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The Ogden standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, April 03, 1920, LAST EDITION - 4 P.M., Image 1

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nil i. " TODAY'S METAL PRICES ' I fff A flf Y M 1" ftV lY TT" lY ' WEATHER FORECAST " .,
I yfe I S NEW YORK Copper firm, 10c; Iron, antimony,. lead I I E 4 R I 9 B 5L AjH N I W ft j i EL B "Weather. Indications for Ogden nd Vicinity:
I yjl Jj and zinc unchanged; tin $63.50. - f JLS .. 'jfL Vj jQr SrW r v'r T . FalrUonight and Sunday; somewhat colder tonight. ' H
III J j ' ' -t' 0 FEARLESS INDEPENDENT.' PROGRESSIVE NEWSPAPER . - r. .
Er I Fiftieth Year-No. oi Price Five cTi OGDEN CITY, UTAh7 SATURDAY EHNgTRIL 3, " 1 920 " LAST EDITION 4 P. Nl
3 & & & A 8 &
( HOOVER TAKES STEPS FOR NOMINATION
II ' HERBERT DECLARES
I : he ci mm
W Advises Hoover Clubs to "Go
m Easy" on Expenditures and j
B Keep Books Open to Public ;
I i " CANDIDATE REGARDS '
5j " FREQUENT ABSENCES
f I , Three More G. O. P. Candid-
i ales get Ready to Open Head- j
I quarters In Chicago j
I i NEW YORK. April 3. Herbert
Ji Hoover, who has announced he Is
ij ready to accent the Republican presl-j
I JJ dantlal nomination it it Is demanded
1 of him. Issued a statement loduy In
M which he requested ho be no furtner.
IK ombarasscd by suggestions of some in-
if dependents that his name be placed
jrji before any other party as "a prima. y
f sense of team work in any parly or-
I ganlxation would preclude such a poa-
lm slbllity." . , , . I
i Vfr Mr. Hoover said in his staloment be
j ft hU no record of partfaan activities
K - and "admitted" that his politics :-.c
K tivity was confined to membership in
1 if a prominent Republican club and al-,
I 111 leglance to the parly over a period of
lt'i vears. He added that, because of h:s(
ifl?.- - profession or mining engineer, coniln-
JltiV! unl shift of residence had prevented-
'lilt him from exercising as much as lie
fMA desired the privilege of every citizen
I Ml lit the 'polls. !
1W( i Asserting that his administrative du-,
1 I tios In various relief organizations
11 1 I would prevent him from making a per-
jl F 8onal canvass for tho uomlnallon, Mr.t
JI; f Hoover said be expected Hoover or-;
all.? ' ganlzatlons throughout thfr country
IMS: I would; have to QxpeniJ..carlain mourns j,
' I fi f iforpfrntlng-aixd-oUi&'oxpOnses, :but ,5
ir M n 3 ithat he nopea mey wouiu wuhhui;
Hf : jthemselves, to minor subscriptions and
m j.' 'orpenditures and Vduld.bC prepared to
open tlieIr b00Hs 10 Pullic spcclion.
iJ ji CHICAGO, April 3 Three more Re
A V PI 1 ipubllcan candidates for the presidency
& ' ''ft -'are planning to open headquarters and
j 1 jofn tho Wood and Lowden forces on
! Jp i ("presidential row" in a downtown ho-
1 , tel. It was announced today.
' l Ji Rooms have been reserved by
, 2 ' I friends of Nicholas Murray Butler.
Il) '. president of Columbia University;
' H Governor Coolidgo of Massachusetts,
and Senator Miles Poindextor.
tt Tho Harding and Hoover forces also
uJ . arc expected to open their headquar-
ff iters here prior to tho convention
y ( 'June S.
! JOHNSON ELOQUENT.
