OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, March 22, 1895, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1895-03-22/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

8
MINING ON THE
PACIFIC SLOPE.
News Gleaned From All the
Gold Districts on the
Coast.
THE SEASON'S PROSPECTING.
A Railroad Company Trying to
Patent Mineral Lands in
Washington.
"The shaft for the North Star mine near
Grass Valley arrived there last Tuesday."
This item is from a Merced paper, and will
surprise miners somewhat. If it had said
a shaft for the mill it might have been
understood, but the arrival of a ready
made shaft for a mine in any camp would
astonish the natives.
The Baker City Democrat says that the
vexed problem of successfully working the
ores of the Eureka and Excelsior mines,
situated in the Cracker Creek district, has
at last been solved. Mr. John Longmald
of Bait Lake City after repealed tests satis
lied himself that cyanide was the proper
process, and he leased the properties and
is now saving 85 per cent of the gold.
Captain Hall has been notified from San
Pram Isco to resume work on the Bonanza
quicksilver mine near Oakland, Or. The
tunnel is being straightened up and prep
arations made for further prospecting.
The Virtue mine, Oregon, owned by G.
W. Qxayson of Oakland, cleaned up $13,000
fur a twenty days' run last month.
|fc A Nap* County paper says: ''The gold
fever has broken out again in Calaveras
County, some rich specimens having just
been unearthed near Copperopolis." The
Napa County paper is respectfully informed
that the gold fever in Calaveras County
has not just broken out, and that the
county in 1883 was the second gold-pro
ducing- county in the State. In 1594 it was
probably the rirst on the list. Calaveras
contains the richest and most productive
gold mine in the State— one which pro
duced last year about five times as much
a^ any other one in California.
At the Alice mine, thirteen miles south
east of Perris, Riverside County, the crop
pings of the ledge come otit in the barley
lields through which it runs, and agricul
ture and raining go hand in hand.
The Windy Camp property, in the same
range as Iron Mountain, Shasta County, is
about to change owners.
The Gladstone mine, French Gulch,
Bhasta County, is running twenty stamps
and employing forty-live men. * The ore
averages weii and the mine is in a prosper
ous condition.
Advice? from Cinnabar, Trinity County,
say that the new furnaces are working
rather slowly, but a good yield of mercury
is on hand and ready for shipment. The
Integral Company also contemplates a run
during the summer.
Tne Nevada Transcript learns that the
prospects for a lively summer at Downie
viile and in that vicinity in Sierra County
are very flattering, and that unusual
activity in mining enterprises is looked for.
The Gold Valley, Gold Bluff. Craycroft and
other mines are to be operated on a more
extensive scale than ever, and it. is said
that more men will be employed in that
section than for many years past.
The Clinton-bar gravel claim on the
Mokelomne River, owned by Free it Chase,
is reported as doing very well.
Some pretty rich gold ore has been found
near Mojave, half a mile from the railroad,
but lack of water prevents profitable work
ing of the claims.
Lc b Angeles people are being asked to in
vest in gravel mines in British Columbia.
There are numbers of California men in
that country now who seem to be pretty
well satisfied with the prospects in aurif
erous niinir.g.
Mining operations around Hornitos,
Maripoaa County, are quite active at pres
ent.
"In general," says the Denver Mining
Industry, '-it may be presumed that no
part of the United States has better facili
ties for cheap mining than California."
Pumping water up 400 feet to get a hy
draulic head is rather a discouraging way
xo work a gravel claim, but some placeV
ground near Yreka is to be worked in that
way.
the oldest gold mining district in Wash
ington and the one from which most of
that precious metal has been taken is the
Swauk district in Kittitas County. From
seventy-live to a hundred miners have
been actively engaged in taking out placer
gold since 1373. The miners are protesting
against the Northern Pacific Railroad
Company getting patents to the lands in
the district as agricultural, when they are
really mineral. Six miners testify" that
they ha*-e taken out $72,600 in the past live
years, and numbers of others have taken
out smaller amounts. This is to show that
it is really mineral not agricultural land
that the railroad is trying to get.
A good many prospectors are preparing
to start from Seattle for the Fort Steel
country, B. C, to hunt for placer mines.
I The old El Rio 10- stamp quartzmill
near Yuma is now being torn down and
will be shipped to a point twenty miles
south of Tucson. The purchasers will take
one boiler, the engine and stamps only,
leaving the rest of the machinery.
Robbers visited the Daisy Hill'mill, a few
miles, from Grass Valley, and, while they
did not clean up the mill, they walked oft
with a number of drills, and some powder
caps and other supplies.
By an accident at the Gold Ridge mine,
Nevada County, near the Sierra County
line, one man was killed and another in
jured. The men had drilled six holes in
the tunnel and went out to the storehouse
to get the powder. Some of the holes
were wet holes and it was necessary after
putting the caps on the fuse, to cover the
cans with a waterproof composition in
order to protect them from the water in
the holes. This composition had become
hard, and in order to soften it so that it
could be used one of the men held a
lighted candle under a piece of the stuff.
"While thus engaged the explosion oc
curred. It is thought that the candle
flame came in contact with the cap, caus
ing it to explode, the concussion imme
diately exploding the balance of the other
cans in the box on the workbench.
The Elsinore coal, Riverside County,
sells for $3 per ton at the mines, and "is
used in the surrounding neighborhood.
The Good Hope is Riverside County's
best mine, and has a twenty-stamp mill
said to be turning out $1000 a stamp each
month.
The Bald Mountain Extension Company,
a prominent Sierra County drift mine, now
bus fifty men employed.
A very large lead of low-grade gold ore
is reported to have been found by William
Ross in the Fox range of mountains, about
twenty miles north of Pyramid Lake. New
It is about eighty miles due north of Reno.
The ledge is said to show a width of about
100 feet. The ore is being analyzed at the
University of California to determine its
peculiar nature.
"Three California miners" at the Bine
River mine, Oregon, report in the Eugene
paper that times are dull, work scarce and
wages low all over the mining sections of
California. This is absurd. The rates of
■wages in the mines have not changed in
years in this State, and times in the min
ing regions have not been as good for
twenty years. There is development work
going on in the mines all over the State,
north and south.
Mineral in the Santa Cruz Mountains.
Tt> the Editor of the Call: "We all know
that miners often go abroad to search for
what may be found at home. That por*
To the Editor of the Call: "We all know
that miners often go abroad to search for
what may be found at home. That por
tion of the Santa Cruz mountains which
would he south of a straight line drawn
from the Almaden quicksilver mines to the
coast, is as favorable for mineral deposits
as any that a miner usually sees. About
two miles back from the main Llagas
Creek and high up on the mountain sides,
a ledge of Jime rock extends from a point
west of the Almaden mines and runs in a
southerly direction through a sandstone
formation very favorable for silver. Ap
pearances indicate that this lime belt is
the cap of a ledge or runs parallel with a
mineral lode of some kind.
On the Reed ranch at the Southern end
of this lime deposit, and running on the
same line close to the lime belt, a ledge of
some sort clearly shows itself for quite a
distance on the surface. The croppings
strongly indicate the existence of copper
or silver at this place. Vet, strange to say,
little or no prospecting has ever been done
in this locality. It appears. that its very
nearness to capital has caused it to be
passed over unnoticed.
William Mackay.
San Jose, March ]8, 1895.
Another Ancient Auriferous River Bed.
A correspondent of the Call writes as
follows: The latest mining excitement
around Elsinore, Riverside County, is
caused by the discovery of an extensive au
riferous gravel deposit or ancient river bed
several hundred feet in width and 100 to
300 feet in thickness, running for a long
distance in close proximity to the best
producing mines in the Pinacate and Meni
fee mining districts. The deposit is con
tinuous and not in fragments or remnants,
nor is it lava-capped as are some of the old
channels in the central part of the State.
The old river bed was discovered last sum
mer by field assistance of the State Mining
Bureau, and first publicly announced in
their report for the year 1894 on page 220,
as follows: "An ancient river bed may be
traced for a long distance north and south
in this county (Riverside). The source of
this old channel, which is gold-bearing, is
to the north, but its exact locality is un
known. The indications are, however,
that several small streams have united to
form the main channel, which may be fol
lowed without difficulty from two miles
north of Good Hope for several miles in a
southerly direction toward the town of
Elsinore. "Where the channel reaches the
San Jacinto River it is several hundred
feet in width and upwards of 100 feet in
depth.
