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The Evening standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1910-1913, November 20, 1912, Image 2

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H THE EVENING STANDARD, OQDEN, UTAH. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1912.
H n - -r " " " I
m 4 -.-- - " "
B WHY DID THE CITY EDITOR LEAVE SO SUDDENLY? 11
H : rrs;s x've srr : mm SwS ThISJ Fl lfEM 1T is A REftC1 1 pT Dov -SE6M 1 --iJ I
H WeASTORY touch o r. put W Mvro nd sbbip rr jj bomb-wuv. Be the. To work- 7n i )
Hj iqiCMT-i--"vfVD J6
H i .
STANDARD SPORTING PAGE
H LAVENDER A SAFE
M BET FOR THE CUBS
H With nil the talk of trades and deals
H to he pulled off beforo the start of
H the training season in 1913, little is
H heard of one Jimmy Lavender. It's
Hi r.Imost a certainty that the lad with
B,v the color scheme for a back monicker
H I will be in the mixing, however, and
H ho'll bo wearing the uniform of a Cub
B and he cavorting around under the
Bf management of John Evers.
HBVBi Jimmy made good in the season just
M passed, and, although there's been a
M lot of regular rumors to the effect that
H the Cub pitching staff would hae to
Hj be strengthened for next year, it's al-
Hl most a family jewel bet that Laven-
H der will he among those present.
H Jimmy's chief stunt during the flura-
H mcr past was to stop Rube Marquard.
You all know that the Rube was out
H on a record-breaking tour, and that it
H was the youthful recruit who put the
Hj I crimp in him. Lavender broke up a
H winning streak which looked like a
HL. i blue ribbon winner.
H The recruit was born and bred a
Southerner and is proud of the fact.
H He's got no use for any tribe that
H shades to the ebony hue, which was
H i best shown back in his minor league
Hft days, when he was asked to twirl a
Hh game against a team of Cubans. Lav-
H ender immediately rebelled and said
HP in a few words that he'd rather quit
Kt the game than go on the mound and
HF fling at the boys from the island,
H In his early days Lavender had no
H thought of being a baseball player.
B He went to the Georgia Tech, where
Hl ho took up the study of mechanical
Hj engineering, and it wasn't until he had
H I reached the age of 21 that he definlte-
ly decided to take up the national
K" pastime as a profession. Prior to that
H Mine he had only played a little, not
H even trying for a place on the college
H nine, but contenting himself with an
occasional game pitched for his class
team.
In 1906 ho started with the Augusta
team in the South Atlantic league.
Next year he was promoted to the
Virginia league, and in 1908 he joined
the Holyoke team In the Connecticut
league. It was while he was with this
club that he was called upon to twirl
against the Cubans and refused to do
so.
In the fall of that same year Provi
dence drafted Jimmy from the Hoi
yoke aggregation and for the next few
summers he was destined to obscurity
with that club, which was noted for
its race for the cellar position each
succeeding season.
Last .spring Jimmy was "wished on"
the We3t Side team He was not
drafted because the Cubs wanted him,
but becauso Montreal wanted him as
part payment for tho release of Ward
Miller to Chicago.
Scouts had watched Lavender pitch
when he was with the Providence club,
but the price placed on him by that
club seemed to be too high, and he
drifted along with the obscure crowd
until he Tvas wished on the West Side
bunch
Those who have followed the game
figure that Lavender will be a big help
to the Cubs, in 1913. He's not a flash
twirler, hut he's learned the art of
flinging slowly and thoroughly and
they expect him to do great things in
the coming year
He Is a spitball pitcher by reputa
tion, but uses cruves and a "fast one"
much oftener than the fellows in the
gallery think he does. He keeps the
batsmen guessing and generally puts
the first one over with telling effect
COOK TO REFEREE
WOLGAST BOUT
Hiram Cook, the veteran who ref
ereed the Jim Corbett-Pcter Jackson,
Dempsey-Lablanche and Dixon -Weir
ring battles, and was a famous arbi
ter 20 years ago, may be tho third
man In the ring when Ad Wolgast
and Willie Ritchie meet on Thanks
giving day. Cook Is 60 years old, but
Is hale and hearty
Tho selection will be made before
next Monday. If Cook Is not chosen,
Eddie Smith, Charlio White or Jack
McGulgan will ofilclate.
