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The Ogden standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, July 20, 1916, PIONEER CELEBRATION EDITION, Image 5

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II 1 l ' THE OGDEN STANDARD: OGDEN, UTAH. THURSDAY, TULY ?n Wfi- ' . -
f FRENCH CAPTURE
I : GERMMP05ITI0N
Austrians Claim to Have Driv-
I en the Russians Across the
I Pruth River.
Paris, July 19. To the south of
the Somme the French report the
capture of several German trenches.
Around Verdun In the region of
Hill 304 and on the Fleury sector
the Germans are heavily bombing the
French positions, probably presaging
the usual Infantry attacks.
The Russians In the vicinity of
! Riga are hammering hard with in-
(fantry and artillery Field Marshal
von Hindenburg's forces, but, accord-
Ing to Berlin all their attacks thus
far have failed with heavy losses.
' Farther south in Volhynia, the Rus
sians along the Stokhod river and
to the west and southwest of Lutsk
'I are heavily bombing the positions of
Im1 tha Tonti-m n nllfpn.
I While Petrograd asserts that the
Russians in Gallcia are advancing to
ward the passes of the Carpathian
mountains leading to the plains of
Hungary, Vienna says that southwest
of Delatyn the Austrians have driven
the Russians back across the river
Pruth.
German naval aircraft have drop
ped a large number of bombs on Re
val, in the Gulf of Finland, causing,
according to Berlin, damage to Rus
sian cruisers, troop boats and subma
rines in the gulf and to military es
tablishments on land.
In Asia Minor, south of Treblzond,
additional gains for the Russians
against the Turks are chronicled by
Petrograd, while Constantinople re-
m arms against the British along th6
M Euphrates river and north of the Per-
B sian gulf near Basra. In addition, the
Turks are believed to have defeated
m the Italian in northern Tripoli at Mis-
8 ratah.
II CIVIL SERVICE POSITIONS
w Prepare at home for civil service
w positions. Data on courses and posi-
tious furnished on request. Box 179,
II Ogden. Advertisement,
i TURKS CAPTURED
BY THE RUSSIANS
Petrograd, July 19. Via London,
7:40 p. m. Russian infantry In
Galicia is advancing toward the
I passes of the Carpathians which lead
into Hungary. Further north in the
! marsh region, the official statement
of today says, an attempt of Austro :
! German forces to take the offensive
was broken. In the Caucasus tho ,
'. Russians have made further ad
vances. The announcement follows:
"On the Riga front artillery en
gagements continue. At Lake Mlazidal
our artillery and lake flotilla under
Lieutenant Olschesviky made a sur
prise attack on the Germans in the
night, throwing them Into complete
panic. Enemy airmen manifested
great activity from the region south
of the Dvlna to the Pinsk marshes.
"On the Stokhod there was artil
lery fighting at many places.
"We repulsed by our artillery fire
an attempt on the part of the enemy
to take the offensive north of Odzer
marsh. Owing to the heavy rains the
; uneister has risen almost 2.5 meters,
i destroying Austrian bridges, buttres-
! ses and ferry boats.
"On our left flank in the region of
the rivers Black and White Tehere
mosche, southwest of Kuty, our in
fl i fantry is advancing toward the moun-
' ' tain defiles.
"In the Caucasus on our right wing,
In tho region of Djlvlzllk, south of
Treblzond and Baiburt and west of
Bailburt we made considerable ad
. ; vances everywhere, dislodging the
1 Turkish rear guards. In combats of
the 18th we have captured 85 Turk
ish officers, more than 2,100 men,
eight heavy guns and five machine
guns.
oo
( AIRMEN ATTACK HOSPITAL.
1 London, July 19. A Petrograd dis
patch to -the Exchange Telegraph says
that the Enfpress Marie Jederovna's
hospital on tho DvinBk front was bom
barded today by German aviators.
Forty bombs were thrown on the
! building and several of the inmates
killed.
P -
Deafness Cannot Be Cured
ft 1t local application, aa they ennnot racb th
R diseased portion of tho ear. There la only one
ray to euro dcalneai, and that la bjr constitution
m al remedies. Deafoest la caused by aa Inflamed
condltlonof tbo mucous lining of tho Eustachian
Tnbe. When tbla tuba is inflamed you hnto a
tumbllnr sound or imperfect hearlDg, and when
It Is entirely closed Deafness is the result, and
unless tho inflammation can be taken oat and
this tube restored to Itfl normal condition, hear
ing Trill bo destroyed forerer: nine cases out of
ten are caused br Catarrh, which is nothing but
an inflamed condition of the mucous surfaces.