In the canyon of the San Jacinto River
may be seen either two or three channels
or else the remnants of one extremely
crooked one. As these ancient river beds
are not at all developed, excepting by the
shallow erosions of their upper portions by
the recent little ravines and gulches, there
is much that would be interesting concern
ing them that for the present must re
main unknown. Although no attempt has
yet been made to systematically work
these deposits or even to prospect them
beyond the sinking of several shafts, it is
nevertheless a significant fact that every
little ravine and gulch cutting through
this old river bed has contained gold, and
in most instances has been worked by the
Mexicans years ago. Signs of work in later
years are also numerous, and at one point
an old prospector was endeavoring to make
a living by "rocking" the gravel of the old
river channel.
If sufficient water for hydraulic opera
tions was obtainable the old river-bed
might be found to produce a large quan- :
tity of gold. The channel was followed
rive miles, but it being evident that to
trace it out and map it would require a
season's work it was abandoned for the
time being. It is but one very crooked
channel and the San Jacinto River cuts
through it three , times in the canyon
where the Southern California Railroad
crosses it, about half way between
Perris and Elsinore. It has not been
cut through to bedrock in any place
as yet discovered. The lowest place
yet found is in the cut made by the
San Jacinto River, which appears to be
within thirty to fifty feet of the'bedrock in
the center of the channel, as indicated by
the angles of the rimrock and the width of
the channel at the bottom of the cut.
Since the publication of the report of the
State Mineralogist the old channel has
been traced from the point indicated
therein to a point two and a half miles
north of the Menifee mine, a distance of
about twenty miles by the meanderings of
the channel.
Most of the placer gold obtained in this
vicinity in recent years has been taken
from the bed of the San Jacinto River, be
low where it cuts the old channel, and
from the gullies and washes. of the old
river bed, and none of the miners appear
to have known that they were upon an
ancient river bed, with the possible ex
ception of M. Chancy, who attempted to
sink a shaft to bedrock, and was driven
out by water at the depth of eighty feet.
The land along this old chadnel is princi
pally Government land; or unpatented
railroad lands, and therefore subject to
mineral location. Several locations have
been made within the last few days, and
preparations are being made by John D.
Horf of Elsinore and others to prospect the
deposit.
Long liife of Sulphuret Furnaces.
The furnaces of the nation works
of the Zeila Mining Company of Ainador
County are being rebuilt after what an
Amador paper notes as the longest life on
record for such works. The furnaces lasted
ever since the resumption of work at the
mine by the present — fourteen
years. For five years and fifteen days from
the commencement of operations the fires
were never extinguished, and at the ex
piration of this protracted period of service
the floors only had to be renewed : not that
they were actually worn out, but had be
come so uneven as to give the employes
considerable trouble in scraping out the
sulphu rets. After repairs the works ran
until the present time. The furnaces, not
withstanding the unparalleled record of
longevity, were not completely worn out.
It was not absolutely necessary to rebuild
them. But inasmuch as a cessation for
over a month was inevitable, owing to the
reconstruction of the mill, and as the capa
city of the old works was unequal to keep
ing pace with the product of the mine, it
was deemed advisable to rebuild on a
larger scale.
The old furnaces were of three tons capa
city, and somewhat overworked at that.
The new furnaces will be of from three and
a half to four tons capacity. With a prac
tically new mill, it is expected that consid- i
erably more rock will be crushed per day
by the forty stamps tnan of late years,
and even with the increased size of the I
chlorination works, it is expected that
enough sulphurets will be turned out to
keep them steadily running to their fullest
! capacity. The extended life of the Zeila
reduction plant i 3 deserving of special note.
Mr. Detert, when the oid works were first
started, said he would make them last
without, repair for five years, and this limit
was exceeded by fifteen days. But a life of
fourteen years without complete renewal
would have been laughed at as utterly un
attainable.
Mariposa County Mines.
To the Editor of the Call: All the mines
are looking fine, and activity is everywhere
to be seen. The old mines that have been
laying dormant for years are now being
taken hold of by new men with capital.
There has been several properties recently
sold to Eastern capitalists. ' The Virginia
j mine has been purchased' by Dan O'Toole
lof ' Arizona and Eastern capitalists. An
English company has purchased a large
group of mines and work will be com
menced at once. Mr. Tarpey of Alameda
County has bonded several large mines
ana work will begin on them at once.
Mr. Ward is l pushing the work on the
Phoiro Blanche; he has cut the ledge and
it looks finely. It bids fair to be one of the
leading mines of Coulterville. Mr George
Gates and Mr. Phil Cochran have bonded
a group of three mines, consisting of ■ the
Belmont, Last Chance and Eighty-four
! . These mines . are located on the mother
ode, adjoining the Virginia. Coulterville
bids fair to become one of the best mining
towns in the State.' The town has once
more , awakened : from her slumbers, and
there are not sufficient accommodations at
the hotels for guests" now arriving. Re
spectfully, " - Phil Cochhan. -
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1895.
THERE IS NO HOPE
FOR FREDERICKS
The Supreme Court Affirms
the Conviction Against
Him.
UNSEEMLY HASTE WAS HAD.
Judge Levy Censured for Hurry
ing Him to Trial So ,
Rapidly.
There is no more for William Fredericks
to expect from the courts of this State, for
the Supreme Court has just decided, prac
tically, that he must hang for the murder
of W. A. Herrick, cashier of the Branch
Bank of the San Francisco Savings Union.
The crime was committed on March 23,
1894. Fredericks entered the bank, on the
corner of Fell and Market streets, and de
manded $0000 from Herrick, the cashier.
Herrick refused to give the money and
Fredericks shot him dead. He was cap
tured after a long chase and was impris
oned. On March 28 his preliminary ex
amination was held and on March 29 an
information charging him with murder
was filed. On March 30 he was arraigned
before Judge Levy, and he was then given
until April 2 to plead. On April 2he re
fused to plead and asked for more time,
but a plea of not guilty was entered for
him by order of the court, and his trial was
set for April 5. At each step the defend
ant, through his attorney, Mr. Colwcll,
prayed for time, but in no instance was he
allowed any more than the law gave him.
He was speedily found guilty and was sen
tenced to death. This judgment has been
affirmed.
Commenting upon the haste with which
his case was pushed through, the Supreme
Court says:
While the period of time— to wit, three
days— intervening between the arraignment
and commencement of the trial of the detend
ant might be enough time in some European
countries to bring to trial, convict and decapi
tate half a dozen criminals, yet in this country,
where persons charged with crime have more
rights under the law, we think this defendant
might well have been allowed ten, twenty or
even thirty days to prepare for his defense. In
view of the enormity of the charge against
him, in view of the public clamor that was pur
suing him, in view of his own poverty and
friendlessness, the .State could well have af
forded to concede him such a continuance, in
order that he might have full opportunity to
make his defense, however weak it may have
been when made. The State would have lost
nothing by such a course, and justice would
have been done just the same. While the State
should administer justice to lawbreakers with
no laggard hand, yd at the instance of public
clamor or other causes, it is beneath its dig
nity to act with unseemly haste. We conclude
this branch oi the case "by saying thai we do
not think the mere fact of fixing the <l# of the
trial at a date so soon after the arraignment
and plea ipso facto furnishes sufficient ground
for a reversal of the judgment.
Continuing on to the points of law in
volved in the case, the opinion proceeds:
It is claimed that the information is fatally
defective in its statement of facts. While ft
alleges the offense to have been committed in
the city and county of San Francisco, it is in
sisted that the Superior Court has no jurisdic
tion over certain territory situated within said
city and county, and for that leasou no juris
diction is shown in the court by the informa
tion to try the case, there being no allegation
contained therein denying the commission of
the oll'ense upon such excepted territory. This
question of jurisdiction was directly presented
lor consideration in the very recent case of
the People vs. Collins, and it was there held
that it could not be raised by demurrer or
motion in arrest of judgment, but was a matter
of defense.
