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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, May 25, 1895, Image 12

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12
THE COMMERCIAL
WORLD
SIMM.4RT OF THE BIARKXTS.
Silver unchaneed.
Spot Wheat higher. Futures lower,
Barley and Oats weaker.
Corn and Rye unchanged.
Beans weak.
Klonr firm at previous prices.
New Hay weaker.
Grain Bass active and firm.
Rice unchanged.
Seventeen failures last week.
Provisions dull.
H ides very strong. Wool quiet.
Hops continue neglected.
Potatoes and Onions lower.
Butter and Cheese very weak.
Kggs slow of sale.
Young Poultry firm.
Berries tending downward.
DecKnooa Fruits quiet.
Citrus Fruiis very weak.
Dried Fruits neglected.
Honey quiet and weak.
lloss lower. Lamb declined.
MtATHEK BIKEAC REPORT.
I'viTEn Status Department of Agricoi/-
TVRK. WKATHKB BURKAf, Sa5C FRANCISCO,
May 24, 1895, 5 p. M.—Weather conditions and
general forecast.
The barometer is highest along the California
coast and lowest over North Dakota and Southern
Arizona. The barometer has fallen over Wash
ington and Northern Oregon and risen over Cali
fornia and the plateau region. It is above the
normal ie all districts except Oregon and Wash
ington, where it is slightly below. The changes in
temperature have been slight, but it has risen
slightly over California and the plateau regions,
except a fall alone the Central California coast.
Kain has fallen over <>r( ton and Washington dur
ing the day and and continues at some stations.
The greatest fall has been along ihi- Washington
coast. It is generally cloudy along the entire Cali
forniacoa«t. High winds b»ve been reported along
the Washington coast. Conditions are favorable
fora continuance of the present weather through
out California.
The following are seasonal rainfalls to date as
compared with those of the same date last year:
Eureka 41.73. last year 08.73: Red Bluff 28.40.
last year 20.52 : Sacramento 28.90. last year 14.93:
Baa Francisco 25.41. last year 17.01: Fresno 14.14,
last year 7.21: Los Angeles 15.91: San Diego,
11.60. last year 4.18: Vuma 2.97, last year 2.16
inches.
The following maximum temperatures have
been rej>orted in California to-day : Kureka, 62 de
grees; Red Bluff. 84: .^aiTair.ento. 78; San Fran
cisco. 69; Fresno. 88: San Luis Obispo, 68: Inde
pendence, 80; Los Angeles, 72; San Diego, 68;
Vunia. 92.
San Francisco nata— Maximum temperature 59
dec., minimum 49 deg.. mean 54 deg.
Forecast made at >an Francisco for thirty hours
ending midnight May 25, 1896:
i or Northern California — Fair: nearly stationary
temperature; fresh to brisk westerly winds.
For Southern California— Fair; nearly stationary
temperature: fresh westerly winds.
For Nevada— Fair; nearly stationary tempera
ture.
For Utah— Fair; nearly stationary temperature.
For Arizona — Fair; nearly stationary tempera
ture.
For San Francisco and vicinity— Fair, but foggy
to-night; nearly stationary temperature; brisk
westerly winds.
G. H. Wjxisojj, Acting Forecast Official.
IMPORTANT TO APrLE-GROWERS.
The San Francisco Fruit Exchange, through its
president, frank Dalton, has issued the following
circular to growers and packers of evaporated ap
ples:
At a recent meeting of the San Francisco Fruit
Exchange the merits of California evaporated ap
ples were compared to those of Eastern manufac
ture and it was unanimously agreed that
the methods employed in California were
such as to make* our article inferior to j
the Eastern and, therefore, less desirable.
The difference is ; caused to a great extent by the I
use of water in packing. This practice, which has !
been ie vogue for years, has not only prejudiced the
Eastern and Southern buyers against our apples,
but it has also proven detrimental to all those who
deal in the article. As it is the province of the San
Francisco Fruit Exchange to call matters of this
kind to the attention of thefruit-growers.and to give
them the benefit of the experience of its members,
it was resolved to address you on the subject.
It is a well-known fact that less than 50 per cent
of the apples packed in California are consumed on
the coast, while the balance Is sold in the terri
tories tributary to San Francisco, and principally
In the State of Texas, the humidity of whose
atmosphere demands a dry pack. In Southern
points our apples come in companion with those
packed in New York, Michigan, Missouri, Arkansas
and other States east of the Missouri River. These
apples are thoroughly dried and packed In that
condition, so that they are suitable for shipment to
any climate. This, however, does not apply to
California apples, the majority of which are put
up not with regard to keeping qualities, but rather
with a view to produce as many pounds as possible
to the ton when ready for marketing. As a result'
a box of evaporated apples sold at 50 pounds net
usually contains from 3 to 5 pounds of water.
It can easily be seen thai this policy is a very
Short-sighted one, as an article put up in. such a
manner cannot possibly keep in the extreme cli
mate of Texas and other Southern points and It is
therefore, sure to prejudice the consumer sooner
or later against the California product. In addi
tion, the packer should not lose sight of the fact
that our apples do not realize from lc to 2c per
pound of the price they would bring If they were
packed perfectly dry. This has been shown very
plainly during the last season by merchants gener
ally who have been buying apples in this market,
and have become so utterly disgusted that a com
plete reform on the part of packers is necessary in
order to Induce their further purchasing at any
price. The claim that the fruit cannot be packed
In boxes without the use of water Is easily contra
dicted by referring to the Eastern dryers who pack
their apples perfectly dry, but who use larger
boxes than in California. • ""S«
Packing with water has resulted in great loss to
ooth packer and dealer, and especially has this
been the case this season, a number of lots having
spoiled while In possession of dealers who pur
chased them in good faith. In order to hold the
t>u»iness already In hand and regain that lost by
the present method of packing, the San Francisco
nouses dealing in evaporated apples have agreed—
and the agreement will be strictly adhered to— not
to buy apples during the coming season which have
been packed with water.
Another point to which we wish to call your at
tention is the matter of packing short weight. This
Has been practiced to such an extent that last sea-
Bon i some lots were marketed which were packed 2
to 3 pounds short. Nothing is gained by this, as in
almost every Instance buyers will carefully tare
boxes before paying for the purchase.
NEW YOUR MARKETS.
NEW YORK. B. V., May 24.-The improvement
In the stocK market continued in to-day's trans
actions and a higher range of values was estab
lished. Speculation was mainly confined to the
local traders, tn«? foreigners . being entirely out of
the market. The volume of business was moder
ate. .The market opened firm with advances of
y«@V2 Per cent, the latter in Minneapolis and St.
Louis. Distilling, an exception, . receded 1 per
cent. General Electric was also pressed by a
prominent bear operator and broke • 1% per cent.
A few other shares sympathized fractionally, but
the general market made gains. Sugar went up
' 1% and the o rangers VB@Vi per cent.
About 1:30 a. bear demonstration was made
against the grangers, with a report that at the June
meeting of the Northwest directors the dividend
would be made 1% per cent, making the rate for
the year 4 per cent. The losses in this group
ransed from % to IVi per cent, and was most
marked in Northwest. The rest of the market fell
off-%@1% per cent. After delivery. hour prices
again took an upward turn, and speculation was
strong at the close. • . ■
The bond market was active and strong, with a
wide distribution of trading. - The sales were
$3,325,000. Government bonds strong. State
bonds inactive. Railroad bonds strong. Petroleum
weak, closed offered $1 60.
Grain and Merchandise.
Flour— Receipts, 21.900- bbls: export*, 11,000
bbls: sales, 18,000- pkgs. ' Market lower to sell
Buyers scarce, and only a band to mouth business
was done. -
Bye flour firm ; sales, 200 bbls.
Wheat— Receipts, 344,000 bushels; .exports,
39,600 bags: sales, 13.325,000 futures. Spot' weak'
No. 2 red store and elevator, 78c: afloat,
79y 8 c; f. o. b. 79% c afloat; , No. l.hard 84i/ 8 c
delivered. Options were weaker to-day. There
was free realizing by outsiders and ■ foreigners and
short selling by local houses. Prices moved within
a smaller range and business was only half of that
of yesterday. , Cables came lower, and there were
predictions of rain in the West. . Closed at 23'= (ai
a^fec net loss. No 2 red. May, 78V 8 c- June
closed at 788/gc: July, 79<&813i, closed 79y c-
August, 79i/8<?-81"«. closed 79Vi: September, 793/0
@B'Jl/4, closed 79% c; October, 80&82% c, closed
■ 80c; November. b2%; December, 813Va84e
closed 81 Vie
Hops— Dull.
Wool-Firm.
Petroleum— Dull; United closed $1 60 asked.
Pigiron— Quiet; Scotch, . $19@20; American,
89 60ta)12. .-..--.
Copper— Firm : brokers' price, 10 50 ; • exchange
; price, JMlliOfo 10 65. ■ •■."-.
Lead— Firm; brokers' price, $3 07 V 2 : exchange
price, $3 20<g,3 25. •< ,
Tin— Barely steady ; straits, ¥14 70@14 80; plate's, 1
steady. , .- ' ■ ■.'-:■ ■■■_■■■■
spelter— Firm: domestic $3 BS@3 60: sales on
'Change, 250 tons tin s. o. September, $14 60. r ' 1,
. Coffee— Options opened quiet at unchanged prices
to 6 points decline and ruled moderately; active.
Sales 14,250 bags, including May. $14 55; June,
*14 45@14 55: July. '$15: September, $14 95;
. October, $16: December. $14 9C@l4 95. •■ \
Spot Coffee— Rio, firm ; No. 7. 1 tic; mild, steady;
Cordova, 18i/4&l»c: sales, 10,000 Maracaibo, p. t.,
1000 mats interior Padang, p. t. . : • \
Sugar— Raw sales, 3000 bags Centrifugal, 96 test,
J%c, ex ship: 180 hhds Muscovado, 89 lest, 3c, ex
chip. • Refined— Dull, but steady. •."-
--! CHICAGO MARKETS.
CHICAGO, lix., May 24.— The edge was : taken
..-■'■.•■■■ '■■;,■->..' "\ .' 7"-" : -' .■ ' ■. '■' " ■-•■'■* ■■."■ ; : •- ; . "~';Vv . : ,7/-"-'' ■■■'■":';
off the bull movement on the Board -of Trade to
day and every ing' closed lower". 'In comparison
with yesterday's final figures wheat finished l s ,4c
off, corn 1 oats y 2 c, pork 30c, lard and ribs
2i^c each. v>" >• .. ; ■ : : -. . V '- '/ ■. '
. Although/the Liverpool wheat market opened 2d
lower than it closed yesterday and it had rained in
Kansas during the night, the market here opened
with Home buyers - willing to pay -79c for July
wheat. Not 1 many buyers, however, paid that.
The great majority .were willing to sell at 78 3 4c, or
the same an it was worth at the close of yesterday's
session, and some even pressed some ■ wheat for
sale which had a good profit in it at 781.4 c.
