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The Evening standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1910-1913, January 29, 1913, Image 1

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- FEAKLESS, INDEPENDENT PKOGRE SSIVE NEWSPAPER.
Forty-thlrd Ve.rNo. 25.-PricTe" Cents. QGDEN CITY, UTAH, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY" 1913 "17d a, Second-las. Matter a. the Poitofflc., Ogden. Uuf M
HEAVY LOSS
WILL RESULT
If Wood Products Ex
periment Section of
Service Is Curtailed
Washington. Jan 29. Industrial
loss will result if congress finally cur
ftaile the work of the wood products
experiment section of the forest ser
vice. In the opinion of Chief Forest
er Graves In the agricultural ap
propriation bill the amount provid
ed for this work Is cut from $17i,ft00
I .to $100,000
In explaining the features of this
branch of the forest servicv Mr
Graves today in a statement declared
that multitudinous users of lumber
bad been shown how thoy could se
cure a maximum of Bervice and dur
ability from a minimum of material.
,' In experiments to determine the best
methods of utilizing and conserving
.timber, in discovering the best roet.h-
ods of using the by-product and in
studying hundreds of allied questions,
Mr Graves contended that this divi
, sion of the forest sen ice had been
paying for Itself many times over
An effort is to be made to have
the full appropriation restored.
WAR NOTE IS
DELIVERED
Grave Ferment Among
Turkish Troops Im
pels Prompt Action
London, Jan 29. The note drafted
by the peace delegates of the allies
waB delivered by Stojan N'ovakovitch.
bead of the Servian delegation, to
Rechad Pasha today
The factor Impelling this action was
the receipt of reports of grave fer
ment among the Turkish troops on
the Tcbatalja lines, many ol w hmn
appear to be unwilling to follow the
lead of the Young Turks
It is considered here that in view
of the internal complications in Tur
key, Mahmoud Shefket Pasha, the
new grand vizier, may yield before
the energetic act of the allies.
Situation Grave.
The gravity of the situation at Con
stantinople is shown by the large na
val forces concentrated by the Eu
ropean powers al the entrance to the
Dardanelles. Even Austria-Hun, irj
which had refused to join tin- other
powers in naval coercive measures,
has now ordered two warships to be
ready to start for the east.
Clouds Gather.
While t hr- clouds are gathering over
Constantinople, the astronomers who
make a study of the European firma
ment consider that the general peace
ol Europe is no longer in danger. As
proof thoy point out that Italy has
just (iisbanded an arm of Hi'UiOO sol
t diers. who served in Tripoli.
Rechad Pasha expressed the hope
that the powers realizing the unfair
treatment which has been iuflieted on
Turkey," would help the porte to sur
mount its present difficulties thus
ensuring the definite political and
economic settlement of the whole
t eastern problem
Envoys Leaving London
Seeral members of the Bulgarian
pea e mission left London today, in
I cludiug T Theodorofi" the Bulgarian
i minister of finance, and Lieutenant
j Tsuuoff. a graduate of Harvard, w 'no
I has been acting as aitaue and Is re
turning to bis regiment.
B The text of the note handed b the
I Balkan delegated to Rechad Pasha
I today was as follows:
The plenlpotentarles of the allied
Balkan states, having since the sus- j
ft pension of the work of the peace con
ference awaited in vain for three
weeks the reply of the Ottoman plen-
5 ipotentianes to their last demands,
and eents which have occurred in
Constantinople appearing to hae de
ptroyed hop.- of arriving ai the con
clusion of peace, are to their great
regret, obliged to declare thai the
peace neot lat ions commenced In
London on December 1C lat are
m broken off."
The note does not denounce the
armistice. This will devolve on the
governments of the Balkan states
when they consider the moment opportune.
TURKS MAY MAKE
CONCESSIONS
p
Constantinople Jan 29 Important
concessions, it is expected, will be
a mmmm j-
made by Turkey in her reply to the
Joint note of the European powers.
