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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, March 05, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-03-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME LXXXI.-NO. 95.
WASHINGTON, D. OL, March 4.— William McKinley of Ohio,
at twenty-seven minutes past 1 o'clock to-day, succeeded
Grover Cleveland as President of the United States, when
he was sworn to preserve, protect and defend the constitu
tion. Before an assemblage of fellow-citizens as representative of
Amerjcan manhood and womanhood as greeted any previous chief
magistrate, and as great in numbers as the accommodations would
permit, the fourth son of the State of Ohio to occupy the high office
became the head of a nation of 70,000,000 people.
The day broke bright, clear and crisp. The memory of the last two
inauguration days was sufficient to cause worry to anybody, which
Boon passed. There have been inaugural days that have come down
from generations past as wonderfully beautiful with regard to weather
condition*. Such days have been in the minority, for March is not the
pleasantest month in the year, even in balmy Washineton.
This mornine a few clouds were in the sky, but they were clouds of a
sort that precurse nothing disagreeable. The newsboys were the nrat to
• waken the town into activity, and they were soon augmented by the
badge fakers, selling gold-bug badges, and the gilt-capped men who sold
official programmes. Between 6 and 7 o'clock, however, the streets and
avenues in the central part of the city became alive with human activity.
Enterprising excursionists who arrived late yesterday or in the early
•ours of the morning, and who feared for thoir chances of viewing the
••iite House, wandered through the grounds surrounding the historic
diansiou belore the sun was well above the horizon.
By 9 o'clock the sun came out full and slcong and served to temper
the slight chill of the atmosphere. Pennsylvania avenue was, of course,
the center resort of the early sightseers. They walked along the broad
pavements congratulating themselves and acquaintances on the perfect
day that had been given for the occasion. It was just cool enough to make
a light overcoat comfortable. It was after 8 o'ciocit before the first blare
©f trumpets reminded the people that the miltary parade would shortly
McKINLEY INAUGURATED PRESIDENT.
The San Francisco Call
assemble. By 9 o'clock the avenue, as the broad highway is best known,
was pretty well crowded.
People had begun to take positions along the curbs and to bank np at
particular points of vantage. In the vicinity o! the White House and the
Ebbkt House the crowds soon grew to large numbers. Bands playing
lively aira followed the bodies of troops, the latter to take part in the
parade, as they marched to the proper positions in the line. The regular
troops, whic i were to form the escort of the President and President-elect
from the White House to the Capitol, formed the principal attraction for
the sightseer* strung alone the avenue irom the White House toward the
Canitol building. They marched along with a swinging step that struck
the admiration of tiie spectators, and frequent applause marked the
passage of each body to its assigned position.
At 10 o'clock streetcars crossing the line of march were stopped by
the police, and wire ropes that blocked passage along tne thoroughfare
over which the procession passed were stretched across the side streets so
that vehicles and other spectators were prevented from going beyond the
curbs.
The White House grounds were closed early in the morning to all ex
cept those entitled by ticket or otherwise to admission there. People who
had green slips of cardboard thtit gave entrance to the reviewing stand
began coming early, satisfied to sit for many hours in anticipation of the
military show which would end the inaugural ceremonies proper. Mrs.
Cleveland had a number of callers during the morning, including the
ladies composing the Cabinet circle and a few intimate friends.
The members of the Cabinet assembled early in the Cabinet-room and
sat for the last time around the long table at which their conferences had
been held. Pr^^ent Cleveland meanwhile was in the private part of the
house busily /^pecting and acting on batches of Congressional bills that
were being < Jivered at intervals by messengers from tne Capitol. Mr.
Cleveland felt decidedly better of his rheumatic attack, but did noc take
any chances, and reste i the troublesome right foot on a chair as he pro
ceeded with his last official work.
At the Ebbitt House the President-oUct w»9 preparing tor too d»y,
SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY MORNING, MARCH 5, 1897.
