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The Evening standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1910-1913, December 31, 1910, Image 4

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THE EVENING STANDARD OGDEN UTAH SATURDAY DECEMBER 31 1910 V V V
I w4r Ewwtg tuiiarui
An Independent Newspaper
V I ESTABLISHED 1870
PUBLISHED EVERY DAY EXCEPT SUNDAY
BY WILLIAM GLASMANN
V
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTIONS ADVANCE
V BY MAIL OUTSIDE OF OGDEN CITY
V
DalJ DI1 fi Months S303
Dldly EvOrT Day 1 Year600 Dally Kwry Day
L DaVIj Vvry Day 3 Months150 Sunday Only I Venr V09 V
c V V 1 In Ogden City by Carrier 75 coins Jpr month j
I1 For Information concerning city subscrlpl nit tIrh p to the city
P circulation department Both Phono GC
V
V
V
j UTAH DIVIDEND STO1ThF3V
c The dividend disbursements of the banks and industrial com
V panics of Utah for this month and January should add to the pros
J ff perity of the state I
V John 0 Cutler Jr in his weekly review of trade and business
kVY conditions gives the following list of dividends
In this month the Descret Savings bank naid a 10i per cent divi
V dend making 50 per cent for the year the First National bank Og
V den and the Ogden Savings bank each paid sneciil dividends making
I 1 per cent paid by each bank this year the Zions Savings bank
paid 5 per cent the Homo Fire Insurance company 2 per cent State
bank 2 per cent and McCormick Co will pay the regular quarterly
dividend the Utah National bank pays 2 per cent and the Utah
r Idaho Sugar company pays its regular 1 34 per cent dividend In
t
V January the following institutions pay dividends
Amalgamated Sugar company preferred 1 12 per cent and coin
anon 2 per cent Barnes Banking company 4 per cent Continental
National bank 4 per cent Deseret National bank 3 per cent Davis
County bank 4 per cent First National Bank of Logan 4 per cent
Homo Fire Insurance company 2 per cent H J Grant Co 3 per
cent Lewiston Sugar company 2 per cent National Bank of Re
V V V public 4 per cent Pingree National bank Ogden 4 per cent Provo
Commercial and Savings bank 2 per cent Beneficial Life Insurance
company 2 per cent Salt Lake Security and Trust company 2 per
V cent State bank 3 per cent State Bank of Brigham City 3 per cent
hatcher Bros Banking company Logan 2 12 per cent Utah Bank
Ing company Lehi 2 per cent Utah Commercial and Savings bank
J 12 per cent Utah ImplementVehicle company 1 34 per cent
Walker Bros bankers 7 per cent Z C Homo Building and Real
jBctate company 1 34 per cent preferred and 2 per cent on common
i Utah Light and Railway company bonds 2 12 per cent Consolidated
Railway and Power company 2 12 per cent and Sumpter Valley rail
jroad 3 per cent
V
Notwithstanding those regular dividends some of the most sub
> tantial stocks are dropping in quoted value the most noticeable be
Jng that of the UtahIdaho Sugar the great sugar company of the
V Jntermountain country with assets said to be in excess of the market
Value of the stock The stock has gradually dropped from around
9 a share to 8 Paying 7 per cent on a par value of 10 this stock
today is yielding almost 9 per cent on the investment
The bank stocks of Ogden hold firm but there has been a heavy
clump in the quoted prices of several Salt Lake institutions due
to the heavy demand for money in Salt Lake following the bursting of
tho real estate boom
V DEMOCRATS DEFINE POLICY
V A call has been issued for a caucus of tho Pe nocratic members
i elect of the next congress to meet at Washington January 19 Rep
resentative Champ Clark of Missouri has an unobstructed right of
V way for the nest speakership and ho is takfn charge of matters
It will be the first time that a Democrat Was ever elected to any
V thing unanimously he remarked jocosely V I
He and other prominent Democrats are anxious to have V this cau
cus so that a definite policy can be announced
to the country The
people have ordered a change they say and it would be wrong to
keep them in suspense for another year till the regular meeting of
the next congress next December The
Democrats however have
never had entire respect for the dictates of King Caucus but
havo always reserved the right to vote against their own party when
ever they wished so there are some difficulties ahead
It is fully understood that the Democratic majority in the next
house will abolish Cannonism to the extent of not allowing the
speaker to rule things by naming the committees to suit himself The
plan is to let all the Democratic
members join in the selection of the
ways and means committee which will have the responsibility of