A great deal of wheat was wanted at from 78% c
up to 783,4 c and before the early buying orders
which succeeded the opening break could be all
filled the price rose again to 79c. For about fifteen
or twenty minutes the price heaved up and down
in irregular swells and depressions between 78 "fee
and 79c and then came a crash.
Corn commenced to tumble, and when it had
broken to i/ 2 c below the price it had closed at yes
terday, then wheat had a sympathetic spasm and
collapsed suddenly to 7714 c. The. reviving influ
ence of fresh baying orders was again applied and
before many minutes it bad again recovered to
Tin,,.. " s „ ':'■-.-■'. V.
• The firs! downward plunge was due to the lower
cables, sales by longs and the execution of stop
loss orders. On the next turn it declined to 7S'/gC
and then kept wobbling lazily for an hour or more
between 78 1 . -jc and 79c. The volume of trading
was very much reduced as compared with the tre
mendous bulk of business done every day for ten
days back. There were considerable intervals dur
ing which there was actual dullness in the pit, but
at no time was there an entire absence of nervous
watchfulness that kept the pit filled with brokers
all alert for contingencies.
The reports from the South concerning the' drops
of the States of Indiana and Illinois were woeful
in their monotonous reiteration of destruction. In
addition to these States, Ohio, Kentucky and Mis
souri joined the doleful chorus, and even the
Northwest had some complaints to send about un
favorable weather for spring wheat. The market
began to weaken very much after the noon hour,
and long wheat kept coming out in heavy chunks
from that time up to the close. That resulted in »
rapid and heavy drop In the price. There were
strong tights during the decline at 78c, 77i/ 2 c ( and
finally 763' B e, but it was not until the latter point
was reached that the selling orders ceased to pre
vail. There was a rapid recovery to 77c in the last
few minutes, but at the close there were sellers at
77c and it dropped to 76S/ 8 c before the crowd sepa
rated.
Corn— The market again suffered from heavy re
ceipts und favorable outlook for the next crop. A
good demand from the seaboard resulted In the
sale for export of 250.000 bushels which sustained
the price early In the day, but in the afternoon weak
ness of wheat and fine weather were the most in
fluential fuctors in the end. and a considerable de
cline resulted. The opening price for July was
543ic, or i^c under the previous day's closing
quotation. It was prevented from getting very
weak while the cash business reported was under
way, hut gradually worked down to 531 «<'• It had
a quick reaction to 833& C, which was the price at
the .lose.
Oats— Further and more discouraging reports of
crop damage by the weather started comparatively
linn feeling in the oats market. It did not las:
long, however, weakening with wheat and corn.
There was free selling on the decline, and at times
some difficulty was experienced in finding buyers.
Taken as a whole, however, business was active
and sales heavy.
Provisions were weak from beginning to end.
The bog receipts are providing more than the cash
demand will absorb, and corn is weak.
The leading futures ranged as follows:
Wheat No. 2— ■ Highest. Lowest.
Way..... 781 753« c
July 79VgC 763/»c
September. 793/ s c 765
Corn No. 2—
May 5334 c 62c
July : 54 : ',4C 53c
September. 56c 58% c
Mess Pork per bbl—
July $12 50 $12 20
September $12 75 $12 421 A
Lard per 100 lbs— »
July $6 67% $6 65
September ; $6 85 $6 80
Short Ribs per 100 lbs—
July „.S6 27% $6221/2
September $6 45 $6 40
Cash quotations were as follows: Flour— Firm
and unchanged : No. 2 spring Wheat. 79@S0c •
No. 3 Spring; Wheat, 78@S2c; No. 2 Red, 76@
76V4C: No. 2 Corn. 55c: No. 2 Oats. 2!ie- No
2 White. 32Vs'a»3V2C; No. 3 White. 32y~c: No. 2
Rye. 6Gy 2 c: No. 2 Barley, 50V»@5lXic: No.
3,47@50V2C: No. 4, 43c; No. 1 Flax"Seed,'ij>l 48%:
Prime Timothy Seed. $5: Mess Pork, • $> bbl.,
$12 25<£12 37**; Lard, $ 100 n>s.. $6 5006 57y»-
Short Ribs, Sides (loose). S6 15@6 20: Dry Salted
Shoulders .boxed). $si/i<S5%: Short Clear Sides
(boxed). $6y 2 tet>%:- Whisky, distillers' finished
goods, "t gai., $1 26%; Sugar, cut loaf, unchanged;
granulated, unchanged: standard A, unchanged.
On the Produce Exchange to-day the Butter mar
ket was steady. Creameries, 10@17y 2 c; Dairies
9@l6c. Eggs.9@l6c. .
Livestock.
Cattle arc selling about where they did a week
ago. The best kinds are a little high, while com
mon lots are weaker. With receipts of only about
3500 head to-day, cattle were active and stronger,
with some sales at an advance of 5 cents, (4ood
shipDlng Steers 96A5 50: fed Texans, $4 lO®4 75.
There were 40.000 ho^s on sale. At the reduced
prices a good business was transacted. The bulk
of best heavy hogs, $4 50: best light weights, $4 60.
At the close, however, the best heavy hogs sold at
$4 65 and the best light at $4 50.
Sheep— This was a great week for sellers and
prices have risen fully 25c per 100 pounds for
choice sheep and 40c for best Mexican lambs. The
receipts continue fair. To-day's market was dull
at about 10c lower, but some choice native 65
--pound lambs brought $6 50— the top price of the
week.
Receipts— Cattle, 3500; hogs, 29,000; sheep,
9000.
THE WOOL MARKET.
BOSTON, Mass., May 23.— The Boston Commer
cial Bulletin will say to-morrow of the wool mar
ket: The sales of the week are 1,657,100 pounds
domestic and 834,000 pounds foreign, against 1,
--519,000 pounds domestic and 1,651,488 pounds
foreign last week and 1.693,500 pounds domestic
and 57.000 pounds foreign for the same week last
year. The sales to date show a decrease of 687,
--000 domestic, an Increase of 15.667,000 pounds
foreign from the sales to the same date in 1893.
The receipts to date show a decrease of 11,226
bales doim-stic and an increase of 90,195 bales
foreign. The market is still dull but uneasy.
Domestic wool on hand is limited to very poor
selection. Rather than pay the higher prices in
the market for new wools, buyers are turning
more than ever to foreign stock. Up to date 14,
--900.000 pounds of Australia alone have been sold
in Boston, against 3,500,000 pounds during the
same time last year. Cape wool at 30@32c, clean,
is now being experimented with exclusively as a
substitute for American clothing fleece, and cross
breds, Australian and South American are being
substituted for the new Kentucky medium wools.
They cost 25@27c clean, against 28@30c clean for
Kentucky.
BKADSTKEET'S REVIEW.
NEW YORK, N. V., May 24.— Bradstreet's to
morrow will say: The moderate reaction In the
stock market lost week and this week, caused pri
marily by frosts and reports of severe damage to
cereal crops, was followed only in part by a corre
sponding check to the movement in general trade.
Not one of the larger grain States confirms the re
ports of severe damage to wheat and corn with
which the exchanges have abounded, and there is
lrss reason to believe in the extent of it as cur
rently reported. The most bullish feature in the
wheat situation lies in the announced restriction
of Argentine and Russian exports, reduced export
ability of nearly all leading producers and shorter
supplies of importing countries.
Few bell-vethat wheat has touched its highest
point on this wuve, although it U 'Jsc per bushel
, at>ove the lowest since the Punic. X.sports of
wheat from the Unit- d States, both coasts, and.
Montreal this week amount to 2,754,000 bushels
;i:,'!iins: 2,897,000 bushels last week; 2,310,000
Im-ihils in the third week of May, 1894; 3.108,000
bushels ia Hie tlnnl wvck of 1893; 2.280,000 bush
eis in the year before that and as compared with
2,34. r ),000 bushels -sported in 1891.
1 his week's record of advances are as conspicu
ous as ever, and include hides, shoes, leather, Bes
semer pisiron. steel bidets, nails, tar Iron, copper
zinc, wheat, Indian corn, oais, pork, lard, Hour,
coffee, cotton, naval stores, potatoes, poultry and
1 butter, twenty-two in all.
The tone of the iron and steel markets is the
strongest since the depression of 1893-94. Woolen
mumifacturer.-i are workingon old orders, and some
refuse- to stock up with raw material, as prices at
the Interior are above a parity with those at the
I seaboard. Western views are that manufacturers
! may be short of supplies to meet fall contracts.
The immense advance In petroleum prices has so
ftr failed to induce any large increase in the well
output, thus pointing to approaching exhaustion of
subterranean stores of thi» product in the Appa
lachian region. Consumption is still lighter than
production.
DUN'S REVIEW OF TRADE.
NEW YORK, N. V., May 24.— R.G. Dun & Co.'s
weekly review of trade, which issues to-morrow,
will say: If wheat has been so greatly injured by
j the snows and frosts in May that the sudden rise
of 12c in two weeks Is justified, the calamity will
affect all business prospects. The markets do not
believe it. for stocks do not collapse, iron, leather
and hides still rise, and no holder of wheat would
sell at 80c, a lower price than had been known
at this season for thirty years prior to 1893,
if curn-m reports were credited. Soaie injury has
undoubtedly been sustained, but our own dis
patches do not show that it Is really serious. The
temper is to buy regardless of possible require
ments, la toe faith that prices are sure to rise.
Wes crn receipts for three weeks have been
larger than last year in spite of storms and frosts.
But the rise has practically stop]>ed buying for ex
port, thejas similar rise did in April. 1894. which was
followed with about the lowest price then ever
known. Whether grain has been greatly injured
or not, foreign markets will take early occasion to
fortify themselves from other sources. The week's
sales here have amounted to 155.000,000 bushels,
and accounts of damage by frosts and insects are
so mixed up that some traders think the bugs must
wear overcoats.
Corn rose 3» 4 c during the week, though much of
the corn iiioed may be replanted. Pork rose 50c
per barrel, lard 5c per 100 pounds and oats 2c.
Cotton also advanced s.jc during the week, with
sales of 1,556,200 bales, current estimates putting
the decrease in acreage at 13.5 per cent and the
crop at 7,300,000. Even this, with Known com
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SATURDAY, MAY 25, 1895.
mercial and spinners' stocks, would give the world
a year and a quarter to consume more American
Koods than it has ever consumed in a year and a
half.
The Iron industry distinctly gains and the im
provement is no longer confined to prices of mate
-1 rials. Better wages at and west- of 1 Pittsburg con- 1
vince bnvers that prices must rise, ana there have
been large sales of finished products with about $1
per ton better prices for structural forms and steel i
bars, while Bessemer pig has .risen to 11 50 at
Pittsburg. The Thomas Company has advanced
its anthracite pig 50 '■ cents, and higher freights
made Southern cost more at the East- Sales of
rails to May 1 were. 420,000 tons and 'deliveries
250,000 tons, I both . larger than last year. Nail
works are combining and a coke pool is expected to
raise prices soon. . . .. \ .. .'■.-•■> ■
Pittsburg banks note with drafts for payrolls in
the past, month of $2,383,397, against $1,865,818
last year '■ by the same ■ works. • Orders this year
number 22.029 freight and 72 passenger cars, 5000
more than the whole year of 1894, but in 1892
and in previous years the output was over 93,000
freight cars. Anthracite coal is decidedly stronger
and copper very firm at IOV2 for lake, though the
April output was about 2500 tons larger than that
of January. '
The textile mills have been kept fairly busy,
but the demand for cottons seems slacker on the
whole and print cloths are a sixteenth weaker.
