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THE OGDEN STANDARD-EXAMINER SATURDAY EVENING, AUGUST 14, 1920. ' W
I THE STANDARD-EXAMINER
PUBLISHING COMPANY
Entered ns Second -Clast Mnttcr ot the Poitofflco, Ogden, Utah. Established 1B70
Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation nnd the Associated Press
An independent Newspaper, published every evening and Sun
day morning without a muzzle or a club.
Subscription in Advance
ONE MONTH 9 -S??-,
ONE YEAR
MEMBER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press Is exclusively entitled to the use for republication of any
news credited to It not otherwise credited In this paper and also the local n i
published herein.
I ARE THE GERMANS DYING?
How much of truth Ihrrc is in tlx- statement of Prof Max Von
Cruebr that ten to fifteen million of the German people will die
out, because (iormany no lonpcr can provide for them, is difficult to
determine, as the fjrnians are committed to a policy of propaganda
which permits the stretchLne; of the truth in order to gain an advan
tage. Hut there is evidence thai ilic Germans suffered severely dur
ing the war and toda are struggling to exist.
Professor Yon Crueber is full of resentment. Tie speaks of the
theft of colonies, of merchant fleet and possessions abroad and of
the unfair hunger blockade imposed during the war. It is a pecu
liar mental process which allows a German to think he was sinned
against, without sinning. The allied countries were clearly informed,
when the conflict seenn-d to be gomg in favor of Germany, that they
would be called on to make heavy sacrifices in territory, pay the
cost of the war and yield up machinery and treasures. In fact, the
manner in which Belgium and northern France were treated pointed
to a despotism worse than anything in modern times Now. with
Germany left almost intact, except the colonial possessions which
were obtained bj aggrandizement, and with her national existence
unimpaired, there should be no complaint as to the harshness of the
'terms of peace.
If the Germans during the war suffered of hunger because of
the blockade, they had only themselves to blame Their submarine
warfare justified retaliation of the drastic nature If the boomerang
kthey employed struck back, the effect was retribution.
With the war over, we as a people must forget the bitterness
of the struggle, and, although resenting accusations such as ema
nate from Professor Von Crueber, plan to alleviate extreme distress
and overcome unbearable conditions in Germany. There is no desire
ito undermine the health of the German people or to impose impos
sible burdens
The French are Buffering of the terrible afflictions placed on
them by the invaders and a lug part of France may never regain
the physical strength of the days before the var But even that sad
reminder of brutal nmsterj does not inspire retaliation now that it
I is within the power of the allies to bleed German v white, as His
imarek had aimed to do with France in the Franco-Prussian war
I ENGLAND'S PERPLEXITIES.
I here is just enough smoke to indicate that the flames of Bol
shevism have spread to England. At a meeting of the British labor
'leaders in London yesterday, resolutions were adopted in opposi
tion to interfering with the Kussian campaign on the Polish border,
and J. H. Thomas, secretary of the National Union of Railway Men,
said that, if circumstances demanded, it would be for the whole labor j
movement to decide upon direct action.
"Desperate and dangerous as is our method." he continued,
"we believe that the disease is so dangerous and the situation so!
.desperate that it is only desperate and dangerous meihods that .an)
prevent calamity The resolutions do not mean that it is to be a I
.mere strike or a simple 'down tools' policy, h they are to be ef
fective, the mean a challenge to the whole constitution of this coun
Robert Smillie of the miners' organization, said.
"If France and General Wrangel cut off Russia's coal supply,
will it be interfering too much with France if th. British miners and
railway men cut off France's supplj ?"
It is the possibility of tins radical action on the part of labor;
.unions in England that causes Lloyd George to seek a way out of the 1
Russian tangle without militarj aggressiveness by Great Britain.
No premier of Great Britain ever has had a more difficult situ-i
tation than that now confronting Lloyd George. His country is try-I
ing to turn away from all thought of the strain and stress and the
blood of war, but there remains a greal work undone in pacifying
the world and snuffing out the flame of anarchy. I'nless Greal
Britain plays a courageous part, now that America refuses to take
any action, there may sweep through Europe the horrors of Die red
terror
RECORD HAILSTORM.
