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The Ogden standard-examiner. (Ogden, Utah) 1920-current, August 09, 1920, LAST EDITION, Image 1

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1 Fiftieth Year-No. ' Pr, F)vC cm. OGDEN CITY, UTAH MONDAY EVENING, AUGUST 9, 1920, LAST EDITION 4 P. M j
I BRITISH DESTROYER LANDS MAN NIX
J! BISHOP ON
WAYT010NDON
- REPORTS SAY
S
. Mystery Surrounding Plans for
I Handling Prelate Ends
With Short Message
UC$: PKNZAM !". In gland, Auk. 9.
Wr (Bj iiic Anm,cIjuo:1 Press) rh-
' J bishop Maxurii ana landed here
I " w from a destroyer nl 1 t3 o'clock
r ' thi- nfternooii. It was stated in
V intended proceeding to txmdou.
y The archbishop declined to give
7 out a statement. U i t rted i"
iTw leave on tin first train i-t Lou-
P Jbl don.
AcctaUbsop Hannli landed
from ill.' destroyer in ' motor
iJB launch ami proceeded io the rail-
BH wav Mutimi. whir.- hi-
99 wu examined bj i ciistoms f v -
fi ccr, i in un ihblshi p old ' t bai e
nothing to sa) u w
j i rom tc rallwaj statli i I he
n archbishop ivcnl lo tin hou9c ol
cJH t anon Wade, the Roman v atln-
M lie nriesi in Penzance, remaining
there sonn time.
f, is und irslood hci l :i 1 1 1 1 h-
9 bishop Mannht la hi liberty to
lj Iflj travel wherever be please lucre
foH arc two detectives in town, iiui
J I thi ij mi- ii"i Interfering with his
j I movements.
; j it was rt ported thai in- an h-
blshop womd go bj train db w i
jl in London.
LOXDOX, Aug. 9. Deep mastery
jpj continued today to surround tbe plans
. for the lundlng of Archbishop Matinlv
of Australia. There was active specu
flj' .-- lciion n.s io where he i. I ..-I. 'in-
MHJ end whetlier he was siill on hoard the
jflH Baltic, but the uncertainty deepened
fH us the day proceeded, causing the ar-
JjL tubs on the Bnbjeci I upy the
front pages of newspapers alongside
thdse on the Polish crisis
fcHH Dispatches from Queenstown show-
J ed that the Baltic slopped off that1
HJh place at midnight with an escort of
jWll destroyers and It was widely believed!
Nj3 thut the prelate WOS removed from
iiCflHl the steamer. The authorities main-1
r32fl lulned silence
'53 Tne Ba,l,c P0Sd Pish Guard this
iiJ forenoon without communicating with
ffi-tSj the shore and proceeded toward Llv-
tSi erpool. being due to enter the Mersey,
at 3:30 o'clock.
:!h9 Messages from other ports Indicated
'.3' they were wlthoul Information as to
. ;M the Baltic.
ft OO
M EIGHT UTAH-IDAHO
B DIRECTORS BOUND
m OVER FOR TRIAL
H SALT LAKE C IT! Utah, lug.
Hf 9. Eight directors of the Utah-
HBh Idaho Sugnr company, chargt d
HBpJ with profiteering in sugar, were
HHJ hound over appear the cto-
HHJ ber term of United Btati a court
Hj for the eastern division of Iduho
HBhj by a United Bt&tes commissioner
h her Li.- Bond we l
rA ' I i 0,0( ch. I lomplalnl s
, lli-b.-r J Grant, president of the
m compai
HB9 the Church of Jesus Christ of i.it-
Kfl tei Day Saints and i wo other offl-
HfeH clals of I he company were dls-
HBV missed
HJ I Anothi r ffaii th i
, ii re tors as com i off i I ha:
1 been set fur hearing al the ..-
HH vsmber term of federal district
9Hf court here
FLYEB MCAUbY BURNED
TOPEKA, Kas Aug U, F.
