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Iron County record. (Cedar City, Utah) 1893-1982, July 02, 1920, Image 1

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Iron County Record ' I
1 EIGHT PAGES ALL HOME PRINT M
VOLUME XXVII. S2.M F TKAR. CEDAR CITY, UTAH. FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1920. 6 CENTS PER COPY. NUMBER 38. ;
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TALMAGE AND SMITH
AODRESSJWEETINGS
4
Apostle and Patriarch Represent
General Church Authorities at
Recent Conference.
I
' ' ' ' MASTERLY DISCOURSES
; ON LIVE CHURCH TOPICS
Wards of Stake Generally Rcpre-
, sented and Large Attendance of
Saints Present at the Sessions.
There was a very largo attendance
at the Parowan Stake Quarterly con
ference held at Cedar City last Satur
day and Sunday. Attho two Sunday
meetings the gatherings were larg
est, approaching close to 800 at each
meeting. Stake President, H. W. Lunt
opened the Saturday morning session
with a welcome to the saints, after
which each member of the stake High
Council gave a short talk.
On Saturday afternoon Counselor
Myron Higbee opened the meeting
with a short sermon, after which Bish
op Hans J. Mortcnson of Parowan
spoke, followed by Bishop Parson
Webster of Cedar East Ward. Apos
tle James Talmago spoko with groat
' eloquence and power from the text,
"Take no Thought of Tomorrow."
, Patriarch Hyrum G. Smith followed
Apostle Talmago with a strong ex-
j bortntion to the saints to know the
-4j laws of God and to obey them.
j Counselor Frank A. Thorley opened
the Sunday morning session, remind
ing the gathered saints that eractly.
seventy-six years ago on that very
day the Prophet Joseph was martyred i
J in the Carthage jail. Elder Arch Spils-1
bury was the next speaker, followed)
by John L. Sevy Sen. The Stake Sun- (
; " day School work was reported by
Stake Sunday School Superintend-1
t ent ThoB. T. Durham. Patriarch Hy-'
rum G. Smith talked on the duties of
a patriarch, after which Apostle Tal
mago gave the final sermon of the
meeting.
The first speaker of the Sunday
j, afternoon gathering was Elder John
i Page of Newcastle, who reported his
1 recent mission experiences in Calif-
: 'ornia, where he had been Conference
president of the Los Angeles confer
ence. Following this, the names of
the general church authorities and
those of Parowan stake were present
ed to the people and sustained. This1
j in turn was followed by what was
; said to bo the most powerful exhor-
i tatlon of the conference. Apostlo Tnl-'
mage reprimanded the neglegent
j among the saints and admonished,
i them tto live the gospel and to be'
prayorful. Patriarch Smith also made
prayer the subject of his discourse.
I The next speaker after Elder Smith
wnB Elder William H. Lyman of Paro-.
wan, who bore a strong testimony.. In '
I closing the conference, President" II.'
W. Lunt counselled the peoplo to re
frain from Sabbath breaking, and to
pay their tithing, and to be careful
in their living and all their dealings
that the same should bo honest. I
Besides the regular conference meet-'
ings, there was a Stake priesthood
I meeting on Saturday night addressed
1 y Apostle Talmago on the duties of
tho priesthood. I
On Sunday evening, too, the Mutual
J Improvement hold a stake conjoint
meeting presided over by first nssist-
i ant Stnko Superintendent Ashton
1 Jones. There was inspiring congrc-
1 gational singing, followed by a stir-
M ring address by Hunter Lunt. A sne-
m red solo was sung by Frank A. Thor-
ley nnd another by E. M. Corry.
Congregational singing and prayer
m closed the meeting.
v
I Our Librarian, Mrs. E. Crane Wat-
son, leaves today for Salt Lake City
to attend the Librarian department of ,
the N. E. A. convention and will con-
ilnue her vacation by spending two or ,
M three weeks in Berkeley and San
Francisco with her daughters, Mrs.
. Afton W, Hunt and Mrs. Nevada W.
Driggfl.
V
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INFORMATION BUREAU
FOR THE TOURISTS
1
If the plans of leading mem-
bers of the Cedar Commercial
4- club mature, tho Club will cstab-
llsh a Bureau of Information for f
travellers at some convenient
point in tho city, whore a regis- 1
tor will bo maintained for names
and addresses of visitors. Tho i
Cedar Breaks, Zion National
Park, tho Iron County Coal do- g
posits, and all points of interest i
and every resource would be
covered in this publicity work.