Failures this week have been 207 in the United
States, against 183 last year, and 23 in Canada,
against 28 last year. /
LONDON WOOL SALES.
LONDON. Esq.. May 24.— At the wool auction
sales to-day 15,962 bales were offered, of which
2300 were withdrawn. ; Offerings included some
good greasy merinos, which were keenly contested
fur by American buyers at extreme prices, Fol
lowing are the details: ■'■wWWBHtfI .._ ,
New South Wales— 332o bales: scoured, bd@ls
2d: greasy, 3%rt(£9d. . .
Queensland— 2lßo bales; scoured, G»id@ls 2y d;
greasy, 4V4@*ls.
Victoria- 2061 bales; scoured, 6%d@ls 4d;
gI th Australia— l66B bales: scourea, 9V @lld;
greasy, Bi/2@7V4d.
Swan River— 3o4 bales; scoured, Bd@ls; greasy.
3 3 /i@6y 2 d. ♦ .
Tasmania— sßl bales; greasy, 6d©ls. '~;'J~.-
New Zealand — 4068 bales: scoured, 7%d@ls;
greasy, s@9d.
Cape of Good Hope and Natal— l37o bales;
scoured, 6%d(g}ls 4d; greasy, 4<&7d.
EASTERN COTTON MARKET.
NEW YORK, N. V., May 24.— Cotton dull and
easy. Middlings, 7 6-16 c; net receipts, none: gross,
800: forwarded, none: sales. 218; spinners, 98;
stock, 219,794.
BANK CLKARINGS.
NEW YORK, N. V., May 24.— The following
table, compiled by Bradstreet's, shows the total
clearances at the principal cities and thepercentage
of increase or decrease, as compared with the cor
responding week last year.
Percentage
Cities. Amount. Inc. Dec.
New York $652. 202,635 40.6
Chicago 95,433.584 18.2
Boston 93,521,595 23.6
Philadelphia 72,259.982 31.2
St. Louis 24,609,636 22.8
Ban Francisco 10.9W.97:! 1.8
Baltimore 12,935,486
Plttsburg 15.216.15S 16.6
Cincinnati 13,256,200 12.8
Kansas City 10,570.046 16.6
New Orleans 8,216.526 31.8
Bunulo 4.659.399 24.0
Milwaukee 4.62:>,91tt 42.1
Detroit 5,914,847 1.1
Louisville 6,181,681 30.5
Minneapolis 7.897.516 41.9
Omaha 3,: J .1i8.009 33.5
Providence 6,059,000 26.2
Cleveland h,485,:i1l 28.9
-Houston 4,4'JL'.699 63.0
St. Paul 4,510,050 7.6
Denver 2,831,321 1.5
Indianapolis 4,337.758 63.7
Columbus 3,699,200 6.6
Hartford 2,121,38b 34.1
Richmond 2,085,976
Washington 1,978.022 31.3
Dulnth
Dallas 2,186,752 2.3
St. Joseph 1,228,766 17.0
Peoria 1.965,720 24.8
Memphis 2,047,646 12.8
Portland, Or 1,112,278 14.4
Rochester 1,508.503 17.1
Nev Haven 1.469,318 11.4 ...
Savannah 1,489,119 8.6
Spririgueld, Mass 1,812,449 42.5
Worcester 1.306,192 7.4
Portland, Me 1,278,548 23.3
Atlanta 1,098,421 . 32.0
Fort Worth 1.274,883 12.3
Waco 1,618,185 69.0
Syracuse 1,235,430 35.1
DesMotncs 1,215.460 4.2
fi rand Rapids 817,181
Sta.tle 466.372 10.3
Lowell 622,443 15.2
Wilmington. Del 813,135 11.5
Norfolk 899,.">62 10.0
Sioux City 485,966 22.7
Los Angeles 1,266,957 40.0
Tatoma 565,48.") 39.1
SaKiuaw. Mich 380,830 57.6
bnoknne 856,122 42.8 ..
Jacksonville 326,226 8.9
Lincoln 250,750 46.3
New Bedford 341,147 12.3
Wichita 454.875 43.2
Birmingham 417,327 12.3
Topeka 48:i,717
Lexington. Ky 320,679 8.1
Binghamton 352.500 1.6
Kmporiu. Kans
•Bay City. Mich 315.203 8.8
♦Full River 778.559 22.9
*Akrou.Ohio 269,553 76.9
•Springfield. Ohio 190.442 22.4
*Canton. Ohio 205,362 32.2
♦Sioux Falls 61,313 57.5
♦Fremont. Nebr 54,900 48.0
♦Hastings. Nebr 63,238
♦Chattanooga 262.521 52.9
♦Fargo 120,625 25.3
♦Naahvllle 849,370 7.4
*»Oalveston 4.043.6*5 21.1
.Salt Lake 950.092 4.0
♦Little Rock 320,382 .
Rockford 272,254 62.7
Helena 662.841 21.6
Hcrauton 777,965 11.3
Kalamazoo 272,550
Totals, V. 8 $1,111,844,944 30.8
Exclusive Of New York 459.640,309 18.8
BOMISIOS OF CANADA.
.Montreal $11,294,036 43.8
Toronto 5.800,176 .41.4
Halifax 1,408,336 29.6
Hamilton 626.522 28.0
Winnipeg 952,733 20.5
Totals $19,721,803 41.7
* Not included in totals because containing other
Items than clearings.
**Not included in totals because of no compari
son for last year.
SEW YORK STOCKS.
Bonds, Exchange, .Money and Railroad
Money on call easy at 1%; last loan 1%;
closed 1%. Prime mercantile paper, 2@4V2X-
Sterling exchange was firm, with actual busi
ness in bankers' bills at $4 88@4 88Vs for de
mand and $4 87@4 87Vs tor sixty dayß. Posted
rates. $4 87Vi@4 88 and $4 88y 2 @4 89. Com
mercial bills, f 4 86Vi©4 86Va- Silver certificates,
67V4(3i6"ya c -
CXOBIXO STOCKS.
Atchlson... 7% Northern Pacific... 5s/ 8
Adams Express 143 Preferred......... 19% ',
Alton.Terre Haute. 62%; U. p. Den. & Gulf.. 6%
.Preferred.:....;.. . Northwestern 983/4
American Express.ll6 | Preferred....;.... 144
American Tobacco. 112»/» N. Y. Central. ..... 102 ■"-.>
Preferred.... .....114 N. Y. &NewEng.. 42%
Baltimore & Ohio.. 63% Ontario & Western 18%
Bell Telephone 20 3. Oregon Improvnu. 13 .
Canada Paci tic... 52 Oregon .'Navigation 26 -
Canada Southern.. 54V4 Oregon Short .Line. : 8%
Central Pacific Pacific Mai1........ 26%
Ches. A Ohio. ....... 225/ 8 Peona D. & Evans. 6V4
Chicago Alton .150 IPittsburg... 1551/4
Chicago, B.& Q,... Pullman Palace.... 172
Chicago Oas. ....... 74% Reading 19S/ 8
Consolidated Gas... 145 •.. Richmond Termini
C. C. C. & St. Louis 44% Preferred.:.......— .
Colo. Coal & Iron.. •9 t RioGrande&Westn 18%
Cotton Oil jCeruv.-.. 28 •• j -Preferred ...; 45 •
Del. Hudson . :.."..l 31 i/i Rock 151 and .....% 69%
Del.Lack<fcWesternie2 ISu L. & S.F. Ist .
Denver&R. G. pfd. ; 48»4 St. Paul... .. 67%
Distillers ;:: r. . .:. 19V* .Preferred.-. .'..■.. . '.12<)i/4
■East Tennessee — — -"." St. Paul & Omaha. 38S/»
Erie. .:;.-. ;:..../.;.' l»%i Preferred. .'.:.. v.. 114
• Preferrea Southern K.Ki.V.. 14
Fort Wayne :.-...'.. 167 ' I ;, Preferred 40
Great Northern pfdl32". Bt. P. M. & M:.....116
Chicago <fe,E 111 pfdlOOVa'Southern- Pacific. 20%
Hocking Valley. 26% Sugar Rchnery
Illinois Central.. .„ , 94% Term: Coal & Iron. 29 „
St Paul & Duluth.. 30 -, Texas Pacific ' ' : 13
Kansas & Texas pf.' r 32% Tol. &O. ten. pfd.. 18Va
Lake Erie <fe Westn . 24% Union Pacific... 15
Preferred 83 • U.S.' Express'..;... 40 -
Lake Shore 146 Wab.S. L. <ft Pac.. 8%
Lead Trust ...... 34% Preferred 19»/»
Louisville Nash. 695/ Wells-Far .108 ■
Louisville <fcNew A) 10y 8 Western Union.... 92%
Manhattan Consol.ll6 . Wheeling & UK.. 5 14%
Memphis & Charts. 15 • • Preferred. ... ... 45y«
Michigan Central.. 100s/g Minn. & St. Louis.. . 37
Mexican Central...- 12 Denver * Ri00.... 15 i
Missouri Pacific... 29 General Electric... 33%
Mobile <fc Ohio. :..*. 23% National Linseed.. 27
Nashville Chatt. . . . 90 ... ,Colo. Fuel & Iron.. ' 25%
National Cordage.. 4%' Preferred r.:...\ 66
Preferred 65/ 8 H. a Texas Cent...:- 28/4
N. J. Central. . ; .;.. 101 Tol.A.A.&N.Mich- 3 -
Norfolk & West pf. 16V4 Tol.St.Louis&liLU.. 6%
North American... : « : | Preferred......... 13
. • . CXOSIMO BONDS. V >:,
V S 4s, new, reg....1223/ 4 ,cen Pac lstsof '95.103
'Do, 4s coupon.... 122% Den & RG7s 1141/.,
C ss, registered.. 115% Do, 45....'......... 86S;£
Do, 5s coupon.... 115% Erie 2d5...... :..„. 71
Do, 4s registered. ll2%; G HAS A 6«.... 97
Do, 45 c0up0n.... 113 ! D0.75.'..V.;....;..101%
v Do, 2s registered. 97 H & Tex Cent 55.. . 109%
Pacific 65 0f '95:... 100 i - Do, 65..... ........ 102
Ala, Class A .107% M X T first 45...... 88 V
Do, Class 8....... 108 I Do, second 45.... 59%
, Do, Class C. ....... 97y 8 Mutual Union 65... 109
Do, Currencies... 97y 8 N J Cent Gen 55...U6i4
La, New Consols 4s Northern Pac 15t5.117%
Missouri 65...-....V.100 ' Do, 2ds:-...'.;.....101
N Carolina 65.;..;.124 Northwest Consols.l4l ; .•
Do, 48...... ......102 I - Do, deb 55... 107%
S C Non-fund z.r... rl% R GrandeWest ls:s 3 7 ■
Term new set 6s. .. 87 nt> Paul Consols 7s . 128 "'.'
