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The Ogden standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, April 02, 1920, LAST EDITION - 4 P.M., Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1920-04-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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Bjivf j TODAY'S METAL PRICES -" jjT A ftf f V V 51 V'Y M ft' WEATHER FORECAST I' j
1 W ? NEW YORK Copper firm, 19c; iron, antimony, lead l I I T J Fllllrll TV I Al E I 1 I 1 I II ,nd,Cat,0ns for d and
0 ARLESS INDEPENDENT PROGRESSIVE NEWSPAPER .
B & I ? H
Jl I pfftieth YearNo. 80 Price Five Cent, OGDEN CITY, UTAH, FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 2, 192cP LAST EDITION 4 P M
r; i 1 I i ' ! !
II ' I '
mm j A A A A A A A jl j jl j j lF i
If NEW YORK'S FOOD SUPPLY MENACED BY STRIKE 1
E Itt' . .c jn. j. n '1 -!
! J JUGS WHICH CffiY
I ; PUBIS DlfT OF
I ; SERVICE BY WMOUT
W, t ,. Switchmen and Switch Tend-
W ers in Chicago Yards Quit
M -a Their Jobs
I 1 ' 1800 SHOPMEN LEAVE
X ' POSTS ON ONE LINE
Pfi I ! 1 Stockyards Employes Return
Ct ' ,i to Work and Packing Crews
1 Draw Pay Again
rh, ! V '
f j f 1a , NEW YORK. April 2. All but twen-
' I ty per cent of the railroad owned tugs
I . nnd steam lighters which mil rood rep-
1 J.'. rcsentativos assert bring to New York
, ' flit 00 per cent of lis food supplies, arc
, MM tied up as a result of the marine work-
i MM ers' str,,rc' J- J- Mantell, railroad man-
V agers' representative, announced to-
It.; m day.
' 1 The railroad owned ferries on the
f Hudson river, the crews of which also
J were called out, are apparently nol se-
f J, riously affected, Mr. Mantoll slating!
' k that all but one line are running onj
t j I regular schedule. Reduced travel to-
f I 1 ; day due to the Good Friday holiday, 1
' ( has enabled the railroads to use fer-
1 .8 ries in the transportation of food and
. 1 ml i mi.. ! t- r. .nlln nnnn i m ftn n c. .
IjSit sorted, to maintain the eight-hour day
which they declare was threatened by
' rTci tne reported transfer of railroad float-
jf; j 3 ing equipment to private owners. The
TIB railroad managers claim the strike was
"& Ml 1 called in support, of striking cpastw&e
fj ' lG'ngshordrh'eh who wal ked' ours'evdriil1
' l if weeks ago.
' RAIL MEN STRIKE.
K I 1 OHICAGO, April 2. Seven hundred
jrI switchmen - and switcii tenders em-
"j I ployed in the Chicago terminal of the
J I , Chicagoi Milwaukee and St. Paul rail-
; ( road were on strike today in protest
I)M i , against the removal of a yardmaster
m I and to enforce demands for a wnge
sL ' I increase of from 52 cents to $1 an
m r ' hour. The strikers areaffUiated with
il t the Chicago Yardmen's assbciation, re-
L; ceutly organized, and the walkout last
I night was not authorized by the
! " Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen,
v i j Brotherhood officials said 300 men.
j sufficient to handle traffic, would rc-
t f main at work.
f '' SHOPMEN ON STRIKE,
k PORTSMOUTH, O.. April 2. Eight-
?. n een hundred shopmen at the local
f ' h' Norfolk and Northwestern terminal
. , -walked out here today In sympathy
. i "vith 150 clerks already out. The men
!t ! who went on strike today include car
repairers, machinists, electricians,
blacksmiths, pipe' fitters, sheet metal
J workers and laborers.
It. i STOCKYARDo STRIKE ENjo,
j j CHICAGO, April 2. Nino hundred
a ' striking stockyards employes returned
F m to work today under an agreement to
R arbitrate their wage differences -with
the Union Stockyards and Transit Co.
W Dolivery of livestock shipments was re-
' sumed and more than 7000 packing
I . r.ouse workers who were forced out of
employment during the strike, went
bick to their jobs.