Kd Nadeau. of Kansas City, an aviator
JfiF was burned to
Jlj airplane crashed Mown 60 t
M 'owles Landing field and burst into
flames. Nadeau was pinned under thp
AB engine. R. C. Travers, also of Kan-
B sas City, N'adcau's pilot, fell free of
HI I t the machine 11 suffered severe
brulie:v
r POLICE AllE 8EN1
WARSAW. Aug. 6. tBy the Asso
ciated Press.) The entire police force
of Warsaw one thousand .-Hong
armed with new English riflos, h is
k-ft for the front. Their puices are
bilng taken by men too tdd to fight.
Among the volunteers who navel
gone to tho front la Stanislas Patek, I
former inlnlster of foreign affair. He
nllsted as a private. I
'
MUST BETTER Ul CITIZENSHIP. ROOSEVELT SAYS
Name of PvS?Grav Connected
With Finding of Injured
Actor in New York Street
NEW YORK, Ant.' 9 Police today continued their investi
gation t' !'arn the manner in which John ('. Slavin, veteran mu
si"..! c hip -dy ji'ior, was : o seriously injured th U he may die He
was found in thf street yesterday morning sulferiug from a frac
tured siviill near the residence of John J MeGraw, manager of
the New York National league baseball team Earl today Sla
j vin was still unconscious.
Ac irding to information communicated t. the police by Win
field Leggett, retired naval officer, he and Slavin had accompa
nied MeGraw to his home from the Lambs' club in a taxieab.
Lcggetl is s.tid to har- told the police thai lie and Slavin inter
vened in a fight at the club between McGravt and an unnamed
actor. Leggetl said he was unable to account lor Slayin's in
juries. MeGraw could not be locate!
:LEATHEiiNECKS
IS goes FIRE
SHOMCOPS
Fifty Persnns Hurt in Fierce
Rioting at Massachusetts
Bathing Resort
REVERE, Mass. Aug. 9 Law andj
order again reign at Revere beach to-i
day Tho mllitarv and police patrolled
the beach to prevent a repetition of
last night s Noting when several hun
dred saUors, reinforced b a few civil
ians, attacked the station house of the
Metropolitan park police and troops
were called out.
I lfty persons were injured, three
seriously. Many persons In the crowd
J of Sunday pleasure seekers estimated
I at 100,000 were bruised by throw n
missiles. Although nearly t0 sailors
! were arrested the police said all but
! six would be released. Those held
were charged with inciting to riot
The battle IV as precipitated when
! sailors attacked n policeman who had
arrested one of their companion on a
charge vt drunkenness.
For three hours the conflict con
tinued and was brought to an end only
, when coast artillerymen from Fort
Hanks. In Boston harbor, sailors from
, harlestown navy yard and police
from adjoining cities arrived. The at
tacking party opened fire with rifles
and revolvers seized from shooting
galleries.
The police answered lhe attack but
shot high to avoid hitting the crowd.
Authorities at the Charfestown navy
i yard said an Inv estigation would be
made and charges preferred against
sailors Implicated.
BULGARIAN PEACE TREATY
HAS GONE INTO EFFECT
PARIS. Aug. 8 The peace with Bui
?;aria today was made formally effec
tive b) the exchange of ratifications
among; the power- ji;tr'v in the P& '
The treaty was signed at Neuilly
November 27 191 D, and war. ratified by
the Bulgarian scbrauje Janu.-.rv 12.
'France's ratification was completed by
her senate July 31.
TWO CHINESE HURT IN
COLLAPSE OF BUILDING
DALLAS. Tex , Aug 0. Two Chi
Jnese were Injured seriously today
When a three-story building at Mum
and Poydras streets collapsed. Several
persons were 6een flying from the
building or In front of It Just as It col
ued and policemen were unable to
sa whether any hodies were under
the plleg of debris.