Defendant's counsel moved for a change of
venue, and in support of his motion read ihe
affidavit of defendunt and also his own. They
are based upon the grounds that defendant
could not have a fair and impartial trial in the
city and county of .San Francisco by reason of
the bias and prejudice of therpeople against
him, The motion was denied by the trial
conrt. The affidavits present a strong prinia
facie case ki support oi the motion, ana were
contradicted in no material point. No counter
affidavits were introduced, and the statement
of the District Attorney under oath in opposi
tion to the granting* of the motion related
almost entirely to matters outside of the ques
tion of the condition of the public mind in tne
locality where the defendant was to be tried.
If the matter had retted at this stage of the
proceedings, we would feel in duty bound to
grant a new trial of this case upon the show
ing made by the defendant, and would be fully
supported in such conclusion by the People vs.
Yoatum and People vs. Goldenson. But sub
sequently, upon the 7th dnv of April, and
during the im panel nient oft the jury, defend
ant's counsel was given a sffeond opportunity
to urge his motion for n change of venue, and
the hearing thereof was set for April 9. At
tnat time counsel failed to call up his motion,
and no action whatever was taken upon it by
the trial court. We deem counsel's conduct
an abandonment und waiver of the whole
question, and he cannot now insist upon a new
trial upon a ruling of the trial court, when he
had full opportunity to secure the results de
sired at the hands of that court; for we must
a.-.sume that his motion when renewed would
have been granted, if the facts and the law de
manded it. The tacts disclosed are similar to
the facts in the case of People vs. Plummer. In
that case during the impanelment of the jury
counsel for defendant expressly declined to re
new their motion for a change of venue which
had been denied. In the present case counsel
in ettect does the same thing, for after the mo
tion is set for hearing lie fails to press or even
insist or ask that the court pass upon it. * * *
* * * This court is only allowed to review
an order denying a challenge to a juror upon
the ground qt actual bias when the evidence
upon the examination of the juroris soopposed
to the decision of the trial court that the ques
tion becomes one of law, for it is only in points
of law that this court has appellate jurisdiction
in criminal cases. In this case the examina
tion of some of the venire, who were subse
quently unsuccessfully challenged upon the
ground of actual bias by the defendant, dis
closed a state of facts which might well have
justified the trial court in excluding them from
the jury-box. Rut the evidence of tnese jurors,
taken upon their voir dire, is not at all con
clusive that they were disqualified from acting
in ihe case. When the matter was submitted
to the court for a decision upon the evidence
taken it can at least be said tnat the question
was an open one as to their disqualification.
The evidence of each juror was contradictory
in itself; it was subject to more than one con
struction. A finding either way by the court
on the challenges would have support in the
evidence, and under such circumstances the
trial court is the arbiter of the question. For
under such conditions the question presented
to this court by the appeal is one of fact, and
our power to hear and determine is limited to
appeals upon questions of law alone. For these
reasons the counsel's contentions in this re
gard furnish no material to justify a retrial of
this case. Neither do we find any merit In the
exception to the order of the court disallowing
his challenge to the panel.
The trial court committed no error in admit
ting evidence as to the pursuit and capture of
the defendant immediately after the commis
sion of the homir ide, and the prosecution had
the right to prove the facts pertaining thereto,
if it deemed that course advisable, rather than
take an admission of them from defendant.
We do not discover any error in admitting de
fendant's statements and confessions. It ap
pears that they were freely and voluntarily
made.
It is claimed that the verdict is contrary to
the evidence. Defendant's counsel declares
that the evidence shows conclusively that it
was a physical Impossibility for defendant to
have tired the shot which killed the deceased.
In answer to this contention it is sufficient to
say that the witness Meivin testified in direct
terms that defendant tired the fatal shot and
the defendant himself admits the fact. Under
these circumstances we will not disturb the
verdict upon the ground of the inefficiency of
the evidence upon the point as to who fired the
fatal shot.
After conviction defendant made a motion
for a new trial, and as one of his grounds relied
upon newly discovered evidence. We find
within the lids of the transcript certain affi
davits which counsel in his brief assumes were
used by him as the basis of his motion for a
new trial. They are not incorporated in any
bill of exception?, neither are they identified
in any way by the Jiidße as having been used
and considered upon the hearinsrof the motion
for a new trial. The affidavit of one Henderson
as to his examination of the gunshot marks in
the bank upon the morning after the homicide,
and to the further fact that he noticed on the
floor, outside of the counter, broken glass from
the hole made by the bullet in the glass near
the cashier's window, Is not even subscribed
and sworn to, and none of the affidavits, with
but a single exception, appear to have been
tiled with the clerks. For the reason that there
is nothing to Indicate, even inferentially, that
these affidavits were used upon the hearing of
the motion for a new trial, we are not author
ized to consider them. We do not oven inti
mate that a new trial would be granted upon
the showing made by these affidavits if they were
properly authenticated as having been used at
the hearing. They were all directed to the
point that defendant did not fire, the fatal shot,
but that Marvin (Melvin?), Herrict's assistant,
accidentally did. All of them except the one
not signed and sworn to tended to show that
Herrick's clothing at the point where the bul
let entered was powder-burned and that a shot
in order to so powder-burn the clothing could
not have been fired at a distance of more than
two feet. It appears by the record that defend
ant's counsel formulated bis defense upon the
foregoing lines as early as March 30 and by
the exercise of due and proper diligence it
seems to the court that prior to the time he
was called on to present his defense to the
jury, which was some two weeks later, he must
have had ample time and opportunity to have
examined the clothing of the deceased in re
lation to powder-burns and have been pre
pared to produce before the jury expert wit
nesses as to the distance powder-burns could
be made in clothing by a pistol-shot, There is
nothing further disclosed by the record de
manding our consideration.
The opinion was written by Justice
Garoutte, McFarland, Van Fleet and Har
rison concurring.
EXEMPT FROM THE TEREDO.
Timber in Alaska Which It Is
Said the Borer Will
Not Molest.
Its Discovery Was Made by Acci
dent by a Local Mining
Expert.
"I know of a timber that is absolutely
proof against the ravages of the teredo,"
said S. C. Lewis when asked what was the
value of a secret that he had proposed to
sell to the Harbor Commission. "I am
not speaking of any theory or any prepa
ration to protect piles, but of something
that has been tested and has proved its
qualities. I am a mining expert, and in
the course of my business found myself in
Alaska several years ago. While there my
attention was called to several pieces of
timber that were floating in the bay of the
port where I was temporarily located. I
was told that they had been in the water
for not less than three years and that wnile
one was rendered useless by the work of
teredos the other was in as good condition
as when it first fell into the bay.
"Realizing at once the valuable signifi
cance of this assertion I made further in
quiries, which confirmed the statement
made by my informant. I then examined
both pieces of timber and found that the
one which had been riddled by the teredo
was a spruce log belonging to the family
of conifers, from which all our piling is now
made. The other was of an entirely .differ
ent kind of tree.
"Now, in all trees of the pine family
there is a resinous substance, for which
the teredo has a particular predilection,
and in this timber, which I say to be
teredo-proof, this substance is entirely ab
sent. It is therefore exempt from depreda
tions of this destructive mollusk.
"There are immense tracts of this timber
in Alaska and we have it in this State, but
it does not jrrow to the height and thick
ness here that it docs in Alaska.
"Having this valuable knowledge I feel
that I should be recompensed by those
who would be benefited for divulging the
name of the tree and the locality where it
can be found. I do not ask for anything
until the efficacy of the timber has been
thoroughly tested by actual experiment in
the waters of San Francisco Isay or even
in the sound country up north, where the
teredo's inroads on wharves, piers and
bridges are more serious than here.
"There is a fortune in the proposition for
some one with the requisite capital and
enterprise, for the land on which this tim
ber grows could be purchased at the Gov
ernment price, and there is -an almost un
limited market for the sale of the timber
right on this coast from Puget Sound to
the bay of fcfan Diego."
Hurley Is Sane.
M. J. Hurley was before the Insanity Com
mission yesterday on complaint of his wife,
who want* io take him out of the prison frying
pan and put him into the fire of the asylum.