The demands of the livestock han
dlers will be arbitrated by Federal
j Judge Samuel Alschuler.
oo
I REPORT ISSUED ON
I OIL WELL PRODUCTION
; " OIL CITY, Pa., April 2. According
to the monthly review of activity In
lS the oil fields of the country, made pub-
lie here today by The Derrick, new
production during March amounted to
286,574 barrels, a loss of 35,99-1 from
' the February record. Wells complet
ed numbered 2.394 or 237 more than
in the previous month. Tbero were
t 432 ,dy holes and 13S gas producers,
the review said. New work at tho
close of March showed 2,993 rigs and
i 7,341 wells drilling.
I' 10,000 POORGET
GIFTS FROM AMERICA
j NEW YORK, April 2. Easter gifL
I ' packages of American food have been
I . distributed to more than 10,000 poor
families In Vienna, according to a
cable message received hero today by
tho American rollcf administration,
Europenn children's fund. More than
50,000 persons have received food.
"f FORMER DICTATOR
M i ENDS HUNGER STRIKE
j lr VIENNA, April 1. Bela Kun, former
I fx - Hungarian dictator, -and his compan-
.J Jr ions' who have been n jail here, have
l I 1 i ended their hunger strike which- bo-
Sjt ' I gan when the Austrian go-rnmont re-
f , ,? fused to consider their demand for
i !f freedom, according to the newspaper
1 Abend.
-
t HJILULI. -a- -
m
Rhineland May Set Up Republic
- - . i .
j! WOMEN UNDRESS
FOR 'DINNER NOW
i PRIEST DECLARES
;
! LONDON, March 27 Pre-
vailing; fashions in women's
gowns were vigorously assailed
I I in a sermon recently by Rev.
j i Bernard Vanghan, the widely
known Jesuit father, whose es
: ; says and sermons on morality
j and heme life have for the past
20 years attracted great atten
! tion throughout the world.
! "In days gone by ladies
. dressed for dinner, now they
i undress for it," he declared.
;' "Women's clothing ought to
! serve the three purposes of de
i cency, of warmth and of orna-;
j ment. Girls who follow the up to ,
i date fashions are ruining their
own and their neighbors' souls j
j as well as their own bodies. De- j
signers of fashions seem to be i
' devoid as much of taste as of
i principle. ' '
-'PEOPLE MT
EDITOR TELLS PSPE1
j Quadruple Alliance Favored to
j Insure Peace of Europe;
I Gives Advice to U. S.
BUDAPEST, April 1. Safety for
the peaco of Europe lies in an alli
ance between Rumania, Poland,
Czeclvo-Slovakia and Greece, in the
opinion of Take Jonescu, who as ed
itor, financier and politician has play
ed a prominent role In the national
life of Rumania for a quarter of a cen
tury. Talking with an Associated
' Press correspondent recently, he ex
pressed the hoMfapelqcsuch. an al
liance realiz6d:v5iTth America 'taking
an Imi)ortant;paln.;thrk. of Bal
knncountrfcB:; l
U. Sjjakcs MlstaWc.
'"Unless America, shows Interest in
Balkan comnw.ee," he said, "Jt is pos
sible we alVswill- again fall Into ihej
hands of Ggrrhpny if only because ofj
the exchange situation. Rumania is
dotormingd to operate matters for her
self butinay not be able to do so. I
am vefrypjorry America has refused to
occupyonstantinople and I am sure
in a fevf years the people of the
United States will realize their mis
take In not doing this service to civili-
(zation and possibly to their own com-
j merco.
I Another Solution. J
! "As America will not take a man-
date auothcr solution must be found.
J I advocate sending Rumanian troops
to help the allies in the present
scheme of neutralizing Constantinople
and the Dardanelles as we have a,
great interest in keeping open that'
outlet to the sea.
"I think Rumania will act in accord I
,with her neighbors in the interest of1
i the rest of Europe. Rumania mado!
j great sacrifices in the war, but the
charges that she had disregarded the'
allies are untrue. Our inter-,
'nal political strifes must not be taken
too seriously. We are democratic and,'
arc for freedom and against despotism,!