framing any tariff revision measures and also to let this committee
select the other
committees
Representative Oscar Underwood of I
Alabama will probably head the ond
ways means committee and thus
become Mr Clarks righthand man
The New York Herald has
made a careful
canvass of all the
V members of the next congress and arrives at the conclusion that of
the 220 Democrats elected 177 are in favor of a strict tariff for rev V
enue only while the others lean to moderate
protection and also
that of the 162 Republican
members elected 61 are standpatters i
VV while most of the
V rest
are ready to vote for
a reduction of duties
V Altogether revision the Herald figures a sure majority of 90 in favor of tariff I
1
I NO NEED OF CONSERVING
COAL
I I
V Dr H W Wiley head ° f Unde Sam > s chemical service does
not share in the fears of that
many unless we look out we shall
burn soon
up all our coal In this
Tal country In an address
he nlM at Washington
t the people not to
1 fuel and to worrythat nature has provided us with
spare Gradually as the earth cools off of
course the
denizens
of the
earth
will
move further south
but
they will
not need
to freeze for neec
a million
years yet said he
We ought to use our coal
freely its
carthis the no good to anyone in the
V way be Put it After thats
take gone something else will
its
s place and to better advantage
wind power For instance theres the
which now almost
nIl
V goes to waste whereas 4
it
could
light and heat the
world if
< ncces T Then theres alcohol which
can be made from almost
any old thingand it makes ideal fuel
I
V PORTUGAL OHmS
AN EXPLANATION
> Iinister Claims Attitude on Prop
V V V erty of Religious Corporations
is Misunderstood
V WASHINGTON Dec 30VIth
tho
Idea that the attitude of the Portu
RUOSOgovernment
regarding
I Dt property
V Ie108 corporations held to be I
1IJC
Illegal
la inisuudortood In this couu
V
trv tho Portugncso minister Viscount
OP A Ho tonlKht undo tte Llowlm I
eiattmcni
Directly the cuubietoationts wore
dIbO1ed nn
Inventory
of their
prop
rty si idioii with u VK w to its
proper protection and In order that
it ma > he autrendered to the rightful
owners
V
The courts arc cxofflclo investi
gating tho titles presented by the
cldlmnn6 without any charge to he
latter and a delay of six months has
boon granted for tho claimants to
prow their titles In case these aft
or proper Investigation should be dis
puted by the public attorney It will
be sufficient for tho claimants to glvo
a guarantee that the legal costs will
be paid should
the
case go against
them for the suit to
proceed until de
cided by duo process of law
The Portuguese government dO S
not Interfere In tho majtor and will
certainly make no attempt to seIze
any prlvaty property whatovor the
uses to which It may have been put
in the post
HOXSEY Is
V ANXIOUS
TO BREAK
RECORD
V
AVIATION FIELD Log Angeles
Dec JJO Fearing that through tome
I technical error or oversight the
r height record of 11474 feet which he
mado last Monday might not stand
I Arch Hoxsey the California aviator
soared Into thp air today and broke
I sill the worlds altitude records but his
own
Height of 10675 Feet
The two barographs ho carried with
him registered a height of 10575 feet
This IB nearly 1000 fc < t under the
worlds mark ho established Monday
but It Is only 7C foot abovo the record
of LegBgneaux made at Pau Franco
A new record muni however exceed
the former mark by at least 300 feeL
Therefore If the International Federa
tion of Aorn clubs refuses to recognize
Honors flight of Monday as official
Leg gnpaux will remain the record
holder and the Californian will lose
besides the glory prlres which aggre
gate nearly 3000
New Endurance Record
Nevertheless through todays per
formance he will han the Batlsfnctlon
of knowing that he holds the Ameri
can endurance record lie was In the I
air today throe hours and seventepn
minutes or eight minutes longer than
A V L Welch
00
CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY RATES
Via OREGON SHORT LINE R R
Salt Lake and return 3110 Also re
duced round trip rates to all other
points on Oregon Short Line Tickets
on sale Dec 23rd 24th 26th 26th
31st 1910 and Jan 1st and 2nd 1911
Final return limit Jan 9th Secure
tickets and full information at City
Ticket Office 2511 Washington Avo
E A SHEWE C P T A
00
TWO HUNDRED MILLIONS IN
PENSIONS
A dozen yearn ngo there were con
fident predictions of diminishing ex V
penditures on pensions The high V
water mark 15S 0flOOOO had been
reached In 1S93 There was a decline
to 139000000 and the probabilities
were cited to show that it would con