Stating that the hailstorm in Lehi, last Monday evening was the
greatest in Utah history. J C Alter declares many of the hailstones
were five inches in circumference, and destroyed windows, shmb
'bery, fruit trees and garden stuff
On examination, Mr. Alter found that the broken hailstones
presented the usual, but very interesting, concentric layer structure
i beginning at the center with a half-inch crystal marble or frozen
, raindrop; on this were alternate Layers of opaque and crstal snow
j and ice, due to its having been repeatedly thrown aloft by violent
vertical drafts into freezing atmosphere before hailstone was finally
thrown far enough out at the top of the draft, or to one side of it,
to allow the stone to fall entirely to the earth Mauv of those exam
I iued had been rethrown eight or ten times, the concentric layers
I being rather thin, indicating a brief experience while getting each
I layer.
I Mr Alter Bays there are records of storms equally as heavy in
the Salt Lake valley, although less destructive for the area covered.
Probably the worst on record occurred near Salt Lake City on June
J 13, 1854, when hail injured several wheat fields most seriously in I
the region of the Big and Little Cottonwood creeks.
I The city of Sacramento is selling out its stock of law books at
$20 a ton. Wonder it' the weigh 'em in the Scales of Justice.
jj A Chicago doctor says folks should have two vacations a year
one in summer and another in winter. Show this to your boss.
OUTBURSTS OF EVERET TRUE
I , - -
I lvJC5L, WCLl, LOOK MHO'S MeLYH. !
JuXSe. T3foiorvj SrllTH 1 "beeicsve: J
THIS IS INDCScT O A pUcASURE TR4T
(or NeRU l) so cia iJZZZ What vs
CONVENTIONS i THC
-" N A J G' I
NVCf3 MfMD MY NtVI ! 1
Two YeAfes a3.o Ycu I 5
SOAKcTD MS FOR.
Contempt of court
AKV NUJ I'M QCMNS TO TJO
A LtTTCe SCQKINQ, BUT H" a -Iuont
Cost you anvthimQ I ro '
BUT A ClTTCe P5ROMA
LEAKAGE? NOT IN THIS 'CELLAR'
CHICAGO Who sairl federal pro
hibition agents are drinking the evi
dence ?"
Not much' Not with Major A.
Dalrymple on the Job. In Chicago,
anyway.
Dalrymple who Is head of Chicago's
"ponge squad." ha.s Just made pub
lic hLs report of booze seizures from
the time he took office last January
10 to July 1,
He has the be3t "cellar" in Chicago.
The cellar Is a warehouse. It has Just
been Inventoried.
Only 11 quarts of whisky are miss
ing! The inventory accounted fori
NEW YORK LABOR UNIONS
WILL FORM SOLID BODY
NEW YORK; Aug 14. The central
federated union, comprising local labor
unions In .Manhattan, voted last night
to Join In the plan proposed by Sam
uel Gompers, president of I he Ameri
can Federation of Labor, for forma
tion of a new central labor body cm
l raring all of the 650 labor unions In
Greater New York.
A stormy debate preceded the vote.
Opposition to endorsement whs led b
Abraham Lefkow Itz of the Teachers'
union, while the proposed organisa
tion was supuorted by Hugh Fraj no,
general organizer of the American
Federation of Labor; James p Hol
land, president of the New York Fed
eration ot Labor, and Wm F K. hoe
of the Teamsters' union.
Mr. Holland declared the men op
rosed to the amalgamation, as advo
cated by President Gompers, "were
fearful that It might curtail their po
litical activities"
He urged the unions to centralist
all their powers In order to carry out
the policies 'of tho American Federa
tion of Lubor to mr-.-t plana which he
said are being made by manufacturers
for th introduction of tho open shop
plan.
uu
TURKS' MOURNING DAY
FOR TREATY IS OBSERVED;
CONSTANTINOPLE, Aug. II
Yesterday was designated here as the
day of mourning in Turkey because
cf the alleged unfavorable character
Ot the Turkish peace treaty The ob
servance ha.i been poorly advertleed
and was not generally observed.