DEMAREE MADE
GREAT RECORD
Pitcher Al Domaroo, who. In his
Initial appearance as a member of the
New York Glant3, scored a shutout
victory In the game that cinched tho
National league pennant, promises a
great future.
The remarkable work of Demareo
In his major league debut Is but an
additional chapter to a series of
wonderful pitching successes which
thi t playor has had this year. It is
doubtful if any record has over been
made In organized baseball such as
Demaree has made this year.
Pitching for the light-hitting Mo
bile team of the Southern league, De
maree won twenty-five games and
lost ten. In none of the defeats was
he hit hard, and In only four games
ere the opponents able to get more
than three runs. Three of these four
games he lost and all his other de
feats were registered when he held
his opponents to three runs or less
In thirty-five games he pitched eleven
shutouts, seven games In which he
allowed the opponents only one run,
seven games in which they got only
two runs and fie games which netted
tho opposing team three runs. Ouce
he allowed four runs, twice he was
reached for five runs, and once for
seven. He was not battod out of the
box during the entire season, and fin
ished every gsme ho started with the
exception of one, when ho was taken
K , A jimmy pipe's god
i fast 8 wherever J!0yr2
i you smoke it! f yO
H if it's filled with Prince Albert it'
H tobacco, now Titer-nationally ,i
H famous for its delightful aroma VBS
H and delicious flavor. You can P?
H I smoke it in any company to .jHmSBP- jfeT ?
H f I Understand this: it isn't the pipe, JJS y A Crm
H , ripes! Prince Albert has doubled ($W Aw 'waWjLw M
ALDER 1 ffMmBLix f
h- - You never even dreamed of such UffmAW S fjPcSI
tobacco as Prince Albertl BSgS lfSU
Paste this in your feat!
t You'll be as happy over Prince Albert rolled into a nifty cigarette as you are
over it in a jimmy pipe.
P. A. as a cigarette is a revelation to men who have suffered with the free
running tfasr-brands for years. Why, it's got flavor and fragrance that no
other tobacco ever equalled. Just you draw in a mouthful and see how cool
and delicious it is. We'll take a chance on your little O. K.
Buy P. A. cucrywherc-in the teppy 5c red bog,
ttdy 10c red tin and pound and half .pound humidors.
1 R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
h Winston-Salem, N. c.
m-
out in the seventh inning to allow
another batsman to hit for him
In the thirty-five games that De
maree pitched for tho Mobile team, to
which he belonged, they averaged
about three and onebalf runs per
game.
MITCHELL DENIES
BEING BRUISER
Mike Mitchell of the Cincinnati
Reds Is a quiet, good-natured fel
low, but some of tho scribes who
1 must fill space . . always featuring
him in team fights Even that won't
make him mad, though It doesn't
plcaso him.
"Honest," said Mitchell, "according
to these reporters I have licked nearly
eery man on the Cincinnati club.
Onlv recently they had me fighting
with Bol) Bescher, and the best part
of !t was that I whipped Bescher
Two years ago I got a decision over
Larry McLean in an awful battle 1
have whipped several others, to hear
the rumorsmlths and the knockers
tell about it.
'But think of them crediting mo
with whipping Bescher and McLean
How such things can get out J don't
know 1 am sure that any player
who couldn't get along with smiling
Bob, and big, good-nature 1 Larrv,
wouldn't be able to get along with his
own mother.
"I never saw a man who would
stand frv more than McLci 1 hive
seen fellows pour a bucket of Ice wa
ter on him while he would be sitting
In the clubhouse after a game, and
all the big fellow would do would be
to toss a shoe or something at his
tormentors Yet they spot Larry as
a trouble-maker and a bad man. He
could be bad If he wanted to, but It
Isn't his nature to fuss
"These fights between ball players
are great to read and hear about.
When a fight does take place no one
eor gets to hear about it."