tinue
But there was a new highwater
mark In 1900 162000000 And now
the House Committee on Pensions has
agreed on u bill which it Is estimated
would Increase the expenditure to
nonrly 200000000 annually by in
creasing the service pension rate
Under the proposed law the appli
cant would not have to furnish proof
of disability Every honorably dis V
charged soldier who served not less
than ninety days In the Civil War or
filxty days In the Mexican War would
be entitled to a pension on reaching
the ago of 62 and the rates are grad
ed at SIr 20 25 and 36 a month
according to ngt not rank as against
old rates of 12 15 and 20
I It Ifi obvloiiB that the recipient of
a pension under such a law might
have seen no service whatever In the
I
strict sense of the term that his ox
perlence In the war might have con
sisted of an interesting diversion of
three months from the routine of busi
ness He would be pensioned at a
high rate for having been available
PO to speak and he might or might
not need the money
If he should need It compassion for I
him because ci lila age and want
must be considered an clement of no
little Importance In sustaining tho
legislation and It is a pertinent ques
tion whether what we are working to
ward Is not a discriminatory system
of old age pensions at very high rates
If so there are many Jndlgnent old
men who may feel aggrieved at the
discrimination and cry out that their
need is much greater than that of
many fairly well todo recipients of
pensions under the lawChicago Rec V
ord Herald
VOO
V
RIGHTS OF HUSBANDS IN ENG
LAND
What are the rights of a husband
has he the right 1 lo supervise his
wifes wardrobe and LO to beat his
wifes wardrobe and 2 t o beat his
provocation
These questions arise from two In
teresting law eases ono In Switzer
land and one In Amurica on the ques
tion of a husbands legal rights at
home V
In the Swiss case Signor Sanguin
etti a welltodo Turin tradesman Is
says the Dally Mirror correspondent
about to SUe his wife for a divorce
on the ground that she insists upon
wearing tight corsets a form of dress
he disapproves of
If thc case reaches the courts the
question of a husbands rights in al
lowing or disallowing his wife to wear
certain dresses costumes will bo
legally threshed out
In the American caso Justice C
I ot the Supreme Court of New York
refused to grant a separation to Mrs
Edith Robinson who alleged that hor
husband watt guilty of cruelty and In
human treatment
According to tho Judgment a wife
who toascs her husband Into a temper
caunot Justify an application for sep
aration on he ground that heln the
eiupcr she horsolf provoked used vio
lent language and struck her C
an outburst is not necessarily cruel
or Inhuman
Opinions on these questions were
obtained recently from wellknown so
licltorb novelists and others
A husband under English law has
no right to strike or assault his wife
lu my way eald a solicitor If he
docs so ho can be summoned by his
wIfe and fined or imprisoned In the
ordinary way Ho Is Just In the same
nositlon as any one else In the mat
ter
If a wife has shown great provoca
tion that fact would have a mitigat
lUg eflect on her husbands punish
ment
As regards a husband having the
right to choose his wifes costumes
he has no lescal right whatever
lie can merely criticise His wife
may go out In the streets wearing a
ballet skirt but ho rausnt lay hands
on her and force her back Into tho
bouse
Although wifeboating has been
abolished since the rIg of Charles
I ns a means ot correcting wives I
am nO nvene t IL practice In cer
tAn ca He a wellknown novelist toll
thy Dally Mirror
I am thlnklnc of that lazy elflsh
vain type of wife who prefers her
ojvn comfort t looking after her child
ren She should be caned JUt an
It she were a naughty child
Such a punishment would bring n
Idle woman t her gensos where words
ngd entreaties would be In vain
NI seriously sugeRt tat husbands
should have the right to beat ther
wives under exceptional circumstan
ces London Dally Mirror
0
GUTHEIE OKLA HAS
VERY QUIET DAY
J
GrjTHRlB Okla Dec 3OWhIc
all the state offices wore nominally
open bert today no official business
was transacted and only routine mat
ters were attended to by tho dorks
The same condition existed In Okla
homa City and n 0 result state busi
standstill
ness was at a standBtl1
The supreme court has recognized
Oklahoma City as the de facto capital
bv refusing to receive suits for tiling
In tho office of the clerk of the su
preme court here
no
WATER POWER IN NORTHERN
ITALY
No other country of Europo has
during1 the last few years made as
