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The Evening standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1910-1913, November 16, 1912, Image 4

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H THE EVENING STANDARD, OGDEN, UTAH, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1912. IB
H William Glamann, Publ shor xPvNv
H An Independent Newspaper MNisSgBpD
H (ESTABLISHED 1870.) QasETi
H This paper will always fight for progress and reform, it .will not
B knowingly tolerate injustice or corruption and will always fight don a
H koctcs of all parties, it will oppoao privileged classes and public plun
B SS ft will never lack sympathy with the PO". 't wiu aaya roma q
H devoted to the publc welfare and will never bo satisfied wKb, merelj print
j ins news, it will always be drastically independent and will never be afraid
H io attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predator poorty.
H
H A FOOL EDITOR AND HIS F.OOL ADVIOE.
H The Ogden Examiner is a peculiar sheet, to say the least. On
H , Thursday it complained that the publisher of the Standard and Ogden
H i City had a meeting and hud kept it from the newspapers. Then on
H Friday morning, the sheet complained because the Standard publish-
H , ed an account of the meeting. So aviso is the editor of the Alley
H sheet, that he tells the city commissioners this morning that every
H ' one of the demands made by the city must be granted by the Ogclon
H Hiver Reservoir Co.
H "Why does the Examiner give that advice? Because it wants to
H defeat the building of the dam. Why? Because the narrow, shrivel-
Hl cd soul who bosses the "Whiskey Trust sheet would rather have Og-
H den never profit by the building of the dam, if the publisher of the
H Evening Standard has anything to do with the success of the un-
H dcrtaking.
H Why are the stockholders of the Examiner complaining about
H the Examiner's losses? Because the policy of the managers is not
approved by the people of Ogden. The sheet does not pay any divi-
H dends and it never will be a success just so long as tho Examiner's
f policy is to fight a good thing simply because its competitor favors it.
Hj i After a while the Examiner stockholders will insist upon a dc-
Hj cent policy. Then there will be hopes of success even for the Ex-
H I amincr.
Hj For 20 years a score or more papers have tried to get rich' in
Hl Ogden by calling William Glasmann names. Up to date they have
Hl all failed. The people of Ogden know Mr. Glasmann and they will
H not pay for a paper that devotes the -greater part of its columns
H simply to abuse of him.
H Now to the point. This comer, this repudiated scribe from Salt
H Lake, this importation from Oregon, who has lived just six months
Hj in Ogden, of course, knows more about the city's business than does
H Sam Browning, who has just served four years as president of tho
H Ogden City council. Of course, he knows more about the city's
M business than does Mayor A. G. Fell, who was a member of the city
M council 20 years ago and has watched city affairs ever since. Of
H course, he knows more about Ogden City's business than does J. C.
1 Nye, because Mr. Nye only served 4 years as city councilman ten
j years ago and has lived in Ogden only 25 years. Sure, a six months'
H importation could gather all of Mr. Nye's 25 years knowledge in
H his soaked cranium in just a second and a quarter. The
H Examiner editor boasts that he knows more than all the people of
H Ogden combined. That is just what that other jackass said,
j Mr. Nye "has been the executive head of the Davis & Weber
H Counties Canal company, a company that has spent more money,
M built more dams and has had more experience with water and water
H rights than any other dozen concerns in this part of Utah, Yet, in
H one glass the Examiner man gains more 'knowledge than all .the ex
H perience of"25 years has taught Sam Browning, A. G. Fell and J. C.
H Nye.
H LTow came Salt Lake to kick this wise Examiner man out of the
H capital of Utah? How did he escape from Oregon?
H Without knowing one thing about the controversy, he says the
H city must not concede a point to the Reservoir company, yet tho
H Reservoir company declines all demands of the city. The commis-
H sioners of Ogden do not know even now how much damage one of the
H Examiner owners did Ogden city while he was mayor.
H When .the city commissioners are fully convinced that the rec-
H ords in the state engineer's office show that the city has no rights
M at the Cobble Creek dam site, that the rights the city once owned
H were cancelled when that Examiner stockholder, Brewer, was mayor
M and that the records in the City hall, Ogden, Utah, were so arranged
M ' as to show that the city owned the Cobble Creek site, then the city
H commissioners will not only be willing to compromise but will waive
1 the present demands and ask for water rights in the reservoir com-
H pany and pay for the same as others do, or the city can build a dam
H at some other point and pay $350,000 for the same water it can now
1 get for one-third of that sum.
