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The Ogden standard-examiner. (Ogden, Utah) 1920-current, August 14, 1920, LAST EDITION, Image 1

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I F,ft..ThY..rN. 210 Pr,c fiv cent, OGDEN CITY, UTAH SATURDAY EVENING, AUGUST 14, 1920. LAST EDltION--4 P. M.
I ROARING OF BIG GUNS HEARD IN WARSAW I
jjl. AAAA A A A A
11 OLYMPIC ATHLETES PASS IN REVIEW
A A A A A e f -' O 4
BRAWN OF 33
NATIONS READY
i FOR CONTESTS
Dismissed American Athlete
Reinstated After Ousting
By Committee
GREAT VARIETY OF
A EVENTS OPEN SUNDAY
jtL ' Flays of Enemy Nations Ab
f sent At Formal Opening
I of Big Stadium
' mWM IVTWKRP. l 1 The ro-
' nisi vtt mcnl ol Dun " '' ''"
Illinois ' v' "'' pd3
1)1 rrom the Vnn rta lympk
f V JB "ii chorgw of hiaubordtouiikwii
H announced ii"- i
' :.ni apologist l this monUllB
"i tf i" i1" ' " ' 1 1 b ""' ""' Vm" ".
vfiM oomrnltteea Thcj mpW
&M hlM spologj and - itm restored
tll hfi forme tending on Hi-
?JB team, dosing the Incident,
ANTWERP. Auk- 11 The Olympic
utadlum was opened today It wax hi
H formal rnrmony, staged With
P- M uK of flags, banners and fluttering
M , i
MH white stone, mmem and WOOd. Wltn
Hi royalty, officialdom, diplomacy, rame
Bl and CMblon participating m the pro-
,1
Lh( thoui indi spoctato
M ... out the h ige ; tnc,r
1 ,,,1, , -m In the actual i onteslani
9 athlete from nearly thirty nations j
jfjKH a who paraded the arena i.ritl t.. mm row
W will begin their teats of strength nnJj
Ti,r spei tutor art i b 1 osmopow
mmmW an the mass of contestants and In Ihc ,
fanls of the athlete- w.T. . Iti-.-.-iiM of
fjfjM .,11 the countries WhOSC fla,;:;. flliiK
from official, dlplomutlc or consular!
boxes, made the Men a colorful
fjjaH hodgepodge like " waronip
out with nil her pennants
TV(i M VGS BSl X i
Two flags, the German and Aus
trlon, which flew over the stadium
in the sixth lmplad at Smckholm.
HI were missing and these eOUntrlM,
MM barred from participating In the meet,
mm
3 tatlon either In the n i In the
diplomatic boxes. Th,- Russian flag,
also, was missing. ' their places,
however. wer the athletes and flags
of nations newborn of the war, Pb-
md and Cw cho Slovak! l, tin I itt i
IB J
though then listed separately, had to!
marcn just behind the Austrian! st
LWg Stockholm.
M The form.ii oerentoniee of opening
mmu the stadium included addresses by the
jjJt tag ol the B igl i
pn seated the itadluni to Baron
Pierre de Coubertln, pr-.ident of thi
jm K International Olyi 1 1 1
I , pj numlirr f other offRlalx if the
.x 01 itidgian or Antwerp city government
WM b Igl i ! mplc ommlttet a
mWt There was SlSO tremendously Impres-
lL
OOXTINUOVS CHEERING
A The cheering wax continuous ai th
athletes, filing In from the open i.
gfl Just back if the stadium where they
wLWM hail formed, nation by nation, swung
Lwi into the arena u uded b the nim
bi i :. ..i ihi I nternal onal 1 Hj mplc
iH committee The) marched in alpha-1
Mm betlcai order, though the Belgians,
alphabetically first In the list, took
Bj last plan , courteously, as hosts. This
Hj brought Australia first in line behind
IBi the official committee.
Each group v. as preceded by Its
Ws flags, and generally peaking, each
HJ group of nationals WSS uniformly
WA dressed not In athletic togs, but In
BBI suits of uniform cut and color. Some
Mm however, went lr army or navy uni-
formi As tai swung by the roj ai
IX, uhrre Viii ,. I'rlnce Uu
M pold and a group of government otfl-
olalfl wero standing, they saluted the
king. Some of the athletes paid slml-i
BM lar courtesy to the ambassadors or
H ministers of th Ii nit Ions, who had
, ui boxes ill around the arena
.MI KM n i hi i Rl n.
