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The Evening standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1910-1913, November 21, 1912, Image 2

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H J r , THE EVENING STANDARD, OGDEN. UTAH, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1912. ; . r
H -T ' " r THE WATER IS COLD IN NOVEMBER
H i 1
M ' PALZER HAS DENT
B IN CHAMP ARMOR
H (By OLto Floto.)
H If the reports that conic from Phil
H I adelphla are true then Al Palzer has
H had quite a dent put in his chain-
Bw plonshlp armor by Tony Ross. Unex-
H poctcdly, of course, hut nevertheless
H true, Palzcr met a tartar and a sur-
Hl prise, and it reports are to be re-
B lied upon even Tom O'Rourke, who
H looks after the destinies of the big
H Iowa, farmer, admitted that his charge
H was beaten. What made the exhi-
H bltion more surprising is the foul tac-
Hl tics employed by Palzer. When men
H I foul an opponent, as a rule, they are
H beaten not only that they expose
H a yellow streak somewhere in their
H makeup We are not ready to label
H Palzer yellow, for he has been tout-
H i ed as one of the gamest men that
Hj ever pulled on a glove. Ot the same
H I ji time his absolutely intentional foul-
H jng is something that will have to be
ML. i explained away before the rank an!
H ! file of the fight followers of the
H I land will r-ia.n "s convinced of his
H stoi't heart and willing hands.
H ' Ross, who at best was looked up-
Hl on as a third rater, and it is charlta-
H blc on our part that the classlflca-
Ht tion is not placed at a lower notch
H In the realm of pugilism, has sent
V his slumbering stock skyward with
m a rush. On the letterheads of his
m manager wo may now hope to read.!
M "Defeated M Palzer In Philadelphia."
H There see.s to be a fascination to a
H fighter to read of his doings against
H fome champion or some near the
H champion's throne that cannot be ex-
H . plained to the ordinary layman. If
. I the . fighter like Ross-,, -wins against
T such a man rhe consldersjltftfame
H enough to last a lifetlnieHewill
H always have his letterheads to refer
j I to "Defeated Al Palzer in Phlladel-
H It w;ll become so chronic with hjm
Hl that his hearers will have business
H J elsewhere, whenever he starts.
BJ jow that Ross has achieved fame in
Hb a night, we might say, there are many,
H' no doubt, not familiar with his deeds
In the roped arena. For them a few
of his wins and defeats are herewith
offered. That little black fellow, Sam
Langfoid, knocked him out cold on two
different occasions. Our old friend,
Jim Scanlan, also administered the
sleeping poultice. Not to be outdone
by others, Miko Schreck landed the
"auctioneer" on the point and also
scored a knockout. Ross, however,
came back, fighting two draws with
Schreck and winning a decision from
him. Jim Flynn defeated Ross at Pu
eblo and the best man in his record
that was beaten by him was George
Gardner He also defeated Sandy Fer
guson and the balanco of his work
in the ring consists of no-decision af
fairs In and nbout Philadelphia. That
about completes the fistic biography
of Antonio.
Now that he practically defeated
Palzer his services will be in demand,
and a return boirt between this r:v.
In Now York would ta?: tho sealing ca
pacity of any of the clubs that are
staging such r flairs. Palzor must
wipe crt Pils setback. It becomes pos-wl-"
out this setback. It becomes im
rc.uJve to do so if the big O'Rourke
prospect hopes to regain his standing
and -wishes to be looked upon as the
real holder of or contender for tho
heavyweight championship among the
white race. Thoro may be a reason
for Palzer's poor showing He may
have failed to train properly. Ross
must be removed before Palzer can
hope to tackle any of the others, such
as Bombardier Wells, McCarthy,
Flynn and any other white man that
may come to the front this winter.