The response will be handed to Mar
grae Johann De Pallaviciui. Austro
HungDriau ambassador to Turkey, as
dean of the diplomatic corps here ei
ther this evening or tomorrow morn
ing
The basis of the solution proposed
by Turkey is said to be different from
auy yet proposed.
COUNT INOUYE
SERIOUSLY ILL
Tokio. Jan 29. The sahi reports
thai Count Katsunosuke Inouye is
eriticallv III. Count Inouye formerly
I was ambassador to Germany
uu
MILITANTS
ARE IN JAIL
Refuse to Pay Fine But
Prepare to Start a
"Hunger Strike"
London. Jan 29. "General" Mrc
Drnmmond and thirt other militant
suffragettes will spend the next four
teen da;' s In jail as the result of their
determination to force Daid Llovd
Ceorge chancellor of the exchequer,
to receive them in the house of com
mons last evening.
All the prisoners declared after
ithe were sentenced today that the:,
would start a 'hunger strike." The
accused women were brought up at
Dow street police court before Rob
ert Marsham, police magistrate Mrs.
Drummond complained during the
hearings that the police had handled
her roughlv when she was arrested.
She declared a patrolman had thrown
her in the mud
It is now war to the knife, ' she
told the magistrate, and continued:
'You and .Air. Llod George hae a
lot of trouble ahead of you. You !
will hae to do the dirty work and
you will have plenty of it "
The women all refused the option
of paying a tine instead of going to
prison
Bow sirf(i court looked like a busy
railroad station when the suffragettes
were arraigned Most of the women
had made preparations to go to prison.
They carried boxes, bags, blankets
and fur-lined coats
uu
PAINTING
DESTROYED
Insane Man Slashes
Famous Picture By
Repine Into Ribbons
Moscow, Russia. Jan. 29 An insane
painter named Balasheff today enter
ed the Tretiakoff art gallerj and
slashed in pieces the famous painting
bj Repine representing Ivan the Ter
rible murdering his son with an iron
sta f f.
Balasheff is wealthy He was ap
parentl) Buffering from religious ma
nia He has been placed under observation
GOVERNMENT SUIT
MAY CLOSE TODAY
New York. Jan 29 The case of j
the government In its suit to dissolve
the Cnited States Steel corporation
ma (lose toda (iovernment coun
sel announced today they would fin
ish taking testimony this afternoon,
but reserved the right to call wit
nesses later. Attorneys for the cor
poration said thQy would have their j
side presented some time in March.
SENTENCED FO RCONTEMPT.
Provo. Jan 29. Judge A B. Mor
gan, in the Fourth district court c,
t.-nlnv. pave a dt-r ision in the lr A '.
Sorensen contempt rase relative io
alimony in the decree of divorce ob
tained by Mrs. Rachel Sorensen and
the failure of defendant to pay the
amount. Judge Morgan found thai
defendant had wilfully sought to
evade the payments. He was requir
ed to pav to Mrs. Sorensen $1." due
January 20. the $3n due December
20 having been paid since the anion
was commenced, to pay costs, amount
ing to .512 80, and to pay attorney fees
for plaintiff in the amount of $75, to
be included in costs, until these pay
ments are made or until further order
of court
L How to Insure
1 Your Pocketbook
To do that you simply make sure
i of getting the highest quality for
the most reasonable price You
yourself cannot be familiar with
pi the values of all the necessities
vou buy. and so you must rely on
what others tell you of the good j
points of tbf various articles
Insure your pocketbook by tak
ing the word of the man who has
bis all at stake the manufacturer
himself If he tells you an untruth
through his advertisements you
win hoi continue to use his poods,
and his profits will fall off. In
lime bis misleading statements to
buyers will drive him out of busi
ness. You can insure vour pocketbook
with the help of THE STAND
ARD get quality and price and
convenience with small effort. Rely
upon the advertisements of THE
STANDARD'S advertisers You
can in that way put yourself out of
tho power of unscrupulous manu
facturers) and be guided to the
Btores of reliable dealers. It pays
in time, money and trouble saved
to read THE STANDARD'S adver
j tiaements closely and coustantly
J every day
NO STRIKERS
ARE INSIGHT
Quiet Follows Riot at
American Steel and
Wire Co. Plant
Pittsburgh, Jan 29. Quiet pre
vailed this morning at the Ranking
! plant of the American Steel & Wire
I company where last night one mm
was killed and a dozen wounded in a
I flcht between mill guards and strik
ers. The streets around ibe mills
are patrolled bv armed men, but not
j a striker was in sight, orders having
been issued by their leaders early tO
I day for them to remain Indoors
Chief of Police Barnott was notified
that several of the guards on duty
at the mil during the nicht had dis
appeared, and it was feared that they
had been captured by strike sympathizers.