The American athlet-K. about 30
LW strong, were cheered frequently not
I only b) tneli compatriot! in the
stands, but by the throngs who recog
nlzed that the group marching behind
Hpj the stars and stripes were among the
Mr j strong contenders for victory In the
V seventh Olympiad.
r I It seemed that there were thousands
j of Americana In the stands. Every
I, i soldier from the. army of occupation
j on the Hhlne who could possibly se-
cure leave was there In khaki Jackles
I j from the cruiser Frederick, sailors
I J from the American merchant and pa--I
i Sanger liners In the harbor and hun
I dreds upon hundreds of tourists
swelled the delegation from across the
Atlantic until. In some parts of the
stadium, at least, It seemed to be a
regular American crowd. The Llel
.lans. of course, and also the French
and English appeared to be out In
force.
v I Mill U M m R.IBJ D.
j The stadium Is something more
than throe miles from the central
fs business di--. Antwerp and
reached by street railway and steam
B railway lines, it has been built of
B stone, concrete. s:eol and wood, with
B an Impressive arched main entranoa
. Its total capacity for spectators U estl-
B mated at 20.000. It, like tho tracks it
B encloses, Is oval In shape. On two
H' v ' slfles there ate roofed "grandstands.
T here are located the boxes and re-
"M served wat.-. At the two ends of tht
(Continued on Togo Two ) J
ANOTHER BOSTON BANK CLOSED IN PONZI CASE
ILLA INFORMS
PRIEST HE'S DONE
WITH POLITICS
I
MEXICO CITY. Aug. 14
Franci3co Villa and his men
reached Tlahualilo, state of Du-rang-oi
Thursday night Tla
huahlo i the place where it was
reported Villa's men would be
mustered out
At Sacramento a priest board
ed the train and talked to Villa
relative to the Catholic party,
General Martinez declared, but 1
Villa replied be would not med
die in politics.
4 j
MAP OUT ROUTE
BlBLO
Test Flight Over Sky Tracts to
Be Made in Big
Machine
WASHINGTON. Aug. 1 I Plans are
In BCtlVe pr.partlon for the first
"round I )u world? aerial derby, It be-
came known today. A special commix
aion appointed by tin Aero t'lub ofi
America Slid the Aerial League of
America, after covering most of thei
tentative route, has completed an or
ganization for conducting the event.
A tent flight Of the entire route Is In
pit p. nation, the start to bo made from
Eoudoa in an Improved Handley-Page I
ulipane carrying ten psssongerg.
The tentative route for the air derbs" ,
ItSi If follows:
New York to Seattle. 1'297 miles, j
to Yokohama Vta Aleutian Islands.'
54 IS mlb s; Shanghai. 1L'26 miles.
Bangkok Slam. 2095 miles. Karachi.':
India, via Rangoon and Delhi. 2563
miles; Bagdad l.".3( miles; Home via
o 17C miles; Ireland (coast) via
Lrndon and Paris, 1528 miles; Mew I
l midland. 1S75 miles, to New York,!
1125 miles Total distance traversed, I
li m; miles.
oo
FEARS GERMANS WILL
DIE OFF BY MILLIONS
BERLIN. Aug. 12. (By the ASSO-T
Hated l"i - -vi "I , onsldor it Inevitable
that ten or fifteen million of our people
ilii out, as we no longer can pro
vide for them because of the th"?ft of
our colonies, our merchant fleet and
our possessions abroad, the destruc
tion of our Industries and the seizure I
of our natural resources," is the reply
of Professor Mas 'on Grueber, noted J
hvglentst. In refusing the request Of
his Munich colleagues that he sign an
international appeal on behalf of t3ei-
man tubercular children.
Profe'-iior Vun Orueber declares tie i
f."d- it "Incompatible, with German
honor" to appeal to the very nations!
who he charges 'Imposed the hunger
blockade which undermined the vitali
ty of the tierman people "
NEGRO FALLS 12 STORIES,
LIVES TO COLLECT CASH
BAM PRANCI8CO, Aug. 14. Napo
leon Brooks, negro cement worker,
who tell from the twelfth story of S
l ulldint: under construction at Fresno
April 3. 1920, was aide to wulk Into
the office of the state Industrial acci
dent commission today and receive
MS7.47 compensation and the first of
Weekly benefits of $20 S3 to be paid
until the termination of his disability,
In the fall he sustained a fractured
skull, a crushed right foot, fractured
bones in several parts of tho body
and several broken ribs.
