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The Evening standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1910-1913, July 02, 1912, Image 1

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PVT71TTM QTAlMnADn fee M X- 1L tt . SHOWERS TONIGHT OR WED- M
iiVbNilNG STAJNDAKD ,A nesday; not much change H
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, A FEARLESS, INDEPENDENT, PROGRESSIVE NEWSPAPER. I H
orty-second Year No. 158 Price Five Cents. OGDEN CITY, UTAH, TUESDAY EVENING, JULY 2, 1912 Entered as Second-class Matter at the Postofficc, Qgden, Utah. H
WOODROW WILSON OF NEW JERSEY I
J IS NOMINATED ON THE 46TH BALLOT I
-
Wild Scene as State After State Joins the Wilson
Column, Assuring the Nomination
of the Governor.
, CLARK MEN COULD NQT STOP STAMPEDE
SNew York Gets in Band Wagon and Moves to
Make Nomination by Acclamation Dele-
gates in a Great Demonstration
;
Baltimore, July 2. Woodrow Wil-
son of New Jersey today was nom
inated Tor the presidency by the
Democratic national convention. The
nomination was made after Under
wood had been withdrawn, Clark had
released his supporters and New York
f as a Umax, had moved to suspend
the balloting and mage the nomina
tion of "Wilson by acclamation
i There was objection to this plan
As the final roll call came on, state
5 after state fell into line for the New
Jersey executive, piling up an over
, whelming majority.
. The result was received with tum
ultuous demonstrations by delegates
and spectators,
i Woodrow Wilson gained 103 votes
on the forty-third balot, the first
cast today at the Democratic national
convention -andthe hope for a break
appeared at hand, Illinois' fifty-
it eight delegates propelled the move
! mont and gains were made also from
Connecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Louisiana,
Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina,
Tennessee, Virginia, "West Virginia,
Wisconsin and Hawaii.
Wilson's voto was G02 a majority
of the convention. It was the high
est vote he had received and the vote
of 329 cast for Mr. Clark was the
lowest received by him during the
prolonged balloting When the result
was announced the demonstration for
Wilson was as enthusiastic and pro
' tracted as the weary delegates could
; make it Wilson lacked only 124 of
the necessary two-thirds to nominate
The final break came this after
noon at the beginning of the forty
sixth allot. Wilson had received 63tf
votes on the forty-fifth with only
721) 1-3 necessary to nomination.
1 Senator Bankhead of Alabama
1 quickly withdrew Underwood.
Senator Stone of Missouri, in be
half of Champ Clark, released all
1 Clark delegates at the same time
, eaying Missouri would vote for him to
thn end.
J Mayor Fitzgerald of Boston wlth-
I drew Governor Foss from considera
tion. By this time It was apparent
Wilson would win on the forty-sixth
ballot and the convention was in an
uproar, delaying th call for a long i
while.
Bryan Center of Interest.
Bryan was a center of interest as
Wilson's nomination became certain
He said he had wanted most of all the
nomination of a progressive
Great confusion Interrupted the
1 roll call. Bell, of California, attempt-
' i ed to explain California's vote and was
howled down The convention was i
; eager to hear the announcement of
, ; ! Wilson's nomination which had now
, become apparent.
; j , California stood by Clark to the last
: but announced it would move, after
J the ballot, to make the nomination
unanimous.
i Senator Stone of Missouri moves to
I make the nomination of Woodrow
" Wilson by acclamation.
Formally Declared Nominee.
I Chairman James formally declared
Woodrow Wilson the nominee of the
convention for president of the United
States at 3:35 p. m. There was a
demonstration,
j A tremendous demonstration fol-
1 lowed the announcements of Wilson's
J nomination by acclamation. Cheer
m, after cheer swept the hall and was
jH taken up bv the crowds outside.
m Tho convention adjourned until 9
ffBBH p. m. when nomination s for vice pres
Hs ldent will be made.
