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The Ogden standard-examiner. (Ogden, Utah) 1920-current, September 19, 1920, LAST EDITION, Image 1

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I Fiftieth Yr-No. 245 ' OGDEN CITY, UTAH SUNDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 19, 1920 PRICE FIVE CENTS J
P RUSSIAN ARRESTED AS BOMB SUSPECT
1 G.o.p.m
1 OVER OUTLDGK
; FOR SENATORS
.
Republicans Have Little Fear
About Presidency or Lower
House. Writer Says
V
y HARD BATTLE IS TO
J ELECT UPPER BRANCH
f Harding Would Do Much to
f Be Certain of Smoot's
j Return, Claim
By MARK SULLIVAN
iU NEW yORK. Sepl IS The Tie
publicans have a good deal of con
cern about the senate, if the word
' concern- can be tped at all in con
nection wilb the atmosphere of both
,1 Marion and nation.;! iKuuquai ters in
New York since the Maine election
this week. The pnrt managers have
I little fear about the president
About the lower house their chief tear
is that they may get too large a
majority.
Their present lower house ma
jority is forty. Tha.t Is a comfortable
working majority. The Republicans
fear, and fear with good reason, that
if the lower house majority were
J much larger they might run into
splits, defection, insurgency, and
every other variety of menace vo
i party solidarity and part; discipline.
They don't want to increase their
lower house majority materially.
Their management ct the campaign
for member of congreKS Is intelli
gent to the highest degree and tho
roughly organized. They are discuss
ing on making sure to keep their pres
ent majority on giving concentrated
support to eeitain Important mem
here of congress, on winning back a
few normally Republican districts
which are now held by nrmicrats
and on making a rhcnclng in about
ten Isolated southern district!
G O P. UNCOMFORTABLE
But about the senate the Repub
licans are net comtortable. Their
present majority la two out of the
ninety-six indeed, it tfl barely two.
The Democrats have Forty-seven
senators, the Republican-! forty-eight,
and one senator. Hiram Johnson ot
California. If Uattid. as "Republican"
and "Progressive."
But even when you say that the
present Republican majority in the
senate is two ,that statement is sub
ject to some Qualification. One of the
two is Newberry of Michigan. Mr.
a- Newberry is under sentence to pen
itentiary lor corruption iu his elec
tion So long as that continues to
be the case, his vole is not available.
Another of the senator who is count
but LaFollettee, as everybody knows,
is Just as likely to vote agalnsi the
ed on as a Republican is LaFolletto.
Republicans as with them With
Newberry eliminated and LaFollcite
voting with the Democrats the Re
publican are really In a minority l
one; and ilu-re are other Republican
senators, but little more dependable
in their Republicanism than LaFol
lelte is.
WANT LARGE MAJORITY
This is the condition that the Re
publicans want to mend, and to mend
surely. They want just as large a
majority in the senate as they can
get, If Lhey are to win at all ihis
fall, they want to control all thicc
branches of the government, so that
they can make the changes they plan
with smooth runniag machinery JJ. r
ding himself is especially concerned
about the senate. He is of the sen
ate himself and he knows its atraos
. phere. He knows well how tin Re
public-an senate has bedevilled Wil
son To be sure, they hae done it be
cause they felt Wilson was the ag
gressor, but they have done it ".ll
i be same. Harding knows well that
if he were elected president, and If
the DemocraLs had control of the
senate, the Democratic senate would
bedevil him Just as much as the Re
publican senators have bedevilled Wil
son!
LEAVING FRONT PORCH
That is what re all Lies behind all
tli- talk of Harding going off the
front porch. All cu h inps as he
takes will be less for the purpose of
adding votes to his own majority
than for tho purpose of helping Re
publican senatorial candidates in
Btatff where the Republicans are
especially eager to elect senator! 1!
AXlOUS to get a comfortable work
ing majority in the senate, and, in
addition to thai, he is particularly
eager for the return of certain es
peclally Important senators.
ioows xnoav sooixnv
Haruiug would probably count a
trip to the Rocky Mountains as a
(Continued cm Page Two )
e tf t 4
BHD YOUTH IS
THOUGHT DEAD
WAGON DRIVER
Anarchists Behind Explosive
Mail Packages Attempt.