Hurley tried to bribe one of the jurors in the
perjury case against K. 11. McDonald Jr., and
the charge of insanity is brought to prove that
he was not responsible. It was no use, how
ever. Hurley was declared sane and was re
manded to the custody of the Sheriff. Hurley
himself always maintained that he was not
crazy.
PUBLICATION OFFICE:
525 Montgomery street, near Clay, open until 11
o'clock r. m. BRANCH OFFICES— 7IO Market
ptreef. near Kearny. open until 12 o'clock midnight ;
fEft Hayes street, open until 0:30 o'clock ; 717 Larkin
street, open until 9:30 o'clock ;SW. corner Sixteenth
stid Mission streets, open until it o'clock ; 2518
M ission t-treet, open until 0 o'clock ; and 110 Ninth
street, open until fl:3O o'clock
NOTICE OF MEETINGS.
IR^S 3 YERBA • BUENA LODGE OF~^T
.jrot^ Perfection No. 6— Regular meeting JH
THIS (FRIDAY) EVENING, March 22, at A
8 o'clock. D. 5. GEORGE J. HOBE, JoL
Sercetarv. sJ -* sSJ
EXCELSIOR LODGE NO. 166, d '
t*^ y F. and A. M.— Officers and members _JV_
are hereby notified to attend the funeral of }£ 3T
our deceased brother, WILLIAM M./v\
A I KEN (late a member of Pecan Grove Lodge
No. 222, Lakf Providence, La.), from the Masonic
Temple TO-DAY (Friday), at 12:30 p. m. By
order of the W. M.
THEODORE E. SMTTH, Secretary.
•Op WALHALLA ENCAMPMENT NO. VJ *
tfc-*' 7, 1. O. O. F.— Tneofflcets and funeral J V^
committee of this encampment are hereby ' X
respectfully requested to assemble at Odd Fellows'
Hall on FRIDAY, March 22. at 1:30 p. m.. for the
purpose of attending the funeral of our late Pa-
triarch, CONRAD GERLACII. In F. H. and C,
H. T. SCHLICHTING, C. P.
Max Schumann, Scribe.
nt^=> CONCORDIA LODGE NO.
ifc-s? 122, 1. O. O. F.— The funeral
commite is hereby notified to assemble ; 5S? > «XJ».~ir
at Odd Follows' Hall, SUNDAY, 'W/HV?"
March 24. at 1 :30 p. m., to attend the funeral of
our late brother, A. C. GLASER.
H. F. SCHLICHTING JR. N. O.
Chb. Rokbkk, Recording Secretary. .-. .
!jt^S= OFFICE AND MEM- -mMrtrm ■
tir-Jy hers of Apollo Lodge No. 123,
I. O. O. F.— You are earnestly request- = s?s*<B£-'*^
ed to attend lodge THIS (FRIDAY) .<w/ir«?"-..
EVENING, March 22, 1895. Business of import-
ance. W. m. McCOLLISTER, Noble Grand.'
HoMiAKD smith. Recording Secretary. ■ \
IKS 3 HARMONY LODGK NO. 13, -H-^ifti
iaP-*»*\ I. O. O. F.— The officers and -
members of the funeral committee of
this lodge are hereby respectfully re- ' /7 '."' .^
quested to assemble at Odd Fellows' Hall on FRI-
DAY, March 22, at 1:30 r. m., for the purpose of
attending die funeral of our late brother P. G,,
CONRAD GERLACH. In F. L. and T.,
EDWARD WENZEL, Noble Grand. ,
Joseph G. Myself Rec. Sec. '/-•"'
Pp2p" THE MANUFACTURERS' CONVEN-
ur~* ? lion will meet at the Chamber of Commerce
at 10 a. m. on FRIDAY, March 22, to elect officers
of the Manufacturers' and Producers' Association
of California for the ensuing year. A large attend-
ance is requested. M. M. -GARNET, Secretary.
Sfc^gp" STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING — A
»B»jy. meeting of the stockholders of the Mendo-
clno Lumber Company (a corporation) will , be
held at the offlce of the company, 1 40 California
street, room 1, In the city and county, of San
Francisco, California, on THURSDAY*, April 11,
A. D. 1896, at 11 o'clock a. m. of that day. The
said corporation having been formed for it period
less than fifty (50) years to wit: '. For a period of
twenty-live (*25) years from and after th( date of
the articles of incorporation of said corporation to
wit: ■ July 30, 1873, said meeting has been called
by the directors of; the corporation expressly for
considering the subject of extending the term of
Its corporate existence, as specified In section 401,
of the Civil Code of California, to a period not ex-
ceeding fifty years from its formation, that is to
Bay, to and until July 30, A. D. 1923. -
,;,;'■ , GUYC. EARL,
i Secretary Mendocino Lumber Company.
Dated at San Francisco, Cal., March 2Q, 1895.
SZrS' STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING— AN-
■>»-■*' • nual meeting of the stockholders of the Ger-
mania Lead Works for the election of a Hoard of
Directors to serve for the ensuing : year, and for the
transaction of such other business as may come
before the meeting, will, bo held at the ofllco of the
company, No. 124 Snnsome St., San Francisco, Cal-
ifornia, on WEDNESDAY, April 3, 1895, at the
hour of 11 a. m. .J. M. QUAY", Secretary. }
f£^g=" THE ANNUAL' MEETING! OP THE
ti-jS' stockholders ' : of .■ Western ' Sugar Refining
Company will be held at the office of the corpora-
tion. 327 Market St., San Francisco, Cal., on MON-
DAY, the 25th day of March, at 12 it., for the elec-
; tion of a board of directors, to serve for the ensuing
year, and the transaction of such other business as
may come before the meeting. ■ •
•MEETING NOTlCES— Continued. I
1 NOTICE- TO THE ""STOCKHOLDERS I
liS^S^ of the Standard Gold and Silver Mining
■ Company:. There will be a meeting of . the stock-
. holders of the Standard Gold and Silver Mining
• Company on MONDAY, April 1, 1895, at 2 p.m.,
at the olllce of the company, room 3, second • floor,
1 Mills' building, San Francisco, Cal., for the purpose
of electing a Board of Directors for the ensuing
year, and transacting such other business as may
properly come before the meeting. The books of
the company for the transfer of stock will be closed
at 2 P. M. Saturday, March 30, 1805.
' J. H. HENRY, Secretary.
SPECIAL NOTICES. ~ ~~ ~
ijiSip~cl^AirrT?ol^^^
£fc~»V rooms -14 and 15, 9th floor, Mills building.
Practices in all State and Federal courts.
C*£*3p' ROOMS WHITENED. $1 UP: PAPER-
I*^ ed $3 50 up. 309 Sixth, George Hartman.
SSTTSr" MONEY TO LOAN ON SAN FRANCISCO
fif-Jp' real estate. W. J. GUNN, 410 Montgomery.
ijjE^Sp JOHN F. LYONS, NOTARY PUBLIC
t*~-& and Commissioner of Deeds. Passports pro-
cured. . Office 607 Montgomery St.; telephone
5439; residence 2202 Steiner st.
IJPS 3 BAD TENANTS EJECTED FOR $4.
1*"-*^ Collections made, city or country. Paeilic
Collection Co., 415 Montgy St., room 6, Tel. 5580.
i?T7§F»~j7B. McINTYRE, BOOKBINDER AND
$S*&- Printer. 422 Commercial s:.
SITUATIONS WANTED- FEMALE.
LADIES! FOR AN Al SERVANT SEE J. F.
XJ CROSETT <fe CO., 312 Sutter st. ' •• .
MARTIN <fe CO., EMPLOYMENT AGENTS. 749
Market st., main telephone No. 1849; furnish
all kinds of reliable female help.
tTadTes-you CAN GET RELIABLE help
-Li at MRS. FENTON'S, 104 Stockton st.
AT THE "SWEDISH EMPLOYMENT BU-
reau first-class Swedish and German girls are
awaiting situations. ■ 332 Geary St.; telephone 983.
WEDISH HOME EMPLOYMENT OFFICE"
for good and respectable girls. 11% Antonio
St., off Jones, near Ellis. ." -,--.:■
. AUNDRESS; YOUNG, STRONG SCANDINA-
J -i vian girl, first-class laundress in all branches,
understands cooking and general housework,
wishes situation; city or country; city references.