1 Bolshevism and Internationalism. Ru-J
! mania is intrinsically woak but we
iare poor because the Germans took,
our cattle by the million and our agri
cultural machinery.
"One of tho worst conditions con-i
Xrontlng us Is that the people will not)
work. During the last five years wej
have produced nothing, but havo ac-!
quired a taste for higher standards or
living. From an economic point ofi
view it was one long joy ride. - War I
means waste and also laziness. Sol-;
dlers In the trenches may be bravo but1
they come homo idlers, even wastrels, i
Our national debt is 25,000,000,000 lei.
and the wonder is It is not more." I
' . . i
RUSSIA READY TO i
PAY IN GOLD COIN
STOCKHOLM, April 2. (Havns).
Russia Is ready to pay In gold and cer
eals for all kinds of industrial pro
ducts, principally farming equipment,
box cars and locomotives, which are
needed urgently, according to n state
ment Issued here by representatives
or Russia co-operative societies.
Trifa ' """"" ""' ,n-w
t '
I Boiled Down News !
I From Political Pot
I tv
, ATLANTA. Ga.. April 2. With the1
j withdrawal of President Wilson's
I name by a number of Democrats who!
I entered him in tho Georgia Demo-
cratlc primary to be held April 20,
ionly three candidates were left in the
Irace when the entries closed y ester-1
iday. They are Attorney General Pal
mer, straight-out advocate of the ad
ministration; United Stales Senator
! Hoke Smith, of Georgia, who partially,
; indorses the administration, and who
j j desires the treaty and league ratified
I 'with reservations, nnd Thomas E. Wat-'
i son, former populist candidate for
! president who "stands squarely
! against the league of nations." '
! JACKSON, Miss.. April 2. Electing
eight delegates at large to the Re-'
publican national convention, each.
I with one-half a vote, the Republican
; state convention has instructed them
i to vote as a unit for Major General ,'
i Leonard Wood., , '
CLEVELAND, April 2. General !
Leonard Wood, candidate for the Re- i
i publican presidential nomination, tie-'
livered an address at a Republican rai-;
jly here. He denounced the candidacy I
'of a "favorite son" nnd nnholrl n svs.
' tern of compulsory military education
as the "crying need of the youth of
America."
"There is a disposition now to point
the finger pf acorn, at the uniform"
the senral saidJicawlii: does
'iCirfsulta Uie memory ofevery dVad
American in Prance."
; NEW YORK, April 2. Senator II i
1 ram W. Johnson Johnson, of Califor
nia, in an address here before leaving
for Michigan to continue his campaign
in that state for the Republican presi
dential nomination, discussed the
i league of nations and in doing so rc-
furred to the "latest candidate for the
I presidency."
I Without men loning Herbert Hoover
I by name. Mr. Johnson said:
j "The latest candidate for tho presi-
j dency a year ago argued for the adop
tion of tho league of nations without
the crossing of a T or the dotting of
an 'i'. I observe now that since he
has become a candidate, he, too, would
welcome reservations.
WASHINGTON, April 2. Plans for
the Democratic national convention in
San -Francisco will be discussed at a
meeting of the committee on arrange
ments April 20 in Chicago. Chairman
Cummings of the national committee
announced that subcommittees recent
ly appointed to deal with specific con
vention matters would make their re
ports nt that time to the full com
mittee. In connection with tho meeting,
there will be a conference of the sev
enteen newly appointed women mem
bers of the Democratic executive com
mittee with the national chairman and
other organization officials.
I BAY CITY, Mich., April 2. Gov.
I Frank O. Lowddn of Illinois in a
speech declared that Americanization
was the most important work now be
fore the people. Development through
law, he said, was the first principle
of Americanization.
NEW YORK. April 2. A confiden
tial report to President Wilson bv Her
bert Hoover, in which the food admin
istrator six months ago outlined his
position on control of the Chicago
packing industry, in response to the
president's request, was made public
by the Hoover national Republican
club with the announcement that the
president had directed Its .publication.