Do,ss. :;..:.. 100 . Do, C.<t P W .113 h
' Do, 3s. •.:;.•...•.;. v jStL&lronMtGen 5s 79
Term old 65.. 60 St. L. &F.Gen 65.110
Va Centuries 60% Southern R.R. 55.. 94V«
: Do.deferred :..:.;: 6V4 Texas Pacific firsts. 93%
Atchison 45.V...... 74 ■ 'Texas Pac seconds " 30%
;■ Do, A.....'..;./* 24% Union Paclstof '97.lo&%
Canada South 2ds r. 1 04% West Shore 4s ..... 106 ik
L& N unified 45... 81 (: ; • ■_ . /8
: STOCKS IN LONDON. - / :
NEW YOBK, N. V., May V 24.-The Evening
Post's London cablegram says : The stock markets
to-day were quiet but firm. The week was satis
factorily concluded. Money Is more plentiful than
ever. Americans were firm, chiefly on bears on
closing and German buying. There was a further
spurt in the street. Louisville and Milwaukee led.
Argentine stocks have risen in sympathy with
wheat.
FOREIGN MARKETS.
WHEAT IK LIVERPOOL
• LIVERPOOL, Eso., May 24.— spot market
is higher at 5s 10i/ 2 d@ss lid. Cargoes are higher at
28s 7V 2 d June-July and 27s 6d for January ship
ments. '
_ ' ' . '■{':■, FUTURES. ,
» The Produce Exchange cable gives the following
Liverpool quotations for No. 2 Red Winter:
May, 5510i,4d; June, 5510% d: July, 6sllV*d;
August, 5s ll%d; September, 6s yid. .
SECURITIES.
LONDON. Ens., Mdv 24.— Consols, 106 3-16;
silver, 303^(1 : French Rentes, 102f 47% c.
PORTLAND'S BUSINESS.
PORTLAND, Or.. May 24.— Exchanges, $267,
--050: balances. $17,858.
Wheat— Walla Walla, 49V2@50c $4 bushel; Val
ley, 52Va@53c $ bushel.
EXCHANGE AND. BULLION.
Sterling Exchange, 60 days ........ — -?4.88;V
Sterling Exchange, sight — 4 89 .
New York Exchange, sight.... — 02y 2
New York Exchange, telegraphic. — 05
line Silver, spot, •*» 0unce..........'. — '67
Fine Silver, SO days:. ••• — , 06%
Mexican D011ar5........ 53 5ay 2
TUB WEEK'S FAILURES.
' The. Bradstreet Mercantile Agency ' reports 17
failures in the Pacific Coast States and Territories
for the week ending yesterday as compared with 15
for the previous week and 25 for the corresponding
weeic ot 1894. The failures for the past week are
divided among the trades as follows: 5 saloons,
2 butchers, 1 paints, 1 dry goods, 1 general store, 1
notel, 1 drugs, 1 livery, 1 pipes and canes. 1 bank,
1 fur dealer and 1 restaurant.
PRODUCE MARKET.
WHEAT AND OTHER GRAINS. .
WHEAT— The Langdale takes for Cork 68,227
ctls, valued at $61,404. '
The usual rumor about ■ the syndicate Wheat
floated about yesterday.* It was to the effect that
the holders of It were no longer anxious to get rid
of It In view of the rise in prices, and that they had
now come to the conclusion to hold it for a couple
of months until ships would probably be in better
supply and Wheat consequently higher: : We give
these dally rumors for what they are worth.
. The market for shipping Wheat was again quoted
higher yesterday, but futures were considerably
lower in sympathy with a drop in the Chicago mar
ket from 78% cto 76 1 /i c - Business showed a cor
responding falling . off. No. 1, 9(M$9 a <2i,gc V ctl;
choice, 833/ic: lower grades, 80@88 ,ic; extra
choice for milling, 95c&'$r '?■ ctl.
■ ' CALL BOARD BAI.KB.
Informal Se»sion — 10 o'clock— December—
600 tons. $1 06; 600, $1 06%: 600. $1 05%. .
Kwfiruß -Morning Session— December— l4oo '
tons, $1 043/ 8 ; 2300. *1 041,4; 800, 81 04i/ 8 ; 600, I
$1 04: 100, $1 08%: 800, $1 08%.
■ Afternoon srshion — December— l4oo tons, i
81 03%; 4800, $1 03V 2 . •
BAKLEV — A sample of the new crop from Volta,
Merced County, was exhibited on 'Change. ■ It was
clean, bright and a good specimen. The market
is rather easier, as receipts are larger and the de
mand is slack. rVed, 62i/ 2 (a!K334c *& ctl' for
ordinary and 65@68i/4C ; f< cil for choice bright:
Brewing, 70@S0c •$ ctl.
' CALL 'BOARD BALKS.
Informal Session*— lo o'clock— December— loo
tons. 67V 2 c. .. ' :
It Kb lax Morning Session— December— looo
tons. 66»4c; 1200, 66 y 2 .
Afternoon- Session- — December — 100 tons,
66y 2 c; 300. 663' 3 c: 100, 66V*c.
OATS— Business is quieter, receipts have been
more liberal .of late and quotations are lower.
Milling are quotable at 81 06@l 12% ?l ctl;
fancy Feed. $1 02y 2 @l 05 "§ ctl: good to choice.
97%c(&5l 02y 2 ; common to fair, 90(a,96c; Red,
90c(a.$l: Gray, 92y 2 (0,95c; Surprise, $1 10@l 16
$ ctl. ..,.,,. „.-.■ „..'.;
CORN— Previous prices are quoted. Large Yel
low, $1 10@l 15; Small Round Yellow, $1 10®
115 ctl: White, $1 10@l IB ctl.
KYK-87 y @POc "$ ctl.
BUCKWHEAT— NominaI at 85@90c f> ctl.
FLOUR AND. MILLSTUFFS.
FLOUR — Quotations remain unchanged. Net
cash prices are: au.il> extras, $3 40@3 50 "# bbl:
Bakers' extras, $3 30@3 40; superfine, $2 25@2 60
>• bbl. - • -
MILLSTUFFS— Ryt_- Flour, 3y 2 c ~$ tb: Rye Meal,
3c; Graham flour. 3c; oatmeal, 4V4c; Oat Uroats,
6c; Cracked Wheat, 31/20: Buckwheat Flour, 3 c;
Pearl Barley, 4yi@43/ic $ tb; Rice Meal, 812M0.5
5p ton. .
CORNMKAL, ETC.— Meal, 3@3%c; Feed
Corn, $24 50@25: Cracked Corn, $25(&'J5 50fl ton:
Hominy, 4y 2 @43/ic 'f, lb
HAY AND FEEDSTUFFS. i
, BRAN-ii306@14 ton.
MIDDLTNGS-.517@19 "# ton. : Ts *?.
FERDSTUFFS —.Ground and rolled Barley,
814 60®15: Oilcake Meal at the mill, $25 %i ton;
Cottonseed Oilcake. $24 ■$ ton. '-':
- HA New Hay is a Hale off again. Old Hay is
not materially changed. I New Wild Oat, %5 50@7 ;
new Wheat and Oat, $5 50(a,7: new Alfalfa, $4 50 |
(&5 50. We quote old Hay: Wheat, SJWgJII & ton;
Wheat and. Oat, S7@lo 60: Barley. $7(aiß -"Bton: I
Oat. $8(0-10; Alfalfa, *7@B 50; Clover, $<<&»; Com
pressed, S7@lo ; Stock, $6@7 $ ton. .
STRAW— 4O@7Oc /£ bale.
BEANS AND 'SEEDS, • :
' BEANS — The market rules weak and dull.
Bayos are quotable at 91 30@l 66 ctl: Small
Whites, $2 50@2 70 1?, ctl: Pea, $2 50@2 70 ft ctl;
Large Whites,. $2 60@2 70 "£ ctl; Pink. $1 30®
1 45; Keas, $1 30@l 60; JUlackeye, $3@3 25: Red
Kidney, | nominal: Uman, $4@4 25: Butters, $1 76
(g,2 for small and S2@2 25 i* ctl for large. •'. ■■ - :
SEEDS— Yellow Mustard. 81 76@2 %* ctl ; Trieste,
$1 50@l 75; Native Brown,sl 25@1 75; Flax, $2 25
@2 60: Canary, 3@4c 1* lb ; Alfalfa, 7@7* / ic; Rape,
l%@2Vic: Hemp, 4c •$ lb. ■
DRIED PEAS— Peas, 4@4%c; Green Peas,'
nominal; Niles, $1 25@1 35; Blackeye, nominal. ' •
POTATOES, ONIONS, VKGETABLEB.
POTATOES— Continue weak. New River Bur
banks, 60@85c; New Potatoes, Insks, 60@76c; New
Early Rose in boxes from the River. 50@75c; new
Peerless, 60@75c; Oregon Burbanks. 35@60c %
ctl. . .:.'....'.' ' ■ ....'.'.
i ONIONS— New Red are lower again at 35@10c »
sack. • ■ ■: • • ■ • ■
• VEGETABLES— was: general. improve
ment yesterday, receipts being . lighter, ana the
shipping demand good. I Summer Squash, 76@90c
for Vaciville and $1 76@2 ? box for Bay. Arrivals
were 667. bxs' Asparagus, 197 bxs Rhubarb and 73
sks Peas. Asparagus, 25@75c ..<$ box for ordinary
and Sl@l 25 for choice; Rhubarb. 25@35c for ordi
nary and 40@65c for choice: Green Peas. 76c@Sl.%'
sk for common and 2@2y 2 c $lb for Garden: String
Beans, 3@4c for Green and 3@4c <$ lb for Golden
Wax; Murysville Cucumbers, 81 76@2 ■$ box:
Dried Ok ra, 15c "ft Tb; Dry Peppers, a @l6c-
Cabbage, 76c ft ctl; Feed Carrots, 30@40c; Garlic,
7@Bc % tt>. .'■■•■ > .■■■'""
BUTTER, CHEESE AND EGGS. .
BUTTER— The market continues depressed, but
there is no further decline. ■
Creamery— Fancy, >. ll^§l2y a c; seconds, 11@
IIV2C lb.
Dairy— Fancy, 10@llc f. Tb; good to choice, 9@
9yac; medium grades, B@BV2<s i* n»; store Butter,
7^TV c "<p lb. ■.. ...-..,-.
CHEESE— Weak.; Supplies j are too large and
dealers shade the quotations to sell. Fancy
mild new is quotable at 6@6!^c "$ lb; common
to good, 3@sc V lb: Young America, 5(S;8c; East
ern, 12% / al4V 2 c, latter figure for cream; Western,
BCa9c Tb. . *„".. ;;•". -„ -. „.
