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The Evening standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1910-1913, November 14, 1912, Image 2

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H - THE EVENING STANDARD, OGDEN, UTAH, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1U12. ' H&"
! -f ' ' " ' ' " ' ' ' - ' - Mli I
ZZZZ NEVER GET TOO HEAVY WITH A WHITE HOPE g
H f - i l j . i - i "n : fflr
H rT&OABOOT- 1 - W, Vft On rt P0U LOOK PRE.TTY (w CANT BSL TOO CAREFUL- NOW X j
THOO f& jQ Shi? TARED CVCLONE,- -T C,PPL YOU 5VWR.NCt W j I
K TODAY-CYCLONE- T?7k , 4wSLS ll ! --BE ENOUGH ?VJ FVC-HT WITH 0TOHNSO I &.
H i . ,
H I POUR STARS PRICE
m j FOR JOE TINKER
H It is doubtful whether there is an-
Hl other athlete In the National league
Hl In a class with Joe Tinker. At least
H not when It comes to placing a price
H upon the ability of the veteran Cub
H shortstop whose one ambition just
H now is to chuck aside the old har-
H ness so that ho can jump down to
H Cincinnati to mnagc the rcdlegged
H team by the Rh.ue.
H The Value of Tinker was made
H known recently when President
H Charles Welch Murphy of the Cubs
H announced what he considered a good
H trade whereby the Cub shortstop
B might attain the goal he is now striv-
Hl Ing for. Tho high cost of living isn't
H .' In it with Murphj's methods of put-j
ting a value on talent. The west
H side chief unblushingly admitted that1
Hj Ecscher, Ho'ilitzell, Marsans and ,
H Doolan would be proper bait to j
H prompt a trade of the popular actor-
There arc a few other good play-
Hl ' crs in the National league, but Mur-
Hj ' jiliy says he will be satisfied if he
M can get the above athletes in ex-
Hl change for Tinker Doolan, of course.
Hl is the man wanted most of all. and
Hl Manager Evers said only a few davs
Hl ago that he would swap Tinker even
H ) for the Philly star. Apparentlv the.
H j Cub owner and his recently installed i
H I manager do not jibe, but this will he
H j cleared up as soon as Murph gets a '
H chance to talk with Evers upon the!
Hj tatter's return to town.
H The men sought bv Murphy need
H no advertising. Hoblitzell guards the
H Initial sack to a considerable extent
H for the Reds and ranks with the best
H in the circuit. Bcscher Is tho fleet-
H footed gent who performed in left
H j firld for the Herrmann gang, and
H while he isn't a terrific hitter, he
H can cover plenty of ground in the
j i
outfield and encounters little trou
ble in his many attempts to pilfer
b2gs on unsuspecting backstops.
Marsans, the Cuban, occupies the
center garden, and like ttie other two,
is considered one of the strongest
members of the Red team.
As for Doolan, he is at present on
the Philadelphia pay roll, but Murphy
expects the Red management to over
come that little obstacle. It is sug
gested that if Herrmann really wants
Tinker for his manager he can go to
the trouble of helping tho Cubs fill
tho post that thev will have to weak
en if the Reds are given the leader
they seek.
JOE M'GINNITY
TO COACH TIGERS
If Ilughey Jennings manager of
(he Detroit Tigers, has his way, "Iron
!Man" Joe McGInnlty, former presl
; dent and manager of the Newark In
dians, will be a member of the Detroit
team next season. This fact was ad
mitted b Jennings, who paid a visit
to Newark yesterday The leader of
the Tigers tried to get In comrnunica-
tion with McGinnlty. but was unable
to locate the "Iron Man."
Jennings considers that McGiimify'
is one of the greatest pitchers the
game ever produced, and in his opin-l
ion the former Newark manager is i
still able to hold his own in the big
show.
"I would be delighted to land Mc
Ginnlty for mv club next season,"
said Jennings. "With the 'Iron Man'
in charge of the young pitchers on
our club. I believe the veteran could
coach these twlvlors and imp3rt to
them knowledce that would be of
greot benefit lo the club.
"When I heard that McGinnlty had
secured .his release I wasted no time
in informing Presitlrnt Xavin of oir
c'ub tint Joe would be a valuable,
ii i ii ii u'.i i.tf jr. . rj t.i n 111 ','j "yr-f irnrTi' i in
addition to our pitching corps, and
.Mr Navln got into communication
with tho 'Iron Man ' Wo could use
McGinnlty to advantage in more ways
than one. There isn't a man in the
country today who can pitch to bat
ters like Joe.
"I don t mean by this that in case
we landed the twirler that he would
be used for that purpose, but ne
would ghe our players confidence
i when they advanced to the plat- be-
I cause McGinnlty has'" always been
noted for the manner in which he
could control the ball and get his
offerings over tho plate. He varies
the ball btit ery little and it is the
balls that go over the plate that we
, want our men to hit and not to go
after evory ball served up. I consid-
! er McGinnlty still able to pitch good
ball and as a rolief twirler, one who
can jump Into tho game could, he has1
never had nn equal. 1 Avould Soulier
hae McGinnit on tho ten;n than a
dozen youngsters who only show
flashes of form "
MAGNATES NEED
TO LEARN LESSON
j Though experience is about the best
as well as the costliest teacher in this
world-wide school of hard knocks, ob
servation is another teacher that can
work great results with an apt pupil
National league magnates, however.,
are cither very dull and slow pupils,
or they aro completely blind to thcli
surroundings.