Wo will giro One Hundred Dollar for any case
of Dcafnesa (caused by catarrh) that cannot be
: cured by HaH' Catarrh Curt. Send for clrcu-
A. Jars, free.
C F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, 0.
t Sold by Drugchts, 76c.
f Tako HnU'a Family Pills for constipation.
Crown Painless
DENTIST
WE ARE UTAH DENTI8TS.
; o GOLD OROWNS FOR r
j 0 BRIDGEWORK FOR $5
P?es 510 up
Fillings 91 up
i ,
BL Head the Classified Ads.
I rtead the Classified Ads.
BRITISH REGAIN
LOST TRENCHES
But Heavy Fighting Is Pro
ceeding on Around Longue
val and Delville Wood.
London, July 19. H P- m The
British troops have recaptured in the
village of Longueval and Delville
"wood most of the ground taken by
the Germans Tuesday night, accord
ing t0 the British official communi
cation issued tonight. Hard fighting
is still In progress in this region.
The communication says:
"North of the Somme heavy fight
ing is still in progress in Longueval
village and the Delville road. In both
these places wo already have regain
ed moBt of the ground lost last night.
"South of Delville wood this after
noon we dispersed with out fire a
large body of Germans massing to at
tack the Waterlot farm from the di
rection of Guillemont."
oo
DRIVERS URGED TO
READ NEW ORDERS
Salt Lake, July 20. The new traf
fic ordinance of the city government
are off the press and will be dis
tributed to citizens wanting them at
the captain's office at police head
quarters, First South and State
streets. The revised edition of the
ordinances varies In many respects
from the last issue. There have been
many changes, and Patrolman Lester
Wire, of the traffic squad, urges driv
ers of all kinds of vehicles to read the
ordinances closeb'.
Among the ordinances are provis
ions that autoists must dim the lights
on automobiles operated on the best-
ugiueu resiaence streeis ana an me
business streets of the city; that au
tomobiles must have mufflers to dead
en the noise of the exhausts; the au
tomobiles shall have two lights in
front and also two in the rear, one
of which will clearly show the num
ber of the machine and the other a
red light, which shall warn autoists
in the rear that there is a car ahead;
that two cars shall not. drive side by
side longer than necessary for one
to pass the other; that cars shall be
parked ten feet apart; that cars shall
be parked ten feet from fire hydrants,;
and that automobiles shall have the
right of way at Intersections over
cars approaching from the left.
The publication also gives directions
for passing intersections -in the con-
gested business district and also de
tailed Information on approaching
curbs, turning corners and the speed
regulations.
nn J
H. S. MARSHALL
IS IN CUSTODY
i '
New York, July 19 United States
Attorney H. Snowden Marshall was
technically In the custody of Robert
D. Gordon, sergeant-at-arms of the
house of representatives, tonight, aft
er his writ of habeas corpus, prevent
ing his removal to Washington to an
swer for alleged contempt of the
houge, was dismissed by Federal
Judge Hand Mr. Gordon is not in
the city, however, and Mr. Marshall
is not actually in his charge.
After a conference with his attor
ney former United States Senator
John C. Spooner. the federal attorney
announced that he would at once file
ttIV. T, . J T T 1
niun juubb nauu au application lor
a stay of execution, which will en
able him to appeal to the supreme
court of the United States. Should
the stay be refused, Mr. Marshall will
go to Washington voluntarily.
In his decision, Judge Hand held
that the house of representatives act
ed within its right In voting Mr. Mar
shall In contempt on the ground that
his criticism of the house was made
public during an investigation into
charges against Representative Frank
Buchanan and others because of their
connection with Labor's National
Peace council. This organization was
alleged to have fomented strikes In
plants manufacturing munitions for
the entente allies.
"While there is no actual decision
on the chief point raised," the opin
ion said In part, "it seems to me
there is both reason and precedent
for the position that the house, while
deliberating upon articles of impeach
ment, has jurisdiction to determino
whether a publication is a contuma
cious assault upon its freedom of
action."
oo
WHO SOLD NICKEL
TO THE GERMANS
Ottawa, Ont., July in. The question
as to who supplied the nickel which
will be such a valuable part of the
submarine Dcutschland's cargo on hor
return to German', became of added
interest here today win be tho an
nouncement that an official statement
will be issued In a few days and Ca
nadian governments in respect to the
sale of the metnl.