' ■ EGGS— Quiet and unchanged. The market is not
firm. Duck Eggs, 13@15c '& doz; store Eggs, HVi
@12% c; ranch Eggs, 13@15c $ dor- . \
POULTRY AND GAME. : ,' • '
POULTRY— Young '-■ Roosters . and Fryers ' con
tinue scarce and very firm. s 'No change in Hens.
We.quote , California stock- as follows: • Live Tur
keys, 12@13c $ for Gobblers; 12@13c for Hens:
Geese, •$ pair,. $liai: 25; Goslings, "<p> pair, 81 25
1.76; .Ducks, $3 50@4 50$ dozen for old and
$vs@7 V doz for young: Hens, $4(cis 50: Roosters,
young, S B@lO •$ dozen: do, old, $4((i5 ~$ do/.; Fry
ers, $6 50@7 50$ doz: Broilers, $5@6 for large
and $2(0,4 for small; Pigeons, *1 76<§,2 Xoryounf
and old. , . . . , .
. GAME— Nominal. V: - '
DECIDUOUS AND CITRUS FRUITS.
ORCHARD FRUlTS— Receipts of Apricots were
126 boxes. The few Peaches that came in were
heldfat 81 1 26@1 50 • box. but "were very slow.
Arrivals of Cherries were ; 2789 boxes. Green Ap
ples, 50c V* box; Apricots, 60@90c 9 box for Prln
gles and Bl@i 25 for Royals; Cherries, 15@35c for
red and white and 25@50c "$ box for black ; 2c "§ lb
for red and white In bulk and 2 y 2 @4c for black in
bulk. . " : i '_■.-. i ■■-..■• ' ■ - •■
BERRIES— The tendency in all kinds In down
ward. Gooseberries- are in i overstock and unsal
able. Raspberries are lower at 40@76c ft drawer
and 81 25 ■£ crate; Currants, 40@66c fi drawer-
Gooseberries, l(g.iy 3 c for common, 2c "j* lii * for
- Oregon Improved and ! — - for English. Receipts or
Strawberries were 940 chests, selling at *4(a)8 for
Longworths and S2@3 Vi chest for large berries
• CITRUS FRUITS — Six cars were uuetioned
as follows: Fancy Navels, 90c@$] 25; choice do,
65cfai$] 75; standard do, 60@80c;fanoy Hee.i
lings, 50c@$l 05; choice do, 40@76c; standard
do, 40^,60c; St. = Michaels, 35c; Mediterranean
Sweets, 45c@$l 05: Ruby Bloods, 40c6s*l UO*
Lemons. SOcSipi: ', , ■ , t f.- : ) T- •, •".'.
: Oranges and Lemons continue weak and top prices
are obtained with difficulty. Navels, SI 60@2 ; Heed
lings, 60c@$l : California Lemons. »I@l 50 forlorn
mon and %Hdu'i 60 for good to choice: : Mexican
; Llmefi, $4<it4 .60 * box : r Bananas, f I< S6<B*J i «
. bunch; Pineapples, f 4@5 * dozen.
DRIED FRUITS, BAISINB, NUTS, ETC;
; ; DRIED FRUITS-Are as dull as ever, there
being no demand of any consequence from any
quarter. " Prunes/4 sizes, quotable at 4o 'if, lb ; larger
sizes. 6@Bc:; smaller sizes, Apples, 4©
• 4i/ 2 c for sliced and 6ffiisVac for evaporated ; Bleached
caches, a ®6c; Apricots, B®«o for fair to choice
j and 7@7y c for fancy Moorpark : Pears. 4®4Y2C
for evaporated nalves. o@4c for quarters and lVa©
2c for Inferior goods; Plums, 3<<s3Va c for | pitted
and IJ/2C for unpitted; Figs, black, 4c for pressed
and Si/ 2 c for impressed. : ■ >>■- ' ■ ■-.'• .
KAISINS AND DRIED GRAPES— Raisins—
four-crown, ' loose, are ■ quotable at 3VSjc: three
crown. 2 V 3 o ■$ Tb: 2-crown, 2c * • tt> : seedless
Sultanas, 3c '<& rb: seedless Muscatels, 2c f, lb;
3-crown London layers, «1 35@1 45 f, box; clusters.
82 25@2 75: Dehesa clusters, 82 60; Imperial
clusters, 83 50; Dried Grapes— lV 2 @l 3 /i c * lb. -
< NUTS— Chestnuts are quotable at 3<aisc f> B>:
Walnuts, 7@loc for pap«r-BheU and softshell, and
6@7cfor hardshell: Almonds, 2@2y 2 c for hard
shell, and - 6@6c 9 tt> for softshell, and — for
paper-shell ; Peanuts, s@6c for Eastern and 4@
4y 2 c for California; Hickory Nuts, s@6c; Pecans,
6c for rough and 8c for polished v Filberts. 8<«»c.:
Brazil Nuts, 7@7y 2 c a Jb: Cocoanuts, $4 60®5 50
100. • . „■ T ..
HONEY— The market is dull and ■ weak, with
only odds and ends offering. Comb. 6@loc . & lb;
water-white extracted, 6S4@6c: light amber ex
tracted, 5@5y 3 o: dark amber. 4@4V»c 3 Ib.
-. BEESWAX— ■# lb
PROVISIONS.
'-:. CURED MEATS— Business Is slack now. Prices
show no change. Bacon, 9@9%c for; heavy and
10c *lb for light medium: 10V 3 c *!b for light, 11
@liy 2 c for extra light and ; 12ya@15c for sugar
curea; Eastern Sugar-cured Hams,l2%c -.California
Hams, ii-v^c; ; Mess iseet, 97(& 1 »° "9> bbl ; extra
mess do, $B@B 50; family do. $10: extra prime
Pork, S9 60 bbl: extra clear,' 817 50@18 «bb ;
mess, .1515@15 60 %i bbl: Smoked Beef, 9y a @loc
%Üb. - ... 1 : •'■■•■.■■ ■<■ r
LARD- Eastern, tierces, quotable at 6»4@7c for
compound and & s Ac for pure; pans, 9y 2 c; Cali
fornia. tierces, 6c for compound and 8c for pure;
hall-bbls, 814 c: 10-lb tins, 81/2 C%i lb; do 5-Ib,
• *COTTOLENE— 7%@7%c in tierces and B»A@
COTTOLENE— 7%@7%c in tierces and B*A@
B%c '? ft. in 10-tb tins. -■•
HIDES, TALLOW, WOOL AND HOPS.
HIDES AND SKINS— Very firm with prospects
of another advance. Heavy salted steers quotable
at 9c 18 1b; medium, B@BV2c'^ lb: light, 7@7V2c;
«:ownides, 7@Bc%»tb; sailed Kip, 7C%*tt>: salted
Calf, 9c: salted veai.Bc; dry hides, usual selection,
16c: culls, 12c:ary Kip, 12(a>13c: dry Calf, 12@14c;
prime Goatskins, 20ftD35c each: Kids, 6c; Deer
sKlns, good summer, 30c '#lb; medium, 15(a»25c;
winter. lO'al.ir; Sheepskins, shearlings, HXdi'iOc
each; short wool, 26(a,35c each: medium, 30(ii>45cr
-each ; long wool, 40(^/60c each ; Culls of all kinds
about V 2 c less.
TALLOW— No. 1 rendered, 4i4@4y 2 c: country
Tallow, 4@4i4c; refined, 6c; Grease, 3@3V 2 c |i lb.
WOOL— Is quiet, and assortments are greatly
cut down. Quotations for the spring clip are
as follows: Humboldt and Mendoctno, ll@l2c
lb; Choice Northern. 10@llc '■$> lb;Ban Joa
quin, year's staple, tK<*7c V- lb: do, seven months',
6<i£Bc: Calaveraa and Foothill, 8<&10c; Nevada, 7©
9c lb.
HOPS— Good to choice, 4@6c lb; inferior and
old Hops, 2@3e. The market shows no change
whatever, being dull and weak.
GENERAL 3IEKCHANDISE.
BAGS— The demand for the country Is brisk. Cal
cutta Grain Bags, 4%c spot and future delivery;
Wool Bags, 24@26c.
COAL— Wellington. $8; New Wellington, $8;
Southfield Wellington, $7 50; Seattle. $6 50 fi ton;
Bryant Seattle, $6: Coos Bay, 95 ft ton: Walls
eud. $7 50: Scotch, $8; Brymbo. 87 50: Cumberland,
$13 60 in Dulk and $15 in sacks; Pennsylvania
Antnraoite Egg, $12: Welsh Anthracite Egg. $9:
Cannel, $8; Kock Springs. Castle Gate and Pleas
ant Valley, $7 60; Coke, $12 in bulk and $14 in
sacks.
RlCE— Chinese mixed, new crop, $3 1714: old
cro f >, S3 mi-i: No. 1, $3 60@3 75; extra No. 1,
$4<to4 25: Hawaiian. $4 60@4 62V 2 ; Japan, S3 75
(aii: Rangoon, $3 40@3 50 V ctl.
SUGAR — The Western Sugar Refining Company
quotes, terms net cash: Cube, Crushed. Powdered
and Fine Crushed, all 5%c; Dry Uranuiated, 5y 8 c;
Confectioners' A, 6c; Magnolia A, 45/ 8 c; Extra
C, 4y 2 c; Golden C, 414 c: D, 4c; half barrels Vie.
more than barrels, and boxes y a c more.
SAN FRANCISCO MEAT MARKET.
Hogs are lower and dull. Lamb Is lower. Mutton
Is in free supply and unchanged. Beef and Veal
show no variation. ,' Wholesale rates for dressed
stock from slaughterers are as follows:
BEEF— First quality, s^4S6c; choice, 6V 2 c; sec
ond quality, 4y 2 @sc; third do, B@4c f lb. '
VEAL— Large, 4(&>sc; small, s(§>7c & lb.
MUTTON— Wethers, MatiVac; Ewes, 4c * lb.
LAMB— 4y 2 @sc f lb.
PORK— Live Hogs. 3c f, lb for soft, 4@4i4c for
hard and 3-%@4c for feeders; dressed do, s@6y c.
RECEIPTS OF PRODUCE.
' ' '"'. . " r . FRIDAY, May 24.
Flonr.qr. 5k8......28,388|Hay, t0n5..'.......: 230
Wheat, ct15......... 1.3101 Wool, bis 465
Barley, ctls 8.130 Leather, rolls 73
0at5, ct15........... 385 Wine, ga15......... '200
Rye, ct15.'.......... eOHldes, no 1,380
Beans, sks... 16] Pelts, Ddls 113
Potatoes, 5k5...... 2,538 Tallow, ctls ...... 30
Onions, sks 500 Lime, bbls 200
Middlings, 5k5..... 575 1 :."•;. '";:•.;..:;
FAMILY RETAIL, MARKET.
Butter, Eggs and Cheese continue plentiful and
cheap.
A decline In Lamb is the only change in Meats.
Poultry remains undisturbed as a rule.
Peaches are added to the Fruit list, but they are
green and hard. ' Apricots are. becoming more
plentiful. A few Green Apples are being received:
Small fruits, such as Cherries and Berries, are daily
arriving more freely and prices are steadily cheap
ening.
