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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, March 13, 1895, Image 8

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8
AGRICULTURE ON
THE PACIFIC COAST.
Chemical Elements of %m Soil
necessary to plant
Life.
THE VALUE OF FERTILIZERS.
Notes From Orchard and Farm.
Outlook for the
Season.
Chemical science has settled two very
important questions in agriculture. First,
that there are only three elements that
any soil is likely to be deficient in for the
growth and maintenance of plant life, and
they are nitrogen, phosphorus and potas
sium. Second, that these three elements
must be in soluble condition in order that
plant life may assimilate them.
Nitrogen is an invisible, tasteless and
odorless gas. The air we breathe is com
posed of about four-fifths of this element.
It is a constituent of all products of
growth, whether animal or vegetable, and
exists in several forms. First, in organic
matter, as in dried blood, bones, fish scrap,
tankage, guano, cotton-seed meal, castor
bean pomace, grape pomace, linseed meal
ami manures. Second, in nitrates, as
nitrate of soda. Third, in ammonia, of
which it forms fourteen parts of every
seventeen. In this latter form its princi
pal source is sulphate of ammonia. Man
ures and some organic substances contain
ammonia.
Phosphorus is a non-metallic substance
which unites with oxygen so readily that
it cannot be kept in air, but must be kept
under water. It exists in all plants and
animals as phosphate of soda, potash,
lime and magnesia. Phosphorus for fer
tilizing purposes is derived from Canada
apatite, Charleston rock, tankage, fish
scrap, bones, cottonseed meal, castor-bean
pomace, grape pomace, linseed meal,
marls, iron ore, slag and manure.
Potassium is an alkali metal. Its affin
ity for oxygen is so great that a piece of
metallic potassium thrown upon water
immediately takes fire. Its most familiar
form is lye. The principal sources from
which potash is derived for fertilizing pur
poses are muriate of potash, kainit, sul
phate of potash and magnesium, ashes,
cottonseed meal, oil meal, flaxseed meal,
castor-bean pomace, grape pomace and
manure.
It often happens that soil is rich in all
necessary elements for plant food, but the
elements are in an insoluble condition. In
such cases the elements may often be dis
solved by the application of lime.
Other elements that enter into organic
life, and which are nearly always pres
ent in quantities sufficient to make
and sustain growth are oxygen, hydrogen,
sulphur, carbon, lime, 'iron, chlorine,
silicon, sodium, magnesium and man
ganese.
The agricultural value of a fertilizer de
pends upon the benefit derived from its
use— its crop - producing power. Some
times the highest priced fertilizers are of
little value to particular crops or lands.
Nitrogen, the most expensive element,
has occasionally been used at a loss,
where potash, the cheapest element, has
been found to be of great agricultural
value.
Certain plants remove from the soil cer
tain elements. When by analysis these
elements have been determined, the kind
of plant food most required is certainly in
dicated. Plant growth is dependent upon
so many factors, however, that no general
rules can be applied, and each set of cir
cumstances must be studied and dealt with
separately. There are certain peculiarities,
too, which are not yet thoroughly under
stood. It often happens, for instance, that
one pound of some certain fertilizer, prop
erly applied, will produce ten pounds of
fruit as an increased crop. This has been
determined by experiments, and is just as
certain as that five pounds of cod liver oil
properly administered to a person may
result in an increase of flesh amounting to
ten pounds. The reason lies partly in the
fact that many of the elements which con
tribute to plant growth are so bountifully
disseminated throughout nature that they
arc nearly always in excess of the require
ments of plant growth, many of them be
ing supplied through the a"ir. Thus the
plant, when supplied with the elements
which may be lacking in the soil, takes up
other elements in their proper proportion
and thrives accordingly.
Upon the other hand fertilizers are occa
sionally applied to trees without resulting
in an increased crop of fruit. No agricul
tural chemist would guarantee an average
crop, even if his own analysis of an abso
lutely fair sample of the soil proved that
the field contained twenty times as much
plant food as any one crop could possibly
remove.
However, the fact remains that proper
fertilization always pays when it is needed.
This has been abundantly proved by ex
periment. Perhaps it has never been made
plainer than at Riverside, where there are
orange groves which have been properly
fertilized, and in which the trees present a
bright, green, healthful appearance and
bear heavy crops, separated only by a fence
from trees that have not been fertilized'
and which present a pale, yellow, sickly
appearance, and which bear small crops of
inferior fruit.
Eastern farmers have demonstrated the
value of fertilizers also, particularly in the
growing of potatoes. Our California farm
ers think they are doing well when they
raise from 300 to 400 bushels of potatoes to
the acre, but Colorado farmers, in a far
less favorable clime and in a soil not any
richer, have, by the intelligent use of fer
tilizers, been enabled to raise as high as
847 bushels per acre at a cost of $20 50 per
•ere for fertilizers, as against 491 bushels
on a similar plat where only stable manure
was used.
Eastern farmers work to great disadvan
tage in making experiments because of the
unreliability of the climate there- The
official! of the Agricultural Department
frequently explain that "no conclusions
can be drawn this year on account of the
excessive rains and storms," or "the
drought unfortunately caused a failure of
the entire plat."
It is surprising that in California, where
the elements are so kind, greater progress
has not beed made in scientific farming.
The lack of experimentation in this line
is, no doubt, due in a great degree to the
fact that the climatic conditions are such
that unusually large crops can be grown
without fertilization.
Again, the land is comparatively new,
much Ox it having been brought under
cultivation within the past few years.
There are soils in several counties which
have been used for grain growing purposes
for thirty or forty years, without apparent
diminution of crops.
This does not mean, however, that
proper fertilization would not greatly in
crease the crops. It only means that the
soil is rich in plant food taken up by grain,
and that the constituents are in a soluble
condition and easily assimilated. It docs
not mean that elements can forever be con
tinuously withdrawn from the soil with
out any apparent diminution of the quan
tity remaining. - i^"-"_B_Pi_!
Fertilizers have been but little used in
California. In fact many valuable fertil
izers are thrown qway. Castor bean pom
ace at the California oilmills is burned for
fuel. In the East castor pomace : sells
readily for from $20 to $26 per ton. Hun
dreds, even thousands of tons of bones are
thrown away or burned up by California
butchers. Grape pomace is often used to
fill a ditch with or some other objectiona
ble depression in the land. The refuse of
the sheep and cattle corrals is often al
lowed to go to waste and barnyard manure
is frequently dumped in a garbage heap
and burned or otherwise destroyed. Straw
is burned annually by the thousands of
tons. All refuse straw, pomace and ma
nure, should be cared for, composted and
used.
All who have experimented with barn
yard manure as a fertilizer knows that it is
valuable and largely increases crops when
ever it is properly applied. Yet it has little
value compared with the prepared fertil
izers. It contains, with other ingredients,
about 70 per cent water, 0.5 per cent nitro
gen, 0.5 per cent phosphoric acid and 0.4
per cent potash. A ton of manure, in
other words, contains only about twenty
eight pounds of the essential elements —
say ten pounds of nitrogen, ten pounds of
phosphoric acid, and eight pounds of pot
ash. These elements would cost about
$3, so that is about the real value of barn
yard manure per ton as a fertilizer. Of
course the cost of hauling must be added,
supposing that the manure first cost $3
per ton. As compared with pure prepared
fertilizers, its value may be stated about
like this: One ton of nitrate of soda con
tains as much nitrogen as would be found
in from thirty to thirty-five tons of man
ure. One ton of bone black contains as
much phosphoric acid as seventy tons of
manure. One ton of muriate of potash con
tains as much potash as 125 tons of man
ure. One may easily carry in a basket in
one hand, more plant food in the shape of
nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash, than
is contained in a ton of barnyard manure.
The latter, however, is valuable, and may
often be cheaply secured and applied.
Luther Burbank, who lives near Santa
Rosa, has what he calls a crossbred walnut
tree, a hybrid of the English walnut and
the American black walnut.
The output of oranges at Oroville, Ther
malito and Palermo for the past season lias
been, according to the Oroville Mercury :
Oroville, _o'_ carloads; Palermo, 45 car
loads.
Apples that are grown in the mountains
are firmer, taste better and keep longer
than those grown in the valleys. Along
the Sierras at elevations of from 2000 to
4000 feet they grow well and bear well. At
greater elevations than this the snow often
breaks down the trees, especially the
younger ones.
The Riverside Press states that the
orange crop of that vicinity will this year
amount to -700 carloads or 768,500 boxes,
! of which a little more than half are navels.
The lemon crop will bring the value of the
citrus crop of that particular section up to
$1,539,000.
Oranges grown near enough to the coast
to be subject to the influence of the moist
ure-laden atmosphere of the ocean are
likely to become smutty. Their appear
ance is greatly impaired and the fruit
never commands as much as good clean
fruit grown in a more arid atmosphere. J.
8. Phillips of National City, San Diego
County, says the best wash he has ever
found for smutty oranges is two parts j
water to one of lemon juice.