ARKANSAS CONGRESSMAN
GETS DEMOCRATIC POST
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14 Repre
sentative W. A. Oldflcld. of Arkansas,
has been selected to take charge of
the Democratic congressional cam
paign headquarters in New York, ac
cording to a statement by Chan man
Flcod of the congressional commit
tee. The New York office as well as
assisting congressional delegates In Its
districts will servo to keep the con
gressional committee in touch with
'b. national Democratic committ .
oo
WYOMING MAN IS GIVEN
FEDERAL JOB IN BUFFALO
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14 Appomt
nenl of John B. llalbert. of Sheridan.
wvo.. to be receiver of public monies
r Buffalo, Wyp., was announced to
COX ADDRESS
WARM ATTACK
ON OPPOSITION
G. 0. P. Leaders Charged With,
Attempt to Trick Ameri
can People
INTERESTS TRYING TO
BUY CONTROL. CLAIM '
Governor Says Millions and
Millions Are Being Raised
for Campaign
WHEELING, W. Vs.. Aug. 14.
Governor Cox lodav opened fire on
hl.4 Republican opposition charging
Its leadership with "attempted trick
ery" of tho American people In op
posing the league of nations and with
conducting a campaign "behind a
smoke s reen" to secure partisan
spoils.
That "a powerful combination of In
terests Is now attempting to buy gov -i
rninent control," he also asserted,
charging that millions and millions
were being raised in campaign con
tributions." The governor loosed his attack in;
an address at the West Virginia Oem
ocratlo convention. U was his first
vigorous assault on the ftepubllcansj
and was to be followed tonight by an
other address to the geneial public. 1
Although advocacy of the league of
nations, which the governor declared
v:i the greatest movement of right
eousness In the history of the world"
was the main theme of his address,
he also attacked again the Republl
. a n 'tin lorlal oligarch) ' Th I ICDI -ocrats.
he added, present a cause of
""constructiv e, nrocre. slv e. economic
service in " SCO,' and promise defi
nitely a saving of $2,000,000,000 an
nuallv in government expenses
c.K I 111 SPONSIBILXTY.
"A grave responsibility rests with
the l mocratlc party," said Governor
Cox. "It must render good faith in
behalf of the nation, of the soldiers
of the war and to our allies who
helped to achieve victory. It Is not
a j. iif - in affair. The campaign thio
vear Is not a contest for the triumph
of a political party. It Is purelv a
matter of concluding a duty to civi
lization, and doing It as quickly as
prudent consideration of our coun
try's Interests suggests
"Leadership in great moral ques
tion hoi been given to the Democracy,
for the simple reason that the sena
torial ollgarc by, whic h for the time
being has assumed control of the Re
publican party, has abandoned the
idealism of other days.
r.v COSfE 1 slLY.
"We shall not alone make appeal
to the electorate by contrasting the
rules of economic thought that have
prevailed in the past, but wo shall
call attention to the delinquent atti
tude In which this country haj been
placed by senatorial intrigue and to
the very definite program of action
wo pledge It is unnecessary to re
call t.'ie issues of the ar. They were
well marked in the public mind. We
frere wining to sacrifice in behalf of
the m t generation because 'reced
ing generations had sac riliced for us.
After all that is the vital thing In
civilization. We resisted a world
wide menace and we Intend now to
establish permanent protection
against another menace We know
how easily wars came in the p est ' e
want to make, their coming difficult
in the future. We have a definite
plan. The American people u .d- i
stand it and after March 4lh. 1921.
It is our purpose to put it Into prac
tical operation. without continuing
months of useless discussion
ri I IMPTED THICKER 1
The platform of our party gives
us the opportunity to render moral
co-operation In the greatest movement
of righteousness In the history of the
world, and at the same time to hold
our own interestj free from peril. Our
position Is plain. The circumstance
in the last eighteen months convict
the Republican leadership with at
tempted trickery of the American
people. I'nder one pretext after an
other they prevented the readjust
ment' of national conditions. They
proposed certain reservations to the
league of nations and then they were
abandoned, to bo followed by nothing
more definite than the annoum ement
of a 'hope' that an entirely new ar
rangement might be made in world
affairs What method they have In
mind. If It a concretely In any one s
mind, the people do not know. No
unprejudiced person can deny that the
consequenco of abandoning the league
and attempting an entirely new pro
ject will be long delay.