-fjMi At noon the main body of delegates
ft were in place, but Chairman James
-) bad not appeared; the galleries were
-V filled, eager and expectant.
jj Convention called to order at 12:09
! M 1-m'
', ( Balloting was resumed after brief
iv preliminaries. Tho chairman an-
f nounced that disorderly uemonstra
jt ; tlons would not be tolerated and the
jjj galleries would be cleared if neces
JjT sary.
T Forty-third ballot ordered at 12:1G.
I Wilson Gets Illinois.
3 Illinois changed its voto to 58 for
t Wilson under the unit rule.
JA j Illinois' Individual standing was au-
'WL uounccd as Clark 18, Wilson 10, but
iHfc under the unit rule the solid voto was
K. cast for Wilson.
m Louisiana gave two more Clark
K votes to Wilson.
i
h .
Wilson gained eight more Clark
votes from Michigan.
The forty-third ballot in the na
tional Democratic convention showed
unusual gains for Woodrow Wilson.
By the time the roll call had been
about one-third completed Wilson had
gained 73 over his last vote. Illinois
had thrown 5S votes to him and It
became apparent that he would pass
the majority mark,
Virginia Goes to Wilson.
Virginia cast ner solid 24 votes for
Wilson amid a storm of cheers.
Chairman Swanson of Virginia said
Virginia acted in view of the emer
gency which had arisen and, while
the delegation had been divided, It
had now determined to apply the unit
iule giving Wilson the solid voto.
West Virginia Flops.
West Virginia added her 1G Clark
votes to Wilson Tumultuous cheers.
Forty-Third Ballot.
Alabama Underwood 24.
Arizona Clark 3, Wilson 2, Bryan 1.
Arkansas Clark IS.
California Clark 26.
Colorado Clark 11, Wilson 1.
Connecticut Underwood 3. Clark 1.
Wilson 5.
Delaware Wilson G.
Florida Wilson 2. Underwood 10.
Georgia Underwood 28.
Idaho Wilson 7, Clark 1.
Illinois Clark 18, Wilson 40.
Indiana Wilson 2S, Clark 1, Kern 1.
Iowa Clark 1H, Wilson 14&.
Kansas Wilson 20.
Kentucky Clark 2fi.
Louisiana Clark 6, Wilson 14.
Maine-Clarke 1, Wilson 11.
Maryland Passed.
Massachusetts Wilson 9, Foss 27.
Michigan Clark 2, Wilson 2S.
Minnesota Wilson 24."
Mississippi Underwood 20.
Missouri Clark 3G.
Montana Wilson 7, Clark 1.
Nebraska Clark 3, Wilson 13.
Nevada Clark 6.
Nev Hampshire Clark 3, Wilson 5
New Jersey Wilson 24, Clark 4.
New Mexico Clark S
New York Clark 90.
North Carolina Wilson 22, Under
wood 2. .
North Dakota Wilson 10.
Ohio Wilson 20, Harmon 28.
Oklahoma Clark 10, Wilson 10.
Oiegon Wilson 10.
Pennsylvania Wilson 74, Clark 2.
Rhode Island Clark 10.
South Carolina Wilson IS.
South Dakota Wilson 10.
Tennessee Underwood G, Wilson S,
Clark 10.
Texas Wilson 40.
Utah Wilson GV, Clark 1V.
Vermont Wilson S.
Virginia Wilson 24.
Washington Clark 14. ,
West Virginia Wilson 16.
Wisconsin Wilson 22, Clark 4.
Wyoming Wilson 6.
Alaska Wilson 5, Clark 1.
District of Columbia Clark G.
Hawaii Wilson 4, Clark 2.
Porto Rico Wilson 4, Clark 1,
Underwood Vs.
Maryland demands a poll,
Maryland Poll resulted: Clark 9,
Wilson 5M:, Underwood 1.
Forty-third ballot, official: Clark
329, Wilson G02, Underwood 98.,
Harmon 28, Foss 27. Bryan 1. Kern 1.
Forty-fourth ballot ordered tit 1:01
p. m.
Colorado Shifts.
Colorado shifted to Wilson, giving
him ten votes.