much progress In tho utilization of rl
water power as the northern part of
Italy There wo find for tho last five
years a steady Increase by about 100
000horbepower annually uo that tho
whole water power now used Is about
six times that of 1001 The explana
tion for this rush is easily found In
the natural conditions of tho country
Coal Is so scarce in Italy that It
fetcheB prices almost thrice as high
us In Great Britain O the other
hand the steep slopes of tho Alps
toward tho south and tho rapid cur
rent of the northern tributaries of tho
Padua river offer tho best opportuni
ties for electrical utilization Tho
numerous lakes high up In the moun
tains facilitated the regulation of their
overflow and tho narrow valleys In
vited the construction of reservoirs al
most everywhere As the plain Is
full of Industrial cities there existed
tho most favorable conditions for
electric works Foremost among the
customer for electric light and pow
er stands tho city of Milan In the
vicinity of the Adda and its tribu
taries A very lucrative source of
power is also tho Tlclno tho waters
of which are now laid under contribu
tion The Adamcllo Company con
centrates Its efforts on tho Ogllo river
while the torrents of the Roja In tho
Maritime Alps offer splendid Invest
ments to the R Negrl company
Swiss capital Is largely Interested
In this Industry Tho Electrobauk of
Zurich the Swiss Association for
Electric Enterprises at Basle and the
wellknown firm of DrownBovorl
were the forerunners They went
hand In hand with the A E G and
tho SlemensSchuckort Works of Ber
lin for supplying the required machin
ery motors dynamos measuring ap
paratus and wires Evidently by
theso electric works a new develop
ment has already been commenced
for the Industrial activity of Northern
Italy Other big towns In Central
and Southern Italy and recently oven
Sicily have learned a lesson from tho
Padus plan Continental Correspond
ence
00
CURIOSITIES OF THE ENGLISH
BALLOT
At Hemyock Devon there Is a small
farm which carries sixvotes Part of
the farm Is In the Tlvcrton division
art In the Honlton and part In thc
Wellington and the landlord anJ ten
ant of course get votes In each
IlhyJ in Flintshire has only three
men within Its bounds as voters and
these entirely rulo tho village There 1
are five cottages however and one
shop together with a public house
Thus tho parish council can only con
sist of tho three voters Nobody Is
ever troubled much by tho rate col
lector In Rhyd nor Is any household
er ever ejected for nonpayment of his
or
rates An oven more remarkable state
of affairs prevails at Bardsey at the
southwester end of Carnarvonshire
1 has a fair number of inhabitants
yot It elects one man to act as the
leader of its council and he has prac
tically the sole voice as to what rates
shalbe levied or paid nnd what shall
not also as to how the money Is
t o be spent Creslow a parish In the
leatitlful Vale of Aylosbury Is an
other icmarkablc example of oneman 1
iiile There stands but
r a single house I
in the whole pailsh namely Creslow
manor whose owner W IL Crcslow
has therefore tho whole and solo
government of the district electing
iiimROlf by his own vote to form the
parish council making his own rates
and paying them to himself after
which ho has the pleasure of spend
ing them a ho pleases
0
FACE AND HEAD
AN AWFUL SIHT
Eruption Broke Out when 2 Week
OldItched So He Could Not
SleepHair All FeN Out
Cuticura Cured Him
Ilh to have you accept thb tuilmo
nut 1 Culicura did bo much for my baby
At the act ot two cekfl
V liU head began to break
out with great sores and
by til time he was two
months bis taco and bead
T r scro an awful tight I
consulted a doctor who
iilj It MUS nothing but a
light skin dlirosc which the
baby would toon set over
But hcswmcU to fct WO I
to I called another doctor
His opinion teemed to bo
the ara They both pre
rcrlbcd medicine that did
not do a bit of good A
friend advl < I me to toko
t him to the hospital which
1 did Two doctors her
cave me medicine Iii a liquid
form It did him no good
Nearly every day I would read a tertl
mental In regard to Cuticura Ant my TO
thought die would try It to we I It would
lulp tho baby I got a box of Cuticura Oint
ment and a cake of Cuticura Sap and after
ujlnt theec he wa entirely cured Before
Cuticura cured him ho could not seem to
sleep M his face anti head would Itch so
What hair he had all fell out but soon ho
hnd a nio head of hair and lib face was per
reel cli ar I l now nearly five years since
he was cured and there has been
11 n no sign 01
the eruption returning Chos I Evans tU
Flint St Somervnie Mua April 10 1910