VOTERS CAM T
If the voters of the republic, with
out regard to part. dc;iie ac tion, and
prompt action along lines that arc
now clearly understood. they will
render a. verdict so overwhelmingly
expressive of public Indignation thut
scheming politicians for yt-ars to come
will not forget.
"In the face of an efficient Demo
cratic leadership during the war. and
of constructive, progressive, economic
service In pence, the Republican lead-
(ConlLnucd ou Base Two.)
I
'NEWSPAPERS IN
ATHENS WRECKED
BY ANGRY MOB
ATHENS, Aug. 13. The
news of the attempted assassi
nation of Premier Venizelos in
Paris has resulted in excesses
such as the wrecking of plants
of opposition newspapers and
the residence of former Premier
Skouloudis Many of the oppo
sition leaders were arrested
M. Iragoumis, former Greek
minister to Pctrograd, was shot
dead while trying to escape
from a military escort
JOINT SCALE i
COMMITTEE AT
IRK ON IKE
I
i
Miners to Present Proposition
for Increased Wages at
Laier Session
CLEVELAND, 0 Aug. 14. The
;clnt scale committee Of miners and
operators In the central competitive!
bituminous coal field, meeting at the
i quest of President Wilson to con
sider th. question of re-oicntng the
v age se al, paid day or month laboi-i
rr:, i. .-convened this morning at 10
i clock and adjourned until five p. m.
when the miners expect to present
their proposition for increased wages.,
i i;v. is SPEAKS.
John L. I. wis. president of the,
United Mine Workers, addressed this
morning's meeting on behalf of tpc
miners He discussed the general sit
uation In the coal Industry, pointing
out that some relief mea-sures wero
necessary for the stabilization of
wagea and said the miners would meet
two o clc-k ibis afternoon for final
discussion of their wage proposal andl
I he hoped to be able to formally pre-'
sent It to the operators at the later
meeting today.
The operators also will meet at 2
I o'clock to discuss tho situation.
MINERS sl'LlT.
From a union olficlal it was learned
that a factional struggle splits the
uiiiiers group and complicates their
i dc liberations.
Prank Partington, president of the
I Illinois miners, and leader In the re-
cent Illinois toil strike, is here wiih
a program of maximum demands,;
backed up by the recent Illinois j
strike, ("resident Lewis and the ad
ministration group In the union have
. (n hand similar demands presented bj
j locals and state bodies throughout the,
i country which have not. however.'
reads any strike thieats.
Circulars asking locals to demand
the calling of nn international con
vention to pass upon whatever action
i.. taken here, are being sent'out by!
(western miners" unions, according to
0 delegate fiom Indiana. President
; .loan L I-wis, of the United Mine
Workers of America, declared he had!
I beard nothing about it.
INDIANA GAINS LITTLE
BY NEW CENSUS REPORT
I I
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14 Indiana,
, ninth r.tate of tho union in point of'
population ten years ago. now has 2,-1
'l30.S44 people within her borders, thel
'census bureau announced today. nil
the ten years sinco 1910 there was an!
I Increase of 229.668 In her population,!
'making her growth h 5 per cent over I
! the population ten vears ago, which
v.as 2.700.876.
Indiana, organized as a territory In
!lS00, held 21st rank among the states1
land territories In the census that year'
;wth G641. The growth In the early
decades was very rapid, the rate hav-
ling been 600. 1 per cent from lSin to
lv-'fi Since then the rate declined
gradually until 1910 when the rate
was 7 3 per cent, the smallest in the
history of the state.
j The largest municipal growth In
population was In the decade 1S50-.
:160 when the Increase was 362." 12 j
and the .state passed the million mark.
I Tho two million mark was passed In
(the decade 18S0-1890.
I oo r-
JAP NOTE ON SAKHALIN
RECEIVED IN WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14. Japan's
liply to the American note protesting
against Japanese occupation of the
island of Saqhulln was received today
at the state department.
The note was described as a lengthy
one and It was understood that it went
thoroughly Into the whole quefUion of
the Japanese policy in Siberia The
document, together with the original
American note, will be made public
next week.