FOOTBALL HAS
PATRON SAINT
Footballers may be interested in the
following piece of folklore about the
game Although it is not general I
known footbnll has a patron saint In
1620 a boy named Hugh, who was one
of the champions of his day, had tho
misfortune to kick a bail through the
window of a Jew's house. Whether
the ball struck the man or any member
of his family Is not known, but cer-
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ssV I li lllwf' 3Kvvm"wag'on on coI das I
H I I II Ik P-1 ffl Wjth a PerfeCt'n 0il i
sH I I J btef&TfP fil e makes his rounds i
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I ' Dnrr, Pablo. AUmauerqu. I
I OywuMi. BdU, Bdi. Slt Lak Clt-. 0
-
tain it is ho vns much incenaed about
the affair. Determined on revenge,
he enticed the unsuspecting Hugh iiuo
his home and plunged a knife in the
youth's back The English people
were very much cut up about tho loss
of their champion, albeit not as much
so as was Hugh. They severely pun
ished his slayor, made the young foot
ball player a saint and gave him a bit
and expensive funeral. They even
wrote verses, bad verses, but still
ver668, describing tho virtues of
"Sweet SMr Hugh" and his prowess as
a football player.
Football was forbidden In Eliza
beth's reign under pain of imprison
ment, the reason being the extreme
brutality of tho ctime, we are told.
And Jaioes I. debarred "all rough and
violent exercise like football" from his
court In spito, however, of the pro
hibition against the game the London
apprentices often kicked a football
about the streets to keep themselves
warm in winter, and It Is on record
that in the severe frost of 1CC5 tho
London streets were "full of footballs."
EVERS WOULD BE
GREAT SHORTSTOP
Suggestions of all descriptions are
being made for the arrangement of
the infield of the Chicago National
league baseball team if Joe Tinker
does not play.
One of the first suggestions made
was for Evers to take himself off
second base and put himself at short.
It will bo remembered Evers was a
shortstop when he joined the Cubs in
the fall of 1002, but he was put on
second base because Tinker was at
short, and Frank Seloe was In dire
need of a fast youngster to take Bob
by Lowe's place. There is no denying
the Cub. leader could play the short
stop posjtion as well as he does his
own. He has often gone there in
nractice and shown it is as easy for
him to get the hot grounders as it
is on the other side of tho middle
sack.
Whether Evers would he content to
make this change is another story. It
Is not likely he would. Evors has
made himself famous on the right side
of the diamond and probahlv would
not care to tear himself away from
the position owing to his having
played it so long with success.
Playing short would be easy for
Evers, and possibly he could Improve
on Tinker's work. He Is fast, covers
a lot of ground, has a strong tin owing
arm, and what Is more is n master
at judging ground balls. Where Evers
probably would Improve on Tinker's
work, is in getting fast men on slow
bounders because of his nbilltv to
throw underhand. He Is skilled In
this on account of his having thrown
with the underhand motion ever sinco
he was put on second base.
Heine Zimmerman Is the candidate
for the second base position if a
change should be made. Zimmerman
came to the Cubs in 1907 from Wll
kesbarre, Pa., as a second baseman,
but since that time has not per
formed regularlv at that place. His
. longest period there was last season,
! when Evers was unable to play. Be
fore this he has been stationed at ev
ery position in the infield. This year
CHILD BADLY
BURNED ON LED
i
Between Knee and Ankle. Skin
Loose, Leg Dark Red, Cuticur?
Ointment Entirely Cured Her.
300 Fuller St.. ltcdwood, Cal. "My t-wo-i-oar-old
daughter UjiihxI a basin or ho
water on hoc Icj; between kneo and anklo.
Sho uas burned so badly. In places as larga
an a man's hnnd, that tho skin ttsw looio.
Tho apearanco of tho leg " dark red.
1 applied tho Cutlcura Ointment at one
and put on a bandaso. I removed tha
bandaKo twenty-four hours later, opened
tbo water blisters, applied more Cutlcura
Ointment and bandaged again. Tho irkln
did not como oft and I did this until sho
waa completely cured. I did not let her
walk much until It was healed. Qbe- did
not complain after tho first day. and after
tho Cutlcura Ointment vrns put on, slept
aa usual, Tho scars are gone: Cutlcura
Ointment entirely cured hor." (Signed)
Mrs. E. O. Chapman, Mar 12, J012.
