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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 11, 1898, Image 1

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VOLUME LXXXIII.— NO. 132.
CONSUL-GENERAL LEE
INSULTED WHILE
LEAVING HAVANA
United States Representatives Jeered At by the Span
ish Rabble and a Warship's Guns
Trained Upon Them.
Blanco Refuses to See the Departing Diplomat and Permits Humiliat
ing Incidents—Vice-Consul Springer Threatens the Dons
That Americans Will Soon Return, While His Chief Is
Eager to Head an Invading Army.
am ■ n»
M "• JTlghted. 1898. by James Gordon Bennett. J. !. v S
KEY WEST, Fla.. April 10— "You may tell Mr. Blanco for me that the Fern is the last ship
of the American navy that will ever go out of Havana harbor while the Spanish flag flies over
Morro."
This was the message that General Lee sent back to General Blanco as he steamed out of
Havana harbor last night. Lee was indignant at the insults heaped upon his head by the Spanish
officials and populace. He had been snubbed at the palace by General Blanco and affronted by Dr. Con
gosto. As the Fern bearing our consular representative left the harbor there were cries of "Fuera !"
("Begone") from thousands of throats, and Vice-Consul Springer made a gesture in reply which meant,
"We will come again," and cried, "Esperen volvernos !" ("Await our return.")
When General Lee went
to the palace yesterday he
was accompanied by the
British Consul, Mr. Gullon,
who was to take unwilling
charge of the American con
sulate. Mr. Gullon is a
Spanish sympathizer and
refused to take charge until
peremptorily ordered to do
so from London. General
Lee sent in his compliments
to General Blanco, with the
request for an audience. He
was still Consul-General,
and desired to say that he
took leave pending his re
turn from the United States.
Instead of General Blanco
came Congosto, with a curt
message that the captain
general did not desire to see
General Lee again. General
Lee was dumfounded. Con
gosto bowed and withdrew.
leaving General Lee boiling
with indignation.
Consul Gullon, instead of
leaving with General Lee,
made an excuse that he had
to see Dr. Congosto on a per
sonal matter and remained
behind. As General Lee
passed down the crowded
staircase Spanish subalterns
and attaches made fun of
him. muttering insults and
crying "Fuera." It is the
duty of soldiers out of the
palace when a consular rep
resentative appears to stand
at attention. As General
Lee passed the soldiers re
mained lounging about. So many threats had been made and so gross had been the insults that General Lee had decided to remain no longer in
Havana, and went on board the Fern. Everything had been done to protect American interests. All the Consuls and Vice-Consuls were gathered
in Cuba. All persons desiring the protection of the United States were given passage in ships.
The steamer James H. Dudley, which came in, was advised by Lee not to unload, but to depart at once. The oil steamer Almouth of
Philadelphia had disregarded General Lee's advioe and unloaded, and was lying at the dock. Nothing could be done for her. The Olivette was
jrally loaded down with passengers, One hundred went aboard the Evelyn, a tramp steamer. There were twenty-six on the Bache, and on the
Fern were General Lee and his staff and the American newspaper correspondents. Among the refugees were several Englishmen. The English
colony had gone over the head of the British Consul and demanded the protection of General Blanco, fearing they would be taken for Amerioans
and killed.
The Dudley was the first to sail ; then the Olivette left ; then the Evelyn, Bache, and last of all, the Pern. Each boat wanted to be last.
The Baches engineers had arranged to plead a breakdown and did it, and General Lee had to peremptorily order the Baohe to proceed. The harbor
was lined from Machina wharf to Morro castle on one side and to La Pnnta on the other with thousands of spectators. Everybody- whistled, as
whistling is a mark of derision, like hissing in the United States.
As the Fern passed the Alphonso XII a gun was trained on her and the gun crew stood ready. General Lee saw it and spoke of it. The
gun was swung around after the Pern had passed. Above the whistling came cries of "Fuera!" acoompanied by insulting epithets. Back went
the reply from Vice-Consul Springer, "Esperen volvernos!" Covering the rear of the fleet of the refugees the Pern swept out to sea and headed
for Key West.
The San Francisco Call
CONSUL-GENERAL FITZHUGH LEE.
SAN FRANCISCO, MONDAY, APRIL 11, 1898 — TWENTY PAGES.
DEATH'S GRIM
HARVEST IN
DYEA CANYON
Search Still Goes on for the Bodies of
Miners Buried by the
Avalanche.
Sam W. Wall Pictures the Harrowing Scenes in
the White-Mantled Graveyard on
the Trail to Dawson.
CORRECTED LIST OF THE DEAD.
E. D. ATWOOD, New York
— ATKINS, Idaho.
ALBERT E. AUGLUND, Tacoma.
A. D. BISSELL, Seattle.
C. BECK, Sanford, Fla.
THOMAS B. CLARK, Idaho.
WALTER CHAPPEY, New York.