' Following Is The Call's regular weekly retail
price list :
• COAL— PER TON.
Cannel :.'... : —010 00 PleasantVal 9 6 0@ 10 00
Wellington. — @10 00 Southfleld ' _i
Ne.w Wei-. :■ '. " . . : Wellington — @ 960
lington.... — <»10 00 [Scotch —(B 9 50
Seattle — <g) 850 Coos Bay... 7 00® —
Castle Gate.; 9 50^10 00 1 • . : '
• . V ■■'...; . ■*■ . DAIRY PROBUCE, KTC.
Butter, fancy, 'f. ■ . ' Cheese. Swiss 20(5)30
square 80@ — Common Eggs'*pdj'.l6@ —
dp, .9- roll 27(»30 Ranch Eisgs, •$ dz. — @20
do, ch0ice.. ...... .25(5>— Eastern Eggs —«£ —
Ordinary do ..20® — Honey, comb, 'gib. —(SIS
Cheese, Cal BtolO . do, extracted....
Cheese, Eastern. . . 15(<«20 1 ..
MEATS— PKR POUND. . ■
Bacon ..... . ."....'... 1 5(aU 7 1 Pork, fre5h. ..:.... — @12
Beef, choice... 12(3>15 Pork, salt 12@15
' do, g00d.:....... 8(SilO Pork Ch0p5. ...... 12r*15
Corned 8eef.:...:. 8® —Round Steak...... B@lo
Ham, Ca1....'.:.... — Sirloin Steak.. .l2i/ (a)15
do, Eastern @15 Porterhouse, d 0... 17(5/20
Lard........ ".;... :..12@1 5 Smoked Beef —(ail 5
Mutton ..:.:. .:.:.. Bslo Pork Sausages.... — @20
Lamb;........ B®lo V r eai;..............10@12
• • - POULTRY AND GAME. •
Hens, each 60@ 60 Turkeys, ~& tb.. 15@ 18
Young Roost- . - -{Ducks, each.. . ' 76fa)l 00
. ers, each. '. . .. . — @1 00 Geese, each. . . .l 50(<b2 50
Fryers, each... ,75® 85 Pigeons, ¥> pr.. 60@ 65
Broilers, each... 60® 65JRabblts, |< pr.. 25(8 40
Old Roosters, Hare, each 20© ; —
j each.......... 60@ 751 ._
FRUITS AND NUTS.
Almonds, H!b — ( Lemons, fl d0z....25@35
Apricots, ft lb B®loLimes, 9 d0z......16WJ —
Apples, fy 1b. ...... Oranges, f, doz 15@40
Bananas, «i doz... Peaches, i* 1b..12y 2 —
Cocoanuts, each... 10&12 Raisins, ft lb.. s(<bls
Cherries, %4 lb s<a>loßaspberrles,'"flbsktls@2o
Currants.^drwer. . —@75 Strawberries,
Gooseberries,- ■ 'Bdrawer 25<<i;40
drawer 20@30| Walnuts, V8>.....16@ —
• >.'■, '' ' ' VEfIKTABLES. . '
Asparagus, 1? 1b... 4f» B Lettuce, %> d0z....15®20
Artichokps,%*tdoz. . 10&25 Onions, & lb ....... 2<§> 3
Beets, ■$ doz :..:... 12@1 5 Okra, dry, 1> 1b.... — @25
Beans, white,, $ lb.— @ 5 Peppers, dry i» lb. .20&25
. • Colored, ylb . . . . 4(& 5 Pepper.green , %* lb. — # —
Lima. •*** Hi 5@ 6 Parsnips, f> ...15ri20
Cabbage, each...:.. 5(a&10 Potatoes, % 1b.'.:..' 2(S 3
Cauliflowers, each. 5@ 8 Do, New, fi 1b... 3r<i» 4
Celery, )) bunch.. . si® — Radishes, ?-dzbchs.ls@2o
Cucumbrs,^ dz... . sO@7s ßhubarb, fi . !b ...... 4& 6
Cress, »- dz bunchs. 2o&2s Sage, lb :. .'...25(435
Garlic, ■# n».:......15@— String Beans, & lb. 5@ 8
Green Peas, m lb.. 4& sThyme, f, lb :..20@30
Lentils, •"# tb..;..:.; 6@ 8 Turnips. d0z.. ..15(^20
• „• „ . FISH— PER POUND.
Barracuda. ......'..; 10@l 2 Sea Bass ........... — @10
Carp..'..:.........;. B@lo Smelts... :.... —folio
Codfish &ai0 501e5... ............ B@io
F10under5.......... —@ 10 Skates, each....... — @1O
Halibut — ........ 6(a>lo Sturgeon. .. — @ —
Herring — (a>— Tomcod 10@12
Kingf15h.. .......... B@loTrout.... ...:.. 20<a25
Mackerel ......;..; —& — Clams, V gal — ©75
■ do, Horse BtolODo, hardshell, . »
Perch..... ...;. H&IO! 100..:.. ...... 50® —
P0mpan0... . . ... . :.35®40!Crabs, each . . . : . . : lOfd —
Rockflsh. — @10iDo. softshell, IS dz.25 (
Salmon, smoked. Mussels, ¥1 qrt.. . . 10@15
Salmon, fresh ...10@12 Oysters, Cal,l» 100.50& —
Shrimps:....;.;.'... B^loDo, Eastern, ft c1z.25@35
5had...;....'...*..:.. — @ 8.
THE STOCK MARKET.
There was quite an Improvement In the Corn
stocks yesterday and the market advanced steadily
all day. Con. Cal. & Va. sold up to $2 40, Ophir
to $1 40, Hale <fe Norcross to $1 10 and the others
in proportion. The rise was not accompanied by
any unusual business, however. The close was
firm.
Bodie continued to decline, dropping to 89c.
NOTES.
On the Stock and Bond Exchange Spring Valley
Water sold up to $99. There were sales of Bank
of California stock at $222. Geary-street, Park
and Ocean Bonds have fallen from $107 62y 2 to
$99 75, at which latter price $10,000 has changed
hands during the past day or two. The company
has declared a monthly dividend of 50c, payable
on the 27th.
The F. E. Belden Mica Mining Company has de
clared a monthly dividend of 4 cents per share,
payable to-morrow.
, * The National Lead Company has declared a quar
terly dividend : of 1% per cent on the preferred
■lock, payable Juno 16. ' . ; > ■.;■
« The Portland Mining Company of Cripple Creek
c recently P ald a dividend of 15c per share. '
Bullion valued at $2567 has been received from
the Mayflower gravel mine. . • >
i« Mono— Kftßt crosscut from i south , drift 400 foot
«^T V^2. < " xt , c " <led2l feet 5 formation porphyry™
i» m i.w En-West crosscut from main drift 20l)-foot
'7' « extended 6 feet and connection made
TtSuak^MfFF^i On w *»h'nKton vein. Have
,'fi, r Hi, no Ilfrom1 lfrom above ' crosscut and ox
fn !« !'»7 ■ f ct * I * ortn drif ; from crosscut 9 200
--ttitlofe" « xteurted 6 '^t; no change in
tended 10 ?! 'f^ B pe above "0-foot level was ex
tended 11 feet: face surface In hard porphyry.
Btope from new No. X upraise 300-foot level is
yielding some Rood grade ore ; the seam ts from 5
to 8 inches wide. Twenty-five tons of ore were
extracted, grade about $25 per ton.
BOARD SALES.
Following were the sales In the San Francisco
Stock Board yesterday:
REGULAR MORMIXO SKSSTOV — 9:30.
200 Alta 08650 Ch011ar.... 25,350 0phir...1.30
100 Andes... .13,900 CC&V...2.301200 overmn..2o
100 Belcher... 50,^00 C Point.. .66300 Potosi ...39
200 B & 8.... 48550 6N150 Savaee. ...38
200 47:1OOG&C 29>300 Seg 8e1.... 17
100 Bodie 94| BO 28 300 Syndcate.os
300 Bulwer. . .05|300 H&N 91 200 titan 04
200 Bullion. . . 10 250 9311100 V Jackl. 54
200Caledonia.07l
AFTKRXOOX SKSSIOX— 2 :30.
300 Alta 09|100ConN Y..08i500 Mono 10
100 10:500 CC&V...2.40rt00 Occidnt...2o
200 Belcher.. . sllloo Confi. ...1.05J200 Ophir. ..1.35
350 B «fc B 62:300 C Point. . . 56jH00 Ovrmn. ...20
150 51500 551200 Potosi 43
100 Bodie 92500 G &C....30400 44
200 90-00 31800 Savage. ...4o
100 Bullion... 12 850 H&N. ..1.05 100 41
100 Bulwer... os '-'GO Justice.... o3 150 S Nev 52
200 <Jhaluse..26ilooMex 42100 Union C..52
200 Ch011ar... 27 1
Following were the sales In the Pacific Stoclc
Board yesterday:
HKfII'LAB 8TCR8IO?*— 10:30.
600 Alta 08,1000 G & C... 29,900 Ophir.. .1.35
100 8e1cher.... 52:200 H&N 90 400 1.32 Va
200 B<fe 8.... 48 100 94,300 1.30
200 Bulliun... 10300 95 300 0vrmn. ...20
400 thai C. .25 650 1.00500 19
050 CCfcV.. 2.35 500 Kontuck .03,300 Potosi ...40
200 a.;>o 200 ilex 45f1200 *rx 8e1... 17
100 C Point... 54 200 0ccidt1.... 26250 SNev 51
400 G <fc C 30i
AFTKRXOOST BKBSIOV— '> :30.
100Cha1C....26i700 H&N 1.07 1/2 0ph1r...1.35
150 CCAV ...2.35550 Mcx 41 200 13/ g
460 2.40 700 42 700 Overmn ...2
4000 ConJmp.Ol 800 Occidtl... .15 500 . .. 21
50 H&N ...1.00 700 L'o 100 Potosi 44
100 1.021/2.400 211000 58& M.17
750 1.05|
CLOSING QUOTATIONS.
FRIDAY, May 24—4 p. m.
Bid.Askr.ilA Bid. Asked.
Alpha Con — or> lowa _ 05
Alta 09 lO'jaekson 20 —
Andes... 13 14Julia 02 04
Belcher 51 62JustIce 03 04
Best & Belcher. 51 52 Keutuck. 02 03
BentonCon 30 — JLady Wash.... 01 02
Bodie 89 90|Mexican 42 43
Bullion 11 13' Mono . ... 11 12
Bulwer — 06Mt. Diablo 15 —
Caledonia 07 09 Nevada Queen. — 05
Challenge Con. 25 26 Occidental 20 22
Cbollar 27 2SOphlr 1.35 1.40
Con. Cal. <fc Va.2.35 2.4oOverman 19 20
Con. Imperial. — 02 Potosi 43 44
Confidence 1.05 l.lOSavaee 41 4'>
Con.NewYorio 03 --Seg. Belcher!!'. 16 17
Crown Point... 54 66Scorpion... — 05
Ksst B. & 8... 11 —Sierra Nevada. 53 55
Kast. Sierra Nev — 06 Silver Hill 02 04
Exchequer..... 01 02|Silver King.... 20 —
EurekaCon — — 25iSyndicate — 05
Gould & Curry. 29 31i Union Con 32 33
Gray Ka«k'.... 40 -iUtah — 05
H ale <fc N orcrs. 1 . 05 1 . 1 0 1 V ello w J acket. 53 64
STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE.