STOCKS ON ILL
! STREET FALL IT
! NEWS OF POLAND
I
Drop of Seven Cents in Ster
ling Exchange Also Speeds
Liquidation
NEW YORK, Aug. P- -New low fig
ures for the year were made in a
number of stocks during the first j
hour's trading on the stock exchange'
today
The more serious aspects of the j
Polish situation, together with a drop
of seven cents In sterling exchange,
was responsible for the renewed liq
uidation and short selling which af
fected all quarters of the j 1st
SHARES WE IKE6T
Shares which command a big spec
ulative following, were the weakest. In
cluding the equipments, steels, oils
and shippings. Baldwin and Pan
American yielded 4 points. Vanadium
and United Fruit five and Mexican
Petroleum I :.-s. in the railroad
'quarter Louisllle and Xushville gave
way 5. Texas and Pacific 4 and Un
ion Pacific ami Lackawanna 3 points.
EXCH .F DROPS
Not only did sterling exchange drop
7 cents since Monday, but rates on
other countries dropped 10 to 35
I points. After sterling exchange had
made a notable rally from last Week's
low figure of $3.""i 1-2. the price of
j demand bills today fell to $3.60 1-4.
Dealers attributed the drop not only
to unfavorable foreign news, but the
fact that exporters were pressing a
large amount ..r grain and cotton bills
on the market for which there was no
demand except at marked concessions.
FARMERS OF NORTHWEST
ARE FACING BANKRUPTCY
WASHINGTON, Aug 9. Agricul
tural interests In the northwest face I
bankruptcy because of the present ear,
Shortage, the Interstate commerce i
commission was told tod, v. by railroad
commissioners and shippers from
Montana. Minnesota, North Dakota I
and South Dakota.
I The commission was asked to Issuel
orders guaranteeing the car supplv
for (he movement of the grain rops.
OO
FIVE KILLED WHEN AUTO
IS STRUCK BY TRAIN
EAST LIVERPOOL. Ohio. Aug. 9
Five men were instantly killed and an
Other died later when a Pennsylvania
passenger train struck an automobile i
In which they were riding tit Salem,
'hlo. near here, last niKht. The dead I
jnieu were Rumanian laborers who llv
tc' at Salem.
"STRIKING TRAM !
! MEN IN DENVER
VOTE TO RETURN
Abandon Previous Conditions
and Send Committee to
Inform Company
MAJOR GENERAL WOOD
TO ARRIVE FOR DUTY
With Troops at Vantage Points
' More Street Cars Are Put
Into Operation
DENVER. Colo., Aug. 9 The ex
, trutlve committee of the tramway
workers' union at a meeting today ap
pointed u committee of three to call
upon Frederick W Hild, general man
ager of the tramway, and Inform him
tin. striking tram men would go back
to work. Henry Sllberg, president of
the union, said there were no restric
tions. The executive committee abandoned
lit", previous position that the then
I would go back only If they were per
mitted to return in a body and the
strikebreakers were discharged.
Tho nc-tlon of the executive commit
tee brought to an oifJtlal end the
I strike of 1000 tram men which began
August 1 The strike turned Denver
into a veritable -ifUi4- oajnp, found
ing riotliip of last Thursdaj and Frl
day nights.
DEATH LIST SEVEN.
The toll of deaths as a result of the
riots was raised today to seven fol
lowing the death of Leonard A Teni
:ucr. IS In a hospital. He was shot
end wounded In the riots at the East
:de car barns Thursday night Tem
mer was u L inon Pacific rSllroad
shopman.
Ilild received the strikers' commit
tee and heard their declaration that
they were ready to return to work
without any condition being exacted
from the company.
Mild told the men he had no reply
to make at tho present lime.
District Attorney Foley appeared
; oeiore .iiioK vioriey in wie criminal
I division of the district court later and i
j requested that a grand jury be sum-j
' moncd at once. The request w'as tak
j en under advisement until Monday
Ralph Pierce, a member of the
j Anient an legion who had been doing
guard duty during the rioting, was at
i icki 'i !;. three men : t Araphoe and
Thirteenth streets this afternoon and
severely beaten
GEN1 R Mi WOOD DUE.