The Paso Robles Record reports that fig I
growing in that vicinity has resulted un
satisfactory with the exception of a few in- {
stances, in which the orchards were in the j
warmer belts along the foothills. Most of j
the trees which were planted there several
years ago are now being removed to make
room for more profitable fruit trees. The
fig reaches its greatest growth in this State
in the San Joaquin" Valley, south of
Merced, in Fresno, Tulare and* Kern. The
trees there, especially in districts where the
soil is irrigated by percolation from irrigat- ;
ing canals, grow "very thriftily. Very few
farmers, however, succeed in" curing* and \
packing tigs so they will present a good ap
pearance, taste well and keep. Most of the
tigs turn sour. It has been claimed that
this was due to lack of caprification. How
ever, the blastophaga, introduced a few
years ago, brings about pollinization, and
yet fig culture has not been profitable ex
cept in a few instances. A few growers
who have studied the matter very closely
have succeeded. The fig especially the
old Mission bears very heavily along
the foothills on the eastern edge of the San
Joaquin Valley, and those who can place
figs in the market in an acceptable manner
can certainly reap large profits.
The annual report of the Sutter Fruit
Growers' Shipping Association showed
that the association had shipped thirty-six
carloads of fresh fruits loaded at Yuba
City. One car was lost in the strike, leav
ing thirty-five cars that reached the East
ern markets. The gross sales on twenty
one cars of which a record was kept
amounted to $18,860 10— an average of I
$S9S3B. After deducting freight and other j
expenses and commissions this leaves an
average net return of $365 40 per about
35 cents per package of twenty pounds.
Bone dust, which is all manner of bones
ground up into flour, is one of the best fer
tilizers known. It has to be ground fine
so roots can feed at once upon it. Other
wise it is not available until time rots it.
We have all heard of carcasses being buried
under fruit trees, asparagus beds and soon,
because the roots feed only as the mass
rots, and -that may run into years. If,
therefore, it is in your power, buy a bone
grinding mill. You would be astonished
at the bones you could collect and the ben
efits you would derive. Green bones, with
with more or less meat thereon, is the
very food for laying hens. Even animals,
old and rejected, can be turned thus into
excellent account.
No one whose trees are affected with the
pernicious scale can afford to neglect spray
ing. The lime, salt and sulphur mixture
seems to give good results, and is made by
mixing two pounds of lime and four pounds
of sulphur with three gallons of water.
The mixture should be boiled an hour and
a half. Put three pounds of salt with six
pounds of lime and slake with hot water;
add to it the boiling mixture and boil for
an hour. Then add nine gallons of water
and apply to the trees with a spray pump.
The following advertisement appeared in
the Fresno Republican of March 3. It wa_
probably inserted as a joke, but is so sug
gestive that we reprint it for the benefit of
Pacific Coast raisin-growers:
"Wanted— A man to go through the col
onies and secure contracts on raisin crops
for the year 1805. The raisins to be bandied
on a commission basis. Any one desiring
this situation who has any character or
principle or any respect for his future need
not apply. We want a man who will make
all kinds of promises as long as he does not
bind us beyond our one-sided contract.
Any who cares not for the future of
his soul will do. Cosmopolitan Packing
Company, Fresno.
Section 39 of the new county government
bill declares that the Boards of Supervisors
"shall have jurisdiction and power to en
courage, under such regulations as they
may adopt, the planting and preservation
of shade and ornamental trees on the pub
lic roads and highways, and on and about
the public grounds and buildings of the
county, and to pay to persons planting and
cultivating the same for every living tree
thus planted at the age of four years a sum
not exceeding one dollar." This will un
doubtedly do more to promote tree-plant
ing than any other law that has been
passed. All that seems to be necessary in
order to secure shade-trees along public
Highways everywhere in the State is to se
cure permission from the Supervisors to
plant them at $1 each.
Barley is already heading out in some
sections of the State and haying has com
menced in some localities.
Scientists have been unable to find any
thing poisonous in rattleweed. Upon the
other hand, none of them are able to tell
us what is the matter with a rattle weeded
horse.
The North American Journal of Home
opathy says that sheep fed on grass
grown on soil wanting silicate of lime are
attacked with pining ill and rot, diseases
closely allied to tuberculosis.
_ Farmers should never waste ashes.
Scatter them over the soil in orchard or
garden. Lime and ashes are most thor
oughly assimilated when applied in dry
weather and plowed under.
Horses are seldom bothered with bots in
California, but in the East horses are often
killed by them. The best preventive is to
wash the deposited spots daily with „
petroleum emulsion to which "a liberal
quantity of carbolic acid has been added. '
Irrigation canals must- eventually be
cemented, as they are in some portions of
Southern California. With an open ditch
more water is wasted than is used for irri
THE SAIST FRANCISCO CALL, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1895
gation. Cement is costly, but its use is
always profitable in the end. Even the
extra expense involved in clearing canals
of weeds would eventually pay for the cost
of a cemented canal.
The Oakdale Leader reports that meadow
larks have badly damaged a large tract of
wheat in that vicinity, owned by J.W.
Tulloch. They bore down into the soil
with their bills and get the kernels of
wheat. Larks very seldom fly in flocks,
and are so quick and nervous in their
movements that very seldom is an oppor
tunity presented to kill more than one at a
shot. The damage done to growing crops
by larks is, as a rule, very slight.
The warnings sent out by the Weather
Bureau are often of great service to farm
ers and orchardists. The service can be
extended to many of the smaller towns if
some reliable citizen will take the trouble
to hoist the weather signals and send in
reports. The bureau will furnish flags and
instruments free of cost to voluntary ob
servers.
Most farmers plan to lighten their own
labor, and adopt, when possible, labor
saving machinery. The housewife, in the
meantime, often "has to work to great dis
advantage. Give the women a chance.
Provide plenty of good dry wood and
kindling. Buy a good range. Arrange to
have plenty of hot and cola water piped in
the kitchen, and provide sinks for dish
washing and others for laundry work, and
see if it doesn't pay.
PUBLICATION OFFICE:
52"i Montgomery street, near Clay, open until 11
o'clock P. M. HKANCH OFFICES— 7IO Market
f treet, near Kearny. open until 12 o'clock midnight ;
": !> Hayes street, open until 0:30 o'clock ; 717 Larkin
ftreet. open until 9:30 o'clock ; SW. corner Sixteenth
and Mission streets, open until 9 o'clock ; '-'518
BI ission street, open until ft o'clock ; and 110 Ninth
street, open until 0:30 o'clock
NOTICK OF MKKTIXOS.
n_-*S=* MOUNT MORIAH LODGE NO. a
J*"-**: 44. P. and A. M.— Meeting THIS >5_
(WEDNESDAY) EVENING at 7:3o"*K_*f
o'clock. Third degree. rSy\
TIIEO. FKOLICH, Secretary.
jJC__S=» MISSION LO DUE NO. 1 iii '■'- AND ft
IJ*-^ A. M. - Called meeting THIS _& .
(WEDNESDAY) EVENING at 7:80*« V
o'clock. First degree. By order of Hic\V./v>
M. C. D. BUNKER, Secretary.
■sS** EXCELSIOR I.iiDUK NO. 166. F. lb
u-^^ and A. Called meeting Tills /&.
(WEDNESDAY) EVENING, March 13, at *«:_-*'
7:30 o'clock. Third degree. '\> A
IHEO K. SMITH, secretary.
Ct__S=*- CROCKETT LODGE Nl). 139. F. a
-»-*- and A. M. -Called meeting THIS «\
(WEDNESDAY) EVENING at 7:3o'K3f
o'clock. Third degree. By order of the W. r^ey
M. H. FORTRIEDE, Sec.
**p*_S-> YERBA BUENA LO_»GKNo. "_*_____!
»»-^ 16, i. O. O. P.— An open meet- ___""_____
ing will be held und<rthe auspices of ' -'--Jf> -
this lodge THURSDAY EVENING, " _wl>w_
March 14, at 8 o'clock. The lodge will meet for
the transaction of business at 7:15 o'clock. Visit-
ing brothers cordially welcome.
U. S. (i. CLIFFORD, N. G.
K. G. Hakrison*, Rec. Secretary.
"*_E__S--» TRIUMPH LODGE NO. 180, A. O. U. ,_*-_*,
■>■»' W.— are notified to meet at your ■ v '•
hall, cor. Seventh and Market sts., to attend tl'.^
the funeral of our late brother. ROBERT MS*
DAVIDSON, WEDNESDAY, Marcb IS, at 1:80
r. m. .1. a. McWii_____, M. W.
.1. H. Cattran. Recorder.
jjE^y A. O. H.. DIVISION NO. 3. \VILLfc tB^-*> >
■Jt^^' hold their regular montly meeting at \J,w/
Drew's Hall, 121 New Montgomery st., on *&'\7l
WEDNESDAY EVENING. March 13,_fW'*
1805. JOHN BOYALL, Presidnet. »"__;
M_C__.__ Kilkenny, Secretary.
