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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 01, 1900, Image 6

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DAYLIGHT BURGLARS.
Two of Them Arrested While at
Work in a Lodging-House.
. David Davis and Thomas Dougherty
wanted to get some money to bring in the
New Year and they went into the Corona
House, 246 Sixth street, to find It. Davis
climbed through the window of the toilet
room into a room occupied by an employe
at the Chutes and carried off a parcel con
taining a number of ladles' belts.
The landlord met him coming down the
stairs with the parcel under his arm and
attempted to hold him. He showed fight
and during the struggle the landlady ran
into the street And shouted for the police.
Policeman T.P. Riordan heard her and
came upon the scen,e as the burglar was
getting the better of the encounter with
the landlord. He tackled Riordan but
Boon discovered his mistake. After Rior
dan had, ylaced the handcuffs on ' his
wrists he made a search for Dougherty
and found him hiding in the toilet room.
They were sent to the City Prison, where
a charge of burglary w*as booked against
them.
To-Morrow! To=Morrow!
ONE DAY ONLY!
AH $LOO Switches, 50 Gents.
Hair Dressing, 25 cts; :; :|I I PIjCDCD ¦
QUINTONICA, the great \. \ Alt jLL/i/LI\L/ila
hair renewer. < '
sendtor pnee ist of 123 Stockton Street,
switches. Opp. City of Paris.
TO BUILD FOB ITSELF.
Eureka Benevolent Association Nego-
tiating for a Site.
The regular annual meeting and election
of officers of the Eureka Benevolent As
sociation,was held yesterday in the- rooms
of the association at 105 Stockton street.
The election resulted in the following
officers bfcing chosen to serve for the en
suing twelve months: President, Charles
Hlrsch; vice president, S. W. Heller;
treasurer, Albert Meyer; secretary, Meyer
Levy; trustees, A. Anspacher, Herman
Levy; S. \V. Rosenstock, Henry Sinshelm
er, Juda Newman and Slg Schwabacher.-
The reports of the different' officers of
the association were read, showing the
work done for the past year and calling
attention to the various needs of the so
ciety. .These reports give 2549 as the
number of cases relieved during the year,
in which number is to be found represent
atives of nearly. every country under the
sun. The causes of : distress were, aa a
general thing, old age. want of employ
ment. slcknesß and insufficient earnings.
There were twenty-three cases that
sought succor because of the desertion of
the husband and father.
The treasurer's report shows the asso
ciation to be in such a flourishing condi
tion that anew building is contemplated
for the exclusive use of the Eureka As
sociation and other Jewish societies.
Wealthy Hebrews of this city have. been
asked for subscriptions- toward the erec
tion of such a building, and they have al
ready promised $13,700. Negotiations are
now in progress for. the purchase of a lot
on O'Farrell street, between Taylor and
Jones, and it will not be long before the
society has a house of its own from which
to dispense its charities.
ADVERTISEMENTS.
Th« individual who tolls the truth with
deliberate caution isn't believed half so
often as the fellow who can lie gracefully.
ADVEBTISEMENTS.
Pain Conquered; Health Re-
stored by Lydia E. Pink-
ham's Vegetable Compound.
£lktte* to was. pikkeam sro. 92,643]
*' I feel it my duty to write and thank
you for whet jour Veg-etable Com-
pound has done for me. It is the only
medicine I have found that has done
me any good. Before taking your medi-
cine, I was all run down, tired all the
time, no appetite, pains in my back and
bearing 1 down pains and a great suf-
ferer during menstruation. Aftertak-
in? two bottles of Lydia E. Pinkham'a
Vegetable Compound I felt like a new
Troman. lam now on my fourth bottle
mid all my pains have left me. I feel
better than I have felt for three years
and would recommend your Compound
to every suffering woman. I hope this
lefjer will help others U> find a cure
for their troubles."' — Mrs. Dellx
Eekickeb, Ekxsselxeb, I>d.
The serious, ills of women develop
from neglect of car] y. symptoms. Every
pain itud ache haa a cause, and the
varnlnjf tlier gire &iiould not be disre-
garded. " .' ¦ • :!( ¦ •V- '.
Mrs. Pinkham understands these
troubles better than any local phy-
sician and will give every woman free
advicci who is puzzled about her
health- Mrs. Pinkham's address is
Lynn, Mass. Don't put off writing until
health is broken down
Write at the first indication of trouble.
WHY,
Use a Welsbach Light!
of course.
And always use a Welsbach
Mantle — no other gives one-tenth
the service. Try one — it'll make
the imitations look expensive.