Held Responsible
BELIEVE DEADLY MISSILE
WAS WEIGHTY AFFAIR
Pait of 'Death Wagon' Is
Found on Ledge at
24th Floor
NEW itJRK, Sept. 18. (liy me As
sociated Press). Alexander J. Brall
ovsky, Russian journallyl. who was
taken into custody late this afternoon
after the police had received an anon
jmnos letter thut he was seen In the
financial district a .short time after the
Wall street explorlon Thursday noon,
v.'w formally placed under arrest Jus',
before midnight on n charge of being
an undesirable alien. Me will he turned
over to the- department of Justice
agents, the poller- said, while a checK
Is being made on his movements
Brallovsky was seiaed In a small sta
tionery store on Fast Seventh street In
the rear of which is a printing shop
whore the "ftussky Golos' I Russian
Volr-p) described by trie authorities as
a radical Russian maguslne Is pub
lished THltl l w EJUS il M'l"S .
The writer of the anonymous letter
informed the police that he saw Brail
OVSky and three other men talking at
the corner of Pine and Nassau efcri eta
near the scene of the- explosion abou."
twenty minutes after the detonation
took place The writer declared the
three men seemed to be in a jubilant
mood
BrailOVaky, police said, admitted be
ing at the place mentioned but placed
hln presence there an auur later than
the letter charged lie denied all
knowledge of the explosion. He ex
plained his presence In the financial
district by stating that he wished to
dispose of some jewlry boxes there
Brallovsky further admitted tho po
lice said, that he talked to three men
there He said he knew only one of
them, but the man whom he knew was
acquainted with 'he other two.
At first he refused absolutely, the
police explained, to dlVutge the name
Of his companions.
"Mj race," he Is quoted as saying,
"never divulges the name of another
; person without that person's consent
and so I cannot enlighten you."
' MAN OP ED IU IJi
Krallovsky, who Is S6 years old. ant
xmall In stature, was well dressed, his
olce. manner and expreslson giving
tho Impression he was a man of educa
tion, lie told the police, they say, (hat
he was the editor of the "Russky Oo
loa" H- explained that In his conver
sation vith the three men the question
Of soliciting a loan for the purpoee of
onstnicthlj S Kusslan people's thea
tre was discussed.
Federal Investigators declared they
recognized him as the man who presid
ed a few days ago at a concert In Madi
son Square Garden glen for the ben
efit of the Kussian children held at
Fort YV'adsworth, pending their de
parture homeward Ludwig c. A. K.
Murtens, unofficial representative
here of the soviet republic, was the
guest of honor at the concert. The
Ku:.iun children sailed for home a
week ago
RADICAL LITER VTl m
Detective James J. Ocgan. long head
of the bomb squad. Identified Brailov
sky as the man who had dingy quar
ters at 133 East Fifteenth street,
where the "Russky Golos." orginally
was published. The detective said he
Went there first in March. 1917 again
I In June of that year, and a third time
In November, 1919. n one or two
occasions, Cegan added, he seized
quantities of radirai Literature there
ar.i each time found Brullovsny pre
siding over earnest conferences of for-
elgner.
The police attached importance to
the arrest. They rii an effort was
i being made to gel Into COIQIQUnlCatlon
I with Attorney (General falrm r tonight
and notify hitn of Brailovsk v's deten
tion. DRIVER OF WAGON.
Only one body found after the ex
plosion remains unidentified tonight
It Is of a boy of about nineteen yean.
The opinion was expressed that he was
the driver of the death wagon,"
which Is believed to have carried the
bomb Into the financial district, and
SO investigation Is being made along
that line.
Medical Rxamlncr Norris declared
that a metal fragment found In the
i unidentified boy's body "Is clearly a
part of the casing of the bomh, or
one of the bombs, which caused the
destruction and loss of life "
SHOT INTO BODY.
"One side of this piece of metal,"
Norris explained. is slightly convex
and highly polished- Further proof
that It was a part of a bomb's easing
j Is furnished by the density and thick
j metal. Very heavy the fragment Is
(Continued on Page Two.)