Additional street cars. In most cases
operating without federal troops as
guards, were placed In operation to
day by the Denver Tramway com
ipany, whose trainmen have been on a
I strike for more than a week Prac
tically all lines In the city were oper
ating. The cars were manned by
strikebreakers.
I Major-Oeneral Wood, commander
of the central department of the
l tilted States army, was to arrive here
lato tonight to look over the local
, strike situation and the disposition of
the federal troops of his department
j now here.
DENVER GUARDED,
Colonol C. C. Ballou, commanding
federal troons In Denver, announced I
today there would be a considerable
change In the method of patrolling
Denver today on account of the
greatly Increased car .service and the
larger area to be patrolled. The col-
onel issued the following statement
"The plan is, briefly, the stationing
of udequute bodies of troops at the:
principal points of danger, In as far as
they can be determined ami where tho I
troops can be within easy call. Small
bodies of troops, sufficiently strong to
prevent any gatherings or demonstra
tions, have been stationed at certain
points "
COMMENDS UNION.
"The attitude of the tramway em
ployes' union Insofar as I have como
Into contact with them has been such
as to make me believe that they are
as eager to prevent disorders as I arn
myself and as a matter of fact I have
received prompt warning of mishaps
and threatened dangers from union
men who were co-operating with us In
bringing about the restoration of nor
mal conditions. ' ,
PAPER CHARGES I
EFFORT TO BUY
U.S. RECOGNITION
LONDON, Aug. 9. The Eve-1
ning Standard claims it has
documentary evidence that a
Sinn Fein congress in June au
thorized Eamonn de Valera,
' president f the Irish repub
lic' to expend $500,000 "in
connection with the campaign
for the presidency of the United J
States. One million dollars in
, expenditure by de Valera was
to obtain recognition of the
Irish republic, the newspaper
I declares.
-t-
PREMIERS MAP
OUT PLANS TO
HELP POLIO
How to Protect Western Hu
rope From Bolshevism Is
Held Big Problem
HTTHB. England. Aug. 9. (By Tho
Associated Press.) The allied con
ference h re rea bed a complete
Lgreemenl this al't-rnoou on plans fo
.dealing with the Russo-Pollsfa crisis
They Include the re-iinposltlon of the
jbloeka.de and civing support In munl
i tlons and technical advice, but on
the advice of the experts no Allied
J troops will be employed.
The plans arc subject to the ap
proval of the British parliament
Which Premier Lloyd George will ad
i dress tomorrow.
The conference of the premiers end-
It is probable, if the plans are ap
proved, that they will not go Into ef
fect until the prellmlnarv results of
the meeting at Minsk between the
soviet and Polish negotiators arc
known. If thev III icate a Willingness
by the Russians to adopt a course con-
sldered reasonable In dealing with the
Poles, the allied aid may be with
held. The British government has decid
ed that the Russian mission may re
main In London until the Minsk con
ference is concluded
Immediately after the conference
Premier Lloyd George and Foreign
Secretary Curzon took a train for Lon
don, while Premier Mlllerand and his
party botfrded a destroyer bound for
France.
EUROPE MEN ICED.
HYTI1B. England, Aug. (By the
Associated Press.) How to save west
ern Lurope from Bolshevism was the
burden of discussion ut this morning's
conference between Premiers Llovd
Georgo and Mlllerand and although
the final decision wass till pending
this afternoon, the chief weapons
probably will be a blockade and thel
establishment of a defenslvn line in I
I Poland
It Is said that the allies, though
I loath to admitting It. feel that there
is llttlo hope of Saving Warsaw and
that tho question of saving Poland is
i.ot the main Issue.