GET RICK QUICK
; EXPERT'S WIFE
TO LOSE MONEY
State Authorities Hold Her
Wealth Was Obtained By
Illegal Means
i
MRS. PONZI DECLARES
SHE WILL STICK TO HIM
Officials Determined Sensa-i
tional Financier Shall Re
main in Jail
BOSTON", Aug 14 Bank Commls
loner Joseph C. Allen today took ;
charge of the affairs of the Polish In
dustrial association conducting a pri
vate bank at 37 Cross street in this
Henry H Chmlellnak.!, president
of the Hanover Trust company, tho
chief depositary of Charles Ponzl,
which was c losed last Wednesday by
the- commissioner. Is president of the
Industrial association
Hank Commissioner Allen said that
the loans of the association were either
bad or of doubtful value and Iherej
was virtually no cash left He said
Its affairs were hopelessly Interwoven
with th.-s. of the Hanover Trust com
p.inv. The capital of the association
la TB 776 an.l it had deposits of about
1350.000.
BREAKFAST IN JUL.
Ponzl ale his breakfast in the Mid
dlesex county Jail in East Cambridge,
a prisoner of the government In de
fault of $25,000 bonds.
Three officers of the Old Colony,
Foreign Exchange company, a rival
concern of Ponzl's Secrultles Exchange j
rompan were prisoners of the com
monwealth In default of $30,000 bonds
each. Samuel Zorn. said to be an em
ploye of the Old Colony Foreign Ex
change company, was at headquarters
awaiting a hearing on a charge of lar
cenj of $T00 from persons unknown
Ttie three officers of tho company j
held are Charley m Brlghtwell, presi
dent and tre.-isurer, Raymond Meyers.,
office manager, and Fred Meyers, salos
a K.-nt The men were held on tech
nical charges Of larceny of $500 from
persons unknown.
CAN'T lilTT OIT.
Tonzi. whose bondsman surrender
ed him yesterday, was confronted with
the alternative of remaining in federal
custody or if be could find another
bondsman, of being arrested again by
tho commonwealth under a blanket
Warren t charging him with larceny In
.'..1 counts, totalling $24,000
The authorities were said to be de
termined that the sensational finan
cier should remain in custody to pre
serve for his creditors whatever as
sets he may have and because of the i
feai that he miht seek to dissipate
or transfer them if out on bail Edwin,
L. Pride, federal auditor of Ponzl's ac-
counts, has placed the latter's known
IllablUtles at $8,000,000 and Ponzl)
Claimed ar.si !s of about $4,000,000
"I am Inclined to believe that a I
great deal of monev collected by Pon-
7.1 and his agents has been deposited j
In the names of others," Mr Prldo
xnld.
I H S MONEY.
Referring to the possible transfer
jof large sums by Ponzl to his wife
Mr. Pride said:
It cun be taken away from her and
it will be. It does not belong 'o her.
J It Is money that was obtained under i
I fraudulent pretense to b- used for,
I fraudulent purposes.'1
Ponzl withheld from his wife the
news of his surrender by his bonds- ,
: man. Mrs. Ponzl re-asserted her faith I
I in her husband
"He is honest," she said, "and I will
stay by him to the end "
The second of the two petition--- th .'
have been filed to have Ponzl adjudged I
bankrupt was pending in the fed rol ,
! court today.
A petition for a reoelver to admlnls-
ter Ponzi's affairs also has been filed.
BOOKS l (.MINED.
Examination of the books of the
Hanover Trust company, was continu
ed today by members of Bunk Com- j
I mlSSloner Allen's staff. Mr. Allen in I
a statement said.
I "Nothing has developed so far to
j lead me to believe that the depositor
! will lose one dollar. The Hanover Trust
company Is the only trust company:
In New England that Is Involved."
The financial district was concerned
yesterday when a Bmall run wis ms Is
ion several trust companies, bu: there!
w'.-ts no Indication today of a comi'i-l
uance of withdrawals.
Mr. Allen has caused the stite seal
to be placed on all safe deposit boxes
In the Hanover Trust company m J
by Pond or officers or employes of
j the bank as a precaution against tho
1 possible removal of securities.
M IDE BIC, CLAIMS
The Old Colony Exchange company
I was organized July 10. it offered to
pay 100 per cent In six months n in
vestments and claimed to be dealing
in foreign men handlse Atorney. Gen
eral Allen said that he knew ttmt the
company had sent large sums abroad
The office was closed after 1 frenz'
ed run yesterday. Doors and windows
wore smashed, threats wers made
against Brlghtwell and a detail of po-
(ContLnucd on Pago Two.)