Officials challenge the statements
of George P. Graham, former minister
of railways In the Laurier cabinet,
that Canadian nickel sold to Ameri
can firms on condition that it shall
not reach England's enemies, can be
obtained without difficulty In the
open market In the United States. It
Is claimed that the United States
produces 24.0,000 tons of nickel an
nually and that all Canadian nickel
exported to tho United States has
"been accounted for by the purchasor
of virtually all of It. No change of
policy is foreshadowed.
oo
London, July 19. Announcement
was made In the houso of commons by
the chancellor of the exchequer, Regi
nald McKenna, that the government
had decided to take In taxation 77
per cent of the excess profits of ship
ping firms.
Wit x
I THE POOR MEN'S FRIEND UPHOLSTERY SHOP
Iri Now is the time to get your furniture repaired and
II mattresses renewed at reasonable prices, at 138 26th St,
If Phone 746-J. v
Br i
PEACE LEAGUE OF
GERMANPEOPLE
Men High in Empire Are Seek
ing to Bring About an
Honorable Peace.
Berlin, July 19. Via London, July
20, 1:05 a, m. The German national
committee for "securing an honorable
peace" has drafted an address to the
countrj-, which will be published in a
few days calling for the support of
Chancellor von Bethman-Hollweg and
the influencing of public opinion in
the direction of moderato peace aims.
The signatures attached to the address
Indicnte the Importance of the move
ment. They include Prince von Wedel,
general adjutant to the emperor;
Philip Heineken, director of the North
German Lloyd Steamship company;
Paul von Schwaback, director of the
Blelchroder bank; ProfesBor Adolph
Harnack and many Important manu
facturers. The address outlines the peace aims
of the committee, steering a course
between the pacificists and tho insati
able plans of the pan-Germans, which
It characterizes as "annexation
lunacy."
"The keynote of such a peace," says
the address, "was struck by the chan
cellor's speech in March,. 1916, In
which he mentioned the extension of
the eastern frontier and substantial
guarantees on the west.
"Without the attainment of both
objects there can be no peace and no
evacuation of occupied territory."
Tho campaign will begin on October
1, when public addresses will be made
in 50 cities.
The principal newspapers already
are in favor of the committee's pro
gram and an active program of educa
tion will be conducted In tho press.
The Catholic newspapers are for the
most part with the committee.
nrv
"Peg o' the Ring," third epi
sode, at the Lyceum today.
00
DWINDLING OF
GERMAN ATTACKS
London, July 19, 11:10 p. m. When
General Haig's afternoon report was
dispatched from headquarters in
France, the violent fighting, which,
developing from the German counter
attack had ben going on all night
and had given the Germans a footing
in Delville wood and Longueval, still
was in progress. The German attacks
on the Waterlot farm and other points
were repulsed.
In a brief dispatch tonight General
haig announced that most of the
ground lost had been regained In both
places and that the British fire had
dispersed the Germans massing for a
further attack on Waterlot farm.
These dispatches seem to confirm the
opinions constantly expressed by the
correspondents at the front on the
dwindling strength of the German
counter attacks.
Fighting of Great Fury.
General Haig's British and colonial
troops progressed steadily today over
the ground lost in last night's counter
attacks by the Germans. The fighting
was at close quarters and of great
fury.
The German counter-attack has been
brought to a definite halt, according
to an indications, ana tne Albert sal
ient, which General Haig's forces have
been deepening and straightening for
two weeks, has now practically re
sumed the same contour it presented
before the kaiser's night counter-blow.
Four German attempts to regain tho
important Waterlot farm have been
repulsed. Three attacks lasl night
and one today were broken up the
British artillery.
Temporarily, at least, the British of
fensive has been held up by the Ger
mans. The Teutons are bringing up
great reinforcements to strengthen
their third lines, which were the next
British objectives, and to expend in
counter-attacks designed to halt the
allies' Plcardy offensive.
Germans Confident.
Dispatches tonight from Berlin de
scribe the great confidence felt that
Bapaumo and Peronne will withstand
the blows of the French and British.
That the German general staff view
the situation with equanimity is in
dicated by the fact that foreign news
paper correspondents today were no
tified that they might visit the Som
me front next week, or, for that mat
ter, any other front that they might
prefer.
The German attacks last night drove
back tho British for a distance of
almost a mile. Grand headquarters
in Berlin asserts that the losses In
flicted on the English were heavy.
Longueval had been held by General
Haig's tpoops since their advance ot
July 1, while the Dellville woods had
been conquered on the following day.