The Genuine Gives Trade
SitisUcilon. In WELSBACH
Sealed Boxßcsring Murit
ALL DEALERS
Eruxire of CtwatrrfeU Man'l's and ekecp
inii'j'ijn bratt pant.
f*r' FAVORITE
FOR WEAK WOMEN.
Il' I H I 111 <*•"«»«> cur** or no
U] M I Kf" y No detention
*II J f § JJj I I MANSFIELD * POR-
l**' l • W I *!¦• TERFIELD. £38 Mar-
ket st.. .San Francisco. ¦
A^^m BAM^M^
?2SM<M& FURWTUKZ
Tunis Dean Received by Elks.
On Friday evening last the San Fran
cisco Lodge of R. P. O. Elks, Xo. 3, ini
tiated Tunis F. Dean for the Indianapolis
Ix>dge of Elks. Mr. Dean is on his first
visit to the coast and is representing "The
Christian," now playing at the Columbia.
WON SUCCESS AND FAME.
California Songstress Returns From
the East With Vaudeville
Laurels.
Miss Dorm M. Cann, a San Francipco
rirl. who made her debut at the Orpheum
throe y«/ar»> ago. has returned from New
York <>v a Ilymg visit. The illness of her
mother, who livt*s in Sacramento, was the
reason for the trip.
Miss i.'arm has won the highest honors
to be attained on the vaudeville stage.
Since her departure from San Krancicso
tihe has sung before Now York and Boston
audit-lifts with marked approval and suc
cess. In Ix>udon she appeared at the St,
Jamps ar.d Quwn's Hall theaters, the
highest class concert hails in the metrop
olis. Miss Cann's voice is a rich, deep
contralto. While Jn Europe she studied
music. >»oth rocal and instrumental.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, MONDAY, JANUARY 1, 1900.
GRIGGS' RULING
LARGELY HELPS
COAST JOBBERS
Making Differentials
Not Illegal.
PRECEDENT IS ESTABLISHED
?
LOCAL BUSINESS MEN/ HIGHLY
GRATIFIED.
Decision Will Have an Important
Bearing on the Suit of the Mid
dle West Before Interstate
Commission..
The Jobbers and manufacturers of the
Pacific Coast have indirectly won a great
point in their controversy with the St.
Louis and other Middle West jobbers by
the decision of Attorney General Griggs
that railways may classify rates without
any violation of the anti-trust law.
Yesterday the jobbers of this city were
found to be very much pleased at the out
come of recent . proceedings at the na
tional capital. The point submitted to the
Attorney General of the United States
has a direct bearing on the question of
differentials. The history of the matter
was learned yesterday from W. K.
Wheeler, who has been a close student of
the entire rate question for years.
Mr. Wheeler taid that the jobbers on
the Pacific Coast had reason to be pleased
as the decision of the Attorney General
had weakened the case that tne Middle
West jobbers have been preparing as a
means ot taking the Paciric Coast terri
tory away from the business men of the
coast, toome time ago notice was given,
that the railroads using the oiricial
classification whicri was in eftect east of
the Mississippi Klver would to-day put
Into eitect a new classification. The eftect
of the change would be to widen the dif
ferentials between the carload and the
less than carload in the territory affected.
Another effect would be to make a pre
cedent in favor of the contention of the
manufacturers and Jobbers of this coast.
The carload rates had not been touched
by the Eastern official classification com
mittee, except in one or two instances,
but the less than carload rates have been
increased by the reclassiflcatlon from 50
to 114 per cent. The differentials were
therefore much greater than those exist
ing in favor of the Pacific Coast jobber, of
which the Middle West jobbers com
plained in the action against the trans
continental railroads now pending.
. The Middle West jobbers had pointed to
the official classification in defense of
their position. The railroads upon whose
action they had largely relied had justi
fied the idea upheld by the jobbers of the
Pacific Coast in reference to the differen
tial, namely, that transportation is like a
commodity, in that larger lots are sold at
less rates than are smaller ones. The
manner in which the matter came before
the Attorney General of the United
States was as follows:
The Ohio people, who were affected,
threatened to bring an injunction to pre
vent putting into effect the new classifica
tion to-day, and asked the Interstate
Commerce Commission to submit the
question to Attorney General Grigga
whether the changes proposed were in the
nature of violation of the anti-trust law.
While there had not been ostensibly a
raise in rates, the changes In the classi
fication, by moving up the less than car
load rates from one to two notches had
really raised the less than carload lots an
average of about 73 per cent. The differ
ential in favor of the Pacific Const of
which the Middle 'West jobbers had com
plained was lrps than 50 per cent. The
decision will have an important bearing
when the hparing before the Interstate
Commerce Commissioners brought on by
the St. Louis-. jobbers is resumed in this
city. Attorney General Griggs advised
that "if there be- a remedy for the com
plaining shippers' it lies In an appeal to
your (interstate) commission under the
interstate commerce law."