BODY OF BABY GIRL IN
LARGE FRUIT BOTTLE
FOUND BY OGDEN MAN
Wlicn Adrift BnUer an employe of the Fred M Nye company
lifted up an I1 ha.1 which was tying on the grdund in the rear of
the store yesterday, he uncovered a larc fpnit bottle containing n
clear liquid.
Floating in the liiuil was the body f a iin bab girl The
bodj was described as a ajat months" baby but srenipd t be full;
developed
D.etccfivea Walter MotJre and W A Taylor f the police de
partment took charge uf the ease ami are eondueting an investiga
tion. The babe in tho bottle is at tin- police station.
Nobody at police headquarters ventured a theory las1 niht as
j b who placed the bain-, bottle and hat in the spot where found
FOREIGN SOI
SEIGFJTS AT
HARDING PORCH
Menace of Organized Hyphen
ated Vote Pointed Out
by Candidate
MARION. O., Sept. IS. Amerlean-
, ism. Its meaning to the foreign-born
eiitzen and the danger of a hyphen-
ated eltlzenshlp was the Keynote of
an address delivered from his front
porch today to delegations of forelgn
Lioiii eltl?.fiis l. Senator Harding, Ke-j
publican presidential candidate.
The delegation j, comprising several
I hundred, came from New York, Chi
eago and cities of the northwest and
Cleveland
W hile declaring 0at "It Is not po-'
slble, and ought not to he expected,!
' thai Americans of foreign birth shall'
stifle love for kinsfolk In tho lands!
'from which they eame." tho senator
', asserted that "we are unalterably j
I against any present or ititure hyphen-
ated Americanism."
Senator Harding was Interrupted
many times during his address by ap-
plausc as he struck a sympathetic!
, note. Touching upon foreign relations,
the senator declared that 'noihlng
helpful has come from the willful as-;
sumption to direct the affairs of Eu-;
' rope, "hut that, on the contrary, the,
mistaken policy of Interference hos
broken the draw strings of good sense
, and spilled bad council and bad man-)
hen al over the world."
Hi: s . im MEDDUNG
"Middling abroad," he asserted,
j "tends to make Americans forget that
they are Americans and to arouso the
! old and tittrr feelings of race or
former nationality or foreign ancestry
In tin hearts of tho.se who ought
I never been enforced to turn their i
! hearts away from undivided loyalty
mid Interest given 'to America first.'"
Warning against byphenlSJU, Sen
I ator Harding averted that "the time1
might come when a group or groups
of men and women of foreign birth I
I or foreign parentage, not organized
i for the interest of America, but or
ganslcd around a resentment against)
our government! might press, ny prop
aganda and political hyphenlsm, uponi
'our government to serve their own ln-1
(crests lather than the interest of aj!
America. It la beyond possibility, ho'
continued, "that the day might come
j and may God forbid It when an or
ganzied hyphenated vole In American
politics might have the balance of
voting power to elect our government.
If this were true, America might be
delivered out of the hands of her I
citizenship and her control might be'
transferred to a foreign capital "
FOR l RISE i.t I K mi i
, Introducing the various delegates to
Senator Harding. Senator Meejlll Mc
cormick of Illinois said:
W e are come to bear witness to our
faith that the success of the Repub
lican part and your own election In
( November holds fortli the certain
promise of the re-cstabllshment of
; free and representative govern nient
at home, no less than the reinsertion
I abroad of those fundamental Amer
ican policies under whb-h the Ainer-'
lean people base become great and
in the pursuit of whirl, U',,v. rn-'
I merit hius enjoyed In ever Increasing
i measure the respect and regard of the
j people of the world." He told the can
didate lhat well nigh all the peoplesl
of the old world were represent" , in
the delegations before him
lNIGH1 B 'l PTTH1 s
Senator Harding attended a reunion
, of Marlon county Knights of Pythtasl
I of which he is n member, at s park
j hen thU afternoon and made a brief!
speech on "fraternallsm."
Senator Hardlhg said he not onlyi
believed In fraternity of citizenship. '
but a fraternity of nations but that!