H which shows how much the Examiner knows all about the
H reservoir and the citys business.
H THE TRIBUNE IS FLIPPANT.'
H u S. S??v standarl baa been paying considerable atteu-
H !.pn the tribune B Position on Roosevelt and other matters and
m doesn t see how we reach the conclusions that we do. We would
m recommend the Standard to sit down and think things over a bit
m an?r,lt would aee only we notQ that it seems to have no 'think-
H .?oregoingia from the Tribune. That paper has another
1 think v coming. Evading the question by reaorting to a pointless
mt play 6n words discloses weakness. The Standard challenges the
H Tribune to reproduce our editorial and attempt a reply We do this
H confident that the Tribune cannot successfully defend its position
M against popular primaries or prove by the election returns that Koos-
H evelt was not robbed of the nomination at the Republican national
H convention,
1 . Tihe Standard is not alonc its contention that the results of
H the election prove the manipulators of the Chicago convention to
m have been rogues. The Boston Globe, a Democratic paper of recog-
m nized editorial ability, with a more brilliant "thinker" on its edi-
1 tonal staff than is known to reside in Salt Lake, reviewing the elec
tion returns, says:
natlonalonvaStS f? mby Coloii?1 Roosevolt at the Republican
naiionai comentlon in Chicago against President Tait dcloeatPH
ses: a sasa Nortt -
LH Tafi'S vln)0 a T,ueday !t Rooaovelt ran ahead of
H Oklahoma ! thBC states-FIc"-l, Kentucky and
H ingtonnS Tnin106". that the convention legates of Wash-
H nominated f HonHiLn' t0 g0 " hIgher ,n tho 1Ist wuld have
H Q JStlonwhLtC ?TZ ?eGn?& to a conclu8lve answer to the
M ni..S? vnelaer or not Colonel Roosevelt wbb robbod of tin
H f5eSi?wo?fioiUittta!ld Whther th to whose0 Rosevlt
H delegates wore not seated approved of that action at the polls.
m If 4he Tribune will cease to be flippant, and, instead, offer a
m flennble explanation of its Standpatism, the Standard will forgive it
M lor its assumption of superiority.
GIRL KIDNAPED
H CRUELLY BEATEN
H u ?5!iCa,gt!; 7a 16 Unrouulted love
m fa believed by the police to have caus-
m . d Samuel Alecchi and two Unidentl-
fled companions to kidnap Christiana
AlessI, 15 years old, last night.
Three hours after the girl had been
forced Into a taxicab by three men,
one of whom she asserted was Alec
chi, a former suitor, she was found
dazed, beaten, bleeding and suffering
from the effects of chloroform beside
0
a railroad track on a lonely road forty
miles from her home.
"Alecchi threatened to kill ine if I
didn't become Ills wife," she told the
police "I refusod and then the threu
attacked me. I attempted to scream.
Alecchi put a handkerchief over my
mouth and I became unconscious.
When I recovoreil consciousness the
chauffeur was telling tho men he
would not carry us any further. I then
was thrown out of the machine. '
STATE NEWS
5 OFFICIAL RETURNS
BOX ELDER COUNTY
i
1 Brlgham City, Nov. 15. The com-
- plote and official roturns of Box Elder
, county give;
Tart 1C50; Wilson 1402, Roosevelt
,' 036.
Congressmen Howell (R), 1.58S; J.
1 Johnson (R), 1,030, T. D. Johnson (D),
1.-147; Thomas (D), 1,449; Lovo (F),
v SOD; Larson (P), 792.
' Governor Sprv (R), 1.404; Tolton
- ID), 1,371, Morris (P), 1,190.
Justice Frlck (R), 1.054; Young
' (D). 1,487; Hiles (P), S3u
! Scctetary Mattson (R), l,G5C;
England (D), 1,4 (J3, lleudershot (P),
' S02.
Treasurer Jewkea (R), ,ZZZ; Mon
denhall (D), 1,144; Adams (P), 830.
Auditor Kelly (R), 1.C92. Hlaln
(D). 1.43G, Adams (P), S3C.
Attorney General -Barnes (R, 1,
77G, Stringfellow (D), 1,433; Law
lenco (P). S21.