A Blnetc nt of Cuticura tlesp and Ointment L
often luracltnl to cure rcndertot U the moil ceo
comical rcftltaeni r aCtelfooi ot the iklo sad j
icalp c Sold throughout the world Potter Drue A
Ctun r I Corp v Sole JroP nutno U Jlnu M
=
UPRISINGV
THRtATfNS
1 HONDURAS
PUERTO CORTEX Honduras Dec
3OVia Wireless to NTCW Oilean
An attack upon Puorto Cortez by the
revolutionary gunboat Hornet which
was reported several miles off this
coast Into last night IB expected
Several hundred government troops
arrived yesterday from Tegucigalpa
and others came In this morning
Fighting has already begun at Las
qttabradofi according to reports
V To Protect Americana
Following rumors that the United
States cruiser Tacoma had sighted
the Hornet last night tho American
consul at the instance of Commander
Davis of the Tacoma today warned
all Americana to remain Indoors If
trouble starts Notice was given the
commandant today that the Tacoma
will land marineR t protect American
Interests bon tomorrow
The Honduran gunboat Tatumbla Is I
In the harbor but her two onepound
ors arc not expected to bo of much
use In defending the town against an
attack by the Hornet which Ig re
ported as having four sixInch modern
rifles and throo machine guns The
Tatumbla is not considered seaworthy
Gatttcmalan troops arrived at Iore
ales lait night This move Is taken
to mean that a land attack by the
Hondurean revolutionists Is expected
along the border
00
CUDAHYS KEY TO
SUCCESS IN BUSINESS
Home religion and business his de
votion to this trinity was the key to
the success In life of the late Michael
Cudahy according to his former busi
ness associates at tho Union stock
assocates
yards
So far as could be learned Mr Cud
ahy had no rulo or sot of rules which
he followed His was too broad a
mind to bo restricted to a formula
from which ho could not deviate say
men who worked with him In the
packing plants of Chicago for years
To those who knew his homo life
Intimately Mr Cudahy was first of all
a home man a devoted husband and
a loving father In the livestock trade
he was known as a business man and
It was the firm conviction of all who
camp In contact with him during of
flee hours that business and that the
packing business was over his first
consideration
Again there were many who believ
ed that his religion was uppermost In
his mind His was a familiar face at
Sl Marys church Wabash avenue and
Eldredge place and his observations
of tho canons of the Catholic church
were not limited to his attendance at
mass on Sundays A man of higher
morals nor lived say those who
wore most familiar with him He was
just and square In all his dealings
and as courteous to the newsboy a
to the millionaire
Whore he excelled was In his abil
ity to concentrate his whole mind on
the subject at hand whether it per
tained to religion home or business
Men who worked under him when ho
was general superintendent of the Ar
mour packing plant found him one of
the easiest men to approach that they
ever knew He was ever ready to listen
Js
ten to them and never appeared to be
i n a hurry or to have more pressing
business at hand
Mr Cudahy was an early riser and
always among the first to reach the
stockyards in the morning Few of
tho oldtlmr traders who knew Mr
Cudahy then are active In the livestock V
stock business now but those who are
remember him best as they used to
see him walking from the packing
house at one end of the yards to the
hog alleys nt tho other
This was I neverfalling daily oc
currence and as ho came swinging
along with a cheery word for all
whom he met the way was lined with
len who made it a practice to ex
change a good morning with tho
old man a title which was spoken
with reverencewhen applied to him
From the hog alleys Mr Cudahy I
wended his way hack to the packing
house and from there once the days j
work was finished his course lay di
rectly home
Mr Cudahy was a comparatively
young man when I first know him V
said George Pratt head hog buyer for I
Armour l Co but I do not emcmbor V V
ever seeing him linger around with
the boys after his days work was
done He did all his visiting and gos I
slplng early In the morning and al
though always sociable and good na
tured he never stopped for a social
glass or to discuss he affairs of the
day after leaxlng the offIce at nIght
hA man of higher morals
V morls never IV
ed At the same time he was not
given to
preaching and seldom gave
advice unless It was sought He was
ever ready to help tho young men un
del him lo hotter themselves and
many who af now prominent In thp
livestock trade and packing Industy