•^---5= REGULAR MONTHLY MEETING
w-t*_ of the Laborers' Protective and Benevolent
Association will he held in Irish-American Hall on
WEDNESDAY EVENING, March 13, at 7:30 p. _.
DENNIS SWEENEY, President.
Thomas CAM.AiiHV. Secretary.
fS_3S-* THE ANNUA- MEETING OF THE
•Jc-* 7 stockholders of Western Sugar Refining
Company will be held at the office of he corpora-
tion. 837 Market St., San Francisco, Cal., on MON-
DAY, the 25th day of March, at 12 _„ for the elec-
tion of a board of directors, to serve fortheensuing
year, and the transaction of such other business as
may come before the meeting.
ROBERT OXNARD, Secretary.
B__S_ ANNUAL MEETING CHE REGULAR
" -* annual meeting of the stockholders of the
Sierra J_ke Ice Company will be held at the ollice
of the company, room 27, fifth floor. Mills build-
ing, San Francisco, Cal., on THURSDAY, the 21st
nay of March, 1895. at the hour of 2 o'clock p. it.,
for the purpose of electing a board of directors to
serve tor the ensuing year and the transaction of
such other business as may come before the meet-
ing. Transfer-books will close on WEDNESDAY,
the 20lh day of March, 1895, at 4 o'clock p. m.
C. A. GROW. Secretary.
V£*-"S-* STOCKHOLDERS' MEETINtJ — THE
U^-£^ annual meeting of the stockholders of the
Mendocino Lumber Company will be held at the
ollice of the company, 40 California street, room 1.
on MONDAY March 18, 1895, at 11 o'clock a. M.,
for the election of directors for the ensuing year,
the amending and altering of the by-laws and the
transaction of such and all other business that
may properly be considered at the annual meeting.
E.G. WILLIAMS. President.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
|-f^*sf^LAl*X'F*-_TZ**^^*T^^
"*-*". rooms 14 and 15, 9th floor. Mills building.
Practices in all State and Federal courts.
*-_Bf* ROOMS WHITENED, . fI UP; PAPER-
->^& ed ff'3 50 up. 309 Sixth, George Hartman.
a_*-_S=» M ONE _*TO LOAN ON SAN FRANCISCO
"^ real estate. W. J. GUNN, 410 Montgomery.
ESS 3 JOHN F. LYONS, NOTARY PUBLIC
t*-*'' and Commissioner of Deeds, l'assports pro-
cured. Ollice 607 Montgomery St.; telephono
5439; residence 2202 Steiner st.
B_-*5-> BAD TENANTS EJECTED FOR $4.
J*""* 1 *" Collections made, city or country. Pacific
Collection Co.. 415 Montgy st., room 6. Tel. 5580.
GrSS=> J.B. McINTYRE, BOOKBINDER AND
"*- J^ Printer. 422 Commercial st.
SITUATIONS WANTED-FEMALE.
LADIES-^FGR~AN Al SERVANT SEE J. F.
CROSETT & CO., 312 Sutter st.
SWEDISH EMPLOYMENT OFFICE FOR ALL
kJ kinds of good respectable girls. liy 2 Antonio
St., off Jones, near Ellis.
ARTIN <fc CO., EMPLOYMENT AGENTS. 749
±11- Market st., main telephone No. 1849; furnish
all kinds of reliable female help.
AT THE SWEDISH EMPLOYMENT BU-
__. reau first-class Swedish and German girls are
awaiting situations. 332 Geary st. ; telephone 983.
G1 ERMAN GIRL WANTS A SITUATION TO
rdo light housework and plain washing. Call or
address GOO Haight st.
GERMAN WOMAN WANTS A SITUATION
VJT as German cook; is willing to do some house-
work • city references: city or country. Please call
206 Fifth St., near Howard.
ANTED— BY EXPERIENCED INFANT'S
>' nurse, care of one child in hotel, country', or
companion to invalid lady; wages $12. Address
M. _.. bo.x 90, Call Branch Office.
WIDOW WANTS GENTLEMEN'S MENDING
''to do; no triflers. Call 437 Natoma st.
T UNO GERMAN* GIRL WOULD LIKE TO
-L do upstairs work in a private family. Call or
address 1022 Jackson St., bet. Mason and Powell.
yOUNG GIRL WOULD LIKE A PLACE TO
J. care one or two children or wait on old lady;
wages $8 to $10; reference. Address G.. box 144,
Call Branch Oflice.
OUNG GIKL WANTS SITUATION TO MINT)
children or to do light housework. Call or ad-
dress 2438 California st. .-•.,.
C COMPETENT GERMAN COOK WANTS
\J place in private family or institution; success-
ful in her undertaking. Apply 957 Market, rm. 1.
G1 OVERN ESS, SECRETARYORCOMPANION
T position wanted by experienced young lady
with sound English education, music, foreign lan-
guages: excellent testimonials and references. Ad-
dress D. F., box 141, Call Branch Office.
WANTED— BY" COMPETENT, GOOD COOK
to do general housework or downstairs work;
will do washing: don't mind large family kind
to children; city or country; wages $15 to is 20
Please call for 3 days, 529 Mission st., near First.
CIANADIAN girl DESIRES SITUATION IN
/'small American family; good cook; no wash-
Ing; city reference : $15 to $20. 1031 Market st.
SCANDINAVIAN GIRL WOULD LIKE TO
have a situation at general housework. Address
45 Sacramento st. \ :-.:^
XT-UNO GIRL, 18 YEARS. WISHES SITUA-
■I tion to do light housework. Call 724 Harrison.
WOMAN WANTS TO WORE BY THE DAY
»» or week, housecleaning and window -cleaning*
$1 a day. Address W. W., box 144, Call Branch.
WIDOW, LATELY FROM THE BAST.
would like a situation as housekeeper for a
gentleman. Call one week, 132 Sixth st., room 42.
GERMAN WOMAN WISHES WORK BY
the day washing and cleaning. Call 431 Clem-
entina st. . • j"ir 'V -";
ITUATIONS WANTED BY A NUMBER OF
Swedish girls; good cooks and general house-
work"s2o. 1 1 1_ Antonio st., off Jones, near Ellis.
SITUATION WANTED BY A GERMAN GLRL
O to do plain cooking and housework. Address
132 Juniper st„ bet. Harrison and Bryant.
GERMAN GIRL WISHES SITUATION TO DO
general housework in American family. Call
545 Mission. • . ■
R"~EBPE_TABLE ,YOUNG GIRL WISHES A
situation to do housework. Apply at 1418
Alabama st.
OMPETENT GIRL WANTS SITUATION TO
do cooking and housework or second work; ref-
erences. Address 233 Fulton st. --
SCANDINAVIAN GIBL WISHES POSITION
O in American family to do general housework
and cooking. Call (327 ' _ Ivy aye. .
"WANTED— HOUSEWORK OR KITCHEN
'' work for a . middle-aged woman. Apply 504
Franklin st. : , ■
"["J OVA SCOTIA WOMAN .WISHES SITUA-
J-* ; tion to do housework In small family; good
plain cook. Call or address next 3 days 1625 Clay.
SITUATIONS "WAN TED— Continued.
"\V : AITR_?SS^- SITUATION WANTED BY
t I young lady not afraid of work. Call or address
19 Clinton st. >'=..-■'•'• - ; ;
SWEDISH GIRL WISHES SITUATION TO
_~_ do housework. Please call at 173 a Clara st.
BY YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST LN HOUSE-
work. Call! 3B 'A Shipley St.
GERMAN ' WOMAN WISHES STEADY EX-
gagement for laundrvwork on Mondays and
Fridays. Call at 105 Berry st., near Third.
G" O V ERN EI^IYOITNG^LArjY DESIRES Po-
sition as visiting governess to young children:
English branches and music: references. Address
B. P... box 117, Call Branch Office.
RESSMAKER WOULD LIKE FEW MORE
engagements by the day: terms $1 50. Call or
address 823 Dolores st.
WIDOW WOULD LIKE A POSITION AS
' i housekeeper- city, or country preferred. Ad-
dress H. X., box i 56. Call Branch Office.
AN ADVANCED WOMAN WISHES SITUA-
-<-"- Hon in small family, housekeeping; no objec-
tion to country, 10 Wetmore place, above Powell
and Washington.
J-RENCH DRESSMAKER, FIRST-CLASS FIT-
X ter, wishes few more engagements in families;
city or country. Call or address 511 Hyde st.
E ESPECTABLE GERMAN LADY, WHO IS A
' good plain cook and willing to work, desires po-
sition as housekeeper In widower's family or lodg-
ing-bouse ; no objection to country. 312 Hyde st.
■VTOUNG FINNLBH GIBL WANTS A SITU A-
-1- tion to do general housework; speaks no Eng-
lish ; small ages. Call or address 42 Everett st.
"IJESPEC "______. GERMAN EASTEBN LADY
-I i' wishes situation at general housework; can
cook and bake; German or English family pre-
ferred. Address 528 Devisadero St.
youNG lady~would" - like PLACE TO
X learn hair-dressing; had some experience; will
give 2 months. Address I. L. A., 522 Turk st.