In Constantinople tho street cars
were stopped for five minutes at noon,
newspapers with black borders and a
lew flags were displayed draped In
black.
FARMERS:
The Holley Milling Co. pays
highest prices for wheat and
give best flour on grist, see us
before you trade. 1430 Wash
ington Ave., Ogden or River
dale. 4365
,112, 649 quarts seized In fhcandahalf
months.
A special guard Is always on duty
at the warehouse to preent leakage.
, This Is the way the inventory of seiz
ures read: 10,792 complete cases of
.bo'tled goods; 411 barrels of whisky;
38C stills, and a carload of broken
lotb of whiskies, wines, cordials and
. moonshine.
The major's card Index shows the
booz.' leisured In size from a carload,
jsmugglcd into Chicago on a forged
permit and seizures In the homes of
millionaires on the "Gold Coast," to
the half-pint bottle of "hlp-llquor."
'SOVIET PAYROLL HERE
UNCOVERED BY OFFICERS
WASHINGTON. Aug. 14. Discov
ery oi what Is said by officials to be
the payroll of Ludwlg C. A. K Mar
tens, unrecognized soviet ambassador
I to the United States, has been made
I by federal authorities.
The alleged payroll was found in
I Martens' residence in Prooklyn, during
r.-cent search of th house for c l.lence
of the connection of the soviet repre
sentative with the liolshevist truffle in
Jewels belonging supposedly to the
Russian Imperial collection.
The name of J. G. Oshal, said to
have been a former employe of the
federal trade commission was identi
fied by government officials In tho
lltt of the thirty names on th sup
posed payroll. Mr Oshal, the fed
eral trade commission said, Cormerl
was employed by the commission as
an examiner and left the service last
March IT
Names were listed on the payroll un
.lr r seven divisions, diplomatic soviet
Russia office, commercial, economic,
financial and technhul
oo
It must be rather embar
rassing io a woman to start to
elope with a man and then be
forced to accept kindness from
the girl he left behind. See
"The Law of the Yukon" at
the Alhambra tomorrow.
ESTATE OF 45 MILLIONS
IS WILLED TO FRIEND
NEW CORK, Aug 14 Tho fortune
left to Arthur T Walker of New York
by the late Edward F. Snrles of
Methuen Mass., who died recently was
conservatively estimated here today at
$50,000,000 Mr Walker, named as
'A friend" in the will which was filed
for probate in Salem. Mass.. received
the residue from the entire estate after
deducting bequests of less than 6,
000.0'ni to relatives and employes of
the Bearles home at Methuen.
The fortune was originally that of
the late Mark Hopkins, accumulated
In the building of the I'nlon Pacific
railroad and left b him lo Mrs. flop
kins who later married Mr Searles. J
STATE AND JDAH0 NEWS
Latest Items of Interest From Utah and Gem Stits
11 DIE WHEN I
HOUSEBURNED
Oil Lamp Explodes and Home
Destroved By the
Flames
BOISE. Ida.. Aug. 13. Two
people are dead and a third quite
badly hurt as the result of burns
received last nlRht nt 9 o'clock
wiien the Martin homo, a few
miles east of Welser. was burned
to the ground following the ex
plosion of a kerosene lntnp which
It Is thought was being filled
while the wick was burning. Tho
dad: Ames Baker, aged 59; Ira
Martin, ngo 64-
OO
IMPRESSIVE SERVICES
HELD FOR LOGAN HERO
LOGAN, Aug. 14. Impressl'.c serv
ices, largely attended, WWt held yes
terday for Private Lafayette B. Black
turn, F battery, 148th field artillery,
who dlod at Coblenz, Germany, fol
lowing the signing of tho armlaili e
The funeral service was held at the
Logan cemetery' and at the grave of
the soldier, taps, was sounded, when
the body had been laid In lis final
resting place firing squad fired a
sulute over the grave Just before the
bugler played Laps.