ITCHING AND BURNING SPOTS
Spreading All Over Face. Sometimes Sore.
Gaston, Ore. "I had Itching and burning
not all over my face. It camo out la
rough places and Itched aad burned all th
lima It to spreading all over my faca.
Sometimes there woro sore-s. and thoy wcr
red and Inflamed. I washed tbo a Hoc ted
parts off with tho Cutlcura Soap, then
applied Cutlcura Ointment. I only put It
on threo times and the cores wero all gono.
(Signed) Chas. Wahl, Dec 27, 1011.
Cutloura Sop and Cutlcura Ointment ai
old throughout tho world. Liberal sample off
each mailed freo. with 32-p. Skin Book A4
drcw post-card "CuUcura, Depl.T. Boston."
aTcndor-faced men should uso Cutlcura
opShYin Stick. 2e. Bamrfo&cc .. .
he more than demonstrated what he
was capable o( if ghen the opportu
nity. He ranked as one of the best
third Backers In tho lcaguo.
Zimmerman likes to cavort around
the far corner, bin ho Iike3 the sec
ond base position better Ho has of
ten remarked ihnt If ever allowed
to play there all the scntson he would
show Ihe fans how efficient ho was
In fielding. Ho Is -willing lo switch,
and declares he wished Manager B't
ers would decided (o make a change
Zimmerman is valuable at any point
In tho Infield owing to his natural
ability, strong pair of hands and u
powerful throwing arm j
ATHLETES GOOD
ONLY SHORT TIME
The pathetic feature of profession
al sport Is the Ehort range of time al
lowed Us followers for the eserciBe
of their physical gifts
Christopher Mathewson of the New
York Giants is 32 years old. He
says he Is an old man It Is admit
ted that the good right arm which
has served him in the pitcher's box
for 12 years has lost Its speed In
sporting parlance he Is "slowing up"
and has kept his place in fast com
pany only owing to his study of the
weakness of batters In other words,
Mr Mathewson Is pitching chiefly
with Ills head and his courage. He
recognizes that such a condition can
not obtain long and that another year
In tho big league baseball probably
will be his last.
Mr Mathewson has been temper
ate. He has violated none of the
rules laid down by professional train
ers. He has kept his bodily welfare
In view at all times and has collect
ed tribute thereon to the ultimate.
But now at 32 he is "old" in a field
lh:it iv- ',rtn t'-o i.irrct rf nhvslpftl
exertion, and he must go the way of
other "star" athletes to oblivion.
It is no wonder, when the physi
cal life is beset by such limitations,
the young men overcrowd the pro
fessions that call for the expenditure
of mental enersy alone. Gladstone,
with h:s brain active and forceful at
SO; Ibsen, with his great work done
when he was past 50. and others who
have scored tholr greatest sJccesses
after middle life, form a potent argu
ment in favor of brain work as
against the toll which calls upon the
muscles.
Life Is short enough at its long
est, but the young man who chooses
a career as a professional athlete de
liberately cuts his time of usefulness
In two. "
'Perhaps it Is worth the sacrifice,
but we doubt it
There is too much pathos in the
exits of the Mathewsons at the very
meridian of life to spell much of a
recommendation for athletics as a
profession.
DUFFY FAVORITE
OF THE OLD ROMAN
Hugh Puffy, late manager of the
Milwaukee team of the American as
sociation, is not hooked for the man
agerial berth .at SL Paul. Buffalo or
any minor league town, according to
Information gleaned In the "Windy
City."