DRAGNET MAY GET
THE GERMAN BOAT
Baltimore, Md., July 19 With much
apprehension the crew of the Deutsch
land is waiting the order that will
start them on their return passage
across tho Atlantic. It became known
today that many of the men fear they
will not be able to escape the drag
net being thrown out by the allied
cruisers now off the Virginia capes.
It is not tho guns of the cruisers nor
the high-powered rifles In the little
British patrol base that the Deutsch
land's men fear, but the submarine
nets that tho British are said to be
sproading just outside of the three
mile limit
The members of tho submarine
crow have openly expressed this feel
ing to friends on Locust Point.
"We are praying every night
against this danger and are getting
our friends to pray for us," said Sec
ond Engineer Karl Freuechte to a
friend with whom he has been spend
ing his evenings slnco, the crew has
been granted shore leave. This friend
today told the story of tho terror
stricken crew, not knowing at the
time, that he was talking to a re
porter. Knowing the tactics of the British
, and French and realizing that Hcores
of German submarines have been
caught in the nets that were stretched
across tho English channel, the men
that man tho Deutschland fear that
I tho British will bo able to make ef
fective this method off the capes.
The crew of the submarine also is
i apprehensive for tho Bremen, sister
ship of the Deutschland, which is due
off the capes within a short time.
THREE BUILDINGS
IN PARK CITY FIRE
Park City, July 19. Fire broke out
in the St. Louis bakery this morning
at 2:30 a. m. The flumes spread to
the Riley building on the south and
the Salt Lake hotel on the north 'bo
fore the fire department arrived. The
fire was caused from a defective flue.
The loss to the bakery will amount to
approximately $800, the Riley building
5500, the. Salt Lake house $300. The
bakery and Riley building are partly
covered by insurance. One of the
firemen, Joseph T. McLaughlin, was
overcome by the smoke and was
placed under tho care of a physician.
oo
SERVICES ARE HELD
FOR GEORGE BAUM
Provo, July 19. The funeral serv
ices for George Baura, held this af
ternoon in the Pleasant View ward
meeting house, were attended by a
large congregation of relatives and
friends. The Indian war veterans' or
ganization, of which the deceased was
a member, was well represented. Tho
speakers wore Elders J. E. Booth and
Albert Jones and Bishop Burdell
Davis. The music was by a quartette
composed of Sidney Cluff, Reed Mol
drum, Florence Meldrum and Arnold
Hood.
oo
JOHN W. TIILEK IS
CANDIDATE FOB
nun
Former State Senator John W.
Thornley of Davis county yesterdav
came out as a candidate for the Re
publican nomination for governor.
The announcement was made at the
Second judicial district Republican
in Ogden.
Senator Thornley's announcement
was made through W. P. Epperson,
editor of the Davis County Reflex.
The editor said that Mr. Thornley
did not finally make up his mind to
become a candidate until he reached
Ogden as one of tho delegates to the
judiciary convention.
The advent of Senator Thornley
makes in all seven candidates for the
Republican gubernatorial nomination,
the others being Governor Spry,'
Nephi L. MorrlB, E. E. Jenkins, John
C. Mackay, Oscar W. Carlson and for
mer state Senator D. O. Rideout.
Editor Epperson told the Republi.
cans- in Ogden yesterday that Senatot
Thornley would make his campaign
for nomination on a "dry" platform.
Mr .Epperson mentioned the fact that
Senator Thornley voted for prohibition
at the last session of the legislature.
Senator Thornley is chairman df the
Davis county Republican committee
and prior to his term in the senate
was a member of the lower house of
I the legislature.
oo
PROGRESSIVES WILL
IE TICKET 1
THIS STATE
Salt Lake, July 20. Utah Progres
sives decided yesterday to call a state
Progressive convention in Salt Lake
City, August IS, which is the same
day the Democratic state convention
will be held in Ogden.
The convention date was announc
ed and approved at an informal meet
ing of Progressives yesterday after
noon in Sheriff John S. Corless' of
fice at the City and County building.
Earlier In the day N. A. Robert
son, secretary of the Progressive
state committee, and A. T. Moon, Pro
gressive national committeeman, talk
ed over the long-distance telephone
with State Chairman Wesley K. Wal
ton, who is at his camp on Bear
lake, and the chairman authorized the
secretary to call the convention for
the eighteenth of next month.
Progressive leaders declared that
the selection of the same day for tho
state convention as that chosen by
the Democrats for theirs did not nec
essarily mean a fusion with the Demo
crats on a state ticket. They admit
ted, however, that there was likeli
hood of a combination with the Demo
crats on part of the stato ticket at
least.