THOMAS COLLINS, Portland, Or.
THOMAS COLLENDEN, Kirkland, Or.
WILLIAM CARROLL, San Francisco.
W. H. DOHLSTROM, Lincoln, Nebr.
— DURBER,
A. DORAN, Tacoma.
GEORGE EGGERT, Portland, Or.
R. L. ESTERBROOK, Seattle.
WILL FALKE, San Francisco.
T. GLENN, Spokane, Wash.
T. GLINN, Portland, Or.
WEED GARRISON, Seattle.
CON GEPHART, Seattle.
W. GRIMES, Atkins, Idaho.
S. M. GRIMES, Tacoma.
F M. GRIMES. Sacramento, Cal.
PRESTON GRIZZELEY, Buffalo, N. Y.
C. R. HOMER, Seattle.
E. J. HUDSON, Seattle.
S. T. HUDSON, Portland, Ort
E. P. HAINES, Seattle.
C. P. HARRISON. Seattle.
HARRY HOLT. Tacoma,
RASMUS HEDEGARD, Baker City, Or.
E. R. JOHNSON, Spokane.
H. JUEGER, .
C. H. KINNEY, Prescott, Ariz.
ANDREW ANDERSON, San Francisco.
BY SAM W. WALL.
DTEA. April 6, via Tacoma, April
10.— At the time of the sailing of the
steamship Australia this morning at 6
o'clock, forty-two bodies had been re
covered from their burial in the snow
at the front of Chilcoot Pass by the
avalanche of Sunday morning.
A large force of men is at work mov
ing the snow and has been so employed
with all possible energy since the slide,
but the work has resulted only in the
opening of two short and narrow
trenches in an expanse of snow that
has changed the topography of the
canyon for a distance of an eighth of a
mile and has subi erged a little city of
tents, their inhabitants and a large
quantity of provisions. To shift this
body of snow, twenty and thirty feet
deep in places, will be impossible, and
the full extent of Saturday's casualty
will not be known until spring and
summer leave the canyon bare. From
what is known of the number of people
who were moving upon, or were located
on, the trail at the point covered by the
slide, it is estimated that the number of
deaths will reach one hundred.
Sheep Camp, a village of nearly 1000
people, has for occupation now only a
search for, and care of, the bodies of
the dead and the few who were taken
out alive after their long submersion.
There were less than a dozen of these,
and their experience was such as to
have wholly broken their nerve. To ask
them to relate it is to invite them to
weep like feeble old men.
A morgue has been established in a
tent where the bodies of the dead
brought from the heights above strap
ped to sleds are laid in a row for iden
tification. An undertaker has prepared
a lot of rough boxes from heavy rip
sawed lumber, and on being identified
the bodies are placed In these and
freighted in wagons dow*n through the
canyon to Dyea, fourteen miles dis
tant. The working force of the Chil
coot Railway and Transportation Com
WILL CONGRESS THINK
AS DOES McKINLEY ?
NEW YORK, April 10. — The following was received from
the Herald's Washington correspondent late to-night: While
the President's message, which goes to Congress to-morrow,
recommends armed intervention, the word "immediate," 1
learn to-night, has been stricken out. Not only this, the
President in his comment on the new programme of Spain will
indicate that she should be allowed an opportunity to prove
her sincerity to establish the new form of self-government
which she now contemplates. Thus it would appear that Spain
has gained at least delay by the new card which she has
played.
GKORGE LEWIS, Spokane.
G. J. MILTON, St. Paul.
J. R. MORGAN, Emporia, Kans.
MRS. ANNIE MOXON, Jefferson County, Pa.
JOHN MERCHANT,- Redding, Cal
E. F. MILLER, Vancouver. Wash.
FRANK MILLER, Butte, Mont.
C. L. McNEIL, Elk River, Minn.
SANFORD McNEIL, Portland, Or.
J. C. MURPHY. Dixon, N. D.
AUSTIN PRESTON, Redding, Cal.
J. B. PIERSE, Tacomo.
J. REESE, Wisconsin.
GEORGE RITCHIE, Chicago.
MRS. W. L. RILEY, Seattle.
C RASMUS, Colorado.
JOHN REDDY. Kansas City, Mo.
GEORGE RISER, Seattle.
MRS. RYAN, Baltimore.
MATT SCHONA, St. Paul.
JOSEPH SMALLWOOD, Portland, Or.
GUS SEABORN, Chicago.
STEVE STEVENSON, Seattle.
FRANK SPRAGUE, Seattle.
G. E. SMITH, Tacoma.
G W.' SMITH. Wooley, Wash
JEFF SOLEY. Idaho.
O. A. ULER, Wooley, Wash.
L. WEIDELEIN, Kansas City.
O. M. WARNER, San Francisco.
— WILHELM. Menlo Park, Cal.
GUS ZABARTH* Seattle.
ANDREW ANDERSON, San Francisco.