WIFE COACHES
FRENCH BOXER
It is rather unusual for a woman
to be mixed up In any way in a boxing
match, but Mme. Isabelle Til, wife of
Paul Til, the French lightweight, has
been making a name for herself In
Australia Mrs Til, who Is a clever
little French woman, attends all the
fights In which her "hubby" Is on
gaged, and is always at the ringside
to watch Paul's every movement Dur
ing the recent battle between Til and
Young McCoy at Sydney the little
Frenchman received a straight left on
the nose, and the claret began to flow
The little Frenchwoman could not
stand for this, and rushed to the of
fice of the management and protcsc
ed that McCoy was not fighting fair,
but hitting In tho clinches which she
said woul'l not be tolerated in
France However, the rules were not
transgressed according to the referee,
and everything went along smoothly
ifter Paul had his face doused with
tle sponge. "It was the first time I
ever saw blood on Paul's face." said
Mr6. Til, "and, of course. I thought
matters were worse than they really
were " She had forgotten all about
the incident tho day following, and
helped to entertain many ladies at the
stadium with a pink tea, which is all
I the rage there nowadays, these mat
inees being given once a week for the
fair sex.
WATHEN BUYS THE
LOUISVILLE CLUB
A meeting of the American asso
ciation magnates was held in Chica
go Friday when the sale of tho Louis
ville club to O. H. Wathen, of Louis
ville, was ratified He was found to
be satisfactory to the league and
hastened away to close tho deal with
Owner Grayson.
Wathen represents a syndicate of
Louisville men who have taken up
the club at a price said to be $100,000,
EVERS WANTS TO
BUY A. HAUSER
Baseball fans were again stirred by
a chance of a trade when Miller Hug
gins, manager of tho St. Louis Cardi
nals, blew Into Chicago after his stay
at Milwaukee, where he attended the
meeting of the minor league magnates
Ho met Owner Murphy and Manager
Eyors of the Cubs, and for three long
hours they met In tho Cub office and
talked When magnates and mana
gers meet and talk for three hours
there Is something in the wind. It
means that some baseball deal Is on.
for they are not particularly fond of
each other.
Tho whole thing hinges on, what
Johnny Evers was willing to give for
a coupe of likely ball players. Hug
gins had a couple, but he could not
be persuaded to put Arnold Hauser
on the market, and that was where
the long discussion came in, Evers
wants a shortstop and he wants Hau
eer if he can get him, but the peppery
little St. Louis leader put the N. D
,slgn out when Hauser was mentioned.
-
If they throw in the Corn Exchange
bank and the city hall, with the rest
of the Cub team, he might consldor the
trade, that is. he might wlro Mrs.
Brltton about It
ACCIDENTS MADE
A STAR CATCHER
When the American league season
of 1912 began Forest Cady was Bos
ton's third catcher. Bill Carrigan and
Leslie Nunatnaker were considered
tho first string backstops of the Red
Sox Cady warmei the bench while
his two colleagues did all the work.
Then Carrigan was hurt NY.namaker
became the first catcher for the time
being It went on that way for nearly
two weeks Then Nunamaker was
hurt and Stahl wag forced to call on
Cady
As Nunamaker handed Cadv his
chest protector, he bald- "Go and do
the best you can I will be ready
again In a few days "
"Huh1" replied Cady "By tho time
you aro ready Stahl won't' know he
has any catcher except Carrigan and
me."
Rather egotistic, but true neverthe
less Cady has been a first stringer
ever since Handling Joe Wood's
deliverv so capably. Cady was per
manently assigned to catch Smoky
Joe His final bit of recognition
came when he was picked to catch
Bedlent In Saturday's game. Carrigan
having been Bedient's receiver in the
American league games. So from
third catcher to first catcher has been
Cady's jump in one season
WOLGAST GIVEN
DIAMOND BELT
Lightweight Champion Ad Wolgast
today was debating what to do with
tho diamond championship belt pre
sented him by Promoter Tom McCare
as the result of his win from Jose Riv
ers. 'I can't wear it," said the cham
pion "It's too heavy, and besides the
thing is worth $1,000 and I'd have to
have a bodyguard If I don't wear it
what's the use of having a belt?"