otve their success to support given
thorn by Mr Cudnhv when they most
ncMcd aid
Pnnrles 0 Robinson of ClayRobin
son A Co voiced the same sentiment
and midcd senlnwnt
1 r Cudahy signed my bond when
J first wont Inlo the live stock com
mIssIon business I was a mal I of
10000 and I had little money of mv
own but Mr Cudahy showed no hesl
tiiilcy In taking what may be termod
t gciablors chance
Get In the cattle businc1 1 was Air
Cudahys vice to another lan who
Id now a cattle buyer for one of tho
big racking firms This man was mi
dccl led whether to fellow tho live
stock Industry or seek employment In
one of tho big financial Institutions
Ic the loop district Ho was twenty
years old at tho time and t114 re
ferred to h Cud thy by his father
wno had known Lie big packer for
years
yearsIs father had cautioned him that
Mr Cudahy was a busy man that he
should state his business briefly and
should not bore Mr Cudahy with his I
troubles He sought the packer In his
downtown offlco and was determined I
to make the call as brief as possible
but Mr Cudahy sent his plans awry
the minute ho Introduced himself
Sit down young man Howa your
father Haventaeen him In months
tell him to come down and see me
Tell him I brings back old days t
see some one from the yards These
nnd many other ejaculations were
buried at the bewildered young man
before ho could open his mouth Then
Mr Cudahy Inqulrod his business and
1 learning of uncertainty V of mfnd
f which enthralled Ute boy he set about
to hel1 him to a decision
He gave me sn much of his time
discussed case thoroughly
and dIscussd my cae ho
that I began t thJnk that he h4llV
nothing elso to tlo for that day said
the man afterward Ho polntml out
the advantage of working out of
doors as J would have to If entered
toors
the cattle business To thIs he con
trasted the disadvantages of Indoor
office work
He spoko of the numerous outside
attractions which were over before lht
young man who worked In tho loop
district Ill showed me whoro I J
rotild mtVo hltr and Inier friends
uy going Into an Industry such as the f
I live stock trade where not 10 man
V temptations to dissipate and associate
with fat peoolo would be offered me
He told mo BlAt I would be benefited
I In roml c Into contnct with tho pure
and honest countrymen who patron
Ized the yards and so firmly convinc
ed me that the cattle business was the
only place for mo that I wondered
that I hud ever entertained any doubt
about 1L
Ho ended It all by offering me a
position at any of his plant to which
my parents woro willing to lot me go
toid mo ho had enjoyed my rlalt 1m
mcnsol and made me promleo to call
on him again at mv earlest conven
ience
fcncSu
Such was Michael Cudahy ns tho
people at the stockyards know him A
man too big to be affected by any po
sition lin might have attained on this
earth a homo man a business man
and a religious man Chicago Trib
une
00
THE MECCA OF CENTRAL ASIA
Bokhara that strange capital at tho
bock of tho world on which every road
In Asia Is paid to have converged
might well bo called tho Mecca of
Central Asia It Is more than that
for beside being a religIous center
It Is also 1 great capital and trade
center
Tho name Bokhara Is well known
yet It has been visited by but few
Fifty years ago It was as Impregnable
as Lhasa and of the few travelers
who penetrated to within Its walls
fewer still ever came out again
Bokhara Is completely surrounded
by D wall and had t enter by one
of the cloven gates If by chance I
had been benighted I should havo had
to stay outside or at least leave my J
caravan behind and enter by the tiny I
door beside the main gato through I
which a man can literally just squeeze
Once Inside the walls the whole page
ant of tho East burst on mo Intense
light and shade bright colors tho
richness of the great men and the
squalid poverty of the beggars tho
cleanllheBB of the mosques and tho
filth of tho streets tho aching glure
of the deep bazars Nowhere In the
world I claim can such perfect
a perect plo
ture of the unspoiled unrogeneratod
East be seen as In Bokhara It
Is as If a Chapter of tho Arabian
Nights had been put on the stage
Hero one looks down through 1 long
vista of years and sees the East as it
vao long beforo the West existed
Let us stand a minute beside tho
pool This Is the very heart of tho
city and Is situated In a squaro stir
rounded by giant mudreBM and a mot
ley crowd of booths and shop Hero
a midday tho people of Bokhara con
gregate to pray in tho mosques near
by and to take a meal on the ter
races that surround tho pool Men of
every eastern race assemble here
The pool Itself lo nothing more than
