled, making altogether a
very miserable showing. H
Even tho the farm is not lorated on
an important highway it is surprising H
how much traffic thero is on the sldo H
roads all over the country, and tho !l
came principle would still hold good ;B
there. No matter where your farm is, M
give it an appropriate numo and dis- H
play that namo for tho passerby. It H
will astonish you how rapidly and far Jl
that information spreads and how "H
well-known your farm becomes as a H
result. H
It has been with great pleasure jM
that I have noted tho nddr.tou of many s M
such signboards on Utah farms tho H
past few months, Let the good' work ' ,'H
continue. It is one of the very, best 'il
wnys in tho world to put your faraF RH
on the map. '(

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