A ""YOUNG WIDOW WISHES GENT'S MEND-
ing to do. Call from 10 to 5:80, 150 Fourth st.,
room 9.
OUSEKEEPER— WANTED BY A YOUNG
and respectable Scandinavian widow, a posi-
tion as housekeeper; good cook and seamstress:
not afraid of work; no tritlers need answer; ref-
erences given. Address S. L., box 118, Call Branch.
K"~~ -LIABLE COLOR WANTS SITUA-
■ tlon in the country as ladies' maid or a house-
keeper in a summer resort. call or address 14 y_
Sherwood place, off Third st.
C* BENCH maid, good seamstress, _____~
X dresser and packer, would like to travel. x. V.,
box 1 lit. Call Branch.
SEAMSTRESS WISHES CHILD RE N'S
0 clothes and plain sewing; $1 per day. Address
s.. box 183, Call Branch Offlee.
y UNG WOMAN WISHES SITUATION IN
x the country as housekeeper. Address H., box
106, Call Branch Office
"ITOMAN* WANTS WORK DAY OR WEEK
" washing or housecleaning. Address or call
1003 Sixteenth aye., 8. S. F.
yOUNG GIBL SPEAKING FRENCH, GER-
-1 man and English, wishes situation at upstairs
work and plain sewing; best of references. Please
call at 1810 Sutter st.
OFFICE-CLEANING OK position AS JANl-
tress wanted by respectable young English
woman with iirst-cfass references. Address Eng-
lish, box 166, Call I, ran. Office.
MIDDLE- AMERICAN WOMAN WISH-
ts situation In a respectable family. Please
call or address 423 Fourth st.
y 0 UNG GERMAN-SWISS "WANTS SITUA-
X tion to do housework or care of children. Call
or address 621 Commercial st.
y oung g~erm"a"n~ _ woman WANTS WORK
1 by the day; washing and bousecleaning. Cull
at 325 Larkin st., downstairs.
yOUNG WOMAN WANTS WORK BY THE
J- day: washing or bousecleaning; or would tike
flannel underwear to wash at home. Address 120
Fourth st., room 11
I MERICAN - WOMAN WISHES SITUATION
-.'V for housework; good plain cook; country pre-
ferred; no postals. Call at 1239V_ Market st., near !
Ninth.
if you WANT A good servant, male
-1 or female, city or country, apply MME LEO-
POLD'S Employment otlice, 957 Market St.; open
evenings.
1? ASTERN I. WOULD LIKE A SITUA-
-d Hon as housekeeper. Call or address 7 Mar-
caret place, upper Hat, bet. 1 I and 16 Turk st.
GI EBMAN WOMAN, 29 YEARS OF AGE,
vT wishes place as housekeeper. Address 7 Au-
gust piace, bet. Union and Green sts., below
Powell.
yOUNG GIRL WISHES A POSITION AS
X housekeeper for a gentleman. Call at 72!_V_
Howard st., room 1.
p EFINED YOUNG LADY WOULD LIKE
II situation as housekeeper. Call or address 1126
Market st., room 18, second floor.
DR ESS M A I RS WANTED; PATTERNS CUT
to order. 25c. McDowell Academy. 213 Powell.
SITUATIONS WANTED-MALK.
1["OB HOTEL COOKS," WAII ERs. CLERKS,
-I. male or female, send in your orders to J. F.
ISETT ifc CO., 628 fcacranif San Francisco.
y UNO BBDMA X E R ills 1 RES* - WORK
-I- cheap In small lodging-house. Address 8., box
19, this office.
T-NGINEER AND MACHINIST WANTS
-Li situation: references: city or country. J., 18
Prospers!.. San Francisco.
SITUATION' WANTED AS BARBER; SIX
O months' experience. Address Barber, box 126,
Call Branch Office.
To MEET THE HARD TIMES; SALARY $40;
expert double-entry bookkeeper wants situation;
can speak German: good references. Address H.
P., box 140, Call Branch Office.
DRUGSTORE'S WORK WANTED BY JAPA-
nese high school graduate, who wants to be-
come a druggist. Address Fuso, 805 Geary.
OOD STBONG ROY (18 YEARS "OtUhWHO
f lives with his parents would like a position in a
butcher-shop. Address A. BRUCKER, 1513 Du-
pont st.
STEADY, RELIABLE YOUNG GERMAN, 22
O years old. wishes a situation: has had expe-
rience In the grocery business. Apdress T. PETER-
SEN, 821 Hampshire street, city.
STRON"g~b6y,"i_, LIVING WITH HIS PAR-
O ents, wants a situation to make himself gener-
ally useful around wholesale house or store. Call
or address 790 Stevenson st.
DELIABLE AND COMPETENT "ENGINEER
J I wants work; an expert in saving fuel in boiler-
room; references. Apply C. THORPE, 1609
California sr.
rjOOD BEE \DH.\KER, SINGLE. WANTS A
VA place; willing to leave city. Address Baker,
box 168, Call Branch Oflice.
yOU NG MAN WANTS WOBK OF ANY KIND.
X Address P. «_, box 163, Call Uranch Office.
"\y I .Mil »W-4 LEANING WANTED BY YOUNG,
tt reliable man, either by day or contract. Ad-
dress W. C. box 156, Call Branch Office.
TA PAN FIRST-CLASS COOK, WANTS A
O situation in family. Address A. S., box 114,
Call Branch Oflice.
C IOACHMAN AND GARDENER BY A FIRST-
V 7 class man; milk and make himself useful; best
of reference. Address F. G., box 100, Call Branch.
SITUATION WANTED BY AN ENGLISH
kJ gardener; can milk and is handy with tools.
Address S. M., :,ox 20, this office.
Al" AN I! i SITUATION FOB GARDENING
' and housework or for gardening and taking
carejof horses; speaks German; good reference.
Address Gardener, Call Branch, 717 Larkin st.
SITUATION WANTED BY YOUNG MAR-
k_J ried coupl< (German); no children; city or
country. Inquire Humboldt House, 1309 Stockton.
JAPANESE |:i,v, YOUNG AND FAITHFUL,
O wants situation as ofllce-bov or waiting at table.
Address J. K-box 106, Call Branch.
SWEDISH "MAN WANTS ACE IN PRI-
-0 vate family to take care horses, cows, garden,
or anything around a place; good reference. Ad-
dress Swede, box 137, all Branch Office.
SITUATION" WANTED IN" PRIVATE _•___•
kJ ily by a German-American coachman; can
milk; understands gardening and any kind of work
in and about the house; temperate and industrious;
city references. Address C. F. & ST., 1300 Turk
st., cor. Webster, San Francisco, Cal.
1 y ANTED— POSITION BY MAN AND WIFE
" as cooks in hotel, ranch or private family. Ap-
ply or address 225 Perry St., city.
FEMALE HELP WANTED.
0 SECOND GiRLS, -20; GERMAN OR'SCAN-
-w dinavian girls, housework. $20; waitress, .$l5-
Spanish second girl, $15; 10 girls, light house-
work, $12 and $15. C. R. HANSEN <fc CO., 110
Geary st.
WANTED-COOK AND LA UNDRESS, SHORT
» » distance, $25, see lady here at 2 o'clock to-
day; German or Scandinavian cook, no wash, $30-
-a German and French second girls, $20; Protestant
second girl and laundress, $25: 2 German nurses,
$20; invalid nurse, $20, and girls for housework in
city and country. J. F. CROSETT <fc CO., 312
Sutter st. ' ..•-..
TO" ANTED-NURSE, $20, SEE PARTY HERE
"T at 10 o'clock to-day; '.' waitresses and cham-
bermaids, country hotels, $20. J. F. CROSETT &
CO., 312 Sutter st. ; .
WAN 2 SWEDISH OR GERMAN LAUN-
dresses, $25; first-class cook, $35; first-class
French waitress, $25; 2 French nurses, $20 and
$15: girls for housework and assist. LEON'
ANDRE, 315 Stockton st. __^
GERMAN OR SWEDISH , GIRL, GENERAL
J housework, plain cooking, $25: seamstress
$25; girl for housework, Bakersfield, $25; nurse-
girl. $12; number of girls for housework. MRS
BIRD, 705 Polk st. - , ;
C-RENCH GOVERNESS, ONE CHILI), $__•
X German cook, $35; cook, American family)
$30; 10 housework girls, city and country, $20
and $25: 6 girls to assist, $12 to $15. Apply MISS
CULLEN, 105 Stockton st.
IjVRENCH SECOND GIRL AND SEAMSTRESS,
$25; waitress, $25; laundress, $25. Apply
Miss CULLEN, 105 Stockton st., room 2. •
HAMBERMAID FOR HOTEL, $20. APPLY
MISS CULLEN, 105 Stockton st.
9 NURSES, $15 EACH. MISS CULLEN, 105
—! Stockton at., room 2.