This bureau would also bo of
service in giving the traveler
correct information as to hotels, f
garages, gasoline and oil pumps,
stage lines and any other such
service as the visitor needs.
I
LIVELY FIREWORKS I
INDEPENDENCE DAY j
The Fourth of July committee has
arranged for tho greatest fireworks i
display ever seen in this part of Utah, j
Tho brilliant pageant, which is to be-
gin at pine in the evening, consists of
thirty-five different numbers, including
ten flights of rockets, nine salvos of
bombshells, ten wonderful arenie dis
plays and five huge designs, described
as follows:
"American Legion" In huge fiery let
ters two feet high. The design is
thirty-five feet long and is given in
honor of the soldiers and sailors of
tho great war.
Massive Wheel, a beautiful design
of revolving fires with a center of
colored bands with circumference of
gold changing to shimmering fires
and then to dazzling silver.
Tree of Liberty emblem of our
victory. A very realistic tree of fire.
The blossoms are rich and beautiful
colors and the foliage glittering gold.
Great White Falls A great cata
ract of fiery splendor and dazzling
magnificence, falling in a great tor
rent of incandescent molten silver and
rising in a beautiful mist of smoke.
Our Flag Grand finale. Old Glory
flung to tho breeze from a golden
staff and outlined in the richest red,
white and blue fires.
Tho above are only five features out
of a dazzling program of thirty-five
numbers.
TWO UTAH COMMUNITIES
LOSE HEAVILY BY FIRE
June 24th tho plant of the Beaver
Woolen and Flour Mills was swept by
fire, the loss amounting to $100,000,
and the newspaper report stating that
"Beaver, without a fire department,
wa3 unable to do any effective work
in combatting the fire."
Tho next day fire wiped out a busi
ness block in Richfield, the loss being
placed nt over $50,000, and being
blamed to ''partial failure of the sup
ply of city water."
Those two calamities nnturally sot
us wondering if Cedar City is pre
pared to avoid like accidents. It is
certain that the city does not want to
lose $100,000, nor even $50,000, in any
such disastrous manner. In going ov
er the matter to some extent, it is
found that the city has good water
pressure, fire hydrants installed to
cover all the more thickly populated
portions of the city, and a supply of
hose and other equipment, the only
element lacking In preparation being
tho organization of a volunteer fire
brigade and the drilling of members
of Buch an organization. A few fire
drills, ladder climbing contests and
like useful activities, might not be
out of order in our progressive com
munity. Anyhow, such property losses, hit
ting not far away, set the average
citizens to thinking along fire-fighting
lines. Tho Beaver fire hits Iron coun
ty especially hard, since n majority of
the stock of the Beaver Woolen Mills
was held in Cedar City and Parowan.
A heavy stockholder in the corporation
makes tho statement that the Iron
county investors are the real losers
by tho fire, since they put their cash
into stock against the old, wornout
plant, which tho new and recently de
stroyed plant replaced.
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IMPENDENCE DAY I
I In Cedar City
I YOU ARE INVITED TO COME AND CELEBRATE THE
GLORIOUS FOURTH WITH US. I
j The American Salute at Daybreak, 13 Guns.
Hoisting of Flag and Band Salute at Sunrise. Band Music j
for thirty minutes. j
! Meeting at 10 O'clock A. M. in Tabernacle, Program as
l follows:
I Band Selection.
S Prayer by Chaplain, Henry W. Lunt.
Review of His Nation, Uncle Sam G. Hunter Lunt.
Colonial Songs La Voma Quartet.
I Sword of Bunker Hill Otto Fife.
I Barbara Frietchie Mrs. John U. Webster.
I Speech of Gettysburg Willie Thorley. 1
I Saxophone and Piano Duet5 Cannon and Harper. -- -
I Anecdotes of the World War W. H. Leigh. J
I Star-Spangled Banner Band and Congregation.