DETROIT, April 3 Senator Hiram
"W. Johnson of California came back
; to Michigan t6 close liis campaign for,
I presidential preferment in Monday's,
1 primaries. j
! , I Discussing nfter-the-war problems,1
M 'Senator Johnson said ho had no fear;
i -JI 'of a social upheaval, that tho country
w M Pvas in no tlnnScr of a revolution, bat j
W fm ' 'that ho did fear reaction,
wf jm "There are sinister forces at work,")
P m ;ho said, "to lake away the progress
I Ithat the people have made in tho last
B !few decades. Social justice is the,
jl 'only cure for anarchy."
The senator expressed contempt for
"two classes of men Hint havo arisen
M Since the war patrioteers and profi-
Df POINDEXTER SPEAKS.
Hf SAGINAW, Mich., April 3. Declar-
Ifl ing that the league or nations is out a
M variation of former Kaiser Wilhelm's
4 plan for centralization of tho govern-
I , ' ment of the world, Senator Miles Poin
kf dexter, candidate for the Republican i
vkl i presidential nomination, deliverod a
I scathing armlgnment of the league be-j
Hl foro a largo audienco here. The
H speaker appealed for ii less centi-alized
W i jforin of government, declaring that
l communities should be able to govern
if Id themselves. He also scored railroad
K ul organizations which threaten to tio up
f jthc transportation of tho nation unless
m thoir demands for certain concessions
Ki , Svere mcL
9 FILED IN HELENA.
4 m HELENA, Mont,, April 3. Nominat-
ing petitions to place tho names of
m Hiram W. Johnson, Herbert Hoover,
9jj Prank O. Lowden and Leonard Wood
M on tho ballot at tho Montana primary
n election April 23 as Republican candi-
H dates for president were filed today
H with the secretary of state.
mto Petitions also wero filed to place
91 the name of Samuel V. Stewart, gov-
H m ernor of Montana, on the ballot as
i. M H Democratic candidate for vice presi-
tlenl"
H ,1 " JM DESTROYER BUMPED.
', m HONOLULU, T. II., April 3. The
H' i llrf United States destroyer -Chauncey ar-
I'll HT rived here yesterday morning in con-
Hj V n voy with a holo in her stern, having
HI i lm been rammed by tho destroyer Aaron
H.' : W Ward while en route from San Diego
, m to Honolulu. The Chauncey was con-
vyedTDy lie ruel su'n Cuyama.
'PLAN COMBINATION
OF WEBBING AM)
ENGAGEMENT RING
CHICAGO, April 3. The
number of marriage licenses
taken out all over the United
States in the first three months
of leap year shows a large in
crease over that of last 3'car and
indicates that the ladies are 02
the job. o
But there is a shortage in the
suppty of wedding- ring?-reported
and jewelers point out ihmay j
be well for the women net to 1
overplay the?r hand by work- i
ing too fast. The scarcity, of
goh and tho big- demand for
plain g-old bands are given ac
the cause of the ring famine.
The leap yoor situation is re
garded so seriously by jewelers
that the trade is considering
putting on the market a ring es
pecially designed to serve a dual
purpose as engagement and
wedding ring.
"This new combination ring,"
said a wholesale jeweler, "will
increase jewelers' sales and at
the same time decrease the high
cost of marrying. If improves
popular, as I believe.it will, it
will establish a fashion vJiich
will i'Qmain a lasting souvenir of
,
editor sear FOR
CALLING POLITICIAN
CHAMPION OF FRAUD
j
I Men Stand Three Hours In
Rain Before Fatal Duel Is
Commenced
MONTEVIDEO. Uruguay, April 2.
Political excitement prevails in this
city tonight as a result of the death
of Washington Beltran, editor of tho
newspaper El Pals, in a duel with for
mer President Jose Batlle Ordones
'this morning. After the last elections
I in Uruguay, the Nationalists accused
the "Battllstes," the party headed by
the former president, of frauds. Bei
, Iran's newspaper In an editorial dis
' cussing the elections called Batlle tho
"champion of fraud." It was this utter
ance that led to tho fatal duel.