State Superintendent "of Instruction
Nelson (R-P), 3.3G2.
First Judicial District James C
Walters (R). 1.5G3, Justin D. Call (D).
1.9S9.
District Attorney B. C. Call (R),
1,946. Roy D. Thatcher (D), 1,541
First Senatorial District Willard S
Hansen (R), 1,745, John P. Chrlstcn
sen (D), 1.49C; V R. Smith (P), 74S.
Box Elder Legislative District
John C. Knudson (R), 1.4S9; Milton H.
Welling (D), 1,747, William L. Gro
vor (P), 732.
County: Four Year Commissioner
Hans S. Larsen (R), 1,560; Thomas
H. Blackburn (D,, 1,674; John F. Enl
mann (P), 737. Two year C. C. Toyn
(It), 1,48S F. A E. Roche (D), 1.G5S;
Charles Edwards (P). 832. Sheriff
Joseph R Olsen (R), 1,773, D Ixircn
Rees (D), 1,480, Lorenzo S Burt (P),
712. Clerk Alvln Ipsen (R), 1,743.
W. W. Chrlstonsen (D), 1.4G1; Enoch
Iverson (P), 7GG. Treasurer M. .1
Richards (R), 1.G61; W J. Facer (D)
1.5SS; C. W. Richards (P), 712. At
torneyWilliam J. Lowe (R), 1.S5.1,
William E. Davis (D), 1,658. Recorder
Rose N Neeley (R), 1,797. Olga
Standing (D), 1,707. Assessor Loren
zo Pett (R). 1,904. W. H. Anderson
(D), 1.391; Moroni Ward (P), G63
Surveyor H. C. Carver (R), l.SGG;
Robert Dalton (D). 1,574 Jutlco of
Peace Denmark Jensen (R). 507; II.
M. FIggins (D), 5S0 Constable Ma
rinus Olsen R), 520; John H, Wat
kins (D), 54S.
Precinct Officials.
The correct list of precinct justices
of the peace and constables for Box
Elder county is as follows:
Malad Justice, E. R. Hadley; con
stable, E. T. Rico,
Rlversldo Justice, John Richards;
constable, Thomas Damond.
Collinston Justice. Hyrum Jensen;
constable, J. J. White.
Fielding Justice, F. S. Peck; con
stable. Edward Haskell.
Calls Fort Justice, Joseph Hunsa
ker; constable, Than. Boothe
Bear River Justice, A. C Petersen;
constable, Eli Anderson.
Mantun Justice. C. M. Petersen;
constable, C A. Anderson.
Deweyille Justice. J. F. Knudson;
constable. R. X. Gardner.
Willard, 1 and 2 Justice. Ephraim
White: constable, R. II. Morgan.
Portage Justice. D W. Morris;
constable. Royal Hal ord
Beaver Dam Justice. R. A. John
son; constable, Michael Ericksen.
Elwood Justice, J. O. Jorgcnsen;
conetablo, O. L. Brough,
Booth Valley Justice, C. W. Stokes;
constable, Willlas Whltnker.
Howell Justice. George J. Wood;
constable, J. L. Baxter.
Plymouth Justice, Don Lamb; con
stable. Thomas Laws.
Garland Justice. J. J Shumway;
constable, E. V Schneider.
East Garland Justice, J. W, Lar
sen; constable, William Adams.
Perry Justice. J, P. Roberts; con
stable, Hyrum Thorn.
Tremonton Justice, H. M. Holler;
constable, W. E. Hadley.
Rawlins Justice, R. C. Harris; con.
stable, T. R. Evans.
Promontory Justice, H. E. Larsen;
constable. D. O. Wadman.
Snowville Justice, William Hurd;
constable, W. A, Stevens,
Park Valley Justice, Charles W.
Goodllffe; constable, Albert D. Hir
schi. Grouse Creok Justice, Allen N.
Tanner; constable, Orson C. Richlns.
Rosette Justlco, Jacob Kunzler;
sonstable, F. J. HIrschi,
Lucin Justice, C. J. Durke; consta
ble. Ralph Smith.
Yost Justlco. A. H. Yato; consta
ble, William YoBt.
TWO WEDDINGS AT POCATELLO
Pocatollo, Nov. 16. Arton Jackson
of this city and Cora .TackBon of Ida
ho Falls were married at Blackfoot
yesterday. After a wedding trip to
Salt Lake they will bo at home- in
this city.