Duffy wont to Chicago last Thurs
day In answer to an urgent telegram
from Owner Comlskey of the Whi'o
Sox Duffy Is quite a favorite with
the Old Roman and If the latter finds
a chanco to better Ilughey's position
In baseball he Is always eager to do
so
Whether Comiskev Is Interested in
the New York Americans or St Louis
Browns is not knqwn but at anv rato
Jt is one of those managerial berths
Duffy geoms destined to fill if the In
fluenco of Comlskey In the American
league calls Tor anything. Duffv has
been In conference with tho Old Ro
man six times In two dys and St
looks as if something cood was break
up for the former Whlto Sox manager
BASEBALL WILL BE
THE WORLD'S GAME
Leading base-ball men aro of the
opinion that within ten years It will
be necessary to arrange a series of
games or a tournament to docldo the
championship of the world with
j countries other than the United
j States Included. Thoy are paving the
I wa for baseball in France, nnd al
I ready several veterans of the Amer
ican gaino have boon consulted In
J regard to visiting , that country and
teaching tho vouiifr Frenchmen the
j fine points of thc game.
I Whon the French people took up
boxing thev went at It with a vim,
land now the fight game la as pouu
!lar in Paris a3 in Xow York. The
I baseball Idea took definite form In
France hc other day, whon the
I "Baseball Union" was organized
! Franz Mesaerjy of Paris, who ha3
Heen the game played in America, was
! elected president, and it is his pur
poso to have'j several leagues organ
ised "within ajyear. The French peo
ple do not do things by halves, and
.they are already in communication
I
I i
with men llko Arthur Irwin. Tommy
McCarthy and Andy Conkloi In re
gard to bocomlDg coaches for thc for
oign players. I
It is well knowu that Cubans have
reached such a state of perfection In
baseball they chafe at not bolns able
to take part in n set of games for
thc world's championsnlp. If Franco
should develop Into a baseball coun
try like Cuba -the fans would demand
an annual tournament to decide tho
world's title.
Incidentally, tho organization of
baseball clubs n Franc would result
In Paris bolng a Mecca for veterans
who have grown loo old unci too slow
for the big leagues In this country,
The placing of these men on the
French teams would be the real way
for them to learn the game.
If Cuba can bo taken as an ex
ample, baseball Is a gamo that Is JUGt
fitted to ihp Latin Idea or -excitement
There is more real excitement
over a Sunday prame In Havana than
there is at the world's series contest
in New York.
MAGNATES LAUGH
AT PLAYERS' FRAT
National and American league
magnates do not appear to be In the
least disturbed by the formal organ
ization of the Baseball Players' Fra
ternity which has recently been ac
complished. Those who have ex
pressed themselves on the subject aro
apparently entirely Indifferent as to
what the fraternity will ask of the
club owners
One official of the Pittsburg club
recently passed the subject up with
tho remark: "I suppose Dave Fultz
needs some money to help out the law
practice." Dave Fultz, retired ball
player, being the president of the or
ganization. Another magnate recalled the his
tory and finish of the Players' Protec
tive association organized In the sum
mer of 1900. when three delegates
from each National league team met
at the Sturtevant house in New York
City and formed an organization and
passed various resolutions
At the National league meeting in
December, 1900, Clark Griffith,
Charley ZIramer, Jimmy Callahan. oJe
Kelly and others handed a petition
to President A. H Soden of the Bos
ton club, to be presented to the
league. Nothing was heard of the
petition until, after the league had
adjourned. Soden found the docu
ment In his pockot and claimed he
had forgotten all about it.
In June. 1901, tbo association re
elected Charley Zimmer president
PresI lent Ban Johnson had ordered
the American league players, who had
that year bocome affiliated with tho
association, to withdraw if Zimmer
was elected. To obviate that step,
Zimmer resigned and Tom Daly of
the Brooklyn club was elected presi
dent. Nobody will deny that the ruling
powers of baseball aro just as astute
in those days If not more so, as they
were In 1900. Whon President Fultz
appears and statos his case, If he Is
allowed to do so, he will confront
some verv wily gentlomon, who un
derstand baseball law as well as the
law of the land, and are fully able
to protect themselves and their Inter
ests If the magnates should balk at
what the fraternity will ask of them
and the phyers may get stubborn,
followers of the game mav have an
opportunity to see how strong the
new protective association really is.