Tho Progressives are frank to con
fess that at this time they don't know
what they will do at tholr state con
vention. There are many among
them, including National Committee
man A. T. Moon, who think that a
Tk , I .11 . I i til. 1 i.
TiifciesBivo Siaie uCKUl Willi uum
Democrats and Republicans repre
sented on it is not beyond the range
of possibilities.
A boom for Stephen H. Love, one
of the Progressive candidates for con
gressman four years ago, for gov1
ernor on the Progressive ticket was
started at yesterday's meeting. The
name of np other possible candidate
was mentioned. Mr. Love himself
was not present at tho raeotlng.
Most Progressives cling to the Idea
of an alliance with the Democrats,
which will leave the distribution of
the nominations to the joint negotia
tions of tho two conventions on Au
gust 18.
Committees Confer.
Unofficial committees of Progres
sives and Domocrats continue their
conferences from time to time and
aro expected, by the tlmo the two
conventions meet, to have a basis of
co-operation to -propose in other
words a distribution of the nomina
tions. The Democrats wiU. probably
insist on the "long end."
Outside of the boom for Stephen
H. Love for governor, there .was no
gossip at yesterday 's meeting, nor
prior thereto, about probable Progres
sive representatives on an entente
allies' ticket.
Tho national Progressive confor-
I I LOW FARES EAST Ml I
I I FOLLOWING SPECIAL ROUND TRIP FARES FROM OGDEN 1111 1
I 1 Chicago $58.00 Omaha $40.00 1111 1
I 1 St. Paul v.- 56.44 Kansas City 4o!oo 1111' fl
II I Bt. Louis 5t20 Memphis... 60.00 1111 1
111 Peoria . 67.28 Denver 22.50 1111 J 1
111 Colorado Springs , $22.50 1111
Hi STOPOVER PRIVILEGES DIVERSE ROUTES 1111 H
HI TICKETS ON SALE 1111
HI August 2, 9, 1JB, 23, SO; H 11 1 1
HI Final Return Limit, October 31, 1916 HI
HI ATTRACTIVE TOURS TO BUFFALO, NEW Y&RK, BOSTON AND 111 1
HI EASTERN RESORTS I
HI CIRCUIT TOURS VIA NIAGARA FALLS AND WASHINGTON H
III For detailed information concerning rates, routes, train eervico 111 IH
llj CITY TICKET OFFICE
HI 2514 Washington Ave. Phone 2500. fjU Hill 1
111 PAUL L. BEEMER, City Paw. and Ticket Agent. ULjjD
ence proposed for August 6 in Chica
go was mentioned at yesterday's
meeting .
WATER SUPPLY OF
SILT LIE SEEN
As the guests of the Salt Lake City
commissioners, Commissioner Miles L.
Jones, superintendent of water works,
E. T. Corey, assistant water works
superintendent, Fred Packard, fore
man, and Joseph H. Tracy, city engi
neer, spent yesterday visiting the var
ious departments of that city. The
Ogden officials were entertained and
treated to an intensely interesting
trip inspecting the Salt Lake water
works.
In speaking of the trip Mr. Jones
had the following to say:
"We left Ogden at 9 o'clock a. ni.
for Salt Lake City. Mr. Barrett,
superintendent of the waterworks de
partment met us at the depot, where
we joined the Salt Lake City com
missioners and the heads of the var
ious departments who were going to
visit the reservoirs where they were
making their final settlement for the
acceptance of the two new reservoirs
recently built. We left Salt Lake
City at 10:45 o'clock and after a pleas
ant ride up Cottonwood Canyon ar
rived at Brighton at 12:30. After
luncheon at the Balsam Inn we rode
horseback to the reservoirs, which are
at an elevation of 9400 feet, The
largest reservoir is concrete and cost
$82,000,000 and has a storage capacity
of three hundred and six million gal
lons, and Is full of water at the pres
sent time and has a nice overflow. The
second reservoir, which Is located
about one mile farther east, cost $69,
000.00 and has a storage capacity of
two hundred and forty million gal
lons. This reservoir Is within a few
feet of being full of water at the pres
ent time. This water comes from snow
banks, which In some places reach to
the edge of the water at the present
time, so that the water is absolutely
pure and as clear as crystal, and the
walls of the canyon being of clear
granite, there is nothing to contami
nate the water. These reservoirs arc
located about thirty miles from Salt
Lake City, and the water will be con
veyed 'from them through an open
ditch to the city's intake in Cotton
wood Canyon. 1
"We left Brigham at 5:25 o'clock
on our return trip and arrived in Og
den at 8:15 p. m. feeling that wo had
spent a most profitable day. The
authorities of Salt Lake City are to
be commended for the work they have
done in conserving water for that
city."