Lloyd Caatagneto and Hannah
Edgeley, both of this city, wore mar
ried yosterday evening, Stake Presi
dent W. A. Hyde performed the cero
mony. Owing to tho iact that tho
bride was only 17 the consent of her
father had to be obtained.
SCAFFOLD COLLAP8ES;
THREE MEN INJURED
American Fork, Nov, IG. Two men
were seriously Injured and another
badly "bruised yesterday afternoon
when a scaffold in the gymnasium
of the new high school building of the
new high school building hero col
lapsed and threw the mqn working on
It to tho floor below. The men were
working on the ceiling of the new
gym when the heavy planks, holding
them gave way, precipitating them to
the floor, with the scaffold on top
of them.
Henry Erickeon of Lehi suffered
severe bruises about the head and a
compound fracture of the ankle. He
was taken to Lehi in an automobile.
Doctors foar that It will bo ucccs
Bary to amputatp the foot.
Albert Ludlow of Spanish Fork" re
ceived what may prove fatal Inju-
nes. One of tho heavy timbers struck
him on his spine, paralyzing the low
er part of liis body He was taken to
his home in Spanish Fork in a se
rious condition.
John Buckley escaped more fortu
uatoly than the other two. lie suf
fered a number of painful though not'
serious bruises. He was nblo to re-
turn lo work a short lime after tho
accident. lle Is a resident of Prove.
SIX MILES OF CEMENT WAL.K.
Lch I, Nov. IG The city council at
Us last session voted to construct
between The and six miles or cement
sidewalk in different parts of tho
JIty Lohs than 10 per cent of the
abutting property owners protested
against tho proposed levy Work on
the pioposed improvement will be
gin In the spring. The property own
ers so desiring will be permitted to
do their own work while the city will
do the work for the others.
FINED FOR SELLING WHISKY.
Ephraim, Nov. IG. Chris Shultz,
one of Ephralm's citizens, has been
fined for selling whisky. Two officeis
of the t'lty were concealed In the
hotel being built by Adulbert Ander
son when Shultz, in company with
a couple of boys, was caught by the
officers. Mr. Shultz received the
money for the liquor just as tho of
ficers stepped out. A Jury found Mr
Shultz guilty and ho was fined ?200
and 55 days In Jail Mr. Shiill- v. Ill
appeal the case.
Since the recent storm tne h'um of
tho threshing machines can be heard
The faimors are rejoicing ovei the
excellent crops which they have had
this year and the good outlook for
the summer, as already a great deal
of snow has fallen in the mountains
READY TO LAY TRACK.
t Provo, Nov 16. Four carloads of
steel rails arrived yesterday for the
Salt Lake & Utah Interurban road, and
three more cars are en loute, for
' which way bills have been received
here. Several cars of ties fire expect-
' ed dally, and on tho arrival of theao
tracklaylng will immediately be com- !
monced from Third South on Academv
avenue to the northern limits of the
; city. The storms of the past wee'.v
havo delayed grading some, but it is
' said that work will be started again
Monday morning, and by that time it
is expected tho tics will bo here, when
tracklaylng will also begin. j
MISSIONARY DIES
Manti, Nov 15. Word was lecebedl
here this morning of the sudden death ,
of George Taylor at Denver, Colo. Mr ,
Taylor was a son-in-law of Presideni
Louis Anderson and had been on a
mission for the last two years Mr
Taylor was taken 111 with typhoid fo- !
vor some time ago and his wife wen!
to nurse him. He had recovered suf
flclenth to be laken home and ho an:
his wife and baby were making preo- i
nratlons to return when ho suddenlj
expired. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor had ,
been married, about three years.
SCHOOL ELECTION DECEMBER 5
Brlgham City, Nov. 10. The regu
lar school election will bo hold Do-1
cember 5 The election Is for rep-'
resentativo of jireclncts Nos 2 and I
and the two now membeis will br
elected for four years. The second
precinct comprises the towns of Bei- r
ver Dam, Collinston. Floldlng, Plv- !
mouth, Portage, Garland, Riverside E
North Garland and East Garland Pre- C
clnct No. 4 is compoqed of the town f
of Mantua. Willard, Three Mile. Lake f
Side Calls Fort, Honeyville and Dew-jf
eyville 1 1
BEET HARVEST DELAYED.