The opponents fnet In tho midst of
'a pouring rainstorm and waited for
three hours for the rain to cease. Be
cause of the rain the two men decided
ito keep on their hats, but Beltran
'changed his straw hat for a felt, so
Ithat both might be on even terms.
I Standing 25 paces apart, tho duelists
were given the word to fire, both miss
ing on the first exchange. Before Bel
tran could fire a second shot, ho was
struck by a bullet from Batlle's pia-
Jfin fXnri nnlr in I Vl O rrvnllml mnplnllv
wounded.
Thorc is a law against duelling in
Uruguay, but is is understood that one
of tho conditions agreed to by Beltran
and Batllo was that neither would
'prosecute the other in case of injury.
Duels aro infrequent in this country.
Batlle, who was twice president of
Uruguay and uow is a member of the
national administrative council, volun
tarily gavo himself up to tho police,
following an order by tho state prose
cutor for his arrest as . well as that
of the doctors, seconds and other por
sons connected with the duel. Ho is
being held Incommunicado in a police
station, and will bo interrogated Sat
urday. I The chamber of deputies at a spe
cial session late tonight unanimously
adopted a resolution according an an
nual pension of $3000 to Bellran's
widow. The chamber also sent a mes
sage of sympathy to the widow. Bol
tran's family has requested that the
body Ho in state In tho chamber or
deputies pending the funeral.
JOHN BURROUGHS
OBSERVES BIRTHDAY
NEW YORK, April 3. John Bur
roughs, dean of American nature writ
ers, today varied the quiet routine of
his lire at "Slabsidcs" on tho Hudson,
near West Park, by inviting a number
of friends to help him observo . his
83rd birthday. Among those invited,
were Thomas A. Edison and Henry
Ford. ,
jII8IB$
m M ATTACK
ON flEUEF W0HKERS
President's Documant Favoring
Ousting of Tuf.ks from Con
stantinople Is Surprise
NOTE DISPLEASING
TO GREEKS ALSO
Allies Inform Ottoman Gov
, ernment it Must Disavow Na
tionalist Movement
CONSTANTINOPLE;' April. 1.
' President Wilson'o note to thv alliet-
.intimating thai the Turks must get out
of Europe, came as a shock to all Turk
ish partips.
?.Ir. Wilson's note appeared -in a
1 slightly censored form which made the
I position of the United Slates 'harsher
j than it appeared in the full text of the
! communication.
1 The nolo was equally displeasing to
j thes Greeks who were much offended
at the American president's apparent
unwillingness to gvant theirclaims to
;a large district about Smyrna and his
1 insistence that Adrianople be' given to
the Bulgarians.
j American business men. here arc apprehensive-o'ver
the erfqet ofnthe pre?1
.(loiit's -stand and thete-is- cpipiderabte
; cati-born teachers and' relief ,w.orkers
I are considered to be 'in considerable
j dpng""cr if the protection of Turkish
(forces should be withdrawn.
LONDON, April 3. The all'.ee have
piosented a collective note reiterat
ing their demand that . the Turkish gov
ernment officially disavow the nation
alist movement, according to an Ex
change Telegraph dispatch from Con
stantinople under Tuesday's date.
NEW YORK DANGER '
IN STRIKE AVERTED
NEW YORK. April 3. Traffic in
Now York harbor was still curtailed
today by tho strike of longshoremen
and marine workers but the ferry lines
except those of tho Erie and West
Shore railroads, were operating on
virtually normal schedules. Railroad
officials claimed that all danger of in
terruption of Hhe food and coal sup
plies had been averted.
Union officials reasserted that the
harbor would be tied up before night
fall, claiming that a mistunderstand
inp in orders yesterday had prevent
ed all the workers from joining the
strike.