Wisconsin voted uodidly for Wilson,
the fimt time the delegation had vot
ed as a unit 26 votes.
Wilson gained steadily as the forty
fourth ballot progressed. Mississippi
thus far solid for Underwood, an
nounced a caucus and was passed.
Pennsylvania Goes Solid.
Pennsylvania, heretofore, almost
solid for Wilson, cast the full seventy
six for him amid cheers. j
Washington's vote on the forty
fourth ballot was questioned and a
poll led to much delay.
The pbll of Washington's vote re
sulted: Clark, 8 1-2; Wilson, 3 1-2; two ab
sent, but under tho unit rule the four
teen otes were for Clark.
Forty-fourth ballot:
Alabama Underwood 24.
Arizona Clark 3, Wilson 3. ' . -
"If I were a cartoonist, I would Jzjl! aT I
represent Ryan as the dominant power rt R I
in the convention, having in his hand jsJililr Si
a cat-o'-nine tails, the nine tails repre- . VfckwV I
senting Murphy, Taggart, Sullivan & JESss k v
Co., the dominating members of the $&&&!& Jrvi NKuoJ!k
national committee, and I would rep- WSSS JS&' Mm nWV
resent the Democratic party as receiv- W$wfT f$Ww $f4( "
ing the lashes upon its back." Wil- Wffi JfL ln
HERE'S YOUR CARTOON, MR. BRYAN ' -
Reproduced from the Philadelphia Daily North American.
- - , " " "- th f T If "I II" I" Ml " I 111 'I II llll Ill an vrwi im II II i TH ii ifirif -f-rn ti- t ti i ihm war n t i ir i ini1 vifrrr i r it ' i I i ---hiiimwi lilll""",M" "-- i . .- ii
Arkansas Clark 18.
California C'ark 2G
Colorado Wilson 10, Clark 2.
Connecticut Underwood 8, Clark 1,
Wilson 5
Delaware Wilson G,
Florida Wilson 2, Underwood 10.
Georgia Underwood 28.
Idaho Wilson G 1-2. Clark 1 1-2.
Illinois Wilson 58.
Indiana Wilson 30.
Iowa Clark S. Wilson 18.
Kansas Wilson 20.
Kentucky Clark 2G.
Louisiana Wilson 15, Clark 5.
Maine Wilson 11. Clark 1.
Maryland Claik S 1-2, Wilson 7,
Underwood 1-2.
Massachusetts Wilson 9, Foss 27.
Michigan Clark 2, Wilson 28.
Minnesota Wilson 20.
Mississippi Passed.
Missouri Clark 36.
Montana Wilson 7, Clark 1.
Montana Wilson 7, Clark 1.
Nebraska Clark 3, Wilson 13.
Nevada Clark G.
Nov Hampshire Clark 3, Wilson 5.
New Jersey Wilson 24, Clark 4.
New Mexico Clark S.
New York Clark 90.
North Carolina Wilson 22, Under
wood 2.
North Dakota Wilson 10.
Ohio Wilson 21, Harmon 27.
OklahomaClark 10, Wilson 10.
Oregon Wilson 10.
Pennsylvania Wilson 7G.
Rhodo Island Clark 10.
South Carolina Wilson IS.
South Dakota Wilson 10.
Tennessee Clark 9, Wilson 9f. Un
derwood 6.
Texas Wilson 40.
Utah Wilson 8
Vermont Wilson S.
Virginia Wilson 24.
Washington Clark 14. '
West Virginia Wilson 16.
Wisconsin Wilson 26.
Wyoming Wilson 6.
Alaska Clark 1, WilBon 5.
District of Columbia Clark 6.
Hawaii Clark 2, Wilson l.
Porto Rico Clark 1, Wilson 4 1-2,
Underwood 1-2. (
Mississippi Underwood 20.
Total, 1.0SS.
Clark, 30G. - -
Wilson, 629.
Underwood. 99. a
Harmon, 27. . ,
Foss, 27. r
Forth-fifth ballot ordered at 1:45
p. ni.
Alabama Underwood y24.
Arizona Clark 3, Wilson 3.