Provo, Nov. IG. At the cutting sta
tion here the Utah-Idaho Sugar com
pany yesterday paid to the farmers .of
Provo and vicinity $27,000. The amount
was considerably less than that paid
in Novembor last year, but the De
cember payment1? are expected to br ,
much greater. The severe storms of;
the past mouth have prevented the
digging of beets, ru-l on that account
not more than a th d of the tonnage
that was ready was delivered.
FORT HALL MINE TO EXPAND
Pocatollo, Ida., Nov. G. il. M. Pal
mer of the Fort Hall mine states that
this mine Is on tho evo of a great de
velopment The stockholders have
agreed to Increase the canital stock
to one million shares and this increaso
In the capitalization, they think, will
afford the connany funds to place
tho mine on a paying basis. There Is
n large amount of ore In sight. The
shares arc now rated at ?1
PRAISES UTAH DAIRIES.
Provo. Nov IG. J C. Lambert, dep
uty state dairy and food insp'ector, has
been in Provo for several days in
specting the dairies and slaughter
houses. Mr. Lambert says that only
one case was found In Utah countv
INTENSE ITCHING OP
SKIN AFFECTION
fci Rash on Leg, Spread to Other
Parts of Body, Several Boils.
Pain Caused Nervousness and
Loss of Sleep, Cuticura Soap
and Ointment Effected Cure.
836 TV. 20th St.. Los Angeles. Cal.
"Tho Bkln affection began in a llttlo red
colored rash on my right leg, and gradually
t spread to other parts of ray
body. Then small pimples
appeared and later aoveral
bolls on my leg. The akin
around tho bolls vns at
first bright red, and after
words becamo darker col
ored. Tho clothing Irritated
the sores. The pain caused
nervousness and loss of
sleep, and tho itching was
lntonso. After using various remedies for
bout six months I saw how a person af
flicted with skin disease was cured by using
Cuticura Soap and Ointment.
"I bathed tho aorea with Outlcura Soap
and hot wntor and then applied Cuticura
Ointment and after about six montlia" con
stant treatment tho sores Kr-idually healed
leaving tho akin soft and smooth. Cuticura
Boap and Ointment effected a complcto
cure." (Signed) H A.Itoblnson,Fob.24.'12.
, If you wish a nkfn clear of pimple, black
leads and other annoying eruptions, hands
ft aQd wldte, hair Uto and glossy, and
calp freo from dandruff and itching, begin
to-day tho rpgular uso or Cuticura Soap for
the toilet, bath and Bhampoo, assisted by
ftn occasional light application of Cuticura
Ointment. Sold every where. Liberal samplo
rf each mailed free, with 32-p. Skin Book. Ad
dress post-enrd "Cuticura. JJept, T. Boston."
WTcnder-raced mon ,jj0U( us0 Cuticura
oap Shaving Stick, 25c. Sample Uto.
f
"'"W PIWi HWW VU...U mm '. ""
1 THIS IS THE LAST DAY OF THE SILK SALE. THE OP- jl
I PORTUNITY TO OBTAIN ELEGANT SILK MATERIALS AT 1 J
I PRICES WHICH ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LOW. HUNDREDS j I
1 OF YARDS HAVE BEEN SOLD SINCETHE SALE STARTED, j