oo
AUTO TAX IN PARK
OBJECTIONABLE
Salt Lake, July 20. B. F. Redman
appeared before the board of gover- g
nors of tho Commercial club at their
meeting yesterday noon and urged "
that stops be taken that will look to
the abolishment of the tax of $7.50
levied on every automobile that paBses
through Yellowstone park. Mr. Red
man has just returned from an auto
mobile tour of the park and said yos
terday that other tourists feel aa he
does, that the tax is an Imposition in
that it Is a special levy. He believes
that were the tax abolished, tho Yel
lowstone traffic would Increase consld
crably. A contrary view of this tax has been
taken by other motorists, who call at
tention to the fact that the Yellow
stone tax is similar to that imposed
upon automobiles in other national
parks and that the moneys thus col
lected are used to defray tho cost of
road upkeep and improvements. Some
havo expressed tho apprehen
sion of poor road conditions unless the
tax 1b maintained.
The board of governors decided to
effect a co-operation with other state
and national civic bodies with a vlow
to having tho tax done away with. I
Secretary J, David Larson will com
municate with such organizations as
tho Lincoln Highway association and
the American Automobile association
to got expressions of opinion on this I
tax.
H. C. Osterman, field secretary for I
the Lincoln Highway association, also I
appeared fbeforo tho board of gover-
nors. He told of the work that Is be
ing done on roads throughout the
country and paid a compliment to the
effectiveness of the work accomplish
ed In Utah. J. David Larson will)
shortly make a trip with Mr. Osterman
over the roads In the western part of I
the state.
Superintendent of School B. A.
Smith was also a guest, and told of his
thorough satisfaction with the school
system of Salt Lake and the way in
which the Commercial club has stood
ready to co-operate.
oo
DEFER HEARING ON
IRRIGATION CASES
Salt Lake, July 20. On the request
Johnson yesterday granted a stay until
of the defendants. Judge Tillman D.
Saturday of the scheduled hearing of
the irrigation case brought by the
United States against certain irriga
tion companies and indlviduaals of the
Uinta basin to prevent alleged mis?
use of waters intended for Indian
lands. In the meanwhile, the tempor
ary writ of injunction granted laat
week at the first hearing will con
tinue in effect. Both sides were in
structed by Judge Johnson to present
their cases in affidavit Saturday
morning.
nn
SHORT LINE IS MAKING
TRACK IMPROVEMENTS.
Salt Lake, " July '20. Team track
improvements representing an expen
diture of $2,000 are being made by
the Oregon Short Line on the vacant
block immediately south of the tract
occupied by the Harriman lines' union
station. The work on the improve.
ments has been begun and the tracks
are expeqtod to be ready for service
within six weeks. IH
The improvements will include four
tracks for the use of teams in nan
dling carload shipments. To elim
lnate dust and mud and make them
serviceable tho year round, concrete IH
platforms will be built between the
tracks.
The block on which the improve
ments are being made has been the jH
property of the railroad company for IH
a number of years and has been IH
vacant, with the exception of the main
tracks of the Salt Lake Route and
a few switching tracks. For some
time past the traffic department has IH
urged the construction of team tracks
on the vacant space to facilitate the
handling of carload shipments.
UU
BATTERY AGAINST A
BARBER IS CHARGED
Salt Lake, July 20. D. J, Watts,
secretary of the state board of barber IH
examiners, yesterday swore to a com- IH
plaint charging D. C. Wray with as
sault and b'attery. The attack made
upon Mr. Watts Tuesday night is al
leged to be the outcome of the prose
cutlon instituted several months ago
by the secretary against Wray for IH
the keeping of an unclean barber
shop. At the time of the prosecution,
it is said, Wray threatened "to get
even" with Watts, and then the two
met Tuesday evening Wray attacked
Watts. The "latter emerged from the
melee with a blackened eye, and yes- IH
terday swore to the complaint in the IH
county attorney's office.
I Pioneer Pageant I I
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Monday, July 24 I
OGDEN I
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Evening H
UTAH'S OLDEST LOG CABIN IN PARADE H
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ON ALL RAILROADS
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in a Shack? I
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