At 8 o'clock he sat down to breakfast with a better appetite than he has
had at any time since his recent illness. Mrs. McKinley took breakfast
in her apartments. At 10 o'clock Senator Sherman and Senator Mitchell
of Wisconsin, the committee irom the Senate of the United States ap
pointed to escort the President-elect from his hotel to the White House,
were ushered into Major McKinley 's room. At ten minutea pa3t 10 Sena
or Sherman said: "I think it is time to start if you are ready, Mr. Presi
dent."
Senator Sherman and Major McKinJey set out. They were followed
by Senator Mitchell, Abner McKinley, Secretary Porter aud Captain H.
O. Heistand. The President-elect entered his carriage amid cheers.
Senator Sherman sat beside h** and Senator Mitchell and Mr. Dougherty
opposite him. Thus they were driven to the White House. A cheer
from the crowd gathered around the east entrance to the White House
ctrounds gave voice to those in waiting in the big mansion that tbe Pres
ident-elect was approaching.
Troop A of Cleveland, the personal escort of Major McKinley, led the
way up the broad asphalted driveway, their arms and accoutrements
sparkling in the sun. They presented a handsome appearance. Every
man except the bugler, whose animal was purposely in contrast with
those of his comrades, rode a mettlesome black horse. A call from tbe
bugler sent tee troop in colnmns of fours to the right of the portico covering
the carriage entrance, and another call brought men and animals into a
long line facing the entrance to the mansion. Senator Sherman's car
riage, drawn by two horses, was guided skillfully up to the steps leading
to the main door. Major McKinley, looking fresh, vigorous and well
dressed, jumped out briskly, followed by Senator Sherman and Senator
Mitchell.
Major McKinley walked across the portico and through the entranc e
to his future home with an easy, dignified swine The tall form of his
Secretary of Slate towered above him at his side, while Senator Mitchell
brought up the rear. The White House employes, formed in line across
the public lobby, bowed as Major McKinley passed them. The big doors
separating the public from the private part of the house were thiowa
wide open, and through these Major McKinley walked, taking off his bat
as he crossed the threshold. It was then 10:20 o'clock.
Vice-President-elect Hob.irt left the Arlington at 10:30 o'clock: With
Senator Elkins of West Virp.nia he entered a carriage at the private en
trance. There was a large crowd to see the Vice-President make his first
start on a journey of four years of public life at the National capital. The
windows of the hot-1 were crowded with ladies. Drawn up on the plaza
in front of the ho:el was the Essex troop of Newark, N. J., to escort Mr.
Hobart to the Capitol. When Mr. Hobart appeared at the entrance ha
was greeted with prolonged cheers. He graceluly acknowledged the
salute by raising hip hat. The troop catne to salute and at the command
of "right about" the procession turned the corner, and by a round-about
way went to the Capitol.
When Major McKinley and the two Senators entered the oval-shaped
blueroom nobody was there to receive them. President Cleveland was
busily engaged upstairs putting his signature to bills and joint resolu
tions. Meanwhile, members of the Cabinet walked in to greet the incom
ing executive, ami there was a pleasant exchange of courtesies. But the
wait was much longer than anybody expected. It was exactly half an
hour after the President-elect entered the blueroom before Mr. Cleveland
came downstairs to greet him. They spent a minute or two only in con
ventionalities, and then word wa3 given to General Howe of the armyi
aid to the grand marshal, that they were ready to start for the Capitol.
It was a dignified procession that walked from the blueroom to the
carriage waiting under tho portico. The approach of the Presidential
party to the Capitol building was made through a vast concourse of
people, and the appearance of the retiring and the incoming Chief Execu
tive was announced by vociferous cheers that were heard distinctly
within the walls of the Senato c ambers. The elevators of the Senate
wing, which had been shut down in order to better handle the crowds,
were pressed into service for Mrs. McKinley, who arrived ahead of her
husband. She repaired to an adjacent committee-room for a short rest
before taking her seat in the gallery, which, owing to the enormous crowd
that bad been forced into the chamber, was suffocatingly hot.
The Presidential party walked up the main steps of the entrance to ta«
PRICE FIVE CENTS.

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