Address M. F., box 70, this office. ; • ;
"\foUNG EASTERN LADY WANTS POSITION
X to do light work of any kind ; housekeeping pre-
ferred; city or country. Call or address 11 Victor
St., upstairs. ' ' -.-;...
IRL WISHES position to do GENERAL
(" housework in small family; city or suburbs,
j Address Girl, box 126, Call Branch Office.
yOUXG EASTERN LADY WANTS A POSI-
-I- tion to do light work of any kind; housekeeping
preferred; city or country. Call or address 110y«
Stockton st., room 11. -
yOUNGWOJIAN FROM THE EAST WISHES
X situation: is good cook, washer and ironer; 6
years' references. Call 737 Howard St., room 2.
T)Y GOOD RELIABLE WOMAN; GOOD COOK
X) and baker; city or country; good city reference.
Address G. C, box 126, Call Branch Office.
XKT ANTED— BY RESPECTABLE PROTES-
' * taut woman to do housework for small family;
is first-class breadmaker. Call 731 Folsom st.
HOI" GERMAN WIDOW DE-
sires position as working housekeeper. 174
Jessie st., room 43.
EASTERN -LADY WOULD LIKE A SITUA-
tion as housekeeper. Call or address 7 Margaret
place, upper flat, between 14 and 16 Turk st.
GIRL WANTS A PLACE TO DOIIOUSE-
work. Apply at 302 Lily aye.
yOUNG WOMAN WISHES SITUATION TO
X do general housework; by the week or by the
day; will sleep home. Call or add. 1321 Mason st.
T>ESPECTABLE GERMAN "WOMAN. II
XV baby four weeks old, desires position as wet-
nurse. Inqulre.at 2819 Sixteenth st., near Howard.
yOUNO WIDOW (SPANISH) WANTS GEN-
X tlemen's mending or housekeeping for widower.
Call between 12 and 5 p. m. at 105 Stockton st.,
room 33.
ERMAN GIRL WANTS SITUATION TO DO
VJT family housework; sleep home. Address 11.
W., box 155, Call Branch Office.
REFINED YOUNG LADY WOULD LIKE
situation as housekeeper. Call or address 1126
I Market st., room 18, second floor.
WANTED-SITUAT7dN~BY YOUNG AMERI-
"" can girl to assist with light housework; wages
$1 50 a week; private family; no children; city or
country. Address D. J., box 149, Call Branch.
O YOUNG SWEDISH GIRLS JUST FROM THE
O East want situations to do general housework;
good cooks. Call Golden Eagle Hotel, Broadway
and Montgomery st., bet. 9 and 2.
WOMAN WANTS TO WORK BY THE WEEK
»» or month washing and housecleaning; $1 a
day. Address W., box 155, Call Branch.
WIDOW WANTS GENTLEMEN'S MENDING;
m shirts made to order: all kinds plain sewing;
cheap. 114 Fourth st., room 15.
RESSMAKEK, GOOD CUTTER* AND FlT-
ter, wants a few more engagements by the day
or take dresses home. Call or address 1620 Polk.
WOMAN WITH TWO CHILDREN WANTS
'* situation in the country to do housework.
Address W., box 89, Call Branch. - •■;»•;; •*■
POSITION AS HOUSEKEEPER BY A RELI-
X able woman, city or country. Call room 26,
1104 Mission st.
WANTED BY AN EDUCATED, REFINED
" girl — Position as nursery governess or upstairs
work; is able to teach the rudiments of English,
German and music. Address B. D., 2019 Mission.
/ 1 ERMAN WOMAN WANTS UPSTAIRS
work: hotel, lodging-house or private family;
rmod nurse for invalids and good sewer. Call 704*4
McAllister St.
i COMPETENT WOMAN WANTS A SITUA-
\J tion as working housekeeper. Call or address
715 Howard st.. room 7; no trlflers. - • ' : -
'DEFINED YOUNG WIDOW DESIRES A
-IV position as housekeeper. Call 967 Mission St.,
room 9, second floor.
\~ r OUNG WIDOW WISHES POSITION AS
• housekeeper or typewriter. 620 Market St.,
room 7, opposite Palace Hotel.
RESS M A X Tn~G AND CHILDREN'S
dresses made cheap. 131 Third st.
\tOUNG~GIRL~ WISHES " SITUATION AS
■ X housekeeper, to a gentleman. Call at 728y a
Howard St., room 1.
IRST-CLASS DRESSMAKER WISHES SEW-
X? Ing in families by the day; terms moderate.
Apply 1923 Ellis St.
"TvRESSMAKER; FIRST - CLASS FITTER;
XJ stylish draper and designer; thorough dress-
maker; by the day. 104 Grove st. ■ ">
tf YOU WANT A GOOD SERVANT, male
X or female, city or country, apply MME LEO-
POLD'S Employment Office, 957 Market st.; open
evenings.
TT4RESSM AKERS WANTED; PATTERNS CUT
XJ to order. 25c . McDowell Academy, 213 Powell.
A WEEK'S NEWS FOR 5 CENTS — THE
JX. WEEKLY CALL, In wrapper, for mailing.
SITUATIONS \V ANTED-MALE.
I^MtE^CHl^VN™^v7LLIN^TO^5A3or^IM^
X self useful wishes situation in iv family; city or
country; references. LEON ANDRE, 315 Stock-
ton St. {■ ■■:<.•: • i : :
Tj'Oß GOOD COOKS, STEWARDS, WAITERS
X I and other hotel or restaurant help send your
orders to J. F. CROSETT & CO., 628 Sacramento.
\\T ANTED— BY A PRACTICABLE SAWMILL
'• . man or lumberman, position ■ as manager,
sawyer or lumber inspector; 20 years' experience;
a skillful mechanic: the best of references. Ad-
dress M., Oakland Call Office. ■
STEADY, SOBER, MIDDLE-AGED MAN, UN-
O der.stands the care of horses and can do gar-
dening; milk cows; good references; low wages. C.
P., box 136, Call Branch.
AT lON WANTED BY GOOD PASTRY
O cook for resort or private family ; wages no ob-
ject. "■: Address J. S., box 153, Call Branch.
\l.' ANTED— SITUATION, BY MIDDLE-AGED
'* German. 10 years' experience, as coachman
and gardener: sober, industrious and reliable; good
references; city or country. Address Coachman,
Call Office, Oakland. .
] ) E L ABLE MAN (DANE) WANTS SITUA-
-CV tion In a private family; is a good coachman:
can take care of garden and cows. Address C. T.,
box 143, Call Branch Office.
E~~ LDERIYTcLE SOBER GERMAN COOK
wishes situation in a small boarding or lunch
house or ranch. Please call -or address T. 8., 236
Clara st. r: ■ ./.-'-- ' - - ■
SITUATION WANTED BY AN ENGLISH
k3 gardener: can milk and is handy with tools.
Address S. M., box 20, this office. :
Arou"NG~MAN WISHES A SITUATION TO
X' drive horses, do washing and laundry work;
good references: or will work in private place, care
for horses and garden. Call 1041 Minna st. ■
\\T ANTED— EMPLOYMENT BY RESPECT-
* able man as coachman ; can milk and be gen-
erally useful; thoroughly understands the care of
horses. Address Coachman, box 17, Call Office. |
SCANDINAVIAN, 26 YEARS OLD, WISHES
O sit tuition: thoroughly understands the manage-
ment of horses, carriages, cows, garden and general
work; good references. Address J. N., box 40,
Call Office. .'...-■-. ■■.'., .-;-<•:,■ '-
A MERICAN,; FARMER AND WIFE WANT
-«-■ situations on ranch; wife cook find house-
keeper; man first-class farmer: no children; best
reference. . Address V., box 91, Call Branch. '
•WANTED — SITUATION BY A RELIABLE
•» » , man ; understands orchard and fruit business
thoroughly; wages low. Address R. M., box 105,
Call Branch. .
15 1 RST-CLASS GERMAN GARDENER WITH
X best of city references wishes position. Inquire
908 Valencia st. .
BY FIRST-CLASS RESTAURANT cook.