PEACE TREATY NOT
PERMANENT, HE SAYS
BUDAPEST, April 2. Count Albert
Apponyi. returning from Paris today
for a conference with Admiral Horthy,
Hungarian regent and party leader, de
clared that peace treaties between the
allied powers and the central empires
were only temporary in nature.
"My impression is," be said, "that no
allied" statesmen sincerely believe the
present peace treaties can hold for
long. 1 have not lost hope and believe
the position of Hungary to be better
than it was a month ago." j
uu - ,
GENERAL SNOWSTORM j
! RAGING IN NEBRASKA '
LINCOLN, Neb., April 3. A general j
snowstorm with low temperatures pre
vailed in Nebraska today. Weather
bureau reports said the storm area ex
tended as tar west as Salt Lake City
I and predicted the snow would continue;
in this state all day and possibly to
morrow. Fears were expressed In rall
Iroad circles that traffic may be hain
pered if the storm continues. J
nn 1
1 DESERTER CAUGHT BY !
! DECOY MESSAGES ;
1
! RENO. Nev., April 3. R. C. Altaian,
army lieutenant wanted for desortiont
at Camp Kearny last July, for the em-1
bozzlement of army funds and for the
theft of an automobile at San Diego
belonging to II. W. Nayler, is under j
arrest here. Altman was lured to
Reno from Stockton, Cal., through de
coy telegrams sent by J. H. Klrkloy,
chief of police ofReno, and was ar
rested on his arrival.- Ho madera com
plete confession of the crimes charg
ed against him. N
. . '
' ' I
! j , -LEADING FIGURES IN COMING Y. W. C. A. CONVENTION j i
j
I f ii
These three vomeu will be prominent in the national Y W. C. A. convention to be held in Cleveland, April 13 to
20. Mrs. Sayre is well known as President Wilson's daughter. Mrs. Pratt has won the reputation of being the pret
tiest Y. W. C. A. worker. Mrs. Cratty is general secretary of the organization.
ill ff IE SOIT
, LIUlJJil
BU'ENOl'' AIRES, April 2. Recont
American notes to Chile, .Bolivia and
Peru are4. described as "the fruit of
diplomatic inexperience", by La Pren
sa, 'which declares they "do not reveal
any political plan that should alarm
the South American continent or give
Argentina any ground for suspicion."
The newspaper declares that the
American state department is an or
gan of Internal politics rather than
international.
"Men of 'the United Stntes," con
tinues La Prensa, "have generally
written on delicate and susceptible In
I ternational questions with crudeness
with which they treat internal poli
tics. These aniecedeuts induce us to
think the notes in cuteslion do not cor
respond to the setting of a continental
protectorate which is contemptuous in
regard to lesser republics. They are
an instance of inadvertnnce and lack
of diplomatic tacL
Discussing tho attitude of Argentina
the editorial says:
"The United States accepts all oc
casions for demonstrating her friend
ship to Argentina. No motive exists
then for suspicion or distrust in our
country as to iho South American pol
icy of that nation. Argentina's future
line of conduct should bo such as to
always lend influenco toward concilia
tion in conflicts between European1
countries and the United States aud
in South America support the United
States in all attitudes which would as
sure peaceful solutions to conflicts
aud the prosperity of sister repub
lics."
Canvass of the votes cast in the re
cent elections shows that out of 15$
seats in the next congress, which will
conyeno in May, radicals will hold at
least 102. The count is completed
with.' the exception of one" province
where only one seat is involved. Con
servatives and Democrats who were
allied in the campaign, will have 45
seals and. the Socialists 10.
00
CLEAR AND COLD IS
WEATHER PREDICTION
WASHINGTON. April 3. Weather
predictions for the week beginning'
Monday are:
Upper and lower Mississippi 'val
leys: Generally fair; cold with freez
ing temperatures first half; normal
temperature latter half.
Rocky mountniu and plateau re
gions: Generally fair; cold with
freezing temperatures first half; nor
mal latter half.
Pacific stales: Except for occasion
al rains on the north Pacific coast;
normal temperature probable.