At Chicago. St. Louis, Cincinnati and
Philadelphia the managerial situation
has assumed a cast very much like r.
Balkan war mnp.
Trouble is written all over the af
fairs of these clubs and success has
been less than In former years.
In Now York and Pittsburg. McGraw
and Trod Cla'ko are given full sum
of the direction of tho clubs and the;
H l'mll Jlf I SJOME ay you'll pack a load of Prince Albert in
! V pBKP i yOUr Jmmy. and find out what real pipe-smoke is. II
M PKPI And the soner'you do it the more fun you'll have, j
-H - vW&fM I Thats 10w P-A-has started millions of men to smok-
H .gBrejM&g ing a pipe steady. In two years it has doubled the
H n TT number of pipe smokers, made the pipe twice as
m popular. Wo tobacco could do that unless it had the goods.
I Fringe Albert
H the national joy smoke
H has everything-that is, everything but the old sting and rankness P A n'f
M awipiy isn t there, because it's cut out by a patented process.
! I cf M l- yU rv y"r ciSarettes. yur smoke educa- .c-
H JLtIolCO tlon sure has bn neglected unless you have AJW
-H . tncd "p- A-" Why, Men, here's the ereatMi- ML b&fe&'Z
I thVhVCrStUCk- 0urwordf-P.A;'makin'sjUsraboeu '$$$3
S the high spot record! Cool, fresh, iragrant, with a flavor thats S
H so good that you'll double-quick forget those dust-brands ! wi
M Sold by all live dealer, in toppy red 5c bag. wrapped in weather- M ( SW llWl
B prooF POP'"' Uy "d 10a tins and half-pound and pound humidor.. ff Wm I
j R- J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO., Winston-Salem, N. C ' IV
showing that has been made by them
goes without saying.
Look at Connlo Mack. Stahl, Grif
fith or at any of tho leaJing clubs and i
it can be seen that the manager, un- !
hindered, has turned out a good ball
club und in general is satisfying fans
and owners alike.
I3ul look at the meddlesome Charles
Words Murphj, at Mrr,. Brltton in St.
Louis, at the many who intorfere it
Cincinnati and Philadelphia and it can
likewise be easily seen that only a
miracle could succeed in producing a
winner at any of these cities with all
the obstacles that are placed in a
manager's way.
When a man is In a business thr.t
is alive with competition he generally
watches the other fellow and is awake
to all his moves and advantages. Ho
vill make use of his competitor's
methods and try to Improve thorn if
they are successful but certain Na
tional league magnates have appar
ently forgotten eerything else in the
world but themselves and that is the
first thing they should have chucked
from their memory.
BATTLE WILL BE
WORTH WATCHING
When Yale meets Princeton Novem
ber JG. within the battle 01 supremacy
between the Blue and the Tigers will
wage a little struggle. Blumenthal of
Princeton and Ketcham of Yale will
fight it out for the honor of being
all-American center of 1012
Last year the Yale man was picked
Tor the place by Walter Camp, but
there were manv who hold that the
Prlncelonlan was the better man. Now
Bluenieutu.il has Improved a great
deal over his 1911 form. Those who
aw him in the Dartmouth game say
he is better at handling the ball, bet
ter at offense and defense, r-nd shows
moie speed.
j u was spec 1 that gae Ketcham the
1 1 edge last year. On defense he cover
' ed nearly as much ground as an end
i and was easily as good as a tackle
I He has slowed down lltt'.e IT any, and
the lace is even closer than it was
Its outcome do. ends on the showing
i of the two men when they clash
SALARY INCREASE
BROUGHT TROUBLE
j Roger Bresnahan's troubles as man
ager of the Cardinals staited last talli
j when he signed a new contract. The
I news that Roger had been given a big
1 boost in salary, with a percentage of j
the club profits, started all the play-
crs on a strike for more money. Steel I
I and Harmon held out until the day be
fore the season opened. Mowrcy also
was a holdout and missed the train
ing trip I co Magce Is another play
ei who kicked for more money and at
one time threatened to jump the team
unless his salarj was increased.
The spring training was a joke Rog- i
er jumped from West Baden to Jack
son, Tenn , and from the latter place
to Jackson, Miss. Then he brouglit '
the team home curing a blizzard and
tho squad was idle for one entiie week '
before the spring series opened with
he Browns. The club beat the Browns
but obtained a poor start in the Na- ,
tional league championship vace. at
one stage losing 15 out of 16 games.
While ihe team was losing, Mrs.
Brltton decided to remove B A. Stein
Inger, then president of the club."
Roger suggested that Steinjnger be
permitted to serve .out his term Then
trouble broke out in earnest between
Mrs. Brltton and Bresnahan.