I large stone reservoir of filthy water
Under a brilliant sky and shadowed by
great trees It makes a fitting fore
ground for the gay costumes of tho
men tnc dark bazars and tho madres
ap piled up behind When I flaw men
on tho steps of the tank washing them
selves In tho water 1 felt surprised
to say the least But when further
nlong I noticed men filling their
water skins from tho same supply l
realized that tho East Is reollv very
far from the West Tho terrible deeds
that oucu made Bokhara a byword are
now prohibited by the Russian govern
ment Prisoners are not permitted
for Instance to be dragged through the
streets by galldplng horses Nor are
they thrown from the tops o the high
tower called the MInar Katan This
vas the usual punishment meted out
to evildoers In the old days Watched
by thousands of spectators tho poor
wretches were flung from that giddy
height on to tilt flagstones beneath
Bokhara has many chambers of hor
rors unwholesome for the western eye I
to see and the description of which
would certainly be unfit for
publica
tion Perhaps the most horrible J f
those Is a pit where prisoners wero
tortured by vermin which were so
mimerous and ravenous that In tho
absence of human pray they were fed
on chunks of raw meatProfessor D
Carruthcrd in Wide World Maga
zlne
00
I THE FRENCH IN AFRICA
The little difficulty which the
French arms are having In the Tchad
I district of Africathe great territory
between back of Tripoli and Lake
I Tchad Is of considerable interest
and importance for through the cur
ious action of some interests at Con
i stantinople the affair might develop
I Into one of International concern
I V The struggle Is between the French
j authority and the Sonouasl slavetrad
1
I lug tribes within this large district
which Is within the French sphere of
i Influence and It Is probable that a
strong Frcrch punitive expedition will
be sent against the Senoussl follow
ing the costly victory which Colbouol
Moll and a few colonists won over the
slave traders A humanitarian touch
and Interest are given the situation
by tho statement that success for the
French plans crowding the Senoussl
I back and chocking the supply of arms
U the Mussulman tribes of Central
Africa would mean closing the last
slave route In Africa and Incidental I
lj would give to Tunis the market
for the products of Tchad Bornou
Sokoto and Bargulrml
I The International flavor to the situ
I atlon lies In lie fact that while the
j French base their claim to the sphere
I o Influence In the Tchad region up
ou the treaty with England signed
I March 21 1S99 under Dolcasse us mln i V
Ister of foreign affairs Turkey pro
tested agaInst that treaty at the time
t1 tme
of Its signing and has never alnce
BETTER THflH SPANKING D
Spanking dom not euro children of
Tliero Is a constitutional
1
cause for this trouble onsttutonal
mers Ilox AV Notro Dame lad will
jeriti free to any mother hor successful
homo treatment with full Instruc
tions ul
Send no money but write her
today It
your Children
chldron trouble you In
chancn this ny > Dont blame the Child thO
treatment It cant help It This
nVoniTV11 also cur < adults nnd cod
people by dly trouhltd or night with urine difficulties
I
T 1
OGDEN THEATRE YEAR NEW
VEEK
V i SUNDAY AND MONDAY I J I i
> The Wonderful
f H GIRL SHOW L
lags y jjv ft d A
t 1 QSj J i t S t U b b 0 r n i i I
f 1
Cinderella
V j 4
i 40 GIRLS 497 TIMES IN CHICAGO
20 SON G S 263 TIMES INN Y
V
MATINEE MONDAY
1 Chorus blessed with nimble legs and wouder
ful voicesSnn Fran clsco Examiner
I Great all around musical howL Angeles Examiner I
Prices 25c to 150 Only a few seats at 150
c t < j
it
rO
ANNOUNCEMENT SPECIAL
gz DR FRANCIS KING the Eyesight
SpecialIst ht opened handsome V
i groundfloor Optometry and Optical E
Parlors 362
gt3o6r Twentyfifth street near
Washington Avenue Everything pos
sible In Glasses and all work guar
anteed
Specl low rateD We dO one thing only Valuable famIly gifThe
to all cchool but We do that one Home Eye Tester given free
children thing exceedingly well to every person fitted
= b rc Y <
V
1 L 0
V OGDEN STATE BANK
OGDEN UTAH I
Interest paid on Savings Accounts and Time Oer
t tificates of Deposit V
Capital 10000000
1000000
Surplus 10000000
Undivided Profits 2000000 V
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
H C BIgelow President A P Bgelow Cashier
J M Browning VlcePrest J C Halvercon Aost Cashr i
G L Becker H M Rowe J N Spargo
O A Parmley E L Van Motor John K Splero V
r mW r M
9J 1
SPECIAL DANCE
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEARS
CONGRESS ACADEMY
V REGULAR PRICES
iJ