-i 00
YACHT IS LAUNCHED.
SOUTHAMPTON, April 3. Sir
Thomas Lipton's 23 metre Shamrock
III, which will be used in the tuning
up races with Shamrock IV, the Amer
ica's cup challenger, off Sandy Hook
this spring, wns launched hero today.
The Shnmrock III will sail for Amer
ica on April 7, without escort.
; j RAID BY THIEVES
FEARED IN MILLION
DOLLAR GALLERY
I ppjjOAG'Q;--. April S.-Pejvrihgr 1
I art ttiieves were planning to
loot the house, conservators of
' the estate of Mrs. W. W. Kim
I ball today asked the Chicago
Art Institute to take charge of
the Kimball collection of paint
ings, jade and other art objects.
Mrs. Kimballis the aged widow
of the piano manufacturer. Ex
1 ports who recently examined
I the collection valued the pic
tures at "far in excess of $2,
000,000." The jades and other
pieces were pronounced "valu
able beyond estimate."
. o
j MEXICAN DENIES HE
1 SIGNED PROCLAMATION
PARIS. April' 3 Francisco do la
Barra, former provisional president of
Mexico, today denied knowledge of the
proclamation issued on Friday at Agua
Prieta, Mexico, announcing the estab
lishment of a new united government
in' that country.
When Informed by the Associated
Press that the proclamation was re
ported to have been signed -by-him,
he said:
"If such a document exists, it is a
forgery. 1 have the greatest esteem
for Emilio Rebaa, (named in the
proclamation as 'secretary of foreign
relations in the .'new government, but
Jam entirely unaware of any such
movement as reported."
De la Barra is busily occupied in
I Paris as counsel for British. Ameri
can and French banks. He is $n ex
Ipcn in international law. (
I 00 j
RUSSIAN BOLSHEVIKI j
i CAPTURE NEW TOWN ,
1
CONSTANTINOPLE, April 1 Vlad-
ikavkaz, an important military station
and trading. center in Circaucasia. has;
been captured by the Russian Bolshe-i
vlki, according to advices received
here.
. Vladikavkaz is situated on the
Terek river about 95 miles due north
of Tiflis. Its capture, together with'
that of Petrovsk, on the west shore of
the Caspian sea, which was reported
tills week, shows an advance of Bol
sheviki toward the great oil Center of
Baku and tho frontier of the Georgian
republic.
00 j
DECISION TO CALL
OFF STRIKE MADE
COPENHAGEN, April 3 Decision
to call off tho general strike in tho
entire Ruhr industrial region was
reached at a plenary session of the ex
ecutive council of the district yester
day, according to n dispatch from Es
sen. It will be removed, however, if
the Berlin government falls to fulfill
obligations entered into with the
workers.
POHfl OF 253
CITIES l IT,
wilSiS BESSES
WASHINGTON, April 3 To date
population (of 23 of the approximately
1-1.000 incorporated cities, towns and
villages in the country have been an
nounced by the census bureau. Prac
tically all show -increases and some
have more Than doubled in size. Some
of tho larger 'cities, including Chicago
and New Orleans, are being prepared
j for announcement, while New York's
portfolios aro almost all in.
I Figures for only ten of the fifty cit- i
I ies of the group having 100.000 or more
inhabitants in 1910 thus far have been j
:made public. Of those Toledo showed
the largest increase with -M.3 per cent.
I Of the 59 cities having 50,000 to
100,000 inhabitants in 1910, six have
j been announced. Schenectady, N, Y.,
I leads the increases in this group witn
21.S per cent.
Population of 2S incorporated places
of the 119 which in 1910 had from 25.
000 to 50,000 inhabitants has been an
nounced. Knoxvillc, Tenn., leads in
this group with an increase of 114.1
per cent
Scottsbluff. Neb.', has tlie highest
percentage of Increase-of any of the
Incorporated places thus announced
with 295.9 per cent. Other. increases
over 100 per cent are: Eldorado, Kan.,
251.4 per cent; Cicero, 111,, iuu.l; Alma.