"I scarcely need to repeat the views
that I expressed to you nearly a year
ago, that there is. here a growing'and !
dangerous domination of the handling!
of the nation's food stuffs," the report"
said.
Mr. Hoover said he did not feel that
the government "should undertake the
solution of the problem by the tempo-J
rary authority conferred" under the;
war powors of. the rallwav and food
administration,V-:bnt rather that it'
should be laid before copgress for,
searching consideration.''
DANIELS-URGES BIG
PACIFIC; IMPROVEMENT J
WASHINGTON, April 2. Secretary j
Daniels announced today that he was I
forwarding a letter to Chairman Page
of tho senato naval commlttoe, urg
ing that provisions for a deep wator
naval baso on San Francisco bay bo
low Mare Island navy yard; a subma
rine base nt San Pedro, Cal.; a do
stroyor baso at Port Angeles, Wash.,
and extensions of naval facilities at
ITawulI, bo passed by the house. These
Increased facilities have been urged by
tho secretary as necessary because of
enlargement of tho Pacific fleet,
jy ,!' iwa , tu&i
I PEACE PARLEY IN j
PARIS GLORIOUS !
PARTY IT SEEMS!
j LONDON, March 26.
I Charges that the government
j had indulged in ruthless extrav
1 agance at the peace conference
' in Paris have been made in con-
nection with its bill of 503,388
' pounds for the expenses of the j
1 British delegation.
When the bill was jDresented i
in the housp of commons re-'
cently, Sir Alfred Mond, the '
first commissioner of works,
i was sharply questioned as to
' whether his bill for hotels in
j Paris covered the cost of cham
I pagne, food and dances. He
replied'that his department was
not responsible for the payment
of bills for food, clothing, for
j typists, dances or bands,
1 One member of the. house m
I dignantly declared that it
' would have been better for the
British delegates to have gone
to bed to think over the peace !
! conference instead of indulging
, in such relaxation ,f
The government represents
tip,5a4mittdi that Mis. -British
flad'i&tolsaTra three other"
! premises, While the Americans r
j had only one hotel, but, he de-1
clared the Americans spent :
I more money. The house in-1
dulged in ironic cheers when j
j Sir Alfred Mond said the gov- j
I eminent "did the thing welL,' i
The total staff of the British j
I delegation numbered 524. !
j COMBS! fil
! MIL WAGES AGAIN
PUT BEFORE WILSfii
i
I Conference Breaks Up When
Roads Declined to Continue
' Considerations
WASHINGTON-, April 2. The whole
railroad wage controversy was placed
before President. Wilson today for tlie
third time since railroad labor filed its
demands for a general increase in
wages last summer,
In a letter to the president, B. M.
j Jewell, chairman of the railway com
jmittee, which constitutes the labor
l party on the railroad wage board,
i said he regretted very much "to ad
vise you of our (allure to obtain any
beneficiary resultf; from these confer
ences." . '
J The employes, Mr. Jewell said, were
j keenly disappointed at the position
( taken by the railway executives com
mittee which announced a deadlock
and a withdrawal, of the members I
ifrom the .conference.
wage negotiations hetween the con
ference committees representing the
railroads and the unions were broken
i of I when the railroad representatives
declined to continue consideration of
demands which have been estimated
i to total one billion dollars, unless the
'public was given a voice In the pro
ceedings. Mr. Jewell did not ask the .president
to lay the wage controversy before tbe
railway labor board, which is to be J
nominated by the president as provld-.
cd in the ti'ansportation act and on j
which the public will have representa
tion. E. T. Whiter, for the railroad execu
tives, wrote that .the executives did
not bollevo congress contemplated a
settlement involving so great an addi
tion to transportation costs without
the public being represented in the
conferences. ,
Replying to this' letter, Mr. Jewell
said he believed the reason given by
the managers for terminating the ne
gotiations was "not' in accord with our
understanding of the law."
"Tho attitude of your committee in
failing to carry outthe wishes of the
president of the United States comes
as a Bur.piiso to us,". Mr. Jewell wrote
to Mr. Whiter. '
"Wo understand from this that your
committee has definitely declined to
assume the responsibility and perform
the duty which js clearly desired
" C .-. . - , '
. ,' -
O
K7C t-
!