In playing Americas role, cautioni
should be exercised. He alluded to ef
fort to ha vi! America accept a man
date over Armenia and utld While!
J I want America to do Its share I do',
(Continued on Page Two i J
BRITISH READY
FOR EVENTS IF
M'SWINEY RIES
Government Physician Not
Anxious to Predict But Al
lows Week More
Ci'RK. Sept. 18. Doubt whether In
the event of Ixird Mayor MacSwlne'u
death the British government woulo
permit .the body to be brought to Ire
land for burial wan expressed by muni
cipal officials today. It was suggest
ed that Inasmuch as the government In
order to avoid demonstrations refused
Ar bbi; hop Mainip pcrmis-ston to i ome
to Ireland, lh- wme course was likely
to be followed In this case. .
n this, the thirty -ninth div of the
hunger strike --.f the Cork' prisoners, all
arc alive The home office physician,
Or. Pearson was at) reluctant as over to
hazard an opinion of how much longer
they might linger, but said that all
might conceivably remain alive a week
or more
iti i 1 1 r w jrjoi s
HnNIiiiX. SvpT IS Tonlgnt's bulle
tin on the condition "f l.ord Maor
MacSwIney Issued by the Irish Self
Determination league, announce,! thai
the prisoner 'continues In a state or
extreme exhaustion; Is In grcal pain,
which lasted throughout the day." This
the bulletin adds, has caused great
anxiety to his relatives. He is still!
conscious.
After leaving her brother at 9
o clock tonight. Annie MacPwlney de
clared ho was "barely conscious and
almost unable to speak."
oo
SHOOTING FIGURES
IN JOY RIDE PARTY
AliBUQUBRQUE, N. M.. Sept. 18.
Francisco Arguello who was found In
an automobile last Wednesday night
mysteriously wounded was the son of
J. M Argueiio of Pasadena, Calif,, a
wealthy orange grower, it was learm 'I
today. Arguello was wounded four
times and died Thursday maintaining
lhat he had shot himself
An Inquest has been called for Mon
day. A party of five Joy riders who
Were arrested the following day after
being chased through the streets by
the sheriff onto the road On which Ar
guello was found in his car have been
summoned as witnesses.
oo
S. L WOMAN RE ELECTED
SERVICE STAR TREASURER
DEJB MOINES, la.. Sept. 18. Mrs.!
M. A. Toy. of Houston, Tex., was elect
ed president of the National Service
Star Legion, last night. It was an-1
nounced today. Cleveland. O.. was1
chosen as the 1 02 1 meeting plaOe.
Other officers elected Included Mrs
Sarah Flanningan. Spokane. Wash,,
second vice president; Mrs. II. I). Mor
ris, Houston, Tex., corresponding sec
retary, and Mrs Selden I Clawaon,
Salt Lake City, treasurer.
on
HE CRITICIZED MONARCHY,
SENTENCED TO 16 YEARS
VALENCIA. Spain. Sept. IS Six
teen years in prison was the sentence
imposed today on Professor rjnamuna,
who has been In Jail for lese majeste. i
It being said ho wrote three articles
criticising the Monarchy.
FORTRESS MONROE FIRE
WILL BE INVESTIGATED
FORTRESS MONROE, Va.. Sept.
18. Gun casements and machinery nt
Fortress Monroe were da'naged early
todaj DJ D fbe which the authorities
s.ild was of undetermined origin. A
military board of Investigation has
been appointed, 1
NOMINEE SAYS
I m PLAN TO
CURB GREEDY
,
Favors Rotary Fund of Gov
ernment to Purchase Food
Supplies
OFFERS HOOVER JOB
IN HIS CABINET
Candidate Says President Has
Fought Profiteers for
Five Years
OAKLAND, Cal.. Sept. 18. Sugar
profiteers were arralgneel here tonight
by Governor James M C".. Hemocrat
lc candidate for president. In the third
speech of his trans-bay program.
Speaking from the rostrum where
President Wilson made one of the last
speeches preceding his breakdown.
Governor Cox reviewed attempts by
the porsldent to dethrone profiteers
who have r Igned for "five long years
jordld. soulless ugly and hateful.'"