\TUB8 _ FOR CHILDREN, $20 TO $25, SEE
-L' boss here: nurse for an invalid, $20: chamber-
maid, $18: waitress, $20: woman for housework,
no washing. MURRAY _ READY, 634 Clay st.
p ERMAN OR FRENCH CHAMBERMAID, TO
VT assist also with 1 grown child, $25. Apply
MISS PLUNKETT, 42 _ Sutter st.
HELP WANTED— Continued.
• 9*GET_*IA^N cooks" 6rt^cXNTHN*A^IAN
l -^ girls that understand German cooking, $30 and
$35. Apply MISS PLUNKETT, 424 Sutter st.
i *lI*ANTED— WAITRESS FOR FIRST-CLASS
TT hotel in city, $25; call early. MISS PLUN-
• KETT, 424 Sutter st. -; «
WANTED- A COOK ON PASTRY ALONE
tt for 3 or 4 hours' work every day; good pay.
' Apply MISS PLUNKETT, 424 Sutter st.
\\r ANTED— WAITRESS, $20 AND ROOM;
TT waitress, $5 a week: waitress, $15 and room,
small place; waitress, $16; 3 housegirls, $25; 5
housegirls, $20; 13 housegirls, $15; woman cook
' for ranch; housekeeper for Oregon; 5 young girls,
$8 and $10 a month, for small families.assist, etc.:
3 nnrsegirls; vest-makers. MARTIN & CO., 749
■ Market st.
A SWEDISH GIRLS FOR GENERAL HOUSE-
, "X work, wages $25; German girl, $20; nurse, $20;
cook, German style, $30; American cook, $25;
housegirl, $15; second girl, $20; 4 girls, country,
$20 and $25. 332 Geary.
: WAITRESS, COUNTRY, $20. FARE AD-
VY vanced. HOTEL GAZETTE, 420 Kearny st.
ANTED — EXPERIENCED CLOAK AND
skirt makers at M. sIMINOFF'S, 1228 Mar-
ket st.
STRONG YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST IN GEN-
eral housework : sleep at home. Address, with
references, A., box 20, this office.
"WANTED— TO ASSIST IN HOUSE?
TT work and care of baby ; $10. 923 Fillmore.
TAILORESS ON CUSTOM CHATS; ALSO Ap-
prentice. 765 Mission st.
"\y ANTED— A LITTLE GIRL FOR HOUSE-
V V work and care for children. 440 Noe st.
! WANTED —AN APPRENTICE GIRL on
TT coats. 11. DAVIS, 457 Jessie st.
1 TAT ANTED— GEBMAN GIRL AS NURSE,
TT help with second work. 1307 Hyde.
GOOD TAILORESS ON CUSTOM COATS. 349
Fourth st.
yOUNG GIKL TO ASSIST IN GENERAL
X housework. 1217 Webster st.
/~1IBI"DO GENERAL HOUSEWORK; MUST
"J" sleep home. 227 Leavenworth st.
■ T ADY CANVASSERS; HOUSEHOLD AR-
JJ tide; good paying business. Apply Wilson
House, 829 Stevenson st., after 2 v. m.
WANTED - FIRST-CLASS SKIRTMAKERS.
V T 504 Sutter st.
. yOUNG GIRL TO TAKE CARE OF CHIL-
x dren. 1308 a Leavenworth st.
WANTED IN CHOPHOUSE. 60 THIRD
vT street.
I"~ -IRST-CLASS WAISTHANDS. CITY PARIS
x Building, room 71.
WANTED TO SELL ALL OR HALF INTER-
tt est in Oakland school of art and science In
dress cutting, making and teaching the French
tailor system simplified; one to take charge of
dressmaking ; also teachers for 01 her schools. 'all
Monday at school. 613 Geary st., San Francisco;
Tuesday and Wednesday, Oakland. Blake block,
on Washington St., room 39. S. S. FREEMAN,
United States Agent.
"[ ADY TO LEARN MUSIC AND TEACHING;
I J tuition 1 year for services. Call Ito 2 o'clock,
California Conservatory, 1704 Sacramento st.
"Term an GIRL, GENERAL housework,
r small family; good home. 126V_ <app St
"PLANTS OPERATOR. COLUMBIAN WOOLEN-
X mills, 541 Market st.
APA BLE GIRL, NOT UNDER 20, FOR
\J housework and assist with children; no cook-
ing; wages $15. Apply 210 Ninth st.
"I A FIBST-CLASS CLOA K-FINISI NONE
1" but first class need apply. I. BOTIONI, 723
Market st., room 34.
YE A I GIRL FOR HOUSEWORK. 1507 FOIr
-!■' som st.
Gi IRL FOR GENERAL HOUSEWORK. 10
C Liberty st., bet. Twentieth and Twenty-first.
\l* ANTED -Good i STBONG " GIRL FOB t GEN-
tt oral housework; German or German descent
preferred. 2002 Golden Gate aye.
TTtIBST-CLASa CAP ' HANDS; WORK BY
X power. 11. FRIEDLANDER, 10 and 12 Sutter.
GTeneral housework girl WANTED at
' I 3221 Brigcs aye., High-street station, Ala-
meda; wages $15.
T ADY~AS DRUMMER FOR PRINTING; GOOD
J J salary to right party. ORMSBY & CO., 636
Clay st.
* ANTED— A YOUNG GERMAN GIRL , TO
TT attend to children. Apply at 933 Haight st.
WANTED— neat girl FOR LIGHT HOUSE-
TT work. 936 Filbert st.
IRLS WANTED — PATTERNS CUT TO
order, 25c. at McDowell Academy, 213 Powell.
■f-REE— TEST AT LAWRENCE DRESSCUT-
-1 tins School. 1231 Market st.
MALE HELP WANTED.
COOK, RESTA -BANT, * 12 WEEK ;
0 baker and pastry cook, hotel, $40; Japanese for
laundry work, $15 and found. C. R. HANSEN &
CO., 110 Geary at.
SO A N 1 1 NAY I A COACHMAN WITH REF-
erences, $30. C. It. HANSEN & CO., 110
Geary st. -
REDWOOD-TIE MA KKRS, 10c A TIE ; WOOD*
XX choppers, $1 50 a cord; vegetable gardener, $30
and found; 4 fanners, $15; 3 Scandinavian or Ger-
man farmers, $15. C.R.HANSEN & CO., 110
Geary st. '-■ /- -':
WANTED — COACHMAN WITH REFER-
! TT ences for country, $30 and found: young Ger-
man to drive milk wagon, $25 and found: stable-
man: farmer, $20 and found; 2 boiler-makers, $6
day, silver; 4 carpenters, $6 day, silver, and mill-
wright for Central America. Apply to J. F.
(SETT <fc CO., 628 Sacramento st.
OX MORE WOODCHOPPEBS, RED, PINE
_- _» and hardwood, shingle bolts, etc., $1 to $1 50
per cord, 1 year's company work. MURRAY «fc
READY, 634 Clay St.
1 A LABORERS AND OFF-BEARERS FOR A
X\J country brickyard. MURRAY & READY,
634 Clay st.
Bailor, GERMAN or - "Scandinavian,
0 for a gentleman's yacht; 2 stablemen city
stables. MURRAY & READY, 634 Clay st.
BUTCHER FOR A LARGE RANCH, SEE
boss here, $25 and found: farmer and wife, 3
farmers, $20. MURRAY & READY, 634 Clay st.
BAKER, COUNTRY SHOP, $30 TO $40 AND
found: 3 hotel cooks, $35 10 $60; 3 waiters,
$25 and $30; 2 dishwashers; cook for a ranch. $30.
MURRAY & READY, 634 Clay st.
W ANTED - SHORT-ORDER COOK, $8 A
TT week; window-cleaner, etc. MARTIN & CO..
749 Market street.
•WANTED— MAN ACQUAINTED IN THE
» » city to deliver coal, $25 and found. L. ANDRE,
315 Stockton st.
A I ARIT N & CO., EMPLOYMENT AGENTS
_»A 749 Market st., main telephone No. 1849, fur-
nish all kinds of reliable male help.
y OUNG MAN WANTED TO LEARN MANU**
X facturing optical trade; one that has had expe-
rience as a manufacturing jeweler and can do hard
soldering. Apply bet. 9 and 10:30 a. m., California
optical Company, 317 Kearny st.
TJABBE KS FOR EMPLOYMENT CALL H.
XJ SCHEUNERT.employment secretary Barbers'
Association, 12 Seventh st.
WANTED-MAN HAVING HAD EXPERT-
• t ence as hotel runner or auctioneer. 405
Kearny st., room 4, after 10 o'clock.
otroncTyoung MAN ASSISTANT SALES-
C man. 829 Howard si.
POOD LARE L WANTED. ROOM 2.323
vJ Front st.
WANTED— 10 LABORERS. 238 KEARNY
' » st., room 7.
BOY WANTED FOR OFFICE; $15. ADDRESS
X, box 11, this office.