VETERAN OF 22
WOUNDS DIES IN I
THUNDERSTORM
PATERSON, N J . Aug. 14
Richard J Foran, a member
of the 309th machine gun bat
talion received 22 wounds m
battles during the world war
and survived to return home
and take up the pursuits of
peace After dodging death
thousands of times on the bat
tlefield, he is dead today, the
victim of a stroke of lightning
I during a storm here.
DEPARTMENT OF
LABOR IS IN
DENMST1E
Portland Man Assigned to Act
as Conciliator: Riot Probe
Ordered
WASHINGTON", Aug 14. G. T
Harry, of Portland. I ire., was ordered
today by the department of labor to
proceed to Denver to take up tho set
tlement of the street railway controv
ersy. Tho assignment was made as a
resujlt of a request from W. B. PltS
g rubJ, vice president of the Associa
tion of Street and Electric Hallway
Employes.
Mr PltSfOrsId wired the department
yesterday that "our representatives at
Denver informs me that ho believes
conciliator of labor department could
Jo something toward settlement of the
Denver street e n trouble and requests
that 1 ask you to deputize one of the
conciliators on the work."
PROBE ORDERED.
DENVEH, Colo, Aug. 14. A grand
Jury probe of disorders In connection
with the strike of trainmen of the Den
vei Tramway company was authorized
today by Judge Clarence J. Morley,
of trie district court
i no
NAVY MAN CONFESSES
TO POISONING HIS WIFE
SAN D1KGO. Cal., Aug 14 T. K
ITash, chief pharmacist's mate on the
I. S S. Prairie, who was arrested
here In connection with the mysterious
death of his wife. Edna Plash, nearly
two months ago, this afternoon con
fessed that he gave his wlfu poison
vhicli resulted In death, the police an
nounced. Plash is quoted as saying
his wife took the poison voluntarily
after a quarrel.
U. S. ROADS IN CANADA
RAISE THROUGH RATES
OTTAWA. Ont., Aug. 11. The do
minion board of railway tSOUlmlSSlOn-1
eis tod i;. granted increases In through,
rates to I'nited States roads in Canada;
to conform with those recently up
proved by the interstate commerce,
commission at Washington. These In-j
OreoseS applj to' all commodities ex-j
cept coal and coke.
oo
SEVERE FIGHTING OCCURS
IN CHINESE PROVINCES
AMOY. China. Aug. 14 Hostilities
have broken out between the prov
inces of Fuklen and Kwantuiur, the,
former supporting the militaristic An-1
f ii group and the latter being loyal to
the OSS. Peking government. Severe,
fighting has occurred in eastern!
Kwantung, and Puklen troops are re
ported to have advanced 2 miles, cap
turing Talpulislen.
OREGON BANKER JAILED
IN ABSENCE OF BONDS
MEDPORD, ore, Aug. 14. W. II.
Johnson, president of tho Bank of
Jacksonville, charged with falsifying
his- reports to the state bank exami
ner, waived examination before -lustier
Bagshnw of Jacksonville today
and was held to the grand Jury un
der $50,000 bonds
He was unable to furnish bond.
nn
SENATOR HARDING TO
SPEAK IN MINNESOTA
Chicago. Aug. 14. Senatm War
ren G. Harding. Kepubllcan nominee
for president, will speak at the Min
nesota state fair. In Ramsey county,
on September R. Senator Harty S. New.
chairman of the Republican national
speaker.-,' bureau, announced today.
RUSSIAN AM
WORKS TOWARD
REAR OF CITY i
Bolsheviki Reported Within j
Dozen Miles of Polish Capi- I
tal on Friday !
SOVIET GUNS UNABLE I
TO STRIKE WARSAW YET
Peace Delegation of 16 Mem
bers Ready to Negotiate
Terms With Victorious Reds
WARSAW, Aug. 14. ( 1 a. m Bv I
The Associated Press, i The Russian! I
attoi kinu Warsaw have worked well 'M
toward the rear of thai cilv's defenses JM
and are attacking Plonak, within a jjM
dosen miles of the Vistula northwest JjJ
of the Polish capital, according to Prl- WM
da night's official Polish com- "M
munlque ntW
The statement savs the enemy Is ad- M
vanclng toward the Novo Georlevsk- I
Zegrje sector, north of Warsaw, and I
i that m i h of Bolsheviki are at-
tacking Naslel.-k (22 miles northwest I
I of Warsaw), and Plonsk (32 miles I
I northwest of Warsaw). The com- I
munlque announces that the attack I
'upon thse places wis repulsed. I
The roar of artillery on tho battle !'
