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The Ogden standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, September 18, 1913, 4 o'clock p.m. City Edition, Image 5

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1913-09-18/ed-1/seq-5/

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II
H . - THE OGDEN STANDARD. OGDEN. L 1 An, ; HLR3DAY, SEPTEMBER 18. 19R c I
I CHIEF TELLS MEN
I SHOOT TO KILL
. !
Chicago Authorities Begin
War of Extermination Up
on the Wave of Crime.
Chicago, Sept 18 Chief of Police
McWeeney, mas detailed twenty-six
men to make war on hold up men in
the hope of averting tbe wave of
crime which ha6 made Its appearance
In Chicago each October for many
year.
j The chief's instructions were
j "Shoot to kill If neeessar There
never must be such another state of
affaire as existed last winter and the
time to prevent It Is before it startB."
Chief McWeeny's action followed
the murder yesterday by four masked
men of Michael Waschuk, a stableman
who sought to prevent the robbery of
a delivery station of a department
store. The robbers drove to the de
livery station in an automobile and
lift the police no trace.
Mrs Francisa Alio, wife of Vincen
I zo Alio, was shot in the back and
probably fatally wounded last niR,t
as she and her husband were enter
log a moving picture theatre It is
thought the shot was intended for her
husband who had received threatening
letters demanding money.
Samuel Eisenberg and Antonio Co
sentana, both grocers, were fired on
last night, but neither was rit. Each
had received threatening letters
The records of last winter show
1 that as a result of the operations ol
bands of armed men operating In au
1 tomoblles, 74 holdupF. eight men were
wounded, lour killed and 45 suspects
I arrested before the bands were exter
minated
oo
DEMONSTRATORS
AND THEIR WORK
Dr Robert J Evans, state leader J
of the Agricultural college farm dem
onetratcrs, on returning from a trip
'hrough western and southern Utah
recently, was enthusiastic over the
interest being aroused among resi
dents of that section in the work
of the demonstrators At Kanarra
and Parov.an Mr Evans took dagon
loads of farmers from field to field,
testing the farms to determine the !
conserving power of water that the
soil of each field possessed For 1
this a soil auger was used and bor- '
;ngs were made from 5 to 10 feet
deep In this waj the effect of va
rious methods of cultivation on the
Writei in the soil at different depths
Is determined The onlookers were
very interested and impressed by
piocedlngs Rain prevented similar
oemonstrations from taking place In
I two other towns where field days had
j been arranged for. Meetings were 1
I afterward held at the two first men
tioned towns, where enthusiastic I
gatherings of slxtv persons in one I
I case and sixty-five in the other were j
eager listeners to the discussion of
better methods of farming.
I Organization In Millard
A farmers' organization has been
effected In Millard county and it Is :
doing things. One example: It has '
slipped a car of peaches from Brig
ham City for home consumption Bj
this wholesale method ol buying it
saved 40 per cent of the price paid
; therefore to fruit venders. Through
the influence of this organization the
whole of the town of Hinckley Is to
be drained Although this will be
I effected at a low- cost, says Dr. Ev-
ans: the price of the land will rise
to twice its present alue Another
Htep the association has decided on
is to clean and disinfect all alfalfa
seed grown by Us members and send
J, it out under its guarantee.
Some Reforms In Uintah.
Dr Evans 6pent a week in the
Uintah basin with Walter J Glenn,
the local county agent. Together
they held a successful demonstra
tion gathering at Utah Here they
made an investigation of the water
'oged lands and advised their own
ers to dig drains to cut oft seepage
from canals. Mr. Glenn has waged a
campaign to induce growers to rc
plact their scrub 6tock with pure
i fcreds. As a result a large num"
of pure bred Hereford and Berks7
elrea have been ordered from a Utah
firm.
The county agents during the im
mediate past have devoted consld
' erable time to instructing competi
tors how to prepare farm products for
the fair.