Arkansas Clark 18.
California Clark 26.
Colorado Wilson 10. Glark ?
Connecticut Underwood 7, Qiark n,
Wilson 5. I
Delaware Wilson 6.
Florida Wilson 2, Underwood 9.
t
.
Georgia Underwood 28.
Idaho Wilson G 1-2, Clark 1 1-2.
Ill nols Wilson 5S
Indiana W ilson 30
Iowa Clark 9, Wilson 17.
Kansas Wilson 20.
Kentucky Clark 2G.
Louisiana Clark 5, Wilson 15.
Maine Clark 1, Wilson 11.
Maryland Clark 8 1-2, Wilson 7,
Underwood 1-2
Massachusetts Wilson 9, Foss 27.
Michigan Clark 2, Wilson 28.
Minnesota Wilson 24.
Mississippi Passed.
Missouri Clark 3G.
Montana Wilson 7, Clark 1.
Nebraska Wilson 13, Clark 3.
Nevada Clark 6.
New Hampshire Clark 3, Wilson 5.
New Jersey Wilson 24, Clark 4.
New Mexico Clark S. New Mex
ico asked for poll.
New Mexico poll resulted:
Wilson 4, Clark 4. Entire vote un
der Instructions cast for Clark.
North Carolina Wilson 22, Under
wood 2.
North Dakota Wilson 10.
Ohio Harmon 25, Wilson 23.
Oklahoma Clark 10, Wilson 10.
Oregon Wilson 10.
Pennsylvania Wilson 76.
Rhodo Island Clark 10.
South Carolina Wilson IS.
South Dakota Wilson 10.
Tennessee Underwood G, Clark S,
Wilson 10.
Texas Wilson 40.
Utah Wilson 8.
Vermont Wilson 8. v
New York Clark 90.
Virginia Wilson 24.
Washington Clark 14.
West Virginia Wilson 16.
Wisconsin Wilson 2G.
Wyoming Wilson G.
Alaska Wilson 6.
District of Columbia Clark 6.
Hawaii Clark 2, Wilson 1.
Porto Rico Clark 1, Wilson 4 1-2,
Underwood 1-2.
Mississippi Underwood 20.
Forty-fifth ballot
Clark. 30G; Wilson, 633; Under
wood, 97; Harmon, 25; Foss, 27.
Sonator Bankhead has gone to
platform and It is reported he "will
withdraw Underwood.
Bankhead spoke amid breathless
silence. Ho said Underwood had
entered the- convention hoping to bo
the nominee. But his chief desire
was to eradicate every vestige of
section feeling. That had now been
demonstrated hy tho liberal support
given the Alabama candidate.
"But I think the tirael has come to
recognize that h'o cannot bo nom
inated In this convention nor can ho
be used to defeat any other candi
date," Bankhead concluded.
' "Vice President?" queried a dele
gate from the floor.
"No," shouted Bankhead. "he will
not turn from tho important duties
he is performing to take such an
office as vice president "
Underwood would remain where he
was, doing his great constructive
work, Bankhead went on, and ho ex
pressed hope no one would further
urge the Alabama candidate for vice
president
Mr Underwood directs me to with
draw his name from this comention,"
said Bankhead, amid Impressive si
lence, adding a trlbuto of thanks
from Underwood for the sincere and
loyal support given him. He added
that all his friends were now re
leased to vote for whom they pleased.
Senator Stone, in Speaker Clark's
Interest, also mounted the platform
for a statement. (
Clark Delegates Released.
Stone said delegates were perfect
ly free to vote for whom they choose,
but the Missouri delegation would
vote for Clark on all ballots, regard
less of what others might do.
Foss Withdrawn.
Mayor Fitzgerald took the platform
to withdraw Foss.
Congressman Fitzgerald of New
York spoke from the platform, pre
senting the view of the New York
delegation under the fast changing
conditions.
Fitzgorald of Now York moved that
roll call bo dispensed with and the
nomination of Wilson be made by ac
clamation. The convention rose en masse as
New York's spokesman moved Wil
son's nomination by acclamation. A
frenzy of cheers swept the floor and
galleries. Delegates stood on their
chairs waving hats and flags.