Mr. Blackburn was the son of Wil
liam Black-burn, lUlng at North
Third East Street, and was the first
Logan soldier (hat died overseas lo
be buried at home He died January
b, 1919. while serving with the army
of occupation His death was caused
by Influenza and meningitis, superin
duced by gas received in battle
Private Blackburn was a native of
Y. st, Utahi nnd was 23 years and 5
months old when he died, lie enlisted
at Powell, Wyo., In June. 1917. and
was assigned to the 148th field artll
lery. He participated in the battle of
li. .Urne In August. 1918. and wan
gussed In this engagement He recov
ered and went back to the front In
time to fight In the St. Mlhlel drive
Ml brother, James A. Blackburn, par
jticlpated In three engagements with
hm. but neither was aware of tho
piescnce in battle of tho other.
oo
THREE JAPANESE KILLED
IN BINGHAM ACCIDENT
BINGHAM. Aug 14 As the result
of a collision between an ore train
and a train loaded with workmen,
which occured at 10.40 oclock yester
day morning, K Fuklmoto, M. Sudow
and M Ito. Japanese, are dead and
seven other Japanese are Injured but
not seriously.
Fuklmoto and Sudow were killed In
stantly. Ito suffered the loss of both
legs and died at the county hospital.
The accident occurred when a train
of seven loaded cars bumped Into n
train loaded with workmen. The ore
train was backing down hill while the
workmen laden tiain was being push
ed up hill None of the train crew w.m
injured
oo
CAMPAIGN AGAINST
M0SQUIT0S DEFERRED
SALT LAKE. Aug. 14 Dr. T. B.
Beatty, secretary of the stato board of
heilth has received a letter from the
United States Public Health Bureau
Informing him that it will be Impos
sible for the bureau to comply with his
request to sent an agent to conduct1
a campaign against mosquitoes in
Bear Rier Valley, Poxelder county.
ROQUest for such .in expert was made
some time ago The bureau Intimated
that the bureau may supply aid at a
later date.
ALLEGED BOOTLEGGER
WANTS POLICE JOB
SALT LAKE, Aug. 14 E- E Hal!,
arrested by the antl-vlce squad Thurs
day on a charge of bootlegging, had
filed application to become a patrol
man on the Salt Lake police force,
acordlng to Lieutenant D. H. Clayton.
Three gallons of moonshine were
found at Hall a residence, 23 Cleve
land avenue. It I? nllegerl
Mali's place was raided Thursday
and In addition to the Illicit whiskey,
over -00 Lotties of beer were discover
ed, the police say.
oo
SHIPMENTS FROM PARK
CITY MINES DECLINE
PARK CITY. Aug. 13. Production
of Pork City mines fell from a total
Of 232S tons for last week to a total
of 17T6 tons for the week ending last
night, according to the weekly report.
Bhlpmerftfl during the week were as
follows:
Ontarlon: 670 tons. Judge Mining
and Smelting, f.39 tons. Sll-r Kins;,
coalition. 281 tons; Daly-West. 176
tons; Daly, 50 tons and NalldHver, 60
tons.
no
It's hard to perish in a
storm. But think of perishing
with your rival clinging to you!
See "The Law of the Yukon"
at the Alhambra tomorrow.
DOLLAR PIECES
FLOOD STREETS
) OF POCATELLO
COCATELLO. Ida . AUg. 14.
Center street yesterday was the
scene of considerable excitement
nt noon, when Bismarck Nelson,
nn employe of the Bannock Na
tional bank, was carrying two
sacks, each containing 1000 sliver
dollars, welching approxlnintel v
1 '.' ." pounds, .hn tho bottom
came out of ono of thtn.
Dollars went rolling in every
direction and a crowd of consider
able size collected at once. It ap
peared at first as though there
Would be a scramble, but Mr.
Nelson Informed the eager-eyed
bystanders that ho needed no as
sistance to collect his coins and
took his time about picking them
up. while the crowd watched.
uu
Logan Man Dies in
Fire at McCammon
POCATBLXiO, Idn . Aug 13. S. P
Lowe, '.'4, was burned to i-.th tnnl.'ht
While attempting to navo his antorno
blli from destruction in a fire which
'wiped out a garage at McCammon.