In tho middle of the campaign the
fiery leader of the Cards had a run
in with Mike Mowrey and fined the
third sacker $25 for not chasing an
infield fly. Hauser tried to make
the play; Roger thought Mowrey
should have caught the ball. Every
body In the grand stand blamed Rube
Geyer for not going after the fly.
Mowrey was out of the game for two
weeks.
Bresnahan Is a torrlflc fighter on
the ball field and a hard loser. Not
withstanding the friction between him
and Mrs. Brltton, he set his heart on
winning the fall series from the
Browns.
It had been common gossip for
weeks that Roger's job was In jeop
ardy. The Browns rooters ligured
that Bresnahan would not try very
hard against the Browns, but he fool
ed everybody by taking off his coat
and working overtime to beat Hedges'
pets.
During the last Sunday game with
the Browns Jack Bliss was coach
ing at first base. One of the Cards
pulled a liner down tho right foul
line. The batsman was racine toward
tlrst base, when Bliss waved him
back.
"Foul ball!" yelled Coacher Bliss.
"Who told you to umpire the
game?" growled Bresnahan as he rush
ed up to Bliss.
"Why, It's as plain as the nose on
your race that it was a foul ball,"
said Bliss, -and I didn't see any use
in allowing tho batsman to waste en
ergy running out a foul ball."
"Well, there Is an umpire up there
paid to all those plavs." bellowed
Bresnahan. "You let him decide 'cm.
and attend fo your own business."
This incident illustrates Bresnahan's
jjfry l;,ltfEByiiM,y-' jtr t' i "VIM
idea of claiming everything in sight. I
Roger is never beaten until the last I
man is out. He is a disciple of the
McGraw school. "Muggsy's" pupils
go on the theory that results alone
count on the ball field.
Roger's hot temper got him in many
a jam on the ball field. Last year
he had a jawing match with Umpire
Klem over in Cincinnati. The urn
piro "lost his head" und took a punch
at Rresnahan. No one doubts Rog
ers gameness, but he had sense
enough not to fight with Klem on
the field. President Lynch fined Klem
S50 for slugging the St. Louis man
ager. The first time George Stovall wont
to the bat in the hpring series be
tween the Cards and tho Browns
Roger greeted him thusly:
"Stick it right over the middle of
the pan for this big Cleveland dis
card. He couldn't hit a signboard
with a gun loaded with buckshot "
"Is that so?" growled Stovall. "Well,
I'll be hitting big league pitchers when
you are paying your way Into the
park Put that in your pipe and
smoke it."
"Why, you aren't mad, are you,
George?" replied Roger with a grin.
"I was only 'kidding' you."
"Well, if you meant it as a joke, I
can Josh, too." replied Stovall as ho
swung on the ball and slammed It
against the fence.
MANY BOYS ON
HOSPITAL LIST j
Chicago. No 14 The Noithwest-i
ern university football squad had
short signal practice In the cage, af
ter a chalk talk, as their part for the
day.
A formidable hospital list repre
sents the iesults of the last few
games the team has played. Cole has
water on the knee. Siegel's ankle will
be examined by X-ray tomorrow.
Springer, who broke his collarbone
in the Indiana game, hopes to get in
tho game with Illinois.
SILENCE IN THE
ILLINOIS STANDS
Urbana. Ill . Nov 1 1 - The Illinois
football team worked hard against tho
freshmen, using defensive tactics
against Universlu of Chicago p?oia'-
ties which the freshmen employed
The team will bo given final haul
practice today In preparation for the
Chicago game.
A feature of the game here will oo
silence in the Illinois stands. Editor
ials in the university papors pointed
out that bands and cheering prevented
signals from being heard in the Min
nesota and Purduo games. In meet
ings students have declared that the
practice of drowning opponents' sig
nals is unsportsmanlike.
Chicago In High Spirits.
Chicago. Nov 1 1. The University
of Chicago football tosnj went through
its entire repertoire of plays today
in signal drill that showed the men
quicker and in better spirits than for
some time.
Severe Practice.
Minneapolis, Nov. 14. Minnesota's
football squad was driven through
more than three hours ot" practice
yestcrUay afternoon In preparation for
the game with Wisconsin here next
Saturday.
Working on Trick Plays.
Bloomlngton. lud.. Nov. 14. The
University of Indiana football team
worked hard on trick plays, which will .
bo a leading feature of their coming
games, according to the coaches. The!
second team was kept on tho defon- j
sivc. using Purdue tactics, while the
'varsity tried to gain ground with for
ward passes and trick end runs. !
i
kn plays omdi
for utahfresi:men
The gTound-sninin? effectiveness oi
the eight new puzzle formations, de
signed especially for the light Ogdcn
High school football team, will be
tried for the first time tomorrow af
tornoon at S:o0 o'clock at Glenwood
Park against the University of Utah
Freshmen team. Ogden High hopes
to use these formations against Salt
Lake High Thanksgiving As the
new formations depend entirely upon
speed and agility, they render inef
fective the weight of the opposing
team, and the same, play may be put
in operation In eight different ways.
General admission 50 cents. Student
tickets 25 cents. (Advertisement)
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