I am in favor, In circumstances
liko this." the governor said, "of the
government, through congress, sup
plying a rotary fund to be placed in
the hands of the president for the
purchase of as much of the sugar crop
ice i. nccesaary to prevent profiteering.
If elected 111 November. I shill recom
mend to the congress that this be done
for future emergencies in food sup
plies. n EZl Si 6 ROBBED
"The extent to which profiteering
prevailed during the war. und especial
ly since the signing ot the armistice,
has been outrageous. The amount
.stolen from householders of America
in that time would pay off the greater
pari of the funded debt arising from
the war Itself.
"it must be more than a coincidence
t that the many profiteers who were
protected by th senatorial Oligarch)
In the pri sent congress are paying
their share into the Republican cam
paign fund, which I charge will not
I be less than $15,000,000."
PRAISES HOOVER
"Mr. Hoover's effective service in
the war was largely due to his tho
rough training as an engineer," he
sulel. "and If I can Induce him, one
of the best engineers in the country
will sit In my cabinet."
The governor also faorcd in this
speech the abolishing of the excess
profits tax. which, he said, w.rs justi
fied during tho war. but no longer
ieasary, and the substltutlonkfor it
of a tax of one or one and one-half
per cent on the olume of business of
a firm.
SPEAKS in WOBfl N
At a lunch' on by the San Francisco
center, a woman's organization, he
declared that the country would have
had a much better Idea of bash- con
ditions in Russia if a group of women
of the character of Jane Addams or
the heads of American educational In
stitutions had been Included in the
Root mission to Russia.
A rotary fund by which tho pres
ident could buy up an entire sugar
crop or In any other way meet u
food crisis when congress was not In
M'Silon w.is proposed In hoth his talks.
tie s.iid ths government should have
Inventories of all food supplies to
forestall alarm over the possibilities
of food shortage.
NEVADA REFUSES PLEA
FOR R. R. RATE RAISE
CARSON CITY. Nev. Sept 18
Holdlnj thai the act of the federal
body did not suspend the state's
rights to regulate rates on intrastate
business, ilio Nevada public service
commission denied today the applica
Hons of certain railroads for freight
and passenger increases, based ou
rate raises recently granted by the
Interstate commerce commission.
nn .
NOTED BRITISH GOLFERS
MEET SEVERE DEFEAT
NEW YORK, Sept. 18. The worsts
deft al given in this country to Ted
Ray and Harry Vardou. thei famous
British golfers, as a team, was ad
ministered today b ("hick Evans
and JJohby Jones, 10 up and 9 to
play. The match was played over
the course cf the Morris County
golf club of New Jersey.
TROOPS AT GALVESTON
QUIT 'OPEN SHOP' FIGHT
AUSTIN. Texas, Sept. 18. All
troops will be out of Galveaton by
October 10, according to a state
ment issued by Governor Hobby late
today. He said no troop movement
would bo slarted before October 5,
however.
HERE IS TICKET
PUT IN FIELD BY
G. O.OF WEBER
Wot stett senator four-year term
Thomas 1. I Kny. Htintsx lllc.
l or stjite senator, two vcur term
iiiid Jcnson, Ogden,
For state representatives Royal
I j. Douglas. Ogden: Reuben T :
Rkeee, North Ogden; v R. !-
Intyrc, Ogden; 11 V soil, rberK.)::-
den.
For mi illy CnmniN-lnncr four
M,,r term Moroni Skecn. Ogden.
For Conntr Commissioner, ivvo
tpsur term Edward S. Green,
Iviinevllle.
For l ounty Clerk and Xmiitor
Claude T, Moycs. Ogden.
For County Treasurer Frank W.
Piper, Ogden.
For CoUntj Assessor A. ' Ber-
, rc It. North -il: n.
i or sheriff Richard Ptnooi k.
Ogden.
t-or Counts Recorder Mr-, (ilen
na Feii, Ogden.
For Count) ittornej naid J.
Wilson Ogden.
For Count Surreyoi So nom
ination. For City Judge David R, Rob
erta, Ogden.