then recognized it Influences which
then prevailed nt Constantinople
seem still to have the ear of tho Turk
ish government and seek now to
hamper French extension of author
ity or enforcement of nominal 111
thority existent In Central Africa
Tho plentiful supply of modern quick
firing weapons ammunition etc
which the warlike Sensouasl have Is
laid to tho doors of Turkish agents
agent
Matters might vory easily bo brought
to a sharp Issue In the wake of tho
projected French punitive expedition
Into the wilds of tho region and dip
lomatic channels might havc another
problem to handle Boston Dally Ad
vertiser V V
00
A MAMMOTH CORN CROP
American Harvest Overshadows Phar
aohs Bumper Crops
I
Such was the magnlturo of the crop
of corn raised by Joseph In Egypt In
the time of Pharaoh
lme Phar that It was
wa
thought worthy of record in the Bible
Ve cannot tell accurately as liv mum
uroment reduced to American bush
ols what this harvest of Egyptan
grain was All thru we know is that
grain was All that we know is that i
rulers of Egypt and make tho country
the commercial master of the ancient
ancIent
world S
Yet it was undoubtedly much small
smal
er than the
harvest of Indian
corn or
palze which the American farmers
sccurod In the early autumn of 1910
That In estimated in round numbers
Ilrbars
at 3121000000 bushels
a Curiously
enough the number of bushels of In
dian Corn harvested by tho farmers
of America Is approximately equiv
alent to the number of dollars In ac
tual circulation throughout he Unit
ed States That is to sny If It were
necessary to buy outright tho corn
crop of lust summer and to pay for
it In cash at tho rate of ono dollnr
i bushel hen In order to do this
there would he needed every dollar of
money In circulation Munseya Mag
azine
00
SOCIAL SECRETARY OF STATE
While tho president of the United
States enjoys his social secretary and V
I Mrs Taft has her boudoir cabinet
a coterie of Washingtons fashionable
women who help the first lady of the
land to arrange her social
ntalgc program
and every government of any cons
quenco In the world employs one pei
sonago o rank as a social secretary
our state department Is fully equipped
along similar lines and Is capable of
discharging 1U peculiar social obligi
tlon through practically the
dium trugb practcnl same me
If one goos to the great grimlook
lag building and gcnt the social
sccretary ho will In all likelihood oo
told that no such person exists never
had existed and never will But a
short Uinc spent with the heads of the j
various departments and bureaus will
I
convince one that the social amenities
are carried out with all duo regard
Iii the mater of precedence and other
multitudinous details that mea much
whon taken Into consideration thjt Uo
state department Is the most punc
tlious arm of the government service
Diplomats must be known tholr rank
j
i
must bo shown every courtesy that 1
one government IB expected to extcnJ
to anothers representatives
This trying task in all of Its forma
Is under the personal supervision of
Chandler Hale third assistant secro
tary of state Mr Hale Is the ret
social secretary Washington Star
00
POSTAGE STAMP MACHINE
Some months ago a Trinidad clergy
man designed a pst estnJp ma
chine which has rcccntlj been Im
proved in London and bistalld In a
poBtoffice In that city
By automatic action when a proper
Coin is placed In the slot and the
handle pulled It separates a penny
stamp from a roll Inside the machlno
and ecuroly fixes It upon the envoi
ope hold in an aperture of the ma
chine Tho machine Is about the slzo
of an ordinary typewriter and stamps
envelopes newspapers or circulars at
the rate of 1000 an hour with room
Ingly absouto accuracy The machlno
will hold 0000 stamps and as 1111
each stamp Is automatically register
ed
I
The coin to be received by this
piece of mechanism must be genuIne
of perfect sIze and shape I Is claim
ed that it will return the silver PiCs5
Inserted in the Blot by error but
keeps without any recompense the
fraudulent metal disk 1 Is reported I
that the machine is to be placed In
every underground railway station
and port at all pillar boxes Consular Re
00
NO CAUSE FOR GLOATING
I suppose youve hoard that Im
to marry Mr Green she said to ono
of her old friends
No he replied coldly
You dont seem very enthusiastic
about It
1 Why should I hOr Not knowing i
Mr Green I havent any grudge
against hlmCatholic Standard and
Times V I
I for I
Llmhel
See To V
Vo I f eraS cowcroft
lumber Co
Before Buying
Anywhere
Either Phone 612
Or Call 237 24th St Ogden
READ THE CLASSIFIED PAGE

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