STEAMER DAMAGED
BY HITTING WHALE
Bt Johns, N F. Sept. 17. ,A col
j llalon with a whale caused such seri
ous damage to the Danish steamer
Wladmlr Relu. that the vessel waa
forced to put In here todav for re
j pairs
The accident occurred Monday af
ternoon about 260 miles east of St
Johns. The crew of the steamer
sj saw the whale approaching at terrific
speed, hut could not alter the ship's
I course In time to prevent the Impact
" " ; The whale struck the steamer head-o
knocking a four foot hole in the bow
The accident Is believed to have
,21 killed the whale, which sank lmme
diately, Its blood discoloring the water
hit Or OTer a lare area- The steamer left
Camphelltoit N B.. September 11, for
Plymouth. England, with lumber. She
rtrixl discharge her cargo to permit re-
! pairs to be made
, 4 oo
UINTAH TOWN OWNER
DECLARED BANKRUPT
H. A. Lee. proprietor and practically
0 the owner of the small town of Lee
ton, located about five miles south of
Whlterock In Uintah county, has com
pletely failed In business and has
been served with a process of Invol
untary bankruptcy by United States
Deputy Marshal Julian Riley. Mr.
pHi RHey returned yesterday rnm tjie
Uintah country. He say that the
small town, which worked the finan
clal downfall of Its promoter, is one
of the prettiest spotB in the basin. He
left last Thursday, going into the
basin by way of Mack, Colo.
All the merchants and residents ui
I the valley are confident that they will
"H Great Seal of U & A.gl pgg, j
nobby, enameled Every well-dressed w n
I j;rxf f(-r. (!) for a 10-o-nt tin of Tuxedo Tobacco, and he will present I llggjpj I I
you with one of these fashionable Watch Fobs, free. (Only one watch fob If il Q rnXJl1!? H
B ecjr cuctomer ) jj jjjj
m k km mm mm lKTu rs I - You Can Buy Tuxedo Everywhere
IJ flH MS am mmmJr mfL mk
iXSgMr MflN fS&M lW TfBm bSMlMt wMw 39 Cosumeat pouch, Fun out gre a Un , Lh
rryi t,,- p".-' r i tTifi - BwM 9n I j Ounrtined xrith mou- sold lettering, curved 1 V
M JKBR W&mL .as3, ij tare-pro: pupcr w tofiipeckcl U i -
mmwr The Per feet Tobacco for Pipe and Cigarette Ij
Tuxedo is the original granulated Burlcy Tobacco, and has been more widely imitated than any other A
high-grade tobacco in the world. Thousands of America's most famous men have found that smoking
19 Tuxedo affords them complete relaxation, soothing comfort, and healthful enjoyment. And every man Jr j 4
HI who tries Tuxedo will find the same desirable qualities in this pure, mild, delightful tobacco, 3
You can smoke Tuxedo, no matter how fully ripened, cured and aged until it is per- fei 1
jBBBki many other pipe-tobaccos you have tried and fectly mild and mellow. Then treated by the - TtjujBffl W
N. had to give up for Tuxedo does not irritate famous "Tuxedo Process" that removes the d5SkHB
mm jSKBlM the most sensitive mouth, throat or nose in last trace of "bite" and bitterness, and develops " 4t 'j
(w - act' rnany public speakers and singers find the wonderful fragrance and flavor of the ($& v
Wf 1 that smoking Tuxedo has a soothing, helpful Burley leaf. Tuxedo has many imitators in j ( y I
I I in uence on their throats. the tin but as long as the secrets of the I V" y
Tuxedo is made from the very best select- "Tuxedo Process" remain undiscovered it M'jj&tt J8
fBmm ""C ed Burley tobacco grown in Kentucky care- will have no equal in the pipe or cigarette. Vpr 3
"Pat" Mcdonald joel hillwan J
1 I"N r y J?1' Fre Watch Foh f ffer. U e ? uc more men to try TuxeoV 8 Ig&ZZtfFSEX""-
cmm- ." " ' ' B &s4 HLjF ftsd Hhlfl Because every man who give Tuxedo a week's trial will find ci th Tuitdoua r-J. whdaotn t-
H WA"Kfui of Turtdc for mtr S ncl orr that time, he has had the most enjoyable and beneficiaj smoke. Jk hiu?J& Jm H