MUSICIAN
A SUICIDE
In Fit of Despondency
Jumps to Bottom of an
Air Shaft
New York, Jan. 29. Burgpss Dick
inson, a young student of music,
whose liodj was found last night at
the bottom or an air shaft of the
apartment house where he lived in
Washington square, is believed to
have taken a suicidal leap from a
window on the sixth floor because he
was discouraged In his ambitions of
musical composition
His brother Howard Carter Dick
inson, who is an assistant disiriii at
torney, declared today that he be
lieved the young man js temporari
ly insane and the coroner decided to
record the case as suicide
PREPARING FOR
INAUGURATION
I Washington, Jan. 29. When Presi
dent Taft looked across the White
t House lawn at breakfast today, he
saw the first physical preparations
for the inauguration of his successor
Pennsylvania avenue, in front of the
I executive mansion, was filled w ith
wagons loaded with lumber for the
stands from which the inauguration
parade will be viewed, and scores of
, laborers began the building.
Almost the first thing that met the
president's eye when he entered his
office a few minutes later, was the
Joint congressional resolution appro
priating il'o.onn for additional police
I protection for Washington during the
inauguration period Mr Taft smiled
and signed the resolution at once
oo
BLOODY CONFLICT
BETWEEN TURKS
Vienna. Jan. 29. Constantinople
dispatches report a bloody conflict ai
Tcbatalja between the adherents of
the late Naslm Pasha and supporters
of the Young Turks.
It also Is reported that Abuk Pa
sha, who Is known as a sympathizer
of Nazim s, is marching on Constanti
nople with the Fourth army corps.
These reports have not been confirmed.
IDAHO LEGISLATURE
ADDING TO COUNTIES
Boise, Ida.. Jan. 28. The twelfth
Idaho legislature has earned the title
of being the banner county division
legislature In the history of this state,
as It passed the Oneida county dlvl
sion bill today, creating the new conn-1
ty of Franklin. With but one third j
of the session gone the legislature lias
created no less than foui new conn-1
ties and has four more measures ask
ing for county division in sight. The
Franklin county division bill passed
the house yesterday and was sent to
the senate and passed by that body to
da under suspension of the rules
The Franklin county bill carries out
the pledge of the legislators elected
from Oneida county to create two new
' counties The temporary county seat
1 of Franklin county is named a Pres
i ion The county division bills so far
' passed give southern Idaho four new
counties- Franklin. Power, flooding
and Minidoka and will increase the
membership in the legislature from
that section of the state by about ten
members.
The joint resolution Introduced In
the house by Representative Fcrgusou
of Bannock county, the object of
which Is to submit to the people Tlx:
question of calling a constitutional
eonvention to revise the constitution
of this 6late was defeated when plac
ed on final passage, this afternoon,
as it lacked but one of the necessary
two-thirds to carry. Notice to recon
sider was served on the house and
the measure will be voted on aga'u
tomorrow
oo
THIRD ADVANCE IN CRUDE OIL
Pittsburg. Jan. 29. The third ad
vance in the price of crude oils this
I week was announced today. Pennsyl
vania crude being placed at $2.27, the
i highest price it has commanded since
I 1895 Other prices were Mercer
new black and forninc. M 7''. ('..!. dl.