Tront coulu be plainly neara in war- t
saw Friday. The Russians have I
brought up artillery In the region of m
Radzvmin, Just south of the Bug,. f
( iiis rvers say. however, that tho en- I
emy has not yet In position guns heavy I
enough to reach this city with their jj
fire. ! I
On this northeastern front, along if:
the Blnlystok road, the Russians were M
2 1 miles from Warsaw! this morning s AM
newspapers reported. If
PEACE DELEGATION. !
WARSAW, Aug. 14. l By The As- mM
OClated Press.) Poland's peace dole- I
gatlon ol 16 members, with mllltarj Ufl
aides, clerks and stenographers, ono
i f whom is a woman, prepared late j
last night to lcavo for the battle front
t to meet representatives of the soviet I
government. No rc spoils, had been M
received from Moscow to a wireless H
dispatch naming the newspaper cor- i H
respondents who were to accompany H
the delegation. Announcement was il
made that correspondents would not
be pern med to go to the front unN
word allowing them to Travel camo
from the Bolsheviki. mm
OH H ERS IN PARTY.
Pour of the delegates will bo mill
tary officers, six will be foreign office. mm
representatives, e ounsellors amT adv is
era and six will be diet leaders. M. ,Mm
Dombski. under minister of foreign mm
affairs, will head tho delegation.
Two representative's of the Ameri- MU
can relief organization, lierschel Mmt
Walker, of Philadelphia, and Muuricu mmt
Pate, have received permission from MM
Moscow toaccompany the Polish com- mmt
mission to Minsk where they will con- MM
fer with the Bolsheviki on treating mM
of 300,000 children formerly cared for
by the Americans, but now within the
Bolshevik lines I
REPORTERS GOING.
This side of Siedlce, the delegation,
which will show white flans, will ineel
soviet representatives who will escort
tho Poles probably to Minsk, .vr-
rehgements have been mudc for news
paper correspondents to start Batur
day and overtake tht- delegation if the
soviet governmc nt nppiovus the nanus
of tho men selected
WHISKY FROM KENTUCKY 1
SENT OUI' BY CARLOADS
LOUISVILLE, Ky , Aug 14. Ship
ment from Kentucky of whisky in car
loads l express has increased rapidly
in the last three months, according
to it. C Hemming, chief lerk to J. MM
shannon, superintendent of the mM
American Railway Express company.
Mr. Hemming said today that since , fH
May o last, express shipments of i
whisky from Loulsvlllo have averaged I
four carloads dally. From May 5 to C
July 26, he sold, 160 carloads left I
i i and from August c to today, thlr- I
lj ,ais Ninety p,-r cent oi the whls- n PH
ky, he added, was consigned to cust
cm cities.
oo ImM
AMERICAN WITH LETTER
ARRESTED BY MEXICANS
: . DIEGOj t al., Aug. 14 Charles
Pox, American, is under arrest ut M
Lnsenada, l-cr California, charged
with carrying from hero to Ensenada
letters inimical to the Interests of Es- lH
teban Cantu, revolting governor of the
northern district of Loner California,
according t.. advices reaching here on
a schooner from Rnsenada. j
oo im
YUKON PEOPLE WITHOUT
SUGAR SINCE CHRISTMAS
DAWSON, Aug- 14. Arrivals from
the head of Polly river, 200 miles
north of Port Selkirk, bring word that H
the stores in that district have been H
out of supplies for months. They hav H
1 id no sugar since Christmas. The
steamer Thistle, however, has Just ar-
rived at the head of navigation with
ample UPPlles for next winter.
oA '
FLAMING GAS WELL SEEN
AT DISTANCE OF 30 MILES
BAKERSFIELD, Col.. Aug- 14. A
ilunn Of flame 300 feet high leaping
fiom a Standard 'Ml company gas well
i.i the Elk hills, thirty j:lca south- ,
west ras vl6lble here early today. Tho
v.ll fF In the vicinity of that which
burned several days last August with H
a loss of approximately 600,000.000
cubic feet of gas. M H
rMw

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