Senator Reed Objects,
Senator Reed, of Missouri, interpos
ed objection to New York's lequest
for unanimous consent to make Wil
son's nomination by acclamation.
"Without the slightest desire to ex
iress anw sentiment or rancor, I ob
ject, because Missouri wants to be
recorded on this ballot, for old Champ
Clark," said Senator Reed in object
ing to the acclamation motion.
Forty-sixth ballot ordered at 2:53
p. ni.
Tho roll call went on because of ob
jection to suspending and making the
nomination by acclamation.
States Fell In Line.
State after state fell Into line for
Wilson, insuring his nomination by an
overwhelming majority.
Delegate Moore, of Ohio, took the
platform and reelascd the Harmon
delegates from further supporting
Harmon.
Wilson was nominatod at 3:15 p. m.
when Pennsylvania cast her 76 votes
for hlui, making his total 733.
Final Roil Call.
Alabama Wilson 24.
Arizona Wilson 6.
Arkansas Wilson IS
California Passed.
Colorado Wilson 10, Clark 2.
Connecticut Wilson 14.
Delaware Wilson 6.
Florida Wilson 7. Clark 5,
Georgia Wilson 28.
Idaho Wilson 8.
Illinois Wilson 58.
Indiana Wilson 30.
Iowa Wilson 26.
Kansas Wilson 20.
Kentucky Wilson 26.
Louisiana Clark 2, WIIso 18.
Maine Wilson 12
Maryland Wilson 16.
Massachusetts Wilson 36.
Michigan Wilson 30.
Minnesota Wilson 24.
Mississippi Wilson 20, l T
Missouri Wilson 20. tl
Missouri Clark 36.
Montana Wilson 8.
Nebraska Wilson 1G.
Nevada Clark 6.
New Hampshire Wilson 8.
New Jersey Wilson 24, Clark 4.
New Mexico Wilson 8.
New York-r-WJlson 90.
North Carolina Wilson 24.
North Dakota Wilson 10.
Ohio Passed.
Oklahoma Wilson 20.
Oregon Wilson 10.
Pennsylvania Wilson 76.
Oregon Wilson 10.
Pennsylvania Wilson 76.
Rhode" Island Wilson 10.
South Carolina Wilson IS. -
South Dakota Wilson 10. ,-
Tennessee Wilson 24.
Texas Wilson 40.
Utah Wilson 0.
Vermont Wilson S.
Virginia Wilson 24.
Washington Wilson 14.
West Virginia Wilson lb.
Wisconsin Wilson 2G.
Wyoming Wilson 0.
Alaska Wilson 6.
District of Columbia Clark G.
Hawaii Wilson G
Porto Rico Wilson G.
California Clark 21, Wilson 2.
Ohio Clark 1, Harmon 12, Wilson
33, two absent.
Forty-sixth ballot, official: Clark,
S4; Wilson, 990; Harmon, 12.
, 1 '
THINK REBELS MET FEDERALS,
Augua Prieta, July 2. Rebels said
to be a part of a force sent north
from Bachlmba to enter the stato of
Sonora, preparatory to an Invasion by
tho main force of the rebels In this
region, are said to have mot federal
troops. Fighting Is' believed to be iu
progress today near Baglves, SO miles
southeast of Augua Prieta.