Charged With Robbery.
Larry Powers, a laborer, and John
Flinn, a sailor, were arrested at an early
hour yesterday morning by Policemen
McSorley, Morrissey and Beach and were
booked at the City Prison on a charge, of
robbery. They are accused of stealing *12
from Martin M. Gleason of the-New Con
tinental Hotel. 547 Mission street, in front
of the Fargo House. 107 New Montgomery
street. They were all drunk at the time.
AMUSEMENTS.
CALIioiNirTHEATER 1-bir
OVER 55000 VOICES
tctt T TO-DAY PROCLAIM WITH ONE AC-
WIL CORD?HE TERRIFIC SUCCCESS OF
"WITH FLYING COLORS."
First time In America of the Great Enrllsh
Adel"hl sScopm. Presented -after Four Weeks
of careful preparation by the
The Biggest Production Ever Made In San
Fraiielwo. • Sixty-two Actual Speaklne Char-
acters In the Play prison SCENE.
SEE TOE GREAT BATTLESHIP
SCENE?- THE GREAT TELEPHONE SCENE.
THE OR^AT RAI^AT HOTEL You £
REME t E TUK^SN- EARS
REMEaiBER, "WITH FLYING COLORS"
will run for Eight Nights and
Saturday Matinee. :,'-'.
NEXT ATTRACTION. MONDAY, Jan. ?.
Em/V\A NEVADA.
Commencing TUESDAY NIGHT. Jan. • .9,
first time In San Francisco, the Comedy of
and the butterfly."
By A. W. Plnero. Author of ".Sweet Laven-
ender " "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray,"
"The Mazlßtrate," etc.
In Preparation— "THE HEART OP MART-
LAND." - . ¦
GRAND OPERA-HOUSE:
TELEPHONE MAIN 632.
matineeTto-day
At 2 o'clock sharp.
EVERY EVENING AT 8 O'CLOCK SHARP.
The Greatest Extravaganza Production Ever
Witnessed Here.
SIINB/\D......
HFAUTIFUL BALLETS, BEAUTIFUL
11ARCHES. BEAUTIFUL SCENERY.
BEAUTIFUL COSTUMES. BEAUTIFUL
GIRLS BEAUTIFUL MUSIC. CLEVER
ARTISTS, FUNNY COMEDIANS. FRANK
KINGS BEAUTIFUL TRANSFORMA-
TION.''.^' \ -¦:¦
PRICES •• -25f. 50c. 75c
GALLERIES 10c and 15c
MATINEE PRICES ;... .25c and 60c
Branch Ticket Office, Emporium.
ALCAZAR_THEATER.
New Year Matinee To-Day.
To-night Begins the Second Week of the Only
.Funmaker In Town..
CHIMMIE
FADDEN.
Standing Room at All Performances.
SECURE SEATS EARLY IN ADVANCE.
MATINEE PRICES 15c. 250, 35c
NIGHT PRICES 50c. 25c, 25c. 15c
WEEKLY. CALL
$1 per Year.
BACK FROM WASHINGTON.
Surveyor and Mrs. Spear Return
From an Extended Tour.
After an absence from the city which
has lasted since the latter part of last
October, Surveyor of Customs and Mis.
Joseph 8. Spear Jr. have returned to the
city, and are once more domiciled at the
Palace Hotel. During their absence Mr.
and Mrs. Spear have visited the entire
East, though most of their time has been
ppent in Washington, D. C. While at the
capital they visited President McKinley a
number of "timrp, but. owing to the illness
©f Mrs. McKinley,. were not able to enjoy
as much of the, hospltalltv of the White
House as would otherwise have been
theirs. On Mr. Spears' last call the Pres
ident informed him that Mrs. MeKinley's
condition had so improved that her com
plete recovery was only a matter of a
short time.
Mr. Spear pays the whole Kast is in fa
vor of prosecuting the war in the Philip
pines until the last vestige of conflict has
vanished and a suitable government es
tablished, which the natives must be
taught to respect. As to the Boer trouble,
the sympathizers are about evenly di
vided. ¦ I^ >: ;'-:S :::•-.
Among the courtesies extended to Mr.
and Mrs. Spear while' in Washington was
a dinner given thorn by John D. Spreckels.
They also had the- pleasure of: several
times meeting Admiral Dewey, and. Mrs.