W. F. WARNER. Menlo Park, Cal
A. F. KING, Tacoma.
pany has lost nineteen men and the
power house of the company at Sheep
Camp has been turned into another
morgue as the bodies of these are re
covered and turned over to the officers.
A citizens' and miners' committee has
taken charge of the work of excavation
and of caring for the bodies and the
effects of the deceased, and all is being
done that can be in the premises expe
ditiously and well.
The avalanche occurred at about 11
o'clock on Sunday morning during a
heavy snowstorm and came from the
precipitous side of the mountain to the
east of the canyon. The storm had
been raging for five days, increasing in
severity until all traffic was stopped.
On Saturday a number of snow slides
had occurred, burying tents and indi
viduals all the way down the line from
the Scales to Sheep Camp, and men
were kept busy digging their fellows
out. In the camp at the Scales an or
ganization was effected and men were
placed on guard day and night with
shovels to respond quickly to the cry
of distress. They were kept busy all
Saturday night.
On Sunday morning the storm still
increased, the snow blowing so thick
before a driving wind that one could
not distinguish a figure ten paces dis
tant. About 9 o'clock a tent occupied
by Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Maxson was
buried under a snow slide, and it was
an hour before the force of men which
answered their cries released them.
Mrs. Maxson, Mrs. Estes and other
women in the camp became hysterical
and called upon the men tolead the
way to Sheep Camp, that •ffriy' might
all of them flee from what seemed cer
tain death.
A number of people congregated
about the restaurant tent of F. B. Hol
brook of Portland, known as No. 99,
and there the expedition down the can
yon was organized. A rope was found—
several ropes were knotted together —
making a line about 200 feet long, and
men and women went through the
camp calling upon all to "come and get
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
on the line and make a run for Sheep
Camp." In this work Mrs. Maxson, who
had had the experience of the morn
ing, was particularly active, passing
from tent to tent in the blinding
storm and crying, "Come out and flee
for your life."
When the line started, it is estimat
ed, there were from eighty to one hun
dred men and women clinging to it,
for the space was entirely full the in
dividuals being: about two feet apart.
In single file the long, dark line like a
serpent followed the windings r>* the
trail down the mountain, its progress
retarded by the stumbling of individ
uals over the caches and through the
snow drifts. At each tent as they
came to it the leader would stop and
some of the number would run to it
and call upon the occupants, if any
there were, to come out and get on
the line for Sheep Camp, "and to be
ware the avalanche."
In this way the number was still
ADVEBTISEMENTS.
/-XX THE old man who
f_.crA j^ looks out at the .
world . with clear
%BBi(iff^*-',§ and healthy eyes
<A\*^c<l cannot help feeling
Jk^&L great gratification at
-ddflewTTCT-. - tne thought that his
/^Bw^\ iK\ children and his
f'\ Kfiik^ fi«\ children's children
I V Bp&\\ U V have inherited from
/ » fffeft^Kj^l l\ ' m no weakness nor
/ kBKESFS! I tendency to disease.
/ */BS9Bi^<! The health y oui man
if Tra™fjj?ltea3 ' ' is the man who has
V 'y£^f%%&?{ throughout his life
'^ ■L/y^^m&rY kept his digestion
( . good and his blood
' I pure. Once in
,- -■ ,:. / / a while you find such
/ : I/ a man who has nevei
/ taken any medicine
js That man has lived
/ #1/ a perfectly natural
■ir> /II life. Not one in a
JAt I 1 thousand .does .do it.
* /"I - Sometimes very
l"\ I slight indiscretions
.. a II or carelessness pave
V i >■[ I the way for serious
ViV fly.' 1 sickness. The germ
* / 11 (l *k \ \ theory of disease 'is
/S» M« \XS well authenticated,
dn? */ J/ l^w >. an<^ g erms are every-
% /*^ where. This need
"• %gy j **'*<' make no difference
;•:■;•.;- . i to the perfectly
healthy man. ' Germs go through the
healthy body without effect. They are
hurried along, rapidly and thrown off before
they have time to develop or increase. Lei
them once find lodgment or let them find a
weak spot, they will develop by the million
and the blood will be full of them. Instead
of rich, life-giving properties, the blood will
be a sluggish, putnd tide of impurity. . In-
stead of giving strength to the tissues, it
will force upon; them unwholesome and
innutritious matter, ' and the man will
lose flesh. ' The more flesh he loses and the
weaker he becomes, the more ; susceptible
he is to disease. His trouble will become
complicated and serious consequences will
follow. Dr. Pierce' 6, Golden Medical : Dis-
covery is the only medicine , that absolutely -
and infallibly cur«;s all blood diseases, and
almost all diseases are; blood diseases. It
isn't a medicine for some one >■ particular
so-called: disease. "It is a medicine for the
whole body. It forces out all the germs of
disease, replaces impurities with rich, red
blood, feeds the *'£sues and makes strong,
healthy flesh.

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