SB ii.f Lett i 1 actually JB W m ff jfl iff week of his life ! Why not get that Free Watch Fob t oda v jswRI "v dew--"
W feel tticnqet cUcr a inr.oke UMlon Bw QU
H C t U LT JVL H """''"'"tclcL H Jovtn comp 0t Sfrt,. or ,a,lnt BH "I Aow tried maaybiorjt of tckex, B ktJJntlhaJ,er:ed 9 keePu3nr, And a ptul cZre. K
IjlrJZ ' r'"ty lo O" othtJ mm Tuzcdo my hf ., H ,,000 mtlu the Atlantic In tht WB good, tad and tnjtfacnt. kcar, al.fk- BO other toiacco Supreme US mild Tuicdo toiccca mk anc forget BH
MM fyi) BR 3t H Xc' ftTuU'0' t& vpom Tuiedo. tht lLal nkc KD vddrttu onj fragrant t, Toledo" Qy cvld. and thepawJflou', more freely " B J
C-SB HvT A We want every dealer in Ogden to be supplied with these Bronze Watch Fobs. All dealers who have not yet se- I
pccidi iiOiicc 10 iiC3isrs cured a s3uppiy f these FobFs cdan ds 80 bybcalli98i9i3 uxedo Headquartcrs' Marin Kot k
have railroad service before long, ond
expressed th opinion In dlsousKlnp
th manor with the doputy that bott
the proposed Moffat road and the
extension of the Uintah Railroad com
pany from Watson to Vernal will be
completed soon. Mr. Riley says that
the country In in excellent condition
and needB only train service lo make
It the most Important in the state
Fort Duehesne, one of the towns he
passed through, was all bedecked for
I the Uintah basin fair and Ine old
deserted post houses were fixed to ac
I commodate at least 10UU persons.
NEW MEMBEIU)F
A. C. FACULTY
Miss Elizabeth E. McKay of Og
den. has been given the position of
professor of foods and cookery at
the Utah Agricultural college.
Miss McKay began her tmlninp In
domestic science at the Logan In
lfiUiuUoan 1906. from which she
graduated from the home economics
division In 1W9. She then became
instructor in ber lni' ;hi the college'
for the school year of 1909-1910. The
following season she went to Ogd-n.
Oi..re she was employed In the We
1 1 r academy nPa'' ' (' domestic
f-clcnc division for two years, Upon
leaigi.lng that position, Bhe went east
fot further study at Columbia unl
verslty New York From hoi past
record "it Is certain that Miss McKaj
will provp a very valuable acquisi
tion by tbe Agricultural college.
While a studeut at Iho college she
was populur with her associates aod
was a strong student, also. At her
graduation she was selected to pre- j
pave and give the class paper.
Ml
BOY RUN DOWN BY
ELECTRIC RUNABOUT
Salt Lake, Sept 18. "Back up
I am undof here," said John Smith,
12 years of age. of 100 Almond street
as be reached up his hand In pro-
' testation from where he lay under
the front wheels of an electric runa
bout that knocked him from his
I bicycle At Intersection of First
South and Main streets Insl evening
The car was that of Mrs 8. Heg
noy of 3L' Fourth East street She
had relaxed her hold on the steenrn;
lever to save a little child sitting
beside her from a tumble to (he bm
torn of the runabout. A woman
companion, however, eaught up the
babe and Mrs. Megncy ca- heed to
the wig-wagging of the boy"s hand
and his plea for her to "back up"
The boy's wheel was hndly damaged)
but aside from a bruise or two, be
escaped without Injury
ATTACK S RATES FOR POWER mM
Boise, Idaho. Sept. 17 The cily jM
of Coeur d'Alene has filed a com- H
I lalnt before the public utilities coin- M
mission of this state against the al- mM
ieged excessive and unreasonable sjB
iat charged for electric power by MM
the Kootenai Power company and M
iiSking that the commission make an I
investigation and upon Its findings I
f iller tbe rates to be reduced. The
complaint if made on behalf of I he jr M
bj Mayor R S Nelson aud thd fflP
1 rr.fcm tiers of the ti'.;. t . g Mf

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