$1.86; Somerset, $i:'.2; Ragland, 70
cents
Tho uew prices have caused produc
Ing companies to predict that the nei I
t v. months will witness a return of
activity in the oil fields of western
Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio
Independence, Kan., Jan. 29. The
I
i price of crude oil here today was ad
vanced 2 cents a barrel by the Prai
rie Oil & Gas company.
WOUNDED IN FIGHT 1
WITH THE MOROS
Washington, Jan. 29 Major Gener
al I Franklin Belf, commanding the
Philippine division, reported toda
thai in the engagement with Morofl
near lolo on .Monday Farrier Clarence
c Underwood, troop Q. Eftghtb caval-
1 ry. was dangerously wounded and the
following were everely wounded
Privates RojJ Keller. Robert
Tracy and Sylvester J. Young, all of
troop E. Eights cavalry
SENATE WILL
INVESTIGATE
Alleged Activity of Post
oflice Department in
Campaign
Washington, Jan 29. Investigation
of alleged activity of the postoffice de
partment in connection wiih Presi
dent Taft's campaign is forecast as
one of the first developments before
the senate campaign expenditures
committee as the result of the sen
ate today extending the authority io
the committee, which expired Novem
ber 5, 1912 The resolution passed
the senate without opposition
It is understood Chairman Clapp of
the committee contemplates calling
Postmaster General Hitchcock, Chas
D. Hilles Republican national com
mitteeman, and others connected with
the Republican campaign as the flr-i
witnesses Representatives of the
other parties will also be called to
testify regarding contributions and
expenditures before and alter the
nominating conventions and election
MONGOLS
WANT AID
Urgent Appeal Is Made
For Russian Assist
ance in Manchuria
St Petersburg, Jan 29 An urgent
request foi Russian assistance
against the Chinese army invading
inner Manchuria and threatening the
new state of Mongolia, was received
today i the Mongolian delegation
which came here to thank the Rus
sian government for recognising the
independence of Mongolia.
The Mongolian government has al
ready dispatched all available Mongol
troops against the invaders, but the
; authorities have no confidence In
their discipline
oo
TODAY IN
CONGRESS
Washington, Jan 29.
Senate
('onvened at noon.
Resumed debate on Lever agricul
tural extension bill
House
Convened at noon
Debate begun on Lincoln memorial
bill
Sundries schedule considered by
ways aud means committee at tariff
I revision hearing
Currency reform committee contin
ued Its hearings
McGulre bill to appropriate $2,200.
i 000 for buildings on slate fair grounds
rejected by agricultural committee.
'Shipping pool" investigation by
merchant marine committee continued
with E M. Bull testifying
Judiciary commit tee voted to finally
ad upon workmen's compensation act
next Saturday, on all interstate liquor
shipment bills Wednesdaj
Railroad interest- I. .-lor,' mi. rsiate
commerce committee objected to Ken
' von odi'i.i ii- freight . I. . v- i f n ation bill.
i "RAG" DANCING IS
BONE OF CONTENTION
Salt Lake Jan. 2d Complaints
were made to the city commission
last night by representatives of the
Odeon and Ideal dancing academies
j that many societies and institutions
I in the cit are evading the dance hall
' license.
I It was even charged by T K. Steele
'of the Odeon that "rag" daneing was
I common lu unlicensed plac es.
"What is 'rag' daneing"" ex
claimed Commissioner Lawrence, ut
terly dumt'ounded at the charges.
"The kind of dancing that Is not
done wholl) with the feet," replied
m eie
"What's the trouble with It?" que
ried the commissioner of finance.
' Well, it isn t supposed to be clone
In the best circles. ' explained Steele
Mr. Steele and bis associates de
clared it was not fair Tor the city to
tax a heavy license against them and
let numerous other places operate
without a license. They were in fa
vor of the license, but they insisted
upon an equitable enforcement of the
ordinance pertaining thereto.