LUNCH WAITER WANTED AT 226 BAT-
_ tery st. r.- ;
* 1 SALESMAN; MEN'S CLOTHING. ___PH"
J-X. A Kg-.. incorporated.
OOD, WAITER; CALL EARLY. CLARK'S
VX bakery, 612 Kearny st.
QOOK WANTED. 613 CLAY STREET]
SHIRT- MACHINE OPERATOR. ADDRESS
O S. 11., box 105, Call Branch.
TAILOR AND TAILORESS WANTED ON CUS"
torn coats. 625 Eddy st.
riEBMAN OB SCANDINAVIAN BOY TO
VX wait at table; $5 and found. 700 Mission st.
"\y ANTED- A BOOTBLACK. 69 _FIFTH ST?
"I"»ARBERS-4 PATENT CHAIRS, MIRRORS"
XJ -1*".,,,*' washstand for sale. 105 Fourth st. '
WANTED -AN INDUSTRIOUS MAN AS
tt partner in cash business; will pay at present
lil lSS^^™-.»*t£l**&. Call
rjIHREE GOOD CANVASSERS WANTEDT.
X Geary st., room 2. *»*»» o
WANTED— 20 PEDDLERS; LADIES OR
9 r, gents; eood pay; household article. Apply after
2 P. m., Wilson House, 529 Stevenson st.
iiJsS.-SO PARTNER WANTED IN A THBIv"
yp* «/«. ingcash business; duties light and ensilv
learned; established several yeara; remaining
L a _"- I ' er ,^' -- , , , ,own business man and thoroushlv
responsible; will clear to each from $50 to $75 per
Si-^cj.:i9 f &_ t hired - eiiJ: -- «•***■
©-JOX PARTNER WANTED IN GOOD^
* ip - L -- - paying butcher shop; experience on.
necessary; see to-day. STRAND & CO., 19 Sixth.
A NTKD-STEADY M A FOR LIGHT
tt ness: $15 to $18 per week; must have $100-
-experience not required. 783 1 ... Market at., room";:
1 *REE BEER: BEST IN CITY ; 2 SCHOONERS
J for 5 cents at 228 Pacific st. tet -^»»^EBS
3 ?-ir N H_y A X -'- : D :MUSTIiKW KLL DRESSED."
O Call between and 12, »36 Howard st.
ANTED— GOOD PANfs~PREBBER. <301
TT lumbian Woolen Mills. 541 Market gt '
Y^^^TO t LEARN^W-BA_UH_R
WANTED— SEAMEN AND GREEN HANDS"
Apply 313 Pacific, Regular ShTppl-gA^y:
Wi AX 7 ED - AT - 1008 SEVENTH ST., OAK*:
and v men l ° WOrk ln woocl cam P: wages $26
/|OOD -COATMAKERS; STEADY; GOOD
1 * wages. 541 Market at. .
WANTED-SOBER, STEADY MAN AS PART"
t t ncr in good-paying cash business: will pay $50
a month and - M ■-- , 1" $250 required. CaU 539 Call-
HELP WANTED— Continned.
"HAVING, WITn BAY' RUM, 10c; HAIR CCT-
tinglsc; a towel for every customer: 8 chairs;
no waiting. JOE'S, 32 Third street.
ARBERS-GOOD-PAYING FOUR-CHAIR 15c
shop for sale. DECKELMAN BROS., 106 Ellis.
I-IRST-CLASS OLD-ESTABLISHED BARBER-
X shop, cheap. 338 Bush.
Q-CHAIR BARBERSHOP FOR SALE; LONG
ij lease. 1317 Stockton st. .__
EAMEN, BLACKSMITHS, ENGINEERS
and carpenters on steam whalers. 103 Mont-
gomery aye.
_»/7'r LADY* WANTS PARTNER TO DE-
"3WO. velop new article. SMITH, HUBER <fc
CO., 1001 Market st. .
BARBER-SHOP AND ICECREAM stand IN
country for sale. 1807 Haight st.
-CHAIR BARBER-SHOP, CENTRAL loca-
tlon. Call ____ O'Farrell st.
MEN'S SHOES HALF-SOLED, 40c; EELS,
25c; done in 15 minutes. 635 Kearny st.
-frr ANTED— MEN WHO DO NOT RECEIVE
11 their wages to place accounts with us; law and
commercial collection; no charge unless success-
ful. KNOX COLLECTION AGENCY*. 110 Sutter.
A" "TTENTION -CLEAN SINGLE "IMS. ];-,,- A
night, 75c week. R. R. House, s33 Commercial.
EAMEN AND GREEN HANDS; BCANDI-
-0 navians preferred. 322 Pacific st.
""VTOTICE— REMOVED FROM 706 TO 726 Va
-t\ Howard St., opp. Howard-st. Theater; best
place In city for new and second-hand shoes.
rpo TAILORS — COATMAKERS WANTED
1 Apply from 9 till 11 to CHARLES LYONS
London Tailor, 1212-1213 Market st.
Air ANTED— MEN Tl > O ET BOTTLE SHARP
tt steam beer, sc; bottle wine, sc. 609 Clay st.
RE-ELECTED EMPLOYMENT SEC. BAR-
bers' Protective Union. C. TROELL, 657 Clay.
Cflft PAIRS OF GOOD SHOES, 25c TO 1. 564
Oyjyj Mission St.; also 631 1 _ Sacramento st.
UTTERS AND TAILORS TO ATTEND THE
"U San Francisco Cutting School. 222 Post St.,
rooms 21 and 22.
HOES HALF-SOLED I-"f 10 MINUTES;
~5 done while you wait; at less than half the usual
price: all repairing done at half price. 564 Mission
St., between First st. and Second st.
AIfAKE THE DEAD — W N /.EL'S ALARM
"1 clock; no electricity. 607 Montgomery st.
REE COFFEE AND ROLLS. 704 SANSOME;
single rooms, 15c, 20c, $1 week with breakfast.
INDELL HOUSE, 6TH AND HOWARD—
J single furnished rooms, 75c week, 15c night.
00l E-.LIS .ROSEDALE— RICES REDUCED;
*-)— X single furnished rooms, $1 week; 25c night.
O GOOD 10c MEALS FOR ONE DIME AT 44
— ' Fourth St.; no humbug.
I/O) MEN TO TAKE LODGING AT 10c. ISO
JLUU and 20c a night, including coffee and rolls.
624 Washington St., near Kearny.
TRY ACME HOUSE, 957 MARKET ST., BE-
X low Sixth, for a room 25c night ; $1 week.
EST IN CITY- SINGLE ROOMS, 15, 20 AND
25 cents per night; $1, $1 25, .$1 50 per week.
Pacific House, Commercial and Leldesdorff sts.
AN LAHORE Rs" AND MECHANICS
ii to know that Ed Rolkin, Reno House propri-
etor, has opened Soto House, 32 Fourth St.: 100
rooms; 25c to $1 per night; $1 25 to $4 per week.
Air ANTED— SINGLE BOOMS, 16c A DAY; $1
t I week : rooms for two, 25c a day, $1 50 a week;
readlngroom: dally papers. 36 clay st.
AGENTS WANTED.
A OENTS-13 TO 5 A DAY CAN BE MADE
-.-V selling the No Burn Frvingpan; easiest article
to sell out. ITRINToN At 0 , Pcs Moines lit.
furniture wanted.
Rurniture, counters, showcases^
X restaurants bought.sold. ANDEBSON.II2I
\».' ILI.IAM BUTTERFIELD, AUCTIONEER;
t» buys, sells and rents furnished houses. Office
opposite Palace Hotel, 2d floor Crocker building.
A LARGE QUANTITY BECOND-HAND FUR-
J- \- ulture wanted ; 20 per cent paid more than else-
where. MAI. ONE. 110 Fourth st.; new store.
ROOMS WANTED.
GENTLEMAN WANTS*^l7Rn£sllT*_^^
T room; reasonable; no other roomers. Partlcu*
lars A. L., box 144, Call Branch Office.
FURNISHED FLAT WANTED.
. tral location; party has TO children. Address
tral location; party has no children. Address
S.. box 156. Call Branch Office.
WANTED— 3IISCELLANEOUS.
D*~T*C\HnT3OB "SIXTH SrCl'A Y^S 1 1 101 l EOT
. price for second-hand ladies', gents' clothing.
PIANOS, VIOLINS AND SHEET MUSIC.
BARGAINSIN NET-_^"N_r_r>HAN_Tpl^
Hazelton. Brown & Simpson, Mozart, etc. ; hard-
tlmes prices; installments. EATON, 735 Market st.
LADY GOING AWAY, M IMMEDIATELY
sell her fine upright; offered at one-half price
she paid. Room "21, Flood building.
BREAKING UP OF A FAMILY" HOME ON AC-
count of unfortunate occurances, causes the
sale of « Stelnway piano: must be so.d; any reason-
able price accepted. Room 10, Flood building.
ARE YOO LOOKING FOR A HIGH-GRADE
-TV piano slightly used? We can positively suit
you both in the instrument and the price. B. CUR
TAZ & SON, 16 to 20 O'Farrell st.