; SEPARATIST MOVE
; MHO PROGRESS
I PARIS PAPERS TOLD,
; Government Demands Work
I ers in Ruhr District Must Give
Up Their Munitions
RADICAL COMMANDER ;
OPPOSED TO ORDER
Threatens to Shoot His Own
Soldiers If They Follow De
mand and Surrender
PARIS. April 2. (Havas). The
Separatist movement is making pro
gress In the Rhineland district of Ger
many which has aspirations to be es-i
tablished as an independent republic,
according to a Mayence dispatch to the)
Echo de Paris.
i 1
Newspapers here, commenting on
ine suuauon in the Ruhr district of
Germany, declare thai tho firm atti
tude of France relative torihe advance
of German government' "troops' into
that region was a1, vital ;61erae'iit.inih.f
setjrnjnk
TtV"cenT'thejGntxifes?ts of Franc and
those 'of Germany no incompatibility
existed, says the Matin.
9 Would Shoot Men.
I DUSSELDORF, April 1. (By The
Associated Press). Soldiers of the
workmen's army in the Ruhr district
i must make a delivery of their arms to
! local authorities before April 10 un
jder the agreement reached between
i the government and tho central com
'mlttce of the workmen's general con
j ference at Essen today. They will not
be considered rebels If fighting ceases
! throughout the district by noon tomor
row. ,
The commander of the communist
, troops before Wesol gave a pledge to
the conference for the strict observ
anc of the agreement, Pie declared he.
I had really a good army but could not
continue fighting because he lacked
ammunition and asserted all' looting
I had been suppressed and that all lool-
J ers had been shot.
I Would Slay Men.
I "I will shoot with my own pistol,"
he said, "any communist soldier who
(disobeys the order to withdraw and
disarm."
Assurance was given the delegates,
'however, there would be no trouble.
Tho general strike throughout the
Ruhr industrial and mining district
has been ordered called off effectiye.
as far us possible, on Friday morning.
At the last meeting of the workmen
speakers said that the revolutionists
could not have lived to accept a final
agreement i,f the allies had not backed
them.
STRIKE IS CLOSING
LARGE SHOE FACTORIES
MARBLEHEAD, Mass., April 2.
Demands of Turn shoe workers for in
creased wages will tie up the shoe in
idustry here, according to announce-;
inents by the workers today. The'
! Parker Shoe company closed its shops 1
land the Herbert Humphrey and Sons)
'company announced it would shut;
down tomorrow night. The Paine Shoei
company has been closed for two!
months by a strike of the Turn shoe
operatives. About a thousand work-'
ers will be out. I
The advances sought, managers
said, averaged 100 per cent. Some of
the workers now receive upwards of
?50 a week, according to the compa
nies. ;
oo
METAL HURLED FROM
PLANT HITS WOMAN j
DAVENPORT, la., April 2 Hurtling
a quarter mile through the air a five-!
pound piece of metal thrown by a blast .
of dynamite, crashed through the rear'
vestibule of a street car Wednesday j
afternoon and struck Mrs. Paul Dice I ,
on the head. She was not seriously in-
jured.
Investgatlon showed that a steel .
projectile had come from the rear of
the Davenport locomotive works, over i
1200 feet away. After striking the
woman's hand the mass metal tore
through the' opposite side of the car 1
and buried itself in the ground.
In tho public interest, and which the
transportation act, as we understand
It, contemplates: That, of agreeing in
conference upon rates of pay 'for rail- 4
road employes which are just and reas
v
QUEEN OF SPAIN .
WASHES FEET OF
DOZEN BEGGARS
t
MADRID, April 1. Extreme
I brilliance marked Holy Week
1 ceremonies at the royal palace
today. King Alfonso, Queen
Victoria and Queen Mother Ma
rie Christine attended mass, at
which there was a large congre
gation of titled personages, .'
army officers and grandees of
Spain. The men were in full
regalia of the various orders of
knighthood, while all the ladies
wore white mantillas.