The complaint was taken under ad.
visement It is possible that the
commission will Investigate the
charges made by Mr Steele and his
friends concerning the ragging pro
pensities ol tho places mentioned.
SUNDRIES
REVIEWED
A j
Tariff Committee Com
promise on Parts of
Payne-Aldrich Act
, i
h I
Washington. Jan. 29. A variety of
articles, ranging from sunshades to
human hair and from aigarttes to
bituminous coal, all going to make up
a total customs revenue of $2C.,9r;it- J
i last year, were at issue in the
hearing todav before the house com- j
mittee on wass and means. They:
comprised the "sundries schedule of
the Payne-Aldrich tariff, the four
teenth and last schedule of that act
The average ad valorem rate in the
schedule now is almost 26 per cent .
and the aggregate oi the articles
make up almost 9 per cent of the to
tal tariff revenue. The estimated I
production of all these articles in the
United States on January 1 was $2.
650,000,000, and $173,479,256 worth
was exported in 1911.
The revenue from the sundry sched
ule has dropped more than $2,000,
000 a year the last two years, though
above the records for many of the
previous year
oo
IMPLEMENTS
STOOD TEST
Russia Experiments in
Manufacturing Farm
Machinery
St Petersburg. Jan. 29 Kxtensh e
experiments with agricultural imple
ment8 were made by the Russian de
partmenl ol agriculture during the
season of 1912 with a view to ending
the dependence of Russia on Ameri
an manufactures.
Any of these Implements, according
to an official report issued today, suc
cessfully stood the requirements un
der varied and difficult conditions
I notably those coming from Canada
and it is stated that they can be man
ufactured equally as well in Russia.
SITUATION
DELICATE
Russia and Austria Fac
ing Trouble Over Al
banian Boundaries
St. Petersburg. Jan 29 The pres
ent state of affairs between Russia
and Austria is regarded here as ex
tremely delicate. The war party Is
now In the saddle In Austria and Rus
sia has 1,600,000 men serving with
the colors.
The trouble is over the boundaries
of Albania. As explained by a hlgb
diplomatic official in the Bourse Ga
setts today Russia has recognized n
an agreement with Austria that the
Turkish fortresses of Scutari and la
i nina belong to the future Albaniau
I nation.
rhe condition is to be imposed.
1 however, that the military and eco
I nomlc inlerests of the adjacent Mon
tenet;rin and Greek populations be
suitably guaranteed.
It is thought that this will be ac
complished by dismantling the fortl
ficatlons of the two cities and allow
ing the free passage of goods.
Russia, on the other hand, the dip
lomat declared, regards Prisrend. Jn
kesa and lpek as belonging to Servia.
The position thus taken by Russia
will enormously increase the difflcul
ties of the Russian foreign office in
coping with public opinion, which may
regard the abandonment of Scutari
and Janlna as an unnecessary con-
c ession to Austria and a sac rifice of
Slav Interests.
The seriousness of the situation
. rises from the fear thai Austria by
(m- sin e, ss In tins respe I ma) be n
Icouraged to make further demands.
The Russian foreign office hoes.
! however, that Austria will now adopt
a cm iliatorv attitude The absence
I of any definite indication that she will
! do tlils is probably the reason way
i Russia has not taken any steps to re
dUce her army to Its normal propor
tions in spite of several announce
ments from Vienna of the dismissal
ol reservists there.
oo
HANDS OFF
ASIA MINOR
Germans Announce At
titude Toward Turkey
at Annual Dinner
C onstantinople. Jan 29 -Hands off
ii ii. Tnrkieh possessions in .s
J , rune's p! "cation to
,, , , ,veryone concerned I was
given by. the German ambassador to
I
Turkey In a speech al the Teutonia
club's annual dinner In honor of Em-
ueror William's birthday
The future ol Turkey lies in Asia j
Minor," Baron Hans You Wangen
heim told an enthuststic gathering ol
his compatriots. He continued
German Interests Great.