MILLER WORLD'S
GREATEST PLAYER
Blake Millor, left end on the Michi
gan Aggie eleven, -Is regarded by crit
ics as the west's greatest player and
about thc only candidate this' section
of the football world will produce for
the All-Ainerlcan team this fall.
According to Ralph Iloagland, for
mer Princeton star and now one of
thc best known officials In tho west,
Miller is the find of the present sea
son He is the first man to score on
Michigan this yeur In thc DcPauw
gnnie he got away four times for long
sprints to the goal, pullod off throe
end runs and received two forward
nasses whlqh wero good for thirty
five yards each.
Hoaglnnd says Miller Is the greatest
"nipper" In the game A nipper
means a player who can catch a for
ward pass on the dead run and net
lose a stride. He's also a star defen
sive man, having stopped every play
directed around his end this season
According to Hoaglnnd, Miller
would be heralded as tho wonder of j
the ag& jf ho plsyed with Harvard,
lofUncaurdlb7Dofonoatnbrerradrop-f5a
plnetfowpfromibonooc. jiondort'f.lbtorUinut
nd ucJiulneCaUrrlial Jo quickly toollitt tfce VH
IrifUintdtl.iuwmjd UmIh tb taw lt. Uob' J
JUL I, ls ,bo ,,rc "B KowlonV. Sola tx DW
zVOOdri)gsHtiiortrTwt!frc KenitKcwBl CF
tor tub, KampHntEEfrpmuioQW. ML.
Kondon Uig. Company, JllnaeapolU, Minn. Jp"
Ya!o or Priueelou, instead of tho ng- I
ricultur&l team of Michigan.
YALE HARD TEAM !
WORK COMPLETED j
Now Ilaveo, Conn, Nov. 21. U j
the hard work for the Yale football
suuud 1ms been completed. This af- .
tcrnoou's practice will be for per
fection of signals with a running I
through of formations which have not j
yel been uncoveied.
Coach Howe says the lineup ngaUiFt I
Harvard will be thc same as against
Prince-ton. Every player is in good j
physical shapo. Castles, vhc wan i
slightly hurt early ir. the wcok, has I
tjoincd the aquad. ;
!
WILLIE HOPPE KEEPS !
HIS BILLIARD TITLE
Nov; York. Nov 21. I3y defeat inf '
Ora Mornlngslar j00 to 27C Willi---Hopne
Inst night retained his tltlo as
78.1 billiard champion of the world.
George Slosson finished I ho tourna
ment In second position, while Morn
Ingstar r.nd Yamada, tho Japaneec
marvel, are tied for third place. Tho
pair will play off tho tio In a special
match ton'ght
Mornlngstar shouldered too much
responsibility last night lo copo with
his illustrious competitor. Ora was
not only fighting for himself, but for
Slosson" as well. Had he been able to
stop the boy wonder he would have
precipitated a triple tic for first place.
Mornlugstar seemed obsessed with the
great Importance of his mission and
worked himself into a state of acute
nervousness.
Hoppe, on the other hand, kept his
head and, after reeling off a good run
of 77 In the third Inning) held matters
very much a6 he desired.
TRYING OUT YALE FIELD.
Cambridge, Mass, Nov. 21. The
Harvard football advance on Yale be
gan today, when a scouting party
of backs and ends went to New Ha
ven to try out the lights and shad
ows of Yale field. The remainder of
tho team will go to New London to
morrow, where they will be Joined by
the backs, and the entire team will
reach Now Haven Saturday.