Later the king washed the
feet of twelve blind men, while
the queen performed the same
office for twelve beggar women
who, after the sovereigns had-
broken bread with them,i4left
the palace bearing baskets of
food,
$
MITE EASTER IS ,
llLT'AfTiCf
STORM IS HI
St Paul Reports Frigid Weath
er and Blizzard; Iova Re
ports High Wind
ST. PAUL, Minn., April 2. A cold
wave and blizzard starting late last
night extended over Minnesota and
eastern Dakotas today giving promise
of a "White easter." The mercury fell
about thirty degrees from yesterday's
maximum to ten degrees above zero
this morning. While the snowfall was
not unusually heavy, the high wind ac
companying it impeded railroad and
city traffic considerably. A fall of a
few inches today at Winona, Minn., re
moved danger of flood waters there
but many cellars in the city were full
of water making dry fuel a scarcity
when most needed. Duluth reported
that the bli'.znrd there was sweeping
ice out of harbor, giving promise of an
early opening of lake navigation.
DAVENPORT. Ia.. April 2. A ter
rific wind, rain and hail storm strucic
tho vicinity of Wilton, la., 32 miles
northwest of Davenport last night at
seven o'clock. The wind blew down
barns, outbuildings, windmills and in
some cases houses. There was no loss
of life as .far as Is known. Telephone
and telegraph communication is im
paired. BAR SILVER.
NEW YORK, April 2. Bar silver
U-26.
Mexican dollars 96c.
QuitHTim m
PART OE MAN A! II
WOMAN SAVES THEM
Train Upon Which American
, Military Attache is Riding Is
t Dynamited by Bandife ,
AMERICAN DOCTOR !
ALSO ESCAPES HARM ' H
'
Fate of Members of Crew and
of Other Passengers Is Not 'M
Stated TH
WASHINGTON, April 2. Lieu- I
tenant Colonel Robert L. Camp- I jH
bell, United States military at- 1 IH
lache at the embassy in Mexico li
City, his wife and an American ' r'
women doctor named Paine were ij
attacked by rebels a few miles
from Mexico City, but escaped ;;
through "quick work and quick- f ' H
inss oE action," the state depart- j ' jH
fnent v&is advised today. ' !; ;
The attack took pla'cc at Tros V. j
Marias,' a small station on tlie rail- ' JJ
v;ay from Mexico City to Cuerna- ' ;
vaca to which place the attache 1
was gojng for an out iug. The rcb- i .IH
els with dynamite wrecked tlie A
train aiid destroyed the track for
sdnie distance r, v
-?olncl&m H
of his party escaped without in-
jury, the advices stated. The -wo- 'iH
men of the party hid in the woods JH
near the station until the rebels 3mm
left. The fate of the members of J JlH
the crew and other passengers on MlH
the train was not stated. 'C tH
Details of the attack are being IH
forwarded by mail from the em- j jH
bassy at Mexico City. ' :, j;
REBELS MAKE MOVE. 1 j jH
AGUA PRIETA, Sonora, Mexico, iH
April 2. A movement for a now unit- ,
ed government in Mexico to be launch- t
ed by the more important rebel fac- j:
tions of the republic, came to light j
here today when half sheet posters ap- o
poured in the form of proclamations t jH
signed by Francisco de la Barra, for- fll
mer provisional president of Mexico. (!!
1 1; !
STATUS OF AMERICANS S H
ON RHINE DISCUSSED !
PARIS. April 2. It was said in offi- i
cial circles today that President Wil- HjfVH
son's conception of tho status of the ' v t i
American troops on the Rhine, as giv- I (4H
en to tho house of representatives Mi
yestorday appeared to be the same as
the French official view, namely, that ;,
the troops were in the occupied area
under the armistice terms, as the Am- j
erican senate had no't ratified the ' ;'
peace treaty. I ;
Thus far, however, it was explained ' JH
at the foreign office, the commander 7lf
of the American forces of occupation ilH
has acted in harmony with the orders f 'JiH
given by Marshal Foch to the other jj tH
occupying troops, Major General Allon H
of the American force simply taking a
over for his own account the orders (
issued by the marshal. (!
. 'ii !
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