Tho main problems facing the pre
miers is the defense of western Eu
rope. In British and French circles it is
declared that the Intention of the Bol
shevlki regarding Poland Is becoming
clearer every hour. The prevailing
Impression among the British and
French officials Is that the soviet gov-:
crnment hopes through the Polish of
fensive firmly to establish Bolshevism
at the doors of the western powers,
1 in
CARNIVAL TRAIN WRECKED
HUNTINGTON W. Va., Auk. 9.
Two persons are known to have been
killed, five are missing and several
icported Injured in a railroad Wreck I
on the Lexington division of the Chesa-
pcake A- Ohio, near Ashland, Ky., latoi
Sunday, it Is reported here J
'COX'S RUNNING
HATE STRONGLY
URGES LEAGUE
U. S. Should Take Seat at
Family of Nation's, Demo
cratic Nominee Says
TWO GREAT PR03LEMS
FACED, CANDIDATE SAYS;
'Bettering Condition of Ameri
i can Citizenship Chief Do
mestic Issue, He Avers
HYDE PARK. N. Y.. Aug. 9
I Franklin D. Roosevelt. In a formal ad
dress accepting the Democratic vice
presidential nominal Ion at his homo
today. Joined with his chief, James M
Cox, in accepting the challenge of the
Republicans to make the leiKue of
nations one or the principal Issues of
the national campaign
"The Pemoeratlc party." h said,
I "has offered to this nation a treaty of
peace which to make it a real treaty
I for a real peace must Include a league
of nations."
OFFERED BEAT VT TARUEL
I "Today." he continued, "we are of
fered a scjtf at the table of the family
' of-nation. to the'end that the smaller
I peoples may he truly safe to work out
ithPir own destiny We will take that
place. I say so because we have
I faith faith that this nation has no
selfish desMnv, faith that our pcopl'
lare looking Into the years beyond for
j better things and that they are not
'afraid tQ do their part
'Even as this nation entered the
I war for an ideal, so It has emerged
from the war with the determination
that the Ideal shall not die." It is idle
to pretend that the declaration of
April 6: 191", was a mere net of self
defense or ihat the ob.tect of our par
ticipation was solely to defeat tht
mllitarv' power of the Central nations,
of Europe We knew then as a na-j
tion, even as we know today that sue-1
r.n l,n,l o r, 1 1 Ml ,.Anl,l L l.i, t 1, .If
a v ictory. To the cry of the French it
Verdun, 'they shall not pass.' and the
cheer of our own men In the Argonue,
'we shall go through' we must add
this positive declaration of our own
vvills; that the world shall be saved
from the repetition of this crime.
PRACTICAL SOLUTION.
"The league of nations Is a practi
cal solution of a practical situation, it
is no more perfect than the original
constitution which has been amended
16 times and will soon, we hope, be
amended the 19th. was perfect. It is;
not anti-nation. It Is anti-war."
Two great problems, he declared,'
will confront the next administration,
our relations with the world and the
pressing nectl of organised progress at
home. Among the most pressing of
our national needs he placed "the bet
tering ol our citizenship, the extension
of teaching to over 6,000,000 of our
population above the age of ten who
are illiterate, the strengthening of Im
migration laws to exclude the ih sir
ally and morally unfit, tho Improve-,
ment In working conditions, especially
In the congested centers, the extension
of communications to make rural life
more attractive and the further pro
tection of women and chrhl life in in
dustry' MODERN MACHINERY.
Reorganization of governmental ma
chinery, which he said has become an
niented und Impracticable since the
war, also wns urged by Mr. Roosevelt
Homer C'ummtngs, former chairman
i of the Democratic national commit
tee, declared In formally notifying Mr.
Roosevelt of his nomination, that the
American people h&Vt paid a "StSg
; gerlng penalty' for the Republican
Victory at the polls in. 1918. Undis
puted in the material and moral lead
ership of the world when the armis
tice was slKned, he said "who will
deny that our title to that leadership
has been grievously impaired If not
completely lost?"