DO YOU WANT AN ELEGANT SELF-PLAYi-
ng organ with 15 rolls of music? A splendid
bargain for aVash customer. BEN. CURTAZ &
SON, 16 to 20 O'Farrell st.
FRIGHT PIANO CHEAP. APPLY 2703%
Cv Folsom, near Twenty-third.
I _-W* ELEGANT UPRIGHTS, STANDARD
makes, almost new. half original cost; see at
once. F. W. SPENCER _ CO., 721 Market st.
-^T-'a ROSEWOOD UPRIGHT, STOOL AND
KP * O. cover; 5 installment. 221 Leavenworth st.
A STEINWAY' PIANO, $160; CHICKERING
-£A- upright, almost new, $250: new pianos at bed-
rock prices, ten different makes: square pianos,
.<;>() upward. BOWERS <fc SON, 23 and 25 Fifth st.
CAUTION— NOT BUY WHAT IS CLAIMED
to be a Stelnway or Weber Upright Piano from
any person not an established piano dealer without
being first assurred that the piano is what is seems
19 be. We have a complete record of all Stelnway
and Weber pianos sold on the Pacific coast the
past twenty years. Bring the manufacturers' num-
ber of piano to us and we will give you its history.
SHERMAN, CLAY* & CO, Pacific Coast represen-
tatives for steinway and Weber Pianos, corner
.Kearny and Sutter sts.
NABE, BUSH A GEBTS AND HAINES
].-,„;:os. A. L. BANCROFT A- CO., 324 Post st.
MAUVAIS, 769 MABKET— SHEET MUSIC _
price; Decker Son pianos.
SACRIFICING LARGT-TSTOCK OF UPRIGHT
pianos of their own make at manufacturers'
prices. Hemme A- Long Piano Co.. 340 Post st.
BARGAINS; ALL KINDS OF MUSICAL IN-
strnments. L. I. STANTON <fe CO., 663 Market.
\ir G. BADGER WITH BENJ. CURTAZ &
tt « SON, 20 O'Farrell st. -
RON MAUZY', 308 POST SOHMEB,
Newby it Evans, Brigcs ami other pianos.
STECK, CHICKERING A- sons. VOSE AND
Sterling pianos sold on $10 Installments. BENJ.
CURTAZ A SON, sole agents. 16-20 O'Farrell st.
QTEfNWAY UPRIGHT; SLIGHTLY USED; !
O grand tone; half-cost. SPENCER, 721 Market.
SU PKRIOifVIOLINS, ZITHERS, OLD A NEW".
O 11. All.' It. maker, repairer. 2 Latham place.
HORSES.
HORS^fTFCTRrs^ALIK^^^OF "tH?__TtneST I
spans of carriage horses on the coast; second j
to none; Cleveland bays; 6 and 7 years old; none I
but principals need apply. Address H., box 20, j
this office.
I,* 1 RST~ ULASS MA RE AND EXPRESS WAGON
- and harness, $76; trial.' 859 Mission.
ADDLE HORSE FOR SALE— STRONGLY
O built; single-footer; a beauty; dark chestnut,
with heavy silver mane and tail; used to city and
will go in harness; price $150. Call at 347 Fremont,
in the rear, between 9 and 10 a. m.
ORSES PASTURED; $2 A MONTH; SEND
for circular. ¥. A. HYDE, 630 Commercial st.
"I AA SETS SECOND-HAND HARNESS; ALL
JLUU kinds: second-hand wagons, buggy, carts;
also 20 cheap horses. FifiPenth and Valencia sis.
WAGONS AND CARRIAGES.
BAROAIN; STRONG CENTRE' HORSE;
buggy and harness. Call 1521 Mission st.
ECOND-HAND A ETON AND DELIVERY
wagon: cheap. 924 Bryant st.
O NEW CARTS; -i spin Nt; WAGON; MILK
— wagon; must sell at once. 829 Howard st.
"VfEW EXPRESS- WAGON, 2D-HAND DF_.IV-
JLAi cry, bus; buggies cheap. 100 Golden Gate aye.
1" "UNE BAKERY AND LAUNDRY WAGONS,
x rockaway, buggies; also hack. 828 Harrison.
fob sale-3iiscellaneous.
OTICE TO RESTAURANT MEN— FRENCH
xi range, first-class order, broiler and large boiler
sold cheap; also, some gas fixtures and a few good
water-closets, from Midwinter Fair. 12 Mason
street, near Market.
ARGAIN (FINEST GOODS); ALBERT SUIT;
44 chest; $26. 803 Golden Gate aye.
--OR SALE— A HOUSE OF 4 ROOMS AND
A' stable. Apply 47 West Mission st.
FOR SALE", VERY CHEAP— 3 FRENCH
ranges and 6 stoves; in good order. Richmond
Stove Company (Schuster Bros.), 306 Sutter st.
CARD TABLES AND OFFICE DESKS. 211
Post st. ; basement; repairing.
BARO A IN— GOOD PNEUMATIC SAFETY
for $25. 326 McAllister st.
CHEAP— FIXTURES THAT WERE ONCE IN
\J the _ Savings Union branch, Market and Fell
s . t !,',\^ l !il for an insurance or real estate office.
ASHTON & GARDINER, 411 Montgomery st.
"YV" ILSHIRE SAFE, LETTER-PRESS. SCALE,'
T T coffee-mill and money-till ; cheap. 102 Clay st.
COUNTERS, SHELVING, SHOWCASES
bought and sold. 11211 _ Market, bet. 7th and Blh
N"t. W RANGES CHEAPER THAN SECOND-
A" hand. W. S. BAY Mlg Co., 12 California st.
PERSONALS.
ID_r_EAG-__^^ WIDOW*ERWITh"
out children would like to form acquaintance
of a lady having some means: object matrimony.
correspondence strictly confidential. Address
C. P., box 19, this office.
MISS MOHR'S BATH AND MANICURE ."a"S"
lor is now at HO 1 /2 Stockton st., room 1.
HE MONTE CARLO ROTISSERIE, 413 ~N_
415 Pine st., has been opened by P. ALLARME
formerly of the Poodle Dog. '
MRS. ALICE, GENERAL MANICURE
Sixth st„ room 12.
CUT IN PRICES THIS WEEK; CALL AND
) examine curly bangs, 75c; switches from $i-
scalp treatment ; blackheads, pimples cured or no
charge; lessons given. La Verite Hairdressm?
Bazaar, over Maze.
EADQUARTERS LONG DISTANCE T-U"_
phones, cheap: send for prices. Klein Electrlo
Works, 720 Montgomery St., San Francisco, u_:.'
» -ISITI NG-CA RDS ENGRAVED AT BOBErS
V SON'S, 138 Post st. '
HIGHEST PRICE PAID LADIES' OR GENTS"
cast-off clothing. Send postal, J. F., 15 Ri;* s a ' t
DVICEFREE ; DIVORCE LAWS A SPEur \r_
ty ; collections, damages, wills, deeds, etc. a \\~
HOWE, Att'y-at-law, 850 Market., cor. Stockton. "
PACIFIC STATES DETECTTv"e"a""""e\\(Ty"~_o
Ellls St., rms. 1 «fc 2; telephone, main 5506, ti p.
FINE SUITS, $15; DRESS PANTS^$"r7_"
! Mistit Parlors, 14 Geary St.
CILOAKS, CAPES AND FURS RETAILK'T - "-
-) manufacturers' cost. 20 Sansome St.; upstairs.
KINETOSCOPES FOB SALe7"fhon7m";i: r_TS
outfits bought for cash. Bacigalupl, 8}(; _j ■_•;
"WALTZ IN THREE LESSONS; AP. TLSTIfi
*t dances for parlor or stage taught dalK- a - IP
VINE'S, 927 Mission St., opposite U. S. Mint.
THE ORIENTAL— 6IS TAYLOR B ST.^N_TiI
Sutter: newly furnished family hotel- -i(.__ P i_
ln the city; superior French lady cook. '
ADVICE FREE ALAND PRI vaTFaTvi-
ters. People's Law Offioe,_S_ Market. Mt i'a'k K.
EDDING INVITATIONS ENGR7 iTlvr;
>' printed. ROBERTSON'S, 126 Post st.
OLD BUILDINGS BOUGHT AND - 80L-"
store-fixtures, doors, windows, lumhor pi'r>_
etc.; cheap. Yard 1166 Mission st., nr. Eighth.
COULDN'T DO THE w , ,'-' _-
»» doing If prices were not right. a
Carpets, new and second hand, from... . _ v n _
Oak Bed Sets... if;; so "£
Mattings, per yard - c 'j:
Linoleum, per yard. " « n '
Kitchen Chairs.. „i.
X Tables ' — __-0
EVERYTHING IN PROPORTION
Largest stock and store In the city lowe«
prices; easy terms, if desired.