"The German interests in Asia M
nor are very great and are bound up
with those of Turkey The recent
note of the European powers prom !
ised that Turkey would be aided In I
her future development Germany
will lend powerful assistance in this
cause
In any case, however, to all the j
Turkish possessions in Asia. Germany j
will attach the label, "Touch me not. "I
uu
JUDGE GIVES
AN OPINION
Landis Tells Wh Judici
ary Is Attacked By the
People
Chicago, Jan 29. "Indecent lnva-
slon of the domain of the state courts
by the federal courts has put a club
into the bands of the people, who are
assailing the judiciary of the coun
tr "
Tnlted States District Judge Landis
delivered himself of this opinion from
the bench today in refusing to enter
tain a petition for a writ of habeas
corpus in which the municipal cou'-t
is attacked as an institution without
existence In law.
"I will not lend mvself to pass upon
the validity of an enactment of the
legislature Of Illinois when none of
the state courts have been resorted
to for relief." said JudKe Landis
"There isn't anything more unseemly
than a mere United States judge pro
suming to annul the act of a slate
legislature."
oo
NEW MERGER
TO CONTROL
All Transportation Sys
tems in Cripple Creek
Included
Denver, Colo.. Jan. 29. The organ
ization of a $25,000,000 corporation to
be known as the Securities company,
to control all the transportation sys
! terns through tin- ripple Creek mln
I lug district. Is the announced object
of the visit of Allen L. Burris to New
! York Burris left yesterday with Jo
seph Walker Jr. and George N. Miller.
New York financiers It is planned
to make the securities company a
' holding company for the five railroads
in the district, the El I'aso Consoli
dated Cold Milling company, of which
I Burris is president, and the Golden
I Cycle Mining company, which the El
j Paso Is under contract to purchase
for $5,000,000.
oo
ILLINOIS VOTING
STILL CONTINUES
Springfield, ill., Jan 29 After six
Ineffectual ballots in the speakership
deadlock In the lower house today,
voting began to shift and rumors of
a break were current.
Twelve votes were case for Repre
sentative William McKinlev, Demo
crat, of Chicago, on the second ballo'.
and be was spoken of as a possible
successful compromise candidate The
voting continued and after the 27th
ballot John M. Rapp. Democrat, the
leading candidate, withdrew from tho
race
The house then recessed until 1
p m.
CONDUCTOR
A BENEDICT
New York, Jan 29 Felix Wein
L;.irtner. late conductor of the Royal
("ra at Vienna, and Lucille Marcel,
B well known American prima donna,
v.er.- married at the New York city
ball today by an alderman.
Ruth arrived yesterday on the Mau
retanla He is to assume the conduc
torship of the Boston Opera compa
ny. ,
We in partner has an International
reputation as a conductor, author and
plants! His bride Is the daughter of
Samuel Wasself. a Harlem drugf
For ten years she has been studying
abroad under the name of Marcel.
Weingartner's former wife was tho
Baroness Fedora von Droyfus She
dlovorced him
W J. LOWE HEADS
COMMERCIAL CLUB
Brlgham City. Jan. 28 The direct
ors of the Box Elder Commercial club
held their election of officers last
eveuing. William L Lowe was the
I unanimous choice of the board of dl
rectors as president ol the club for
the ensuing year Mr. Lowe is coun
ty attorn. and is among the ni.-'
prominent oung men of Box Elder
county, He succeeds Judge J. D. Call
as the head of the club
Other members elected were I. E
Duffin, vice president; tleorge A. An
derson, treasurer, and John L. Fierce,
secretary and manager Mr. Pierce
has served a number of terms being
a very active worker for the commer
cial Interests of the dtj aud county.