For ( onstabJi Henry Steele. Og
den. If
WILSON SENGS
$51111 FOR PARTY
CAMPAIGN FUND
President Gives His Bit As
"Private Citizen in the
Ranks"
I NSW rOBK Sfcpt. I- A $5no con
tribution to Ibe Democratic national
(campaign commute.- was received
I hero today from President W ilson.
' who wrote thut he was offering the
1 money as "a private in the ranks."
The text of the president's note as
pi ven out by W". W Marsh Democratic
national treasurer was as follow
May I not. a.s o prixate in the
ranks, give myself the pleasure of con
tributing the enclosed to the expense
of the Democratic canlpagn', 1 feel
'very deeply that the very honor and
destiny of the nation ure Involved In
I this campaign, and that I and all citl
! zens who love Its honor and covet for
It a high influence In the world should
contribute to the success of the can
didate who stands for the re-cstabllsh-i
ment of our position among the na
tion"." The contribution was accepted.
In commenting on the president's
letter. National I'halrman George
White said:
Throughout the land there are
private cltliens In the ranks' whose
thought and nspirutlon the president
has expressed In his letter. 'The hon
or and destiny" of the nation are truly
involved in the outcome of the cam
paign, for you upon the acceptance
by Americans of the Ideals for which
the Democratic candidates are fight
Inir depends the place this nation is
to hold in the world. To such a cause
we are committed.
' The contribution of Woodrow Wil
son Is welcome and needed from a
financial standpoint "
SAILORS AID TAWPIC0
FIREMEN DURING BLAZE
I , .
MEXICO CITY. Sept. IS Forty
buildings. Including many stores
tug and a wharf were destroyed by fire
at Tamplco yesterday afternoon, ac
cording to Information received here.
N,. estimate was tpafle of the damage.
The flames started near the railway
terminal and Fnited States warships
and a number of foreign vessels In
port sent men to assist the fire-Xight-
This was the second fire at Tamplco
thut week. Property ot tne Aguila oil
company burned September 15, with s
loss of $300,000.
EGERTON CASTLE. AUTHOR.
IS CALLED IN LONDON
LONDON'. Sept. 17. Fgerton Castle.
English author and newspaper direc
tor, died In London today.
Egerton Cantle was a prolific writer
of novels and plays, his first works
making their appearance In the early
eighties. Some of his plays, among
them 'The Pride of Jennlco." ajd
"Ths Bath Comedy." were produced
In American theaters His play "Des
I perats Remedies,'' was written espec
ially for Richard Mansfield.
oo
REDS ASK WORKERS TO
I STOP ANTI-RUSS SHELLS
WORCESTER. Mass. Sept. 18.
Tlundreds of copies of a "red" circular
icalllng on the worklngmeu of this city
to refuse to make, handle or ship mu
nitions that might be used against the
soviet government in Russia were
found today scattered over the man
ufacturlng sections. Thev had been
distributed during the night bj
known agents and many of them wen
taken by the finders to police head
qua rtera.
niN i
sacs vote
FDR ATTORNEY
Miss Iva Steers Plavs Big Part
In Defeat of Jesse
Holther
CLAUDE T. M0YES IS
CANDIDATE FOR CLERK I
Skeen Again Out for Commis
sion and Pincock for
Sheriff
In convention session which
nod in nominating by acclamation H
land ended in one of the stiffesl utrug
ides yet witnessed In Weber county
during the present political campaign,
Republicans yesterday nominated their
legislative and county ticket In the
was CTu o'clock when the con-
jYintion finally adjourned and the dele- H
gaes rushed to their belated dinners. H
hi were weary and hoarse from
Shouting, working, balloting and re- H
'balloting, but they were enthusiastic, H
happy and proud over the list of men H
they had fought for and finally placed H
on i he Republican ticket in Weber H
FEATURE OF BATTLE.
The feature ol the entire afternoon
session was the intense battle to se- H
jcure a nominee for county attorney H
whtich would please the majority of H
I the delegates The fray finally set- H
tied down to a word battle as to which H
j or two men were most worthy a man
.v. ho had served in France foi eighteen
1 months or a mar. who made sacrifices
lal home, and unable to don the unl- H
form and do Justice to his family, had 1
I aided his country as best ne could by H
working in the shipyards.