17 miles east of here The body of
Lowe was found in the ruins. The
dead man reside,) in MeOimmon about
I four months coming from Txipnn,
Utah, where his parents reside Fif
teen automobiles were destroyed and
loss to bull. lint' and contents is esti
mated at $30,000.
on
EXTRACT MAKERS TO
MEET IN SALT LAKE
SALT LAKE Aug 14 Mathonihah
l Thomas, federal prohibition director
j foi Utah has called a meting of Utah
manufacturers of extracts in tho cham
i ber of tho house of representatives
of the state capltol at 10 o'clock Mon
day morning The gathering Is called
for the purpose of clearing up mis
understandings with regard to the pro
visions of the national prohibition law
oo
ANGLICAN CHURCH HEADS
END0RE NATION LEAGUE
LONDON, Aug. 13 Emphatic in
dorsement of the leiguc of nations as
("essentially Christian" was given by
the recent Lambeth conference of the
Anglican church, which was attended
by bishops and archbishops from all
parts of the world, according to an
official report on tho work of the con
ference issued today. It was urged
that the peace of the world, no les.-)
than Christian principals, demanded
the admission of Germany and other
nations Into the lcaguo at the earliest
posslblo time
Concern was expressed bv the con
ference over the disease and distress
prevailing In large parts of Europe and
Vsia The bishops ailed for energetic
action for relief.
A resolution of "docp interest" In
the prohibition movement was adopted
In which the action of the United
States and Canada was commended ' to
the earnest and sympathetic attention
of the Christian church throughout
tho world "
Another resolution affirmed life
long Indissoluble marriage as the
hrlstinn principal and standard,
though allowing a national church to
make special provision wnen the
ground on which dissolution is sought
is adultery.
r,n
NORMAL CONDITIONS IN
BUSINESS ARE EXPECTED
DETKoIT Aug. 14 Normal con
ditions In business will shortly replace
U)e present depression, J H. Trego,
secretary-treasurer of the Retail
Credit Men s National association de
clared in a speech before the associa
tion's annual convention here today.
Business, ho said Waa now experienc
ing the morning after," effects of
post-war extravagance.
Lifting of the excess profits tax, Mr.
Trego said, would do much to restore
normal conditions.
Houston. Texa. or Los Angeles,
Cal . will be tho next convention city.
The board of directors will decide.
George A. Iawe of Memphis, was
chosen pr. sidcnt.
uu
UNION MEN FINED FOR
CALLING THEATRE 'UNFAIR'
MINNEAPOLIS, Aug 14. Four
members of the Minneapolis Tradea
and Ltbor Assembly were held guilty
oi contempt of court by Judge W. W.
Bardwoll In Hennepin county district
court here yesterday. The court ruled
they disobeyed an Injunction granted
recently, forbidding Statements that a
downtow n moving picture theatre w-as
unfair to orgunized labor.
Km h of the four men was fined
SI -'5 and costs.
nn
Census Report
WASHINGTON Aug 14. State of
Indiana. 2, 930, 544, increase 2-9.663,
cr 8.5 per cent.
Gary, Ind (relsed) 65,378. Pre
viously announced 55,344.
Qulncy, III 35.97$, decrease 609. or
1 . 7 per cent.
TOOTS AND CASPER It Was a Dangerous Disguise for Casper. By J. E. Murphy
WflOIMg OUTJioeJ out WITHOUT , ssesjlf I0085 J t WE COOK ' J f? , TW.T SUBPOEWvK-, ujhU THEffWkl ' rA-- WAS HIS flfFIMlW
s
KNIGHT WAIVES
FIRSTJMG J
Alleged Burglar Who Sold
Stolen Goods in Ogden
Arraigned at Provo
George W. Knight, who recently
confessed In California of hnvlng rob
bed more than eight I'tah stores, much
of the loot having been sold to Ben
Cohen, an Ogden storekeeper. who
since has returned many of the stolen
articles, waived preliminary hearinj?
at Provo yesterday beforo Judge.