t
BATTLE IS I
NOWJNDED I
Exciting Day as Crisis H
Was Reached in Big M
Political Contest H
Baltimore, July 2. The convention H
hall began to fill by 11 o'clock, but H
delegates, wearied with the long night :H
sessions and numerous roll calls, -were . 1
late appearing. Free admission j&afi . H
again an attraction of the crowds, M
which filled the galleries and massed M
solidly in tho areas flanking and jH
back of the delegates. Cool breezeB H
through the upper windows added H
comfort to the day and kept the flags H
fluttering. H
The New York delegation arrived H
early for the purpose of holding a H
caucus. The stand-pat element in the H
delegation, which thus far has been in H
the ascendancy, was for standing by H
Clark through thick and thin, but the jB
Clark men conceded that there was a jH
considerable element that felt that the H
time was near for a change. H
The New York delegates were still jH
in caucus when the convention met. H
The Information that came from the f
caucus room was that the, New York l
vote would continue to be cast for iH
Clark 1 1
At 12:09, Chairman James took his tH
place on the platform. James" voice, HH
worn by a week of shouting was husky jH
as he announced the Rev. George T. H
Grose, of Grace Methodist Episco- B
pal church, of Baltimore, -as chaplain jjH
of the day who offered prayer. jVfl
The clerk of the convention an- 'H
nounced another extension of time to H
July 15 for the validation of railroad JB
tickets held by delegates. BVjVJ
At 12:15 Chairman James directed
the calling of the roll for the forty- H
' third time. There was a general im- M
pression that today's session would JH
find some means of breaking t 'H
deadlock. .H
In Arizona, on the forty-third vote, M
Clark lost one vote to Bryan. fM
Connecticut showed a gain of two "H
for Wilson. They left the Clark col- H
umn. H
In Idaho Wilson gained 1 1-2. m
'The hall was quiet as Iillinois was M
cached. When Roger C. Sullivan of ,-fH
Chicago announced: 'jl
"Eighteen votes for Clark, forty for ,H
Wilson," there was great chcerins '
Chairman James pounded the table SH
with his gavelkind finally quieted the U
uproar. i
Illinois for Wilson. M
"Illinois, under ihe unit rule, "U ZH
-jS votes for Wilson," he announce H
and another cheer greeted the M
This gave Wilson a clear gain 0' o ' JM
votes in Illinois. ll
The New Jersey governor contwiM jH
to gain. In. Iowa he added l"1.- -M
his total voto. H
When Kentucky was called anl t n 'H
'ote was announced 2G rnr Clar H
one of the delegates demanded: M
"I want to know if Kentucky r" M
vote for Wilson If a majority of the H
delegates desire to do so?" H
Governor McCreary, chairman of JM
the delegation, argued that the In- H
structions of the Kentuckians would H
not allow a break. The Wilson men H
did not press the point, although eyl- H
dently confident of a vote in the dele- 1 H
gation. . , x j r 1
In Louisiana Wilson gained two and H
In Michigan olght, yL M
New York stopped for what for a f. H
few minutes looked like a Wilson IM
landslide. Representative William
Sulzer announced tho New York vote mjM
as 90 for Clark, as heretofore. This N91
dispelled all hope of a nomination on BH
this ballot. The delegation had de- M
cided In caucus to continue to cast jH
Its 90 votes for Clark. The vote In H
the caucus showed 78 for Clark, 10 H
for Wilson and 2 for Underwood. H
North Carolina Helps. M
North Carolina added two extra H
votes to the augmenting Wilson H
count. When Virginia was reached, H
Senator Swanson arose to explain Ue H
state's vote Ho asserted that at a H
caucus this morning the delegation (H
had decided to enforce the unit rule H
for the first time. Wilson had se- H
cured a majority of the delegation and H
the state's 24 votes were cost for him fm
The Wilson adherents cheered the h
Virginia vote, but from the Clark lH
forces there went up a shout of: H
"Ryan and Bryan." IH
Thomas R. Ryan, who was de- jjH
nounced by William J. Bryan. Is a H
member of the Virginia delegation H
Tho disordor was quickly eup- H
pressed, only to break out with re- H
lewed vigor when the entire Clark H
voto of 16 in West Virginia went oer H
to Wilson. In Wisconsin Wilson H
gained one more. H
The forty-third ballot gave: m
Wilson 602. M
Clark 229. B
Underwood OS1,?. m
(Continued on Page Eight.) jM
THIS PAPER CONSISTS H
OF 10, INSTEAD OF 8, H
PAGES THIS EVENING. H
WHY BECAUSE ADVER- H
TISEMENTS MUST NOT H
CROWD OUT THE NEWS. JM

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