Address Cook, box 105, Call Branch.
T>AINTER,GRAINER AND PAPER-HANGER
X wants engagement, town or country. H. N., 16
Maria st., off Chesley.
> FEMALE '-; HELP WANTKO.
\\T ANTED— PROTEST ANT SECOND 1 GIRL
and laundress, $25; German nurse and sewing,
$25 ; 2 German second I girls, * $20 ; 5 girls for gen-
eral housework in families of 2 and 3, $20; German
cook,' s2s ;s Invalid's nurse, $20; chambermaid,
some '.washing, : country .; hotel,: $20, ■ middle-aged
woman preferred; waitress and laundress, country
. hotel, $20; girls for general housework, i ßakers-
Held, $25;. Auburn, $20: Berkeley, $20; • Salinas.
$20; Pescadero, $20; ■. Colusa, $25; and a number
of young girls for light housework, $10, $12 and
$15.1- J. F. CROSETT A CO., 312 Butter st.
HELP WANTED— Continued. ; ,_
/I ERMAN GIRL, NURSE CHILD, 4 YEARS,
VT $15; nurse, country, $20: 10 housework girls,
city and Vountrv. $20 and $25; 3 young girls, assist,
*12 to $15 MISS CULLEN, 105 Stockton, rm. 2.
OVERMAN OR SWEDISH SISTERS OR
_J friends; $,25 and $15: country ; cook and second.
Apply MtVSS C U LL_ N, 105 Stockton st.
ERMAN OR FRENCH SEAMSTRESS, $20;
(j second girl, $25; cook, country, $30. Apply
MISS CULLEX, 105 Stockton St.
ATEAT, REFINED YOUNG GIRL. LIGHT
-IN Ivork: $15 MISS CULLEX, 105 Stockton st.
GUIAMBERMAID, LODGING - HOUSE, $15.
\J MISS CULLEX. 105 Stockton st.
SWEDISH LAUNDRESS, $25. MISS CULLEX,
0 105 Stockton St., room 2. _______
ERMAN NURSERY GOVERNESS, NEED
\JC not speak English, for country, .$2O; ironer to
run Troy shirt-machine No. 9 for country hotel,
$40, found and free fare; 3 ironers for steam laun-
dry, country, $25; fancy ironer, country laundry,
$25, free fare; German second girl, $20; German
nursegirl and seamstress, $20; 3 girls for general
housework, $20; 10 girls, nurses and house-
work, $12 and $15. C. R. HANSEN & CO., 110
Geary st. ■ ' •
HOTEL COOK, SUMMER SORT, $50. C. R.
HANSEN _ CO., 110 Geary st.
T\r ANTED — CHAMBERMAID AND WAIT
VV table once a day: German second girl, $20
month; girl for Alameda; woman with child on
dairy ranch, $15 month: 2 girls in country, general
housework, $15; 3 young girls, $10 month. MAR-
TIN _ CO., 749 Market st. ___ :
mEN GOOD HOUSEWORK GIRLS, CITY
1 and country, $25 and $20. Apply MISS
PLUXKETT, 424 Sutter St.
IRST-CLASS COOK FOR 3 IN FAMILY',
$30 ; must do German cooking; country. Apply
Miss PLUXKETT.
O HOTEL COOKS, $30 and $25, country.
-i MURRAY & READY, 634 Clay st.
WANTED— NEAT GIRL FOR NICE FAMILY
TT of 2 persons, short distance in country, to do
general housework at $20 per month. Apply to
W. D. EWER _ CO., 626 Clay St.
SCOTCH GIRL, $15; GERMAN GIRL. $20;
German nurse, Oakland: German girl, Pesca-
dero: middle-axed woman, Larkspur; others.
MME. LEOPOLD, 957 Market st. '.•,'■; ■:•
ATEAT GERMAN LADY CARE FOR CHILD 4
i-i years old, wages $20: Swedish cook, $25;
houseglrl, 3 in family, no washing, $20: girl, Ala-
meda, $20, Berkeley, $20. 332 Geary st.
ERMAN OR SWEDISH HOUSEGIRL, 2 IN
\X family, wages $20. 332 Geary Bt.
p IRL WORK IX KITCHEN, COFFEE-HOUSE.
VJ" 606 Mission st. ; ■ ■
YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST WITH LIGHT
1 housework; good home; small wages. 719
Clementina st.
OOD APPRENTICE ON CUSTOM COATS.
1044 Howard st.
EASY PLACE, KIND home for protes-
tant girl not over 20; $10. Apply 989 Howard
st, near Sixth, room 43.
IRL FOR GENERAL HOUSEWORK AND
cooking, German preferred. 426 Golden Gate.
TROXG GIBL OR TOMAN. 34 HUBBARD
St., off Howard, near Second.
IDDLE-AGED WOMAN TO WASH DISHES.
__9_to_B p. m., 2012 Fillmore st.
/ 1 IllL FOR HOUSEWORK AND ASSIST CHIL-
VX dren. 928 Fillmore st.
p IRL FOR HOUSEWORK AND ASSIST WITH
VJ children; French or German. Apply 1207
Gough st.
MART GIRL FOR CHAMBERWORK, $15.
Apply 8 Mason St.
YOUNG GIRL LIGHT HOUSEWORK FOR 1
A person: must sleep at home; $6 monthly.
Teacher, box 74, Call Office.
OOD GIRL To ASSIST LIGHT HOUSE-
work; $8. Call 108 Thirtieth St., near San
Jose aye.
YOUNG GIRL ASSIST WITH HOUSEWORK
JL and child: $10. 131 Post st., room 20.
pIRL TO ASSIST HOUSEWORK; GERMAN
VJ preferred. 1138 Alabama st., near Twenty-
fourth. ....
F'~ "IRST-CLARS HAND WANTED ON CUSTOM
X 1 vests. 622 Clay St., second floor, room 13.
"W ANTED— GERMAN GIRL TO ATTEND TO
TT children. Apply at 933 Haight st.
A PPHEXTICE AT DRESSMAKIXG. 330 SUT-
-r_ ter st., upstairs. ■"■•-/
IRLS WANTED — PATTERNS CUT TO
order, 25c. at McDowell Academy, 213 Powell.
IpREE— AT LAWRENCE DRESSCUT-
J ting School. 1231 Market st. -
A WEEK'S NEWS FOR 5 CENTS— THE
WEEKLY CALL, in wrapper, for mailing.
MALE HELP WANTED.
l\rANTEn—_NGLls'_f BUTLER WITH GOOD
TT references, $45. L. ANDRE, 315 Stockton st.
TRONER WHO CAN RUN A NO. 9 TROY
X shin machine, hotel laundry, country, $40 and
found and free fare. C. R. HANSEN _ CO., 110
Geary at.
IpRENCH MEAT AND PASTRY COOK FOR A
JD country club. $50 to $60 and increase; 2 colored
waiters for summer resort, $35 and $30. C. R.
HANSEN <fc CO., 110 Geary st.
STRONG YOUNG GARDENER FOR A PRl-
vate place, $36; woodchoppers, $1 50 a cord.
C. R. HANSEN <fe CO., 110 Geary st.
BAKER, $50; PASTRY COOK, $55; BOTH
for same country hotel. C. R. HANSEN _
CO., l_p Geary st.
W ANTED— SOAPMAKER, $15 TO $20 A
■I' week; 3 carpenters for Central America, part
fare advanced, and millwright and 2 boilermakers
same place; man about place with references, $25
and found, and others. Apply to J. F. CROSETT
& CO., 628 Sacramento st. - : :;? -„
"WANTED— WAITER FOR STEAMBOAT, $20;
V V 4 milkers, $15 and $20 ; 2 ranch teamsters,s2o ;
farmer for stock ranch, $20; cooks, waiters, dish-
washers and others. W. D. EWER _ CO., 626 Clay.
Oft WOODCHOPPERS,SI 50 PER CORD; OLD
O\J man to do chores. MURRAY _ READY, 634
Clay st. ■
3 LABORERS TO DIG DITCHES NEAR CITY;
stableman, $25; 3 hotel cooks, $35 and $50;
cook and wife, country hotel, $50. MURRAY _
READY, 63< Clay st.