Because of the unsatisfactory out
come of the Wolgast-Rivers battle
McCaroy held up the presentation of
the belt for several months Wolgast
went to San Francisco today to be
gin training for his bout with Willie
Ritchie Thanksgiving day.
PLAN TO FORM NEW
OUTLAW LEAGUE
Chicago, Nov. 19 Word was re
ceived hero tonight of a move on the
part of several western league clubs
to break away from the present cir
cuit and expand. The invasion of
Chicogo and tho establishment of riv
al clubs in several American asso
ciation cities are Included in the plan
to form, a new "outlaw" league
Its promoters in the Western
league expect to be joined by dis
gruntled American association own
ers, but in case this does not occur,
the plans the to locate rival clubs in
such towns aB are necessary to make
a compact and paying circuit.
HOLD FIFTY-MILE
INDOOR MARATHON
A fifty mile Indoor marathon will
be held In Milwaukee November 22
and besides an $800 gold cup, ten oth
er prizes have been hung up. Several
runners from Chicago will compete,
among which will be found John Kal
las of the P. A. A
WOLVERTON TO BE
SACTO MANAGER
A deal hns been closed whereby
Harry Wolverton, erstwhile manager
of the New York Highlanders, will
manage the Sacramento Pacific Coast
club next year His contract will run
for one year only.
PREPARING FOR SATURDAY.
Minneapolis, Nov. 20. Generous
scrimmage today played a part In the
work of Minnesota's eleven In prep
aration for the game next Saturday
with the University of Chicago.
NORTHWESTERN SQUAD
NOT SATISFACTORY
Chicago, Nov. 20. The Northwest
ern upiveraity foothill squad went
through Its second day of hard prac
tice yesterday, The scrimmage with
the freshmen was far from satisfac
tory to Coach Hammett. After an
Sound Sleep
is usually impossible to the bilious.
But biliousness yields and head
aches, sour stomach, indigestion go
when the bowels are regulated and
the liver and kidneys stimulated by
BELCHAM'S
PILLS ,
liour's practice tho freshmen made
ono touchdown on a long forward
pass.
Coach Hammett is in doubt what
men to use at guard and tackle
against Illinois.
SCRIMMAGE PRACTICE.
Chicago, Nov. 20. Scrimmage
praotlco by the University of Chicago
football team was .deferred again by
Coach Stagg The team went through
signal practice for two hours while :
tho kickers punted, drop kicked and I
tried goals from placement In the I
hope that they might get in a posi
tion to ubo some of the latter against
MltinoBQta next Saturday.
t
INDIANA DEFEATS SCRUBS. j
Bloomington, Ind., Nov 20. In n
practice which lasted nearly three,
hours and which was continued by
aid of the arc lights and "ghost" ball,
the Indiana varsity continued to dis
play "pep" not hitherto shown this
season bv defeating the scrubs 5G to
0 yesterday ,
Tho practice was in preparation for;
the Perdue contest. '
CRACK AVIATOR MARRIED.
Wsshington, Nov. 20. Theodore G.
EJlyson, the navy's crack aviator, has
launched out on a long journey with
a passenger. The passenger, form
erly Miss Helen M. Glenn of New
York and now Mrs. Eilyson, was mar
ried to the airman last Friday, but
the marriage was kept secret until
today.
PERDUE AT TOP NOTCH.
Lafayette, nd.t Nov. 20. Plaving in
top notch form the Perdue regulars
battered down the freshman defense
vestcrdav afternoon In practice and
worked new plays to perfection.
FINAL FOOTBALL WEEK.
Iowa City, Iowa, Nov. 20. The final
football week of the scseon in this
state will be featured Saturday by
the Wisconsin-Iowa battle in Iowa
field.
UTAH WOMAN FOR
VICBPRESIBENT
frs, Margaret Zane Witchcr, of
Salt Lake, may receivo the compli
mentary vote of the presidential elec
tors of Utah and Vermont for vice
president of the United States, when
the ejectors meet in Washington next
month to deliver the vote cast by
their respective states for president
and vice president.