"There Is but one way out." ho add
ed. "It Is to redeem America's word
to the world and to assume without
I hesitation our share of the task of re
habilitating the broken strings of civi
I lizntiun "
W, FORGES I
SWEEPING ON I
POLECAPITAL I
Soviet Armies Fear Great Gap I
in Defenses Built Around
ARMISTICE CONFAB AT
MINSK ON WEDNESDAY
France and Britain Angered by
Bolshevik Refusal of Lloyd
George Request
LONDON, Aug. 1). The Polish
government i leaving W arsaw. Its
capital, it is asserted in a wireless
dispatch hrom Moscow received
lre this afternoon.
The government is being re
moved to Kahv. the message say-
Kali- Is the capital of the pmv
Ince ol Kallsa and is about i"o
miles west-southwest of Warsaw,
close to the old German bonier.
It is on the direct railway lino
I'l iim Warsaw to Post n, for which
latter place all the foreign legn
tions In Warsaw have left, it vva-.
announced in an Associated Press
dispatch from the Polish capital
filed at midnight,
LONDON, Aug 9. Poland l
still far from being beaten, in tint
opinion of Marshal Ftoch, us e
pn -.-i d in an Interview with tho
Exchangi Telegraph company's
correspondent at Rytbc.
Providing Poland's forces and
her mllitarv material are quickly
organised, the marshal is quoted
a-, suvliijt, she may vet be able
UCCffaMg to dcfcuU iicr iiun-
tiera,
(Bj The Associated Press.)
Russian bolshevik attacks apparent
lv have broken he Polish lines near
I the East Prussian frontier and soviet
cvalr patrols have swept forward ill
a event encircling movement north of
Warsaw. In a center of the Polish
front the soviet armies also seem to
have torn a greal gap in the defenses
i of Warsaw .
Przasuysz, 11 n lies north of Wir-
saw, has been occupied by those ad
.Vance guards of the bolshevik, which
are now reported to be approaching
Mlawa, to the wnst, and Clechanow, to
the southwest The loss of Przasnycz
is admitted in a -, official statement is
sued in Warsaw last night, and it
would seem that tho soviet horsemen
are advancing a'most without serious
opposition.
TEN MILES IN THREE DAYS
On Friday th - bolsbeviki were re- N
ported fighting tbe Poles near Myszy
nlec, near the East Prussian border,
When they broic 3 through is not known
but it appears they have gained at
h.ist ten milt's in three days. Polish
troops have ocn intrenching east o(
Mlawa, which is situated on the rail
road running from Warsaw to Dan
zig. It is believed they will make a
desperate effort io prevent the capture
of the city.
FURTHER GAINS.
Coincident with the bolshevik ad
Vance on the north, the Polish lines H
from south of O.-trov to west of Brest
Litovsk have been forced back. Soviet
troops have forced their way into So- N
kolow and are reported to be fighting
east of Sledlce The bolsheviki are N
also said to have taken Piszczac, WBt N
of Brest-Lilovsk. in this region they
are said to have control of the road
leading westward from Brest-Li tovsk
to Biala. N
Further south there has been serious
fighting and Important successes are N
claimed by the bolsheviki
NATIONS TO ACT.
Great Britain and France are pre- N
pared to take Instant action against
the bolsheviki as a consequence of Ihe
tatter's refusal to grant Premier Lloyd
George's request for a ten-day truce
with the Poles Lloyd George con
ferred with Premier Millcrand. of
Prance, at Hytho, England, yesterday
and heads of the British army and
navy were closeted with Marshal Foch
of France at the same place until ear
ly today. Lloyd George was to have
made a statement in the house of com
mons today, but late advices state he
.will defer his declaration until tomor-
Polish plenipotentiaries will cross
the fighting zone cast of Warsaw late
today on their way to Minsk, where
'hey will begin armistice and peace no
Roiiatinns The conference at Minsk
probably will begin on Wednesday.
I IRRIGATION DISTRICT ELECTION TOMORROW, AUGUST 10, 1920 1 1
j I WEBER COUNTY'S FUTURE WATER SUPPLY IS TO BE DECIDED I I

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