FRIDAY, May 24—2 p. m.
BONI>B. Bid. Asked. Bid. Asked.
VS 4b c0np..1 121/2 — i Banks, Commercial-
US 4s rep... 1121A — Amerß&TC. — —
Cal-stCblesH.loP%llo%Anglo-Cal. .. 69 —
Cal Elec L 6slO7Va — Bank of Ca1..219i/ 2 225
CntraC W6sloly 2 — Cal BD&TCO. 40 " —
Dpnt-stox-cp 92 99 !FirstNationl.l77y a —
EdsnL&P6s. — 110 'Grangers.... — —
F4CII RR6slO4 - LondonP&A.l24 —
Geary-stßss. — 103WL ( >n<!on&SF. — 81
LosAngLt's. 97V 2 _ Mf-rch Ex... 12 —
Do.Gnted.6s. — 103 Nevada — —
Mkt-stCble6sl2.S — SatherßCo.. — —
NevCNgRSs. — 110 Banks. Savings—
NPCRRBs.IOO — GerS&LCo..l76o —
NyßCal6s.. 99y 2 103 —
NRyCalss.. — — Mutual — 45
Oak Gas 55..101%108 SFSavl T nion49s 605
Do, 2d las 55.. 1021/* — Sav«t Loan. .110 150
Omnibus 6a.. — 118 Securltv — 310
Pacßo!lMbs.io2y 3 — Vnion Trust. B2s 875
Do, 2disstJs.. — — ! Street Rail way—
P&ORy6s..llO 120 California.. . .101 106
P<fcChßy6s. — 100 Geary-st — 90
Pwl-stRRBs. — 113 Miu-Ket-Rt.... 37Vi 38
Reno.WL<tLlo2 105 Oak,SL<tHay — 100
River\VCo6s — 100 Presidio 10 15
SF&NPRK6sIO2 — Siutfr-st — —
SPRRAriz6s 93 100 Powrtcr—
SPRRCaI 03.1116/8113% Atlantic D... — 20
SPRRCaI6s. — 97 V a California.... 75 —
Do.lcontrtd. — 97 1 / 2 Giant 141 A —
SPBrRCal6s. 91 93 .luoson — —
SV\Vater6s..l2H ? il2li/ 2 Vigorlt — 60c
SV\Vater4s.. 97 97»/i Miscellaneous—
Stktn(i&E6s — 101 BlkDCoalCo. — 12
BunstT&T6s — 103 -Cal Co- Mills. — —
Sutter-stR5s.lOVy 2 — ;Cal Dry Dock — —
Visalia\VC6s — 92 KdisonLlght. 96 97y 3
stocks— Water— <;a«ConAssn. — —
Contra Costa. — 551-2 HawCASCo.. 51/ij 7^/i
MariuCo. ... — 50 HutchSX'Co.. 123 A 13i/ 4
i^anJost- — 100 JndtonMfgC. — —
Sprng Valley 98»4 99y-. : MprKxAsßn. 100 —
Gas— OceanicSSCo — 23
Capital — 46 .PacAuxFA.. 1% —
Central 96 — Pac Borax... 97 —
M(JI.*H. 4»i/ 2 — PacI&NCo. — 30
PaoGaslmp. 81 " 8 82i/i Pac Roll Mill 17 —
PaciticLight. 45V 2 46% I'arf Paint Co — 9
SanFrancsco 71% 72 iPac Trans Co — 251 A
Stockton — »0 PacTATCo. 46 > —
Insurance— Sunset T&T. 30 —
FlremansFd.lso — United C Co.. — 25
Sun — DO
MORNIXB SKSSIOV.
Board— 2 Edison Light <ft Power Co, 96y 2 .
Street— ?Booo California-st R R Bonds. 110: 6 8
V Water, 99.
AFTERNOON SKSsrOX.
Board— s Pacific Gas Imp, 82.
street— lls Bank of California, 220: 40 S V
Water, 99: $5000 SF4XP Railway Bonds, 102.
EEAL ESTATE TEANSACTIONS. ■
Duncan and Jennie G. MacKinlay to Carrie B.
Crocker, lot on S line of Oak street, 181:3 W of
Pierce, W 25 by S 137:6; $10.
Sarah Henney to Ludwie Wagner. lot on X line
of Haight street, 200 Wof Scott, W 25 by N 137:6;
$10.
Benjamin F. and Pacific I. Knox to W. P. and
Clara V. Spencer, lot on S line of Jackson street,
175 X of Baker, E 25 by S 127:8V4: $10.
Annie T. Dunphy to Clara K. Cunningham, lot on
Eline of Lyon street, 100:41/2 S of Washington,
S 50 by B 106:3; $10.
Milton F. and Mary L. Gabbs to same, lot on S
line of Washington street, 81 :3 Kof Lvon, K25 by
S 100-4V-j: $10.
Charles and Kittie J. Sonntag (by Charles Sonn
tag, attorney) to David A. Hnlso. lot on SK corner
of Jackson and Locust streets, X 37:6 by S
102:8V4: $10.
F.lla Kaplan to H. W. Hutton. lot on W line of
Clayton street, 133:9 S of Waller, S 25 by W 125
--slo'.
Mary McMorry to Katie Lagan, lot on S corner
of Mission and Lafayette streets, SW 65, SK 100
8W 26:4, NX 90. NW 125:4: also lot on NE cor
ner of Haight and Laguna streets. E 50 by N 120;
also lot on X line of Haight street, 50 E of Laguna!
E 2:6 by N 120; gift.
Robert B. Woodward to Christine L. St raven, lot
on W line of Jessie street, 246 N of Fourteenth, N
26 by W 65: $10.
Same to Patrick and Ellen Clark, lot on W line
of Jessie street, '270 X of Fourteenth, X 25 by W
65: $10.
Same to Leonard B. Schmid, lot ofl X line of
Jessie street, 298 H of Fourteenth, N 25 by E 70
--$lO.
Same to Margaret MeCormick. lot on W line of
Mission street, 198 X of Fourteenth, X 55 by W
170; $10.
Same to Bridget Costello, lot on E line of Julian
avi-nue. 95 S of Fourteenth street, S 25 by E
88:10: $10.
A. F.and Anna M. Farmer to Josephine P. Klrby,
lot on S line of California street, 77:6 W of Mason,
W 20 by S6O; $10.
Xathaniel \V. and Isabella Burpee to Anna New
he .-In, undivided half of lot on E line of Douglas
street, '-'15 X of Twenty-third, E 134:3 by S 25,
subject to life estate: gift.
Amelia and Abel Owens. Thomas J. and Susan
Pownall, Anna Searle and J. H. and Fannie L.
Trouncer to Louis Schoenberg. lot on W corner of
Stevenson and First streets, NW 75 by SW 60,
subject to mortgage: $10.
H. W. Hutton to Ella Kaplan, lot on XW line
of Tohama street, 262:6 XE of Fourth, XE 25 by
XW80; $10.
William T. and Romietta J. Wallace to Charlotte
E. sni £mma H. Provost, lot an W line of Elev
enth avenue, 300 X of D street, X 25 by W
120: $10. '
Sol and Dora Getz to Carrie K. Jacobs, lot on W
line of Seventh avenue, 275 Sof J street, S 25 by
W 120; $10. *
Benjamin F. and Zelea B. Clarke to Henry Syl
vester Jr., lot on SW corner of Twenty-seventh
avenue and X street, W 32:6, S 100: $ 10".
Adolph Sntro to Augusta Bengston, lot 13, block
Z, Park Lane Tract, Mup 6; $io!
Al AMKHa COUNTY.
A. M. Simpson of Oakland to Emma Rust of
Oakland, lot beginning 100 from SE corner of Caa-
and Sixteenth streets, S 92 by E 32. warranrv
deed, Oakland: $1600. warranty
Same to William J. Raymond of. Oakland lot
beginning 100 W of SW corner of Grove and six
teenth streets, S 92 by W 68, warranty deed Oak
land; $3400. '■■;■• •'■ ' . :.'• ". ■ .'
Sarah A. McKee of Oakland to Marcus Martens
of Oakland, lot on N line of Mariposa streeet
250:8 W of Grove. W 60 by N- lSfffufg lot To'
block 2,- McKee Tract, Oakland Township; $10
H. and Hanslne Dirchsen to Abel Roust of oak
land Township, undivided • half interest in lot 11
Handy.Tract. Oakland Townsnlp- Sio '
■ ■ Louisa dußrutz Bradley to Betsy E. Bradley of
Alameda, lot on^E corner of Railroad avenue and
Morton street, N 100 by E 100, Alameda: grant
i Herbert SHerrick of San Francisco to Elizabeth
S. Herrlck of Oakland, lot on SW corner of Fstu
dlllo ■avenue and Sau Jose street, S 283-6 by W
!Sl o en^o n wn b sh < p k ; 3 |i oi9tU<llnO0 i9tU<llnO T ™' SaD ■ I *"W
- A. N. and J. S. Johnson of Oakland to William
G. Henshaw of Oakland, lot on W line of Washing
ton street, 50 N of Third, N 60 by W 76, being lots
19 and 20, block 29. Oakland ; *10. !
William G. and Hetty T. Henshaw to Annie N.
Johnson (wife of J. S.). lot on W line of Washing
ton street, 60 N of Third, N 50 by W 75, block 29,
Oakland; 910. .. • . .;.-',
' ' Christian Bauer (trustee for Frank Becht) to
Frank Becht, lot on S line of Charter street, 750
W of Telegraph avenue and; 609:3 E from East
San Pablo avenue, W 50 by 8 129:4, being lot 15,
Tnttle Homestead Tract, . Oakland, given as ter
mination of trust given from estate of Mary Becht,
deceased: 91. •• : ;• .. v,; -. ; • . .
■■- Emma .Werssig and Dora M. Becht to same, all
interest in lot on S line of Charter | street, 760 W of
Telegraph avenue and 609:3 E from E line of San
: Pablo avenue, W 50 by S 129:4, being lot 15, Tut
tle Homestead Tract, Oakland: $1. ; . ■<■.
John A. and Maria D. Merrill to Home Security
Building and Loan Association, lot on NE, line of
East Twenty-second street (SaundersJ, 529 ;SE of
Twenty-first avenue (Alameda street), SK 80 b«
NE 140, block 74, map of lots in Brooklyn, t,,^
Oakland: $10. ■
Manuel M. Ayala of Temesca! to Charles F. » n ,i
Mary H. Brown of San Francisco, lots 2, 3, I<i, 20^
block A. Vic-pnte Peralta Reservation Tract ; f. so»
lot on E line of Telegraph avenue, 90 S of Sutler
street, S 90 hy E 150, being lots 2, 3, 19 ann u>
block a, Vicente Peralta Reservation Tract at
Temescal; also lot on W line of Vicente averm
-45 S of Sutter street, S 45 by W 150. block i l ,'
Vic^nto Peralta Reservation Tract at Ten
Oakland Township; $10.