I Prayer by Chaplain
! SPORT? AND AMUSEMENTS j
I The Sports Program will be staged at the Fair Grounds, i
I beginning at 3 o'clock. Following arc the events :
i Girls' Races. 1
1 Girls five to seven years, cash prize of $ .50
I Girls seven to nine years, cash prizo of x - 60 1
1 Girls nino to 12 years, cash prize of 1.00
1 Girls twelvo to fifteen years, cash prize of - 1.60 a
Boys' Races I
I Boys five to seven years, cash prize of $ .60
I Boys seven to nino years, cash prizo of. 60
I Boys nine to twelve years, cash prizo of 1.00
I Boys twelve to fifteen years, caBh prize of 1.50 1
I Potato Race I
Potato Race for Boys, cash prize of $2.00 f
I Potato Race for GirlB, cash prize of 2.00 g
I Blindfolded Boxing Contest
1 For Boys, cosh prize of . $2.00
I Barrel and Table Race
Freo for all, paBh prize of. $5.00 g
Saddle Horse Race
One-fourth Mile, $5 entrance fee, thrco to enter, cash prize of $25.00
I Novelty Race, 1 milos; three horses, change nt each half
i mile; three to enter; cash prizo of 25.00
I Base Ball Game 1
I Cedar City vs. some outside team. The fair grounds will be sprinkled I
I for tho occasion.
I Free Ice Cream for Children
1 An ico cream cone Is to be given each child under twelve years of
i "Be.
Grand Ball in the Evening
The evening will be given to dancing, n live committee having that a
part of the program in charge.
i The General Committee extends a cordial invitation to the
people of neighboring towns to join us in this day of pleasure. I
f ?
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CEDAR CITY PREPARES
FOR BOY SCOUT CARAVAN
The B. A. C. campus has been pro
vided with a camping place for the
monster Boy Scout caravan from Salt
Lake 'City to.. Zion Canyon, during
their stay in Cedar, which will be pn
July 13th. The Boy Scout organiza
tion of Cedar City has taken tho re
sponsibility of providing wood for
campfircs and tho Relief Society and
Beehive girls are joining in the prep
aration of dinner for the caravan, as
well as for breakfast on the morning
of the fourteenth. Just what pro
gram will bo arranged is not yet defi
nitely decided, but plans nro under
consideration by tho City Council for
a community demonstration of Homo
fort as a greeting and wclcomo to tho
visitors.
w
Chapman Duncan, one of the old
est linotype operators on the Deseret
News, in point of service, and a na-
GOOD VALUES FOUND IN BIG
SUNFLOWER, AT STATELINE
Stockholders in the Liberty Leasing
Association of Cedar City arc rejoic
ing in the discovery of a streak of
rich oro in their lease, which covers
what was formerly known as tho Big
Sunflower mine, one of tho group
held by tho Big Fourteen Consolida
tion. The last assay received shows
3,000 ounces of silver and $108 gold
to tho ton, and oro taker) later, on
which returns have not been as yet
received, have the appearance of being
much better still.
tlve son of Cedar City, accompanied
by his wife and two sons, Homer and
Billie, are spending their vacation in
southern Utah, looking over Mr. Dun
can's old stomping grounds when a
boy, making a trip to Zion Park, and
seeing other things of interest in this
section. Homer, following in his fa
ther's footsteps, is also learning to
operate a Lino, at the News office.
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COMMERCIAL CLUB
MEETING COMING
. 41
Within a few days tho dato
will bo set for tho big coming
Commercial Club meeting nnd
banquet. This is scheduled to
take placo at tho Christcnsen
Construction Company camp in
Cedar canyon. Hero feasting
nnd festivities will cap tho an-
nual club election, which ought
to bo a most impressive cero-
mony in such a wild and bcautl-
ful setting. Tho matter of set-
ting a dato is causing tho Club
officials some closo figuring, to
avoid clashing with many other
interesting events scheduled for
tho present month. That tho big
doings will be on somo date in
in July js, as near as can bo
promised at present.
-! 4.
KNOX TO ENTER
RACE FOR BENCH
The following letter announcing tho
candidacy of Attorney William F.
Knox of Beaver for tho nomination
of District Judge of to Fifth Judicial
district on the Republican ticket, ap
peared in the Beaver County News
of June IGUi:
I Beaver, June 14, 1020.
i Mr. C. T. Woodbury, Milford-Utah.,
I Dear Mr. Woodbury: I am just in
receipt of a very kind letter, in which
tho signers urgo mo to become a cnn
didato for tho offico of Judge of this
district, on tho Republican ticket at
tho coming election.