I BUT THERE IS STILL A GOOD ASSORTMENT REMAINING, i
I TODAY, THEREFORE, IS THE TIME TO BUY SILKS FOR I I
I THE SEASON. - 1 ' 1
500 YARDS OP FANCY SILKS, 65c QUALITY 1,500 YARDS OF CHEENY SHOWER-PROOF : B
4 35 SILKS IN STRIPES AND FANCIES, IN ALL ! K
E THE LATEST COLORS 96c TO $1.00 QUAL- ) fl
j 36-INCH BLACK MESSALINE SILK, $1.00 ITY 68 l
i QUALITY, SALE PRICE 79' 36-INCH SATIN DE PARIS. $1.75 QUALITY. J . 1
I SALE PRICE S1.49 I
I 36-INCH CRYSTAL CORD SILK, $2.00 QUAL- 36-INCH MORlE SILK, $1.25, SALE E
ITY, 75c TO $1.00 NOVEMBER SALE $1.69 PRICE &($ 1 H
1 1,500 YARDS OF CHEENY SHOWER-PROOr "p'Sfcg $AT'N " 8AL, fiq I
3 SILKS, 26 INCHES WIDE-IN STRIPES AND 36.NCH PEAU DE SOIE 91 75 SALE I
I. FANCIES, ALL THE LATEST SHADES-85c PRICE ' ' 1 2 l i
j QUALITY AT 5S scinch bl'ack"ta'ffe'ta'.'$'i.'50.'saLe
i PRICE 3-i no 5
1,000 YARDS OF 36-INCH MESSALINE AND JpJ-.UJ i
5 CHANGEABLE CHIFFONS, TAFFETAS, $1.25 p'p.r'rl BLACK TAFFETA' 51.00, SALE
TO $1.75, SPECIAL AT 9S 'E 76 g
n v 27-INCH BLACK TAFFETA, 75c QUAL- fl
!j 2,000 YARDS FIGURED CHIFFON TAFFETA. ITY, SALE PRICE 53
3 BROCADE SATINS. FANCY STRIPES AND 27-INCH DUCHESS, $1.25 QUALITY, ' g
2 PERSIAN DESIGNS 90c TO $1.25 QUAL- SALE PR,CE $1.05
;1 ITY 7Q 27-INCH MESSALINE, 75c QUALITY, &
i 2. SALE PRICE . Q5.
i i
Min&fll PTCC r'AArftiCZ
WVHIIIL UffCtL IjUUIJO i
I AMD CLOAKINGS 1
ADDED TO THE FEATURES IN THE SILK LINES WE ARE 1
j OFFERING SPECIALS ON SEASONABLE WOOL DRESS
I GOODS AND CLOAKINGS. THESE HAVE BEEN UNDER-
I PRICED IN THIS OFERING TO MAKE THEM DESIRABLE TO E '
THE PRUDENT BUYERS. TAKE TIME TO READ THROUGH S
jl THE LIST AND YOU ARE SURE TO CONCEDE THAT THEY (
i ARE REMARKABLY MODERATE IN PRICE. f
J ;
y 36-INCH DRESS GOODS IN PLAIN 44 TO 50-INCH DRESS G O O D S IN
AND FANCY MIXTURES, 50c TO STAPLE SHADES IN FANCY MIX- j
75c QUALITY NOVEMBER SALE.. 39 T!H?ES PLA,N SERGES, DIAGONAL 3
i r AND VHIP CORD, FR1M $1.00 TO I I
36 TO 44-INCH DRESS GOODS ALL' $1.50 NOVEMBER SALE 7J fl
' STYLES AND COLORS, SERGES - J"S,H DRESS GOODS IN A L L ' fc ffl
WHIP CORDS AND FANCY MIX- f JS tSSBLN WS" I I
b TURES. VALUES FROM 75c TO $1.00 $1.50 TO $2 00 VALUES NOVEM t I
-NOVEMBER SALE 5g BER SALE . .T. 7.. . . ." QS: 5 j
deserving of censure, and In tbat case
the offending dairyman was selling
butter to tbe retailers which is one
ounce short in weight The samples
of milk taken and te3ted were all
up to standard, says Mr. Lambert
Twin Falls, Ida,, Nov. IG. An acci
dental shooting occurred IS miles fioin
rtogerson on the Salmon tract yes
terday, icsultlng in the serious Injury
of Ray Kline of this city, who was
working on the Baker ranch A gun
In the hands of Fred Atkinson, also
employed on the ranch, was acciden
tally discharged, the bullet striking
a flngor on Atkinson's left hand, which '
was over the muzzle of the gun, and
going on struck young Kline. Inflict
ing a very serious abdominal wound.