Tucker and stated he would plead
Kuilty to four charges of burglary In
S'lu-n portions of the stolen goods
wer. traced to Cohen's store on Twon
t -fifth street a few weeks ugo, Cohen
told tho officers that he purchased the
articles, believing Knlirht to be an au
thorized salesman He diclard that
some of tho goods had been shipped
to Idaho and Wyoming and since has
recovered a portion of the goods from
these states Ho waa not nrro3tcd. jfl
Knight hns made written confes
sions to having robbed tho Columbia
Music and Jewelry company of Provo
of about 1000 worth of Jewelry and
the J. C. Penney company's storee of H
Provo. American Pork and Spanish
Fork of $9000 In merchandise, making
a total of $10,000, which was divided
betwoon himself and partners and sold.
nn X.
CIRCUS COMING
HERE MUST I
John Robinson's Museum and
Menagerie to Show Here
One Day
John Robinson's great clrci"
museum and menagerie now on Itt
97th annual tour, will exhibit In Og
den on Thursday, August 26. .1
The 6how which requires a train,
transported in three sections, carries rvfl
B fifty-cage zoo. utilizes tho seel...
of over 1200 persons and 500 horses, H
is one of the largest this season ever
projected.
The big top contains four rings, an ipj
aerial enclosure, and a hippodrome
track one-half mile in circumference.
There are sixty distinct displavs
programmed, Including a big congresj
of trained animals, embracing three
sep.irato herds of elophants.
A street parade fully a mile In
length will traverse the principal busi
ness thoroughfares at 10 a. m. Tho
usual two performances will be given
in .gden.
oo BWi'
Democrats to Hold I
Primaries August 26
The fiemocratic county convention
will be held August 28, and prlmarleaf
on August 24, according to a vote tak
en at a meeting last nlKht. State Chair
man H. L, Muljlner addressed the
meeting on matters of organization
and cnmplimented Weber county or- J
sanitation for having practically com
pleted the details of organization in
almost every precinct in the county.
Local Democratic leaders outlined
further steps to be taken in the organ
ization work and Samuel A King of
Salt Lnke made an address on the
nature of the Cox-for-Presldent clubs
Which are being started In every pre
cinct of the county.
Ashby Thatcher, member of the
state committee on apeakers, told the
meeting what provision could be count
ed on for campaign orators and Thorn
as Maglnnls, vice-chairman of the
Weber countv committee, made a re
port on the organization as it stands
at present.
on-
Priesthoods of North I
Weber Meet Tomorrow B
Ail members of the North Weber
stake priesthood aro Invited by the
stake presidency to attend a stake !-
meeting to be held in the Weber Nor
mal college Sunday afternoon at 2 30 Hl
o'clock.
Elder Nephl L Morris will address
the meeting upon a subject that will
be of Interest to the priesthood. -I
.In addition to members of the
North Weher stake priesthood, mem
bers of the other stakes are also cor
dially Invited to attend the meeting I
to hear Elder Morris V
oo- .
What sorrow would be W i
averted if bored husbands and
Wives would flirt with each
other sometimes instead of
with other husbands' wives
and other wives' husbands.
See 'The Law of the Yukon"
at the Alhambra tomorrow.
oo hm:
SEN. JOHNSON AND BORAH
WILL SPEAK IN JERSEY m ,
TRENTON N J.. Aim ii!-n,...
States Senators Johnson and borah
haNe promised to speak In New Jersey
during the Ha rding-Coolidge cam
paign. Republican state LlrmTn
Stoke, ,old Republican leader ' who
as the advisory committee of the Re I M
publican Htate committee conferred T J
her.- today on the details of the c7m
pa.ln Mr Stokes lf, ln cn
Hardin, SStStftS
on address or series of them ln this
oo
Watch the truck drive up
the walk to City Hallsome
thing new everybody come
neighborhood party Saturdav
evening 7:30 sharp.
ARMY AIRPLANES LEAVE
TODAY 0NJJ0RTHERN TRIP
fouHrAVeTdsVat?s rno
"as perfect when their lanHint " i
M

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