Mich., 173.6; Knoxvillc, Tenn., 111.1
and Oak Park. III., 108.-1 per cent.
Manister, Mich., has shown tho
heaviest decrease with 21.7 per ceut.
Other decreases are: Shelburn, Ind.,
31.7 per cent; Jeffersonville, Ind., 3.U
per cent. 1
ATTORNEY ffiffll M
REPLIES TO RE ,.
OF FUEL 11ICE M
Increase In Price Should Be I 'l
Only 20 Cents a Ton At . KH
Mine, Claim jH
DISTRICT ATTORNEYS
TOLD TO GET BUSY
Demand For Export Coal No k'l
cExusc.For Raising Price -Palmer
Declares
WASHINGTON, April 3. Fedcj-al
district attorneys wore instructedtjO; ; ;H
day by Attorney General Palmer to l! fl
receive and consider complaints of M
profiteering in bituminous coal which V H
may -arise in your district under' tho I 'H
Lever I
Mr. .Palmer's telegram was prepared Jl JH
aftpr some bituminous coal operators V
had stated publicly that the new wago fl'H
scale agreed on -under the terms of jTI
the award by 'tho coal strike settle- m' M
uicnt commission would result in an "fF!
increase uf from GO cents to $1.25 a tlll
ton .on coal. 11
Pointing out that tho total increase '1
in wages had been estimated at np- r'X
proximately $200,000,000 a year, Mr. ;1
: palmer said that if this entire amount j 'H
! were "added by the operators to tho J jH
price, il would only make an increase r H
of 50 cents a ton." jH
) "If, however, the operators absorb
the 11 per cent increase which became
effective in December," said tho aUor- ' IH
ney general, "there will be left only " IH
S9G.O00,0O0 to be passed on to tho con- ,
Burner. In this event the oncrcasc;in
the price of coal at the mine should J
amount to 20 conts a ton." il
Mr. Palmer said he understood op- JH
cratprs had estimated the demand for FH
export coal would belGO.QOO.O.O'Os ton;,,
but that port JucJUtics ate ohly.;ae lH
quale; for the export; of. 30.0QO,bUoitpiU-' ill
per annum. This, he said, 'Sho'uldniot . ill
!be madcan '-excuse, (or raisingtj" l-r
00 , 8 wmmm
MILITARY ACTIVITY f H
IN IRELAND NOTED H
BELFAST, April 3. In addition to
pronounced military activity in the jH
vicinity of Londonderry today, all 'tho
roads about the town being patrolled,
the passengers who arrived by tho jj
Scotch boat at Londonderry were ; jH
searched by the police. Meanwhile , ;
violent scenes wore reported taking jl
place among the Sinn Fein prisoners f fH
confined in Londonderry jail. 1
Unusual activity also was displayed iH
by authorities at Dundalk, mid-way bo ''-H
tween Belfast and Dublin, special pa- H
trols being poBted at all approaches H
! to tho town. Motor car drivers were I
I required to produce permits. jI
SYNDICATE TO TAKE
OVER GERMAN SHIPS H
PARIS. April 3 . (Havas.) Germar. mmm
ships seized by Brazil will be taken 1
over by a syndicate of French ship I
owners on payment of 526,000,000, ac il
cording to the Journal .which says the
matter has been definitely settled. fl
STEEL MAGNATE DIES. ifil
BUFFALO, N. Y., April o. Charlea (GH
H. McCulloch. Jr.. president of tli6
Lackawanna Steel company, died to Ifl
day in Baltimore, according to a tele lll
gram received iby the company here 1 11
McCulloch was appointed president 'ri'l
January 1, 1919. YiH
iH
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J aminer, over 1 3,000 circulation, without-a single dup- hH
4 lication- , II
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