Louis J. Holther was the candidate H
Who served ill France as a private in
the L'nlled States army. His friends H
fought for him and shouted his name H
until they were bourse, eulogizing not H
Irmly his war record, but h capablll- H
lies for the position. H
WOW N I Mfjft FLOOR.
A woman iore the brunt or uttac
for David Wilson and her appeal for H
I the n.ui who served his country as
best he ..ould i-en though compelled
to stay at home, turned the roar ol H
SO that W ilson" overshadowed H
cries for "Holther." iH
The woman was MLss Iva Steers.
M.1SS Steers held her audience for H
nearly five minutes and it was appar- H
ent that by her plea the delegates !H
swung their votes to W ilson. H
VOTE is ( Lost
Count of the first ballot showed the
two men deadlocked, with the coun-
try districts leaning toward Wilson and H
the city districts almost evening up H
the score for Holther. In the first
ote Wilson gained lyOVi votes with
' Holther lv und John A. Sneddon. H
la third candidate, 16 votes it was H
'necessary for a candidate to secure H
198 votes to secure nomination. H
I immediately following the an
Ineuncement of the initial ballot, Mr.
j Sneddon arose amid the bedlam of H
demonstration, and motioning th H
'delegates to be quiet, declared hira- H
self out of the race and . c-leused hit H
delegates in favor of Wilson. H
MADE l Si wimoi s.
The second ballot won the nomlna- H
Ition lor Wilson with I'll Votes against H
! 183 lor Holther So intense was the
contest and so high the interest that H
the delegates called for Holther after H
Pis defeat und from the speaker a H
I'lutlorm he asked that the rules of
convention l suspended und the H
.il.- be made unanimous for Wilson. H
Tills was done amid tumultous cheer- H
ling and applause.
Win rlER W RM FH.M I
Service during the world war also
entered in the fight between Claude
Sloyes and W. 1. Cook for noml
liailon as, county- clery and auditor.
Friends of (uok, in nomination
S hes dwelt almost entirely upon
ip the army und pleaded
, for his nomination. The first ballot. H
howevei. won overwhelming victory
with votes against
Tim- afternoon session opened at H
11.26 o'clock When W. H. Reeder, Jr . H
permaiii ni ch. drin. in. plunged directly H
'into work and announced that noml
'nations were in order for county com-
ii.:;-sioiier four-year term- Frank J. H
Stephens took the floor and placed the H
i me Ot Thomas F. McKay before the H
The delegates went into an uproar H
j at the mention of the candidate's name H
I and began shouting for nomination H
' by acclamation. The vote went over H
, without a dissenting voice.
JEN so BEATS HEY WOOD
Three candidates were entered in H
the race for county commissioner. H
two year term, with David Jenson of H
i igden polling a majority vote on tho H
i first ballot. His rivals for the po- H
sltlon were P A 1 lx of Roy and A. R.
Heywood of iigden. The result of
the- vote gave Mr Jenson 229 1-2
M I wood 11L' and Mr. OU
Five men were entered In the fight !
for state representative, two year H
i term, and resulted In a lively battle H
! before tour Candidates WCre chosen
I DJ iwillo'. Royal J Dougln of igden
I lust nosed out Reuben T Rhees of I
"oi-th iigden for first place. Mr. Doug-
iptured 268 1-4 votes against Mr 1
Elhfps With 867 H A. Seiderberg of
igoeu ran Mr Rhees a close race and (I
gained 2".6 1--I votes. A. R Mclntyrc
of Ogden was nominated with 2iio 1-4
votes. T. R Jones of Ivanesvllle was
eliminated after losing out by one
irote, his final i ' n being 249 1-4 votes. t
MORONI SKEEN WINS
Moroni Skeep of iigden captured j
nomination for COlinty commlsslonei .
four year term, after two ballots were
rust Ills rivals wore John D. Hooper
of Hooper, John T. Bybee of River
dale and Lyman Skeen of I'lain City.
(Continued on Page Two.) '

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