William J. Laymance of Oakland to Willl
Hipßins of Elmhurst, lot 22, block 14, .
Tract, subject to a mortgage, Brooklyn Tow
$10. '
Charles L. and Mary J. Herrmann to Adolph
Tanzer of San Francisco, lot on W \iw of
nut street, 93:4 N of Encinal avenue. \4-
W 108, blook 6, amended map Bartlett Ira
meda; $10.
Builders' Contracts.
E. and Charlotta Johnson with Pf-t<r^nn and
Persßon, to erect a two-story frame t.u - »• j»q
Mississippi street; f 1363. "" * <r9
THE CALL CALENDAR.
May, 1895.
Mooni Phaspa.
May 1,
First Quartet.
6
11 Uft
MayS,
.Full Moon.
13
15
16
rsrri©
IT
May 16.
Lit -it Quarter.
May 24,
'Sew Moon.
I 21
99
27|28|
29
! 30
May 24,
New Moon.
OC*.AN STKAMJCBB,
Daten of Departure From San FrancMco.
STEAMKB. I DKSTINATIOS I
s\n.s.
I PIER.
Arapo I Coos Bay |
TrucKee 'Portland
Eureka j Newport
Point Loma.i Grays Harbor. 1
City Peking; China* Japan!
CityPuebla.. i Vie & Pi{t Snd '
Willamt Val Mexico [
North Fork. | Humboldtßavl
Uumboldl... | Humboldtßay j
Santa Hosa.. 1 8an Diego |
San Bias.... Panama
Pomona ! Humboldtßay |
st Haul Newport I
W eeott Eel Ri ver. .... j
Mate of Call Portland I
Walla Walla Vie <fe Pgt Snd
Mariposa. .. Sydney '
Corona j stan Diego j
Karallon ■ Yaquina 8ay..,.
Alceßlnchd Portland L
Del None. .. Urays HarborL
On-gon t'ortland '.
• IMay'.'S.lOAM Val!^io
. I MayliS, 5,. M Vallejo
. May2s. AM Bdw'y 3
. May25,lOAM Miss 1
i May2s. 3pm i* m s a
I -May2s, 9 aM H.lw'y 1
. May25,lOAM Rdw'y 1
Way 2s, 9am Miss'n 1 -%
jMa.VJS.IIAM Wa.sht'nV *
!.Mny27,llAM Bdw'y 2
3fay2S.l2jr P3lBB
May2B. 2pm Bdw'r 1
May 29, Bam Bdw*7 2
(May 29. 9am Valleio
iMay*J9.IUAM Spear
MaySO, 9am B.lw'y 1
May.SO. 2pm Oceanic
May3l.llAM, Bdw'y '1
June I,loam Mist 1
Tune 1, sPMiVallejo
'June 2, spm Spear
June M.l oam Snear
STEAMERS TO AKKIVE.
I
Santa Kosa. I
Weeott I
State of Ca1..... i
Walla Wa11a. ...1
Pomona
China
.Nt Paui I
Alice Blanchard
Corona |
A rear a i
Farallon i
Humooldt i
Araeo I
Homer I
De1N0rte.......
Oregon |
Umar.illa
ProgTeso
North Fork '
San Juan
San Diego
1 Kel River... :....
| Portland .-.;
Victoria & Puget Sound
Humoolclt Bar
China and Japan
! Newport
Portland
San D1»»ko
i Coos Bay ;
| Yaauina Bay ]
Humboldt iJay»
Coos Bay ..". j
I Coos Bay
Grays Harbor
! I'ortland
Victoria & Puget Sound
j Panama ,
Humboldt Bay ;
Panama '
..May
..May
..May
..May
..May
. .May '
..May:
..May:
..May:
..May!
..May:
..May:
..May:
..May;
..May:
..May?
|..MayJ
i . .June
I ..Juno
..June
SUN AND TIDE TABLE.
c
\VA
WA
38.
'^arge . Small . Large. (
11.21F 1.42p! 6.09aJ
O.OUa 2.34 p 6.55 a
.32ri 4.52! 7.2
■ 25p; 4.521 7.2:
I 9.0
110.09P
HYDKOGKAI'HIC BULLETIN.
Branch Htdrographio Office. V. S. N.,%
MkRCHAXTS' Gxchakox >
Bax Francisco. May 24. 1893. ) 4
The time ball on Telegraph Ilia was dropped "
exactly at noon to-day— l. c., at noon of the r/lKh
meridian, or at exactly 3 p. m., Greenwich time.
A. F. Fkchtklicr,
Lieutenant U. S. N.. in charge.
SHIPPING LSTELLIGESCE.
Arrived.
FRIDAY. May 24.
Stmr Mlneola, Pillsbury, 83 hoars from Comox;
3150 tons coal, to S P Co. Oakland direct.
Stmr Gipsy, Leland. 12 hours from Santa Cruz,
etc: produce to Goodall. Perkins * Co.
Schr Rachael Meyer, 1 « hours from Blhiers Point
-110 cds wood, to J Johnson. '
. Schr. Arthur I, Kro*. 16 hours from Ivcrsens
Landing: 86 cds wood 60 cds barfc, to N Iversen
Sclir Eliza Miller, Christiansen, 20 hours im Na
varro; 9000 posts &It li ties, to Navarro Mill Co
" Schr Corinthian, Zaddart, 20 hours from Mondo
cino: lumber, to Mendocino Lumber Co. Up river
direct. j -.i v, :
SchrC H Wright. Brummer, 20 days from Ma
hukona; sugar, to J D Spreckels & Bros Co.
Cleared.
FRTDAY. May 24.
Stmr Eureka, Green, San Pedro: Gootlaii Per
kins & Co.
Stmr City of Puebla, Debney, Victoria and Port
Townsend: c-ioodall. Perkins * Co.
Stmr Humboldt, EdwarOa, Eureka; MKalish*
Co.
Htmr North Forfe, Hanson, Eureka: Chas Kel
son.
Ship Great Admiral, Rowell, Manila; J n
Knowles.
Bark Sea Kin?, Pierce, Nanaimo: John Rosen*
feld's Sons. -
Schr Falcon, Peterson, Petropaulovskl; C Grun
wedt.
Sailed.
FRIDAY, May "4.
Stmr Homer, Drisko. Coos Bay. '
Stmr Oregon. Poleman. Astoria.
Br atmr Wellington, Salmond, Nanaimo.
Stmr (iiDsy, l.t-land. Santa Cruz.
Schr Seven Sisters. StHiiborn.
• Schr Rio Rey, Isiekrit. Bowens Landing.
Schr Neptune, Kstvold. . ■ •
Charter*. .
The ship Yosemito loads coal at Departure Bar
for this port. '
Movements of Vessel*.
The ship J B Walker towed from Main street to
Port Costa yesterday.
The uriz W H Myer was towed off the Spear
street drydock and docked at Howard street.
The schooner Challenger towed from Oakland
Creek to Union street.
The barks Canada and Sea King- towed to sea
The ship Travamore and the bark Santiago were
The C Jf Crocker went to Pacific street and th»
Jabez Howes docked at Spear street.
The ships America and Mamioi l,la°-uno will m
to sea to-day and the bark Hollywood will tow tn
Port Costa.
Telegraphic.
POINT LOBOR— May 24—10 p. v —Weather
cloudy; wind S\V: velocity 16 miles per hour.
Memorandum.
A tishingr-boat caDsfzed this afternoon off thn
heads. Jt is thought the occupant of the boat wl*
rescued. I^ter the boat was picked ud hv th?
steamer Farragut. v * ao
* Domestic Ports.
ALBION-r Arrived May 24-Schr Bessie X.hence
May 20.
MENDOCINO— SaiIed May 24—Schr Nettie
Sundborg. for San Francisco. :
TATOOSH— May '23— Schr Spokane, from
Point Gamble, for San Francisco : May 24— Br ship
Earl of Hopetoun, from Vancouver, for Adelaide
STEWARTS POINT- Arrived May 24-Schr Ar
chie and Fontie, hence May 22. . : .
REDOXDO— Sailed May 24— Stmr Protection for i
San Pedro.' ' M
Arrived May 24— Schr Sequoia, from Grays Har-i
bor. ■ • ' • : •/... ;
• Sailed May 24— Stmr Pasadena, for Eureka* schr
Chas E Falk, for Port Blakeley.
SAN DIEGO-Salled May 24-Schrs Bertha Dol
beer and Maggie C Russ, for Eureka; HB M stmr
Wild wan , or Esquimau.
FORT BK AGO- Arrived May 24— Stmrs Noyo
and Navarro. hence May 23.
SAN PEDRO— May Stmrs TUla
mook and Protection, from Redondo.
Sailed May 514— Stan Jewel, for San Francisco.
BOWESS LANDING-Sailed . May 24— Schr
Newark, for San Francisco. * .'
Eastern Forts.
! BOSTON— May 23— Br ship Caverdon, for
Portland.
Foreign Ports.
COMOX— Arrived May Haw stmr San Ma
teo, from Port Los Angeles. . ■ • •
■ ■ - • -. Importations. . •
WATSON Per Gipsy— l reaper.
Blanco— looo sks barley.
Salinas— l7l4 ska barley.
Monterey— s cs cheese, 49 sks almonds. ■
Moss Landing— 3 bxs butter. •
Santa Cruz— 46 cs cheese, 120 bbls lime, ' 3 pkga
chairs. 12 bxs butter, 6 dressed calves, 2 sledges.
MAUUKONA-Per H C Wright— l bale coffee
bags, 8300 bags sugar. : .
Consignees.
' Per Gipsy— Cal Bottling Co ; Wieland Brewing Co;
CCarpy&Co; W V Fuller* Co; OB Smith it Co;
Standard Oil Co; De Bernard! A Co ; Herman Joost;
Moore, Ferguson <fe Co: J H Newbauer & Co; •"■ P
Milling Co; Wheaton, Breon A Co; Hills ii! - En
terprise Brewery: Norton, Teller Co; A\\ Kink;
Dairymen's Union; Dodge, Sweeney & Co : Union
. Ice Co; Hammond <£ Brod; W V Mitchell; L) N
Osborne; Arctic Oil Works; Miller Son; XJrl &
Co; H Co we! I «fc Co.
Per H C Wright- Williams, Dimond & Co:
Welch <fc Co. ;
Fur Lair, Shipping InifUlgence Ste fifteeniti /''•». .
$^s* OFFICE FURNITURE
iiiSfel OFFICE FIXTURES.
AND FIXTURES.
Ifsplllj C. F. WEBER & CO.,
300 to 306 Post St., cor. 'Stockton
Weak Men and Women
; SHOULD USE DAMUNA BITTERS, THE
,kj great Mexican Remedy;, gives Health' and
Strength to the Sexual Organs.

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