BUSINESS I
INCREASES I
Foreign Trade Figures I
Mount Into Billions in I
Washington. Jan. 2f. The year
1912 was one of prosperity for the
Fnited States insofar as foreign com- I
merce is concerned, according to fig- j
urcs made public today b the bureau '
rif foreign and domestic commerce. j
The imports for that vear totalled $1,
MMnr.. 355, as compared with SI.".::. H
359,160 uv the corresponding period
ol 1911 Tbe?e were balanced by in- u
creaseg also in the exports, which In
1912 showed an increase to $2...99,
216,993 from 2.092,526,740 in the year H
previous.
During 19U crude materials with H
an aggregate value of $6:53.786,671 H
ere Imported as against $.")03,87n.4tji; H
in 1911, manufactures in an unfin
ished state to the value of $..20.r:88,- H
041, an increase over 1911 of $.:::, Ill - H
;7I and manufacturers In the com- H
plete state ro the value of $404,0.",!,- H
843, as against 1356,673,257 Ibe pre- H
ceding year. H
Tn the inn' tor of exerts crude ma- Bg
te.Ial incrcised from $fi62.019.S10 In BE
1911 to .:;790,oo4,it;r, in 912; un- Kg
finished manufactures from Si:,,9,95,. ma
685 to $72::.S."4,742
oo El
PRESIDENT I
AT DINNER I
Taft Makes His Farewell 13
Speech to Ohio Society p
Tonight I
i,'
Washington. Tan. 29. -President i;i
Taft will make his farewell speech
to the Ohio society tonight at its t.
third annual banquet here. The pres. i.
Idenl will speak on ''The Rainbow fc
j Comes Down in Ohio." the motto P
i adopted by the Ohio ' corn boys '"
who recently visited the capital. 6th-
er speakers will be Speaker Clark,
Representative Cannon and Senator
Poraerene. Senator Burton will make J
his farewell address and review the i
achievements of the Taft administra- J
(ion. H
This is President Mc-Kinley's birth- 1
day H
oo j
COMFORT A I
NECESSITY I
Veterans Should Not Be
Sacrificed in Attempt
to Save a Few Dollar
Washington Jan 20. "The con
fort and happiness of our former sob H
diers should not be sacrificed and
their years shortened In order that a
few dollars may be saved to the na
tion's treasur) While economy is
- ..niinendable it should not be obtain
ed at stich a sacrifice."
This declaration was contained in a
report made to the senate today by
i he special committer whic h investi
gated conditions at the Pacific branch
of the National Home for Disabled
Volunteer Soldiers, at Santa Monica,
The committee reported that the
reterans were poorly fed and that
thoir housing conditions could be
greatly improved. imM
Recommends Liberal Appropriations.
It recommended ' more liberal ap
propriai ions for food and better fa
cilities for cooking."
Senator Jones presented with the
report a bill to transfer control of ;he
bome to the war department Tfce in
vestigating committee found no evi
deuces of graft or raisappropriat Ion
Ol tunds It found that the soldiers
were being fed. however, for from 16
to 20 cents a day. while in the nation- flisfl
al home at Washington the average la H EH
:15 cents a day. The Pacific coast Sifl
home has become so popular with old
soldiers seeking a mild climate thai 1
the committee recommended a law
limiting admission to the home to vet
eran! enjoying pensions of less thai)
$20 a month.
RULING BARS THE
MARRIED ALIENS
Chicago. Jan. 29. Married aliens
whose families are in their aatlve KVJ
land must bring them to the United
States before they can become clti
sens, according to ruling of Federal
Judge Anderson of Indianapolis, who IWJ
was sitting here yesterday In place MM
of Judge Landis The court made
the rulinK as a general policy rein- HVJ
live to the naturalization of aliens. H!H
For this reason out of ss applicants
for citizenship Judce Anderson held
up the applications of two
ou
WARREN ELECTION RATIFIED.
Cheyenne, Wyo , Jan 29. The Wy IB1
omlng legislature in Joint aesslou to- KJH
dav at noon ratified the election ol IflJ
Senator Francis B. Warren to su
ceed himself in the United States X
senate. Senator Warren was present SjMJ
and acknowledged the honor with a H3fl
short address. HSH
I

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