The young man was brought to this
city and hurried to the hospital, where
he was operated upou The bullet
was not located and tho injured man
is in a serious condition, although he
rallied from the operation.
oo
SERVIA CLAIMS
ANOTHER CITY
London, Nov. 16, A dispatch to
the Daily Nows from Vienna says
Servla, instead of abating In her
demands, now claims Avlond, in the
Adriatic sea, 33 miles southwest of
Derat,
The correspondent adds that Ser
via's answer to tho Austrian repre
sentation Is still unknown, but that
it Is reported that Servian troopa
have reached the Albanian coast of
the Adriatic, It is reported, also says
Iho correspondent, that three large
ships under command of naval offi
cers havo loft for the south under
sealed orders It Is uncertain wheth
er they are transporting recruits to
Bosnia and Dalmatla or are ou a
mission connected with the Servian
occupation of the Albanian coasL
rm
PRIEST LEADS THE ,
TROOPS TO VICTORY
London, Nor. 16. A correspondent
or the Morning Post with the Monto
nogrlns describes an act of heroism
by a priest who led the soldiers in
battle when their commander was
killed. This occurred Thursday when
an unsuccessful attempt bv tho Turks
to storm a position held by the Mon
tenegrins In the valley or the Boy- I
ana river. n
When tho commander was taken to
tho rear, mortajly wounded, the chap-
.nmigaVe, hIm nIs benediction.
Then," says the correspondent,"
ho snatched -up a rifle and cried to
the soldiers, 'Forward, sons of Cher- C
nagora, In defenso of the cross and I
. JL ry of Klns Nicholas." I
The priest, brandishing his cross
t ".''iij.i';PiiilmiWiW)WiiipiiLiNi,ip(j ac
I like a banner, had reached the firing
line when a fresh and more furious
volley came from tlie Turkish column
He stood among the recumbent sol-
i dlers, who continued lo (Ire. Then he
began to chant the hymn "God
Against the Infidel." He reached the
lines which In English run. "Tribu
latiou shall not avail to bend the
army of the Lord," when his voice
suddenly died away He waved his
arms about his head and fell on his
face with a bullet through his heart."
IO
KNOTTY QUESTION
BEFORE PRESIDENT
Washington, Nov. IG President
Taft and several of his legal advisers
wrestled unsuccessfully last night. with
the question of the admjnlstratlon'3
policy toward concerns which produce
and transport oil and which seek to
obtain leases to government oil lands.
Tho Interior department recently-issued
regulations governing the leasing
of Indian oil lands which prohibited
concerns engaged both in tho produc
tion and transportation oil from bid
ding for these Indian lands.
No decision was reached but It was
annpunced that tho president would
take up the case next week with Mr.
Wickersham and Mr, Fisher.
FEDERAL GENERAL
JOINS THE REBELS
Mexico City, Nov IG. A possiblo
explanation of the more effloiont cam
paigning recently on the part of tho
Zapatistas In the states of Puebla,
Morolos and Mexico Is suggested by
the assertion from a credible source
that Hlglno Aguilar, an aged general
of the regular army who Joined tho
Insurrection several weoks ago, has
entered into an alliance with tho Za
patistas and now is their directing
officer. Agullar's chief lieutenant is
" "
said to be Guadencio De Lallave, who
was a colonel in the regular army
The defeat of the foderals at Bar
ranca Honda Is said to have been
I Agullar's' work. Later reports of this
onsagement say that all but our of
the ono hundred federals who were -
on their way from Buebla to the ro
lief of Tepeje were killed in tho am
buscade. Encounters are reported today in
the state of Gunajuato at the Cerro
Zlanco ranch and Pnnales Hill. The
rebels were defeated at both places
with slight losses. At the Borrago
ranch, In the state of Mlchoachan,
ruralcs have defeated tho rebels, kill
ing eleven
"
; BULGARIANS PUT '
UP FIELD WORKS
1
' London, Nov. IG. The Times cor-
respondent with the Turkish forcas
behind the Tchatalja, telegraphing
Friday, says:
"I have been able to ascertain
from personal observation that the
Bulgarians are constructing field
works at Papas Buyas. These oper- s
at'ons attract an occasional shell fire
1 from Turkish warships off Kalllkar-
da.
"The Turkish front appears capa-
ble of defeating any further advance.
The position' Is being entrenched
I along tho entire front and the warm ,
weather has greatly helped the Turks
to recover from the effects of the '
last three wooks."
A dispatch to the Times from So-
fin says that among the serious con- -i
slderatfons likely to Influorce Bulga-
rla to refrain from occupjlug Con- j
stantlnople, there is danger in con-
centrating a greater part of the Bui- ;
garlan army at a point so remote ;
fiom its baso and at a moment when :
Bulgaria may be threatened by a
hostile demonstration from another
quarter.
i nrrrTTTrnMTT7wiiwTinraBMTTTimriniiii ii i 1 1 1 iTiKrrirrffMp" "
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