"W ANTE! (-SHOP CARPENTER, $2 70 DAY;
T T American farmer, $20; boy for bar and grocery,
$15. R. T. WARD _ CO., 608 and 610 Clay st.
ARTIN _ CO., EMPLOYMENT AGENTS,
749 Market St., main telephone No. 1849, fur-
nish all kinds of reliable male heln.
an i age-trimmer at
»T once; German cook. $8 week and room; man
to ride and repair bicycles. MARTIN _ CO., 749
Market st.
"WANTED— BUTLER FOR FAMILY OF 3
TT in city a year around; $45. Apply MISS
PLUXKETT, 424 Sutter st.
AIL O R S— CO ATM AKERS AND PANTS-
i. makers wanted for the country. Apply to
STEIN, SIMON _ CO., cor. Second and Market sts.
A CTIVE MAN FOR"STEADY POSITION; $25
-C_ required. 809 Mission St., downstairs.
"\rOUXG MAN WITH EXPERIENCE FOR
-L>bakcshop, $20 a month. 223 Sixth.
ISHWASIIER WANTED. CALL EARLY
Valencia-street Hotel, 718 Valencia st.
ANTED — EXPERIENCED LODGlNG-
house clerk. 639 Clay st.
WANTED— GOOD DISHWASHER. PARK
VV Hotel, 1830 Jlaight st.
TO ARBER FOR SATURDAY. 606 THIRD.
WANTED— 4 LABORERS. 238 KEARNY ST.,
•T» room 7. ■
p EBMAN UNDER 20 FOR RETAIL WINE-
vJT store ; must be recommended. Bush & Devisa-
dero sts.
TITORKINGMAN, STRANGER, DESIRES AC-
»». quaintance working-girl. M., box 120, Call Br.
3 -CH__R BARBER-SHOP: CHEAP; BEFORE
O April 1. Call 1281/2 O'Farrell st.
ARBERS-GOOD PAYING 3-CHAIR SHOP.
DECK ELM AN BROS., 106 Ellis st.
ARBER-SHOP FOR SALE; 2 CHAIRS; 10-
-cent shop. 602 Clay st.
WANTED— IS OK 2B CANVASSERS, ACTIVE,
: »' experienced, earnest men and women; salary
and commission. Apply at 532 Market St., room 8.
XT' X PERI E NCED MILK SOLICITORS. 552
JLJ Bryant st., before noon. . ;
Tl . CABINET-MAKER AND FINISHER,
__ with complete set of tools and bench; with
references. C, box 155, Call Branch Office.
PUTTERS AXD TAILORS TO ATTEND THE
\J S. F. Cutting School. 222 Post st. , rooms 21&22.
"PANTS - PRESSER. COLUMBIAN WOOLEN
X Mills, 641 Market st. ■ . .
SEAMEN AND GREEN HANDS. APPLY 313
Pacific St., regular shipping agents.
RIGHT YOUNG MAN WANTED IN WHOLE-
sale and retail business downtown; must de-
posit $800; Interest on money and salary paid.
Apply SPECK'S, 30 Montgomery.
MEN'S SHOES y 2 -SOLED, 40c; HEELS, 25c;
done in 15 minutes. 635 Kearny St.. basement.
ABB WO-C H A SHOP IN COUN-
try; good show for married man. 1807 Haight.
SEAMEN AND GREEN HANDS FOR WHAL-
ing. L. LEVY, NE. cor. Battery and Jackson.
ATOTICE— REMOVED FROM 706 TO 726%,
JLV opp. Howard-st. Theater, misfit shoes bought
or exchanged: best place in city for new and sec-
ond-hand shoes. ■
EAMEX AND GREEN HANDS; SCANDl-
navlans preferred. , 322 Pacific st. .
WAXTED-3 LIVE, ENERGETIC CITY
TT agents by large insurance company; must be
well- acquainted and of long residence; good re-
muneration to right party. Address L. A., box
123, Call Branch Office. : ,
WANTED — ENERGETIC AND WELL-AC-
quainted gentleman to handle a fine proposi-
tlon. CA DENasso & CO., 512 Montgomery st.
BARBERS FOR EMPLOYMENT CALL H.
SCHEUXERT.employment secretary barbers'
Association, 12 Seventh st. ' ■
2" EGGS, MUSH MILK OR SOUP, POTA-
toes, bread and butter, coffee, all 10c. : 44 4th.
IpR_E_tEER: BEST IX CITY; 2 SCHOONERS
: "for 5 cents at 228 Pacific st.
A TTEXTIOX— CLEAX SINGLE ROOMS, 15c A
J\. night, 75c week. R. R. House, Commercial.
"W ANTED— MEN TO GET BOTTLE SHARP
.f » steam beer, sc; bottle wine, sc. 609 Clay st.
_ HELP WANTKIJ-Continned. J
QHAVING.WITir BAY IMM.lOc:)! LIB '
0 ting 15c; a towel for every customer- 8oh»i~I
do waiting. JOE'S. 32 Third street. halr3;
RE-ELECTED EMPLOYMENT SEC BaTC
bers 1 Protective Union. C. TROELL, 657 ci B <
P , AI " S OF GOOD SHOES, 25c TO
OUU Mission at.; also 63iy 8 Sacramento at.
SHOES HALF-SOLED IN 10~ MINUTES^
0 done while you wait; at less than half the usual
price; aU repairing done at half price. 664 Mission
St.. between First at. and Second St. a
rAKE THE DEAD — WENZEL'S ALARM
TT clock :no electricity. 607 Montgomery st.
ITIREE COFFEE AND ROLLS. TMSANSOME^
I 1 single_ooms,_lsc L 2oc, $1 week with breakfas''
jTNDELL HOUSK, 6TH AND HOW\ 1U )_
_J_single t_m__ed rooms, 75c week, 15c ni ? ht
100 ME^n TO ■ I : VKE LODGIXG AT 10r. 1 :, _
«ol Bn .? cam nt . '"eluding coffee and roi la.
624 Washington st., near Kearny. lu -'a»
ELLIS .ROSEDALE— l-UiCESREDUn '-
O^J.___lef_rntahed rooms, *l week ; 25c nlgnu
TRY' ACME HOUSE, 957 KASEET ST it_~
1 low Sixth, for a room: -'5. night- $1 week!'
BEST IX CITY-SINGLE ROOMS. 15 20 A\D
25 cents per night; 81, $1 25 $1 50 ncr wePiP
Pacific House, Commercial L_de__gff__* fc
"WANTED— LABORERS am, MECHAVICa
\\ ,0 know that Ed Rolkin, Reno House'propr^
etor, has opened Soto House, 32 Fourth £• lno
rooms; 25c __ per night; _] 28 _*_>_
-WrANTBD-SINGLB ROOMS i;,,. A DAY . »l
TT week: rooms for two, 25c a day, 91 60 a week-
readme room: daily papers. 36 Clay st. V, .
4 WEEK'S NEWS FOR T CENTS-THE
_ V WEEKLY CALL, in wrapper, for mailing.
HOUSES WANTED! ~ r "~ =
"nr ANTED— COTTAGE OF '6 ROOMS BATH
TT and stable; rent not over $30. Address B but
116. Call Branch Office. ■*-. pox
ROOMS WANTKIi. . j
lADY AND IdaUGHTER WISH ro
J large sunny room, with board. Apply 1247
Twenty-third st., near Castro.
WANTED— MISCELLANEOUS"
D^~H__:NT^B^XTH~ST7rPA VS Hi 1 1 ; | i EST
. price for second-hand ladles', gents' clothing.
FINANCIAL.
MONEY TO LOAN ON SAN FRANCISCO RE \L
I<l estate. W. J. GUN.V 410 Montgomery st.
PIANOS. VIOLINS AND .SHEET MUSIC.
GREAT BARGAINS IN SECOND-HAND I'l-
anos at SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 'S, cor. Kear-
ny and Sutter sts.
V I ■'■ PIAXOS FROM $100 UPWARD; EASY
-Li payments. SHERMAN, CLAY _ CO., cor.