J. NOONAN, 1017-1019-1021 Mission st
above Sixth. Open evenings. _ — «sion "**
SECOND-HAND AS WEI. 'AS NEW. BARsT
showcases, counters, shelving, mirrors, desks
safes, chairs, scales, ere., and a very large stock of
them, too; be sure and see stock and get prices be-
fore going elsewhere. J. NOONANT 1017 1 ma.
1021-1023 Mission St., above Sixth. "^
GAS FIXTURES AND PLUMBING *"""
Golden Gate aye. H. HUFSCHMIDT.'
piANO LESSONS, 25c H. LF-lioL* R; gUrT
X man lady. 1126 Howard st.
OLD GOLD, SILVER, GENTS~AND LADm"""""
clothing bought. COLMAN, 41 Thirl st.
WINDOW BRAD! S MANL*FAC"t U RE iTto
TT order by WILLIAM McPHUN. 11P5 Market.
' LOST.
lOST- SUNDAY NIGHT, MAR( _T_o
J terrier; black spot on side; black tail tipped
with white: answers to name Jerry. Liberal re-
ward at 121 g Jackson st.
LOST— A 'PASSBOOK WITH THE HIKER"
nia Savlnes and Loan Society of San Francisco,
in the name of JOSEPH GANNON, No. 179,600.
The finder will please return to bank.
J PASSBOOK WITH THE HIBERNIA
J-< Savings and Loan Society of San Francisco In
the name of MINNIE ERR, No. 134419. The
finder will please return to the bank.
L" OST— A LIGHT-BROWN IRISH SETTER
dog. Reward at 117 Seventh st.
rpilE YOUNG MAN WITH LIGHT-STRIPED
J- suit who took bicycle from entrance to Sutro
Heights Sunday at 3:30 p. M. would better return
same to 26 Fell St., as he Is known; no questions
asked.
MEDICAL.
A SURE, SAFE AND SPEEDY CURE FOR
all female diseases; ladies may have the
benefit of the skill and attention of a physician of
; long and successful practice, A home in confine-
! ment, with best care, with t#e privacy of a home
1 and conveniences of a hospital. Those who are sick
j or discouraged should call on the doctor and state
j their case; they will find in her a true friend. All
; consultation free. A positive cure for the liquor,
, morphine and tobacco habit. Every case guar-
-1 anteed without injury to health. MRS. DR.
GWYER, 811*»_ Hyde St., bet. Ellis and Eddy.
ALL IRItEGITLARiTIES RESTORED AT
I -iV- once: every ease guaranteed; Cancers and
Tumors expelled by Medical Electricity: refined
home during confinement, with every comfort and
privacy; regular physician of long and successful
practice; travelers treated without delay; French
pills guaranteed; safe and sure relief _i"any time:
consultation free, confidential. MRS. DR. WYETH,
Sanitarium, 916 Post St., bet. Hyde and Larklu.
PRIVATE HOME IN (ONFINI.MI.N ft
x terms reasonable. 790 Stevenson st.
A NEW PROCESS— NO MEDICINE. INSTR U*"
-ii. ments or worthless pills used; every woman
her own physician for all female troubles': no mat-
ter from what cause; restores always in one day;
can be sent and used at home; all cases guaran-
teed^ DR. POPPER. 318 Kearny st.
ALL LADIES CONSULT FREE MRS. DR.
-<"V DA VIES. 14 McAllister St.. near Market;
leads all competitors; only qualified, trusty sp»-
cialist for safe, quick relief of irresularities. no
matter what cause; treatment scientific, harmless
and painless; neverfalls; babies adopted; homein
confinement.
DR. HALL. 14 MCALLISTER, SECOND FLOOR,
next Hibernia Bank; diseases of women.
AU"""E"T*_ APHRO TABLETS -THE GBEAT
modern remedy for the cure of neurasthenia,
impotency and all disorders of the sexual organs;
$1 a box, 6 boxes $5; send for circular. J. H.
WIDRER, cor. Market and Third, sole agent.
IF" IRREGULAR OR ANY FEMALE DISEASE
J- see Mrs. Dr. Puetz and be content. 254' _ 4th.
RIVATE HOME IN CONFINEMENT. MRS.
M. E. ROGERS 929 Howard st.
A LL LADIES CONSULT MRS. DR. SC-TT.
-l\. 1101 _ Turk St.; only qualified trusty specialist
for sure, quick relief of Irregularities; no matter
what cause; painless method; neverfalls; homo
iv confinement; babes adopted: also treats dis-
ease of the eye successfully.
DBS. GOODWIN, SPECIALTY DISEASES OF
women; ladles near or far assured quick relief
of disease; Irregularities restored dally; safe cure
guaranted; no instruments; home for patients;
best medical attendance; low fees; free; Drs. Scud-
der's pills and capsules warranted.l37o Market st.
MRS. DR. WEGNER, 419 EDDY ST.— IRREG^
I'JL ularities cured in one day; no instruments;
pills and safety capsules guaranteed; travelers at-
tended; no delay; private home for ladies.
LPEAU'S FRENCH - ! "ILLS"
ALPEAU'S FRENCH 1M1.1.5.
A boon to ladies troubled with Irregularities;
no danger; safe and sure; $2 60, express C. O. D.;
don't delay untn> too late. OSGOOD BROS., Oak-
land. Cal.. agents for Alpeau et Cle.
DR. AND MRS. DR. SCHmTdT, FORMERLY"
of 1211*/!j Mission, now 1508 Market st.; month-
y Irregularities cured In a few hours; guaranteed;
no instruments used: sure preventive.
A WEEK'S NEWS FOR 5 CENTS — THE
WEEKLY CALL, in rapper, mr mailing.
___________
DENTIST-..
A~"*_?Y~TtjOTH*~FILLE"d'*~6r~ FrXTRAi
J\. painlessly by my secret method without dan-
' gerous cocaine or gas: won 8 first prizes; prices rea-
-1 sonable; work warranted; all operations expertly
I done; remember I have removed from li to 20
O'Farrell st. DR. GEORGE W. LEEK.
DR. J. J. LEEK, 1 FIFTH— OPEN EVENINGS,
and Sunday until noon.
B~ C. _ E. BLAKE'S INDESTRUCTIBLE
LATEST INVENTlON— Especially for
bridge work; positively guaranteed never to break:
any patient once seeing them will admit this is the
tooth most wanted: also DR. BLAKE'S enameled
platinum crowns: no display of gold.
THE HIGHEST ART IN DENTISTRY.
Prices moderate. Office 405 Sutter, nr. Stockton.
BEAUTIFUL ALUMINUM-LINED O SET. OF'
artificial teeth, $10, former price $30; for a
short time only. DR. W. P. COOL, 22 Kearny st.
C~~ ROOME DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 759 MAR
\J ket, bet. 3d and 4tn, gas specialists; only reli-
able agent for paimess extraction; artificial teeth
rm $5 ; fillings from $1 ; extracting 50c, with gas $1.
DR. 9 SIXTH ST.: ALL DENTAL WORK
at lowest prices ana warranted ; open evenings
<J_/T A SET for TEETH; WARRANTED A3
<P I good as can be made; filling $1. DR. SIMMS,
dentist, 930 Market st., next Baldwin Theater.
I LLWORK REASONABLE AND WARRANT-
_-. cd. DR. J. W. KEY, 1122 Market st.
DR. H. G. YOUNG. BRIDGES AND TEETH
without plates a specialty. 1841 Polk st.
DR. "LUDLUM HILL. 1443 'MARKET ST.,
near Eleventh; no charge for extracting when
plates are made; old plates made over like new;
teeth from $8 per set: extracting SOc; gas given.
lOLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION. 806 MAR
J ket st. DR. CHARLES W. DECKER.
ATTOKNEYS-AT-LAAV.
A"~~l"»V_C__*_*J__*C-H^ LA^V r SA*SF^i_CIAL*
ty; collections, damages, wills, deeds, etc. G. W.
HO WE, Att'y-at-law, 850 Market St., cor. Stockton.
WW. DAVIDSON, ATTORNE Y-AT-LA W. 420
T T . California St.. rms. 14-15; advice free.
JOHN R. AITKEN, ATTORNE Y-AT-LA W, RS.
16 and 17. 402 Montgomery St., cor. California.
TYPEWRITERS AND SUP FLIES. _
TYPEWRITERS l"OR RENT; MACHINES
sold cheap. HANSON <fc CO. .Chronicle _____
A "CALIGRAPH" WILL OUTLAST ALLOTH-
A. era. See NAY" LOB, 19 Mty st., about 1 ; rents,
repairs, supplies Mimeographs: installment terms.
___________ -_
STORAGE.
TORAGEOF FURNITURE, PI ANOS, HOUSE-*
hold goods, etc. J. M. PIERCE, 735 Market st.
T*IRST-( !LABS STORAGE ; ADVANCES MADE
F 421-423 Market st. CHAS. L. TAYLOR.
___ FINANCIAL.
ONEY TO LOAN ON SAN FR A-^UISCfJREAX
estate. W. J. GUNN, 410 Montgomery at.

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