DON'T PILL OUT
THE GRAY HAIRS
A Few Applications of a
Simple Remedy Will
Bring Back the Nat
ural Color
"Pull out one gray hair and a dozen
will take Its place" Is an old saying,
which is, to a reat extent, true, It
no steps are taken to atop the cause,
when gray hairs appear It is a sign
that Nature needa assistance. It Is
Nature's call for help. Gray hair, dull,
lifeless hair, or nair that ls falling
out, Is not necessarily a sign of ad
vancing age, for there are thousands
of elderly people with perfect head
of hair without a single streak of
g.ray. V
When gray hairs come, or when the
hair seems to be lifeless or dead,
some cood, reliable hair-restoring
treatment, should be resorted to at
once Specialists say that one of the
best preparations to use Is the old
fashioned ''sage tea" which our
grandparents uaed. The best prepar
ation of this kind Is Wyeth's Sage
and Sulphur Hair Remedy, a prep
aration of domestic sage and sulphur,
scientifically compounded with later
discovered hair tonics and stimulants, j
the whole mixture being carefully !
balanced and tested by experts.
Wyeth's Sage and Sulphur is clean
and wholesome ami perfectly harm
less. It refreshes dry, parched hair,
remove? dandruff and gradually re
stores f2ded or gray hair to Its na
tural color,
Don't dolay another minute. Start
using Wyeth's Sage and Sulphur at
once and aco what a dlfferenco a few
days' treatment will make In your
hair.
This preparation ls offered to the
public at fifty cents a bottle, and 1?
recommended and oold by all drug
gists. Special Agent, A. R. Mclntyre,
(Advertisement)
uu
GRANGE DEBATE
ON NEW BUREAU
Spokane, Wash., Nov. 21 Continu
ation of the debate over (he proposi
tion to establish a bureau of Infor
mation In regard to the supplies and
products of tho country and consid
eration of the revised report of the
executive committee were the prin
cipal moasures scheduled for today's
session of tho National Grange
Matters still ponding Include pro
posed chunges In the constitution and
by-laws touching on expulsion of
members by subordinate grangos and
proportionate representation in the!
National Grange.
'How Is It that you are never sea
sick9 "I have Passed nearly aii of my it6
in a rolling mill." '
-
.
I f
Our prices are as low 1: ffii
as the quality will u
warrant. Beware of l;
the price cutter, as jii
lie who cuis the price
is willing; to cut the
quality to equalize f
the price. yr
.ADGER if
COAL & jjj
LUMBER COc
WE ALWAYS 1
HAVE COAL
Phone 865. if
!
When You I
VKEAR MUSIC
Think of
Glen Bros. Piano J
Company
WESTERN VACUUM j
CLEANING CO.
Doec all kinds of wall paper and ; 5
window cleaning. 3
Clear.cs your carpets and rugs, also
hard wood floors. Work guaran- t I
teed. Prices right. 1 9
In phoning please give accurate I
address and phone number. hi
165 Twenty-sixth St. Phone 1045 jj
C. A. JOHNSON jj I
i
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. j s
THE UTAH SHOE 1
HOSPITAL I
Men's Half Soles Sewsd cs j 'a
65 CJENTS
Ladies' and Children's b
Half Soles i I
40 CENTS 1
SOLES FIXED IN 10 MINUTES. I J
Beet workmanship and Wdc Oak
Leather used. If you try our wori: ? g
once you will surely come again. ll S
221 TWENTY-FIFTH ST. i
OGDEN, UTAH
OGDEN TURF EXCHANGE j
3601 Washington Ave. jj 1
Direct wirea to Dutte, Anaconda, I 8
Havre do Grac-, Lexington, Louis- I,
vllle, Windsor, La tenia and Juarez K
Knee Tracks. j; yj
Ths room has the only direct j
servleu to all tracks. Phone 313 ;
lg
13th ST. ADDITION ' Pi
Large lots set with choice frullc. 1 r
I Easy terms, See mo, owner, I f
603 TWELFTH. A S
. ;i :
it h
CHICHESTER S PILLS ll
,67. THK1MAMOND JIJIAKD. A 'i
fiflv I'lIN t-x Knl end GpIi i,.cuilAV ' 8
Vfi . f- ,alc'1 IU "lie nbln. V X
vir uU" n" """ Jlur r your v y!
mT HIAlT(M JIR.M IMLLS.Ar 0 '
Al c4tsl.n naiat.Sfcvt.AVlRtli" &
r SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE J
Head tho Classified Ads. ,!
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