Kearny and Sutter sts.
piANOS SOLD UPON NEW RENT CONTRA
J. plan; please call and have it explained; the
easiest terms ever quoted for procuring lint- Diana
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., cor. Kearny and Sutterl
A LIST OF BARGAINS IX PIANOS FOR
A this week.
Fine upright, 3 strings, rosewood case $150
Nice upright piano, good for practicing 75
Fine si.-inway, square 150
Elegant mahogany upright, 3 pedals, full Iron
frame. 200
Hardman upright, slightly used, at a liberal reduc-
tion.
THE J. DEWING CO. warerooms 12. 13, 14,
Flood .mildlng.
BLASI is PIANOS, THE XEW FAVORITE
among artists. KOHLER _ CHASE.
t-OIILEK & CHASE. 28 AND 30 O'FAI:
.IV st.; oldest and largest music house: high-grade
pianos; low prices; caff or write.
EASY TERMS; LOW PRICES. KOHLER .*
CHASE.
ORGAN FOR SALE CHEAP. 1623 CHURCH
street.
\Y G. BADGER, WITH BEXJ. CURTAZ, 20
TT . O'Farrell, agent for Hallet and Davi piano*. 1
RE YOU LOOKING FOR a HIGH-GRADE 4
piano slightly used? We can positively suit
you both In the Instrument and the price. B. CUR-
TAZ & son, 16 to 20 O'Farrell st.
O YOU WANT AX ELEGANT SELF-PLAY-
ing organ with 15 rolls of music? A splendid
bargain for a'cash customer. BEN. CURTAZ Js
son. 16 to 20 O'Farrbll st.
XflBW ELEGANT UPRIGHTS, STANDARD
X makes, almost new, half original cost.; see at
once. F. W. SPEXCER A CO., 721 Market st.
XABE, .BUSH _ HERTS AND lIAINE9
pianos. A. L. BANCROFT _ CO., 324 Post st.
MAI VAIS, 769 MARKET— SHEET MUSIC a
price; Decker & Son pianos.
QACRIFICING LARGE STOCK OF UPRIGHT
0 pianos of their own make at manufacturers'
prices. Hemme _ Long Piano Co., 340 Post st.
ARGAINS; ALL KINDS OF MUSICAL IX-
X> struments. L. I. STANTON it CO., 663 Market.
BYRON 3IAUZY, 308 POST ST.-SOHM I It,"
Xewby _ Evans, Brlggs and other pianos.
TECK, CHICKKRTXO * SONS,- VOBK JOBS
Sterling pianos sold on $10 installments. BENJ.
CURTAZ & SON, sole agents. >6-20 p'Farrell gt.
TEINWAY UPRIGHT; SLIGHTLY USED;
grand tone; half-cost. SPENCER, 721 Market.
UPERIOR VIOLINS, ZITHERS, OLD A NEW."
t~ H. MULLER. maker. repairer. 2 Latham place.
HORSES.
FINF. TEAM CHESTNUT SOR^TETsTii^RITK
single or double; very gentle; for sale, or trade
for a team of heavy working horses. Inquire 214
Sixth st.
1?OR CHEAP; TOP DELIVERY-WAG-
.r on and 6-year-old bay mare party has no uso
for it. 318 Eleventh st.
MATCHED TEAM FOR SALE; BETWEEN 5
ITI and 6 years old. SE.cor. Duncan and Dolores.
HORSES PASTURED; *'_' A MONTH; BEND .
for circular. F. A. HYDE, 630 Commercial st. \
"I AA SETS SECOND-HAND HARNESS; ALL *
X\j\j kinds; second-hand wagons, buggy, carts;
also 20 cheap horses. Fifteenth and Valencia its.
WAGONS AND CARRIAGES.
OUBLE~EXPRESS TE AM FOR~^ALeT~ApI
ply 1122 York st.
ANTED— RYE STRAW FOR HORSE-
V 1 collars. W, DAVIS A SON, 410 Market st.
2 NEW CARTS; "4-81' RING WAGON; MILK
wagon; must sell at once. 829 Howard st.
FIXE BAKERY AND LAUNDRY WAGONS,
J rockaway, buggies: also hack. 828 Harrison.
FOR SALE-MISCELLANEOUS.
XT E W~P_^_U_t^^XUß^TOßr_26_iGGs".
-l-> 811 Treat aye., near Twenty-first.
ALZARD VIOLIX FOR SALE— OF THE
best of that rare maker: in perfect tone and
condition. To be seen at MULLER'S, 2 Latham
place.
T AYING HENS FOR SALE; ALSO GOAT
J— with 2 kids. 529 Seventh st.
OR SALE — HOUSE OF ~4 ROOMS AND
stable. Apply 47 West Mission St.
FOR SALE— IOO,OOO BRICK; ALSO RED-
wooa lumber; $6 per thousand. Greenwich
and Octaviiv sts.
C" ARD TABLES AND OFFICE DESKS. 211
Post st. ; basement: repairing.
ARGAIX— GOOD PNEUMATIC SAFETY
for $25. 326 McAllister st.
FIXTURES THAT WERE ONCE IN
\J the Savings Union branch. Market and Fell
sts. ; suitable for an Insurance or real estate office.
ASHTON <fe GARDINER, 411 Montgomery at.
\\riLSHIRE SAFE, LETTER-PRESS. SCALE, : «V . 4
TT coffee-mill and money-till ; cheap. 102 Clay st.
OUXTERS, shelving, SHOWCASES
bought and sold. 1181 y% Market, bet. 7th and _»
A7EW RANGES CHEAPER THAN SECOND-
■L> hand. W. S. RAY Mfg Co.. 12 California st.
MONEY TO LOAN. .4^
"WANTED — MODERATE LOAN ON 150
TT acres land in bay county: Improved; A 1 se-
curity. Address 8., box 17, this oflice. _ f .^
IST AND 2D MORTGAGES, ESTATES,
lpianos,allmony;any sum. M D RPHY.62B Market.
TST72D OR CHATTEL MORTGAGE, PIANOS,
■L estates. Insurance, etc. SPECK'S, 30 Montgy.
ONEY TO LOAN ON MORTGAGE OR COL-
laterals. JAS. E. DAMON, 303 Montgomery.
MUNICIPAL LOAN OFFICE, CROCKER
building, room 67: telephone Mam 6122.
6% MONEY ON REAL-ES i' ATE SECURITY.
. SHADBOURNE JR. & CO., 313 Montgy st.
ANY SUM OF MONEY ADVANCED ON
your furniture, pianos or real estate: low rates;
call and state your proposition or write: open
evenings. J. XOOXAX, 1021 Mission st.
ON AN V SECURITY , A r LOW RATES; DEAL-
ing confidential. 43 Crocker building.
ONEY LOANED ON JBW_LBY__TD OTHER
iVI valuables at the Security Loan Bank, 1106
Market st.. nr. Mason: private cntranco 7 Turk.
TYPEWRITERS AND SUPPLIES.
mWEW^rT*ERs""FOIT^ENT: MACHINES
Isold cheap. HANSON A CO.,Chroniclebld,r. 38.
IN COMPARISON THE CALIGRAPH LASTS
J. forever. NAYLOR. 19 Montgomery. Rents,
repairs, supplies, mimeographs. Installments.
~~~ ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
'^r^vYcEFREETorVORCEhAVfS, A SPECIAL^
J\. Tv ; collections, damages, wills, deeds, etc. G. W. *•
HOWE, Att'y-at-law, 850 Market St., cor. Stockton.
TIT, W. DAVIDSON, ATfo R N 1; Y-AT- L AW ,420 i V
\\ . California St., rms. 14-16; advice free. 1 w
JOHN B. AITKEX, ATTORXEY-AT-LAW,
_ 16 and 17. 402 Montgomery m., cor. California. i
partnership notices. fs
otice~iTlserebT gi v^n^that^the
_X firm heretofore existing under the name of >■?
HULL & McDOXOUGH is mutually disolved-
MR. HULL has purchased MR. McDOXOUGH'3
Interest and will pay all bills and liabilities- all Hi
outstanding accounts to be paid to MR. HULL.
H. N.HULL. J.G. McDOXOUGH.

xml | txt