I have also received a number of
letters from prominent Republicans,
residing in the other counties in the
district, urging mo to become a can
didate. I came to Beaver soon after I com
menced to practice law; nnd during
nil the years I have lived here and
practiced in the district, I have re
ceived the most kind nnd courteous
treatment nt the hands of the people
for which I nm very grateful, indeed.
Since receiving your letter, nnd tho
other letters above referred to, I havo
given the matter careful consideration
nnd havo decided, if it is the wish of
our party that I become a candidato,
that I shall be pleased to do so.
(Continued on page five.)
THEY'RE HAPPY NOW
s iWfSr " Vv, S2E3
A new picture or Mrs. Warren
O. Harding, wife of the Repub
lican presidential nominee and
Mrs. Calvin Coolldgo, wife of the
vice presidential nominee. Both
picture were takes since the
nominations.
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CHAUTAUQUA ON .
HERFJEXl WEEK I
Ellison-White Corporation Fura- 'M
ishes Exceptional Repertoire il
For This Season. jl
FIVE DAYS OF ENTERTAIN-
MENT AND INSTRUCTION
Big Tent Will Go Up East of Tab- M
crnaclc Opens Tuesday, July M
6, Two Sessions Held Daily. jH
The past week has been one of hustle
for tho various committees charged ;'H
with preparing for tho Chautauqua. uH
Posters havo been tacked and posted ' H
in every city nnd its environs, store M
windows havo been placarded, pro- M
grams distributed and tickets sold 1 M
from houso to houso, until tho rest- ) H
dent of Cedar City who does not know t'l
there is to bo a monster program of
exceptional merit next week, would be ,M
an interesting specimen to examine. ," M
The big tent will go up just cast of ?l
the tabernacle, and the first program jl
will bo given Tuesday afternoon, -July
THE PROGRAM I lM
Daily Schedule. (fll
Afternoon concert 2:30
Afternoon lecture 3:00 '"1
Children's Hour 4:00 1
Evening concert 7:30 vH
Evening lecture 8:00 lM
FIRST DAY .t'ii- iM
Afternoon. '-"in (!
Opening announcement of the week, if :
Chautauqua Director. - ?
Concort, Tho MacGregor Singers. S fl
Organizing Junior Chautauqua.
Evening. JB, H
Concert prelude, Tho MacGregor Wt IH
Singers. jSh J, H
Cartoon-Lccturo Entcrtnimncnt, by 8f fl
Marion Bnllou Fisk. $S ll
SECOND DAY W tl
Afternoon. $ fl
Concert prelude Fenwick Newell Jjj fl
Concert Company. '5!
"Green Stockings" Rtiby Pago fr1 VH
Ferguson. (A. E. Mason's delightful $ IH
comedy in monologue.)
Junior Chnutauqua play hour. fl
Evening. H
Concert prelude Fenwick Newell
Concert Company. l M
Lecture "The Unfoldling of De- '' H
mocracy," Joel W. Eastman. - LH
THIRD DAY J 'M
Afternoon. .r- , M
Concert prelude Oversens Orchea- 'HH
Lecture "Human Ltfo in Relation H
to Americanism" M. Pirio Bcyea, R. H
N., first volunteer Amcr, Red CroPi H
nurse. H
Junior Chautauqua play hour. H
Evening. & H
Concert The Overseas Orchestra. " H
FOURTH DAY . lM
Afternoon. va!
Music nnd Entertainment Tho Reg- $ :"H
niers. M
Junior Chautauqua play hour. l ' H
Evening. H
Music and Entcrtninmcnt The Reg- H
nici's. -H
Illustrated Lecture "Hunting Big H
Game in Alaska" Dr. Chas. S. Price. 2, H
FIFTH DAY S
Afternoon. H
Junior Chautauqua Games in Public. " H
Conceit Tho Stearns-Gregg Con v , H
cert Company. H
Entertainment Fay Epperson. y J H
Evening. ' H
Concert Stearns-Gregg Concert
Company. H
Song Recital Josephine Martino. H
Season tickets are on sale by the - H
committee nnd at tho principal busi- H
ness establishments at the following f H
rates, including war tax: Adults $2.76; 'H
students, $1.65; children, $1.10. These H
low prices will hold good only until H
the committee has secured the amount i '. H
pledged to secure the Chautauqua, H
when they will be raised approximate- , H
ly 25 per cent, And were an adult ! I M
person to pay separate admissions to l'9B
the ten sessions the cost would bes-y 'I jm
(Continued on last page) 'Mrfcfl

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