The Republicans at the recent elec
tion carried only two states, Utah and
Vermont. On account of the death of
Vice President James S. Sherman,
who had been renominated by the
Republicans, there is a vacancy on
the Republican national ticket. Re
publican presidential electors are at
liberty to fill this vacancy when thev
meet to deliver the vote of their
statos. There Is a strong sentiment
in favor of casting the eight votes
of Utah and Vermont for some promi
nent Republican from ono of these
states.
Eph Homer of Provo, presidential
elector from Utah, yesterday' started
a boom for Mrs." Margaret Zane
WItcher for tho place made vacant
on the ticket by the death of Vice
President Sherman. Of course, there
would be only eight votes cast for
Mrs. Witchcr, but the. fact that this
has been the first time a woman has
beon suggested for the place of vice
president is in itself a signal honor.
Thus far, Vermont has submitted no
candidate for the vice presidency, and
it would appear that tiiero was moro
than a possibility that Mrs, WItcher
might be solected by the Utah and
Vermont electors to receive this com
plimentary vote.
-oo
TROOPS BURNING
TO ENTERCAPITAL
London, Nov 20. A Sofia dieoatch
to tho Times says:
There Is reason to belleve that the
portc has been Informed that Con
stantinople and the straits of Mar
mo3sa and the Dardanelles with a
small adjacent territory, may remain
under Turkish sovereignty,
Even should theso terms be accept
ed tho Bulgarian government will
have difficulty in arresting the ad
vance of its troops, who together
with the commanding officers are
burning to dictate tho terms of pence
from tho capital of their ancient
foe.
A dispatch to the Times says it la
believed an ultimatum will be sent
by Austria to Servia within twenty
four hours giving five dav8 for a I
reply.
THOMAS E. WATSON
INDICTED BY JURY
Augusta, Nov. 20. Thomas E.; Wat
son, at ono time presidential candi
date of the PopullBt partv, now editor
and publisher of tho Watson Jcffer
ponisn. was indlctod last night by a
federal grand Jury 0n a charge of
Our prices are as low
as the quality will ;
warrant. Beware of
the price cutter, as
he who cuts the price
is willing: to cut the ;
quality to equalize
the price. I
COAL & i
LUMBER CO.
WE ALWAYS
HAVE COAL
Phone 865.
'x . -.
When You
HEAR MUSIC
Think of
Glen Bros. Piano
. Company
WESTERN VACUUM
CLEANING CO.
Docs all kinds of wall paper and
window cleaning. )
Cleans your carpets and rugs, also i
hard wood floors. Work guaran
teed. Prices right. f
In phoning please give accurate '
address and phone number.
165 Twenty-sixth St. Phone 1045 !
C. A. JOHNSON l
il
t
THE UTAH SHOE I I
HOSPITAL
Men's Half Soles Sewed or. )
65 CENTS '
Ladies' and Children's i
Half Soles
40 CENTS I
SOLES FIXED IN 10 MINUTES.
Best workmanship and Wide Oak
Leather used. If you try our work
once you will ourely corns again :
221 TWENTY-FIFTH ST. :
OGDEN, UTAH ;
I
. i
. . ,
OGDEN TURF EXCHANGE I
3501 Washington Ave.
Direct wires to Butte, Annconda. '
Havre dc Grace, Lexington, Louis- '-
vlllo, Windsor, Latonla and Juarci ,
Race Tracks. fy
This room hits the only direct j
sarvjeo to all tracks. Phono 31"
. j,
13th ST. ADDITION i
i
Large lots set with choice fruits. u
Easy terms. See me, owner, y,
603 TWELFTH. ij
I ! ft
. i
sending obsceno matter through tin ft
mnils. K
The charges Averc presented in con- u
nectlon with articles which nK:wcd i
In the magazine under Mr Watson's. 8
signature bitterly arraigning Catho- if
llclsm. These articles were charnc- w
terlzed by the grand jur.v as loo jfj
"obscene, filthy and Improper to bo A
spread on the court records." 19
Head the Classified A(i3. M
" I
1 1
1

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