Spear is the proud possessor of a photo
graph which the naval horo presented to
her, with his autograph written across its
?ace. When she received it Mrs. Spear
told ' the admiral that she was going to
frame it. togeihrr with the one she pos
sessed of Ix>rd Charles Beresford. ;.~ ' v
DOING HONOR TO
THE MEMORY OF
DWIGHT MOODY
Memorial Services for
the Evangelist.
ASSOCIATION HALL CROWDED
LOVING TRIBUTES TO THE
DEAD PREACHER.
His Sterling Worth and Prodigious
Work in the Cause of Christian
ity Attested by Several
Eulogies.
Impressive memorial services to com
memorate the death of Dwight L»." Moody
were held yesterday afternoon under the
auspices of the Young Men's Christian
Association in the Auditorium on Mason
street. A laree audience was present to
testify its reverence for the dead evangel
ist and his prodigious work in the cause
of Christianity was attested by eulogies
pronounced by prominent divines, some of
whom were personally acquainted with
him in life.
Henry J. McCoy, secretary of the asso
ciation, presided at the services. The
opening hymn, "Coronation," which was
sung by the congregation, was followed
by the "Rock of Ages," sung by the
Knickerbocker Quartet, after which
prayer was said by Rev. H. H. Bell, D. D.
The quartet sang the response, "The
Lord's Prayer," and Mr. McCoy then gave
a lew personal reminiscences of the de
ceased. The speaker spoke of the asso
ciation's debt of $84,000, which some ye;£rs
ago had been lifted entirely through the
efforts of ,ur. Moody.
Rev. K. K. Dille, I). D., then delivered
a beautiful eulogy of the evangelist.
"God raises special men for special pur
poses." saJd he, "and he raised Moody
at a critical Juncture after the Civil War
to counteract the resulting demoraliza
tion by a revival of religion. Moody's
power to convert lost souls was marvel
ous, and his judgment and sympathy were
wonderfully well balanced. He was
strong in hard common sense, and in sim
plicity sublime. He was a safe counsel
or and leader, and in his great cam
paigns on two continents he mustered his
forces with all the genius of a Grant. The
monuments of his life's work are the
great school at Northfield, where 3,000 stu
dents have been educated; the Chicago
Avenue Church,- with a membership of
2,000, and the Bible Institute in Chicago.
He took his stand on the impregnable
rock of the Holy Bible, and burned out
his great life upon the altar of God."
The quartet sang "Crossing the Bar,"
and A. B. Forbes, chairman of the Board
of Trustees of the San Francisco Young
Men's Christian Association, referred to
Moody's sterling work and characterized
him as a general who never lost a light.
A tenor solo, "He Knows, My Jesus
Knows," was sung by Charles M. Elliott
v.nd Rev. George C Adams paid the final
tribute to Mr. Moody, whom, he said,
was a peculiar product of Christian civil
ization.
"Moody was what he was'," said Dr.
Adame. "because the Bible got hold of
him and he used it magnificently in tlie
good mission of saving lost souls. The
proper study of the good book brought
out the best and richest in him. and
though not an ordained minister, he was
specially called by God to do a mighty
work in this generation. He has shown
that the Bible has not lost its power, and
never will, so long as God will raise up
Moodys to interpret its wonderful
The quartet sang "Good Night, I Am
Going Home." and the "Sweet Bye and
Bye was sung by the congregation. Ben
ediction concluded the services.
?
Services in Oakland.
OAKLAND, Dec. 31.— Moody memorial
services were held at some of the local
churches to-day. At the Union-street
Presbyterian Church Rev. Dwight E.
Potter gave a sketch of the late evange
list's life. Some of the late Mr. Moody's
favorite songs were sung at the service.
Rev. Charles R. Brown, pastor of the
First Congregational Church delivered a
sermon this morning on "The Life Work
of Dwight L.. Moody." and Rev. Dr. Coyle
at the First Presbyterian Church like
wise spoke on "Dwight L.. Moody."
At the Fourth Congregational Church
Rev. Alfred Bayley spoke on "Lessons
From the 1-lfe of the Great Evangelist,
Dwight L. Moody." To-night watchers'
meetings were held at most of the
churches.
HIGHBINDERS
WHO WILL HAVE
CHEONG'S BLOOD
Spirited Away on an
Old Warrant.
HE IS DOOMED TO DIE
ATTORNEY JAMES MAKES A
STARTL327G STATEMENT.
A Chinese Merchant Arrested Here
and Taken to San Jose as Part
of a Scheme to Kill
Him.
Blf what Attorney James of San Jos«
iy« bo true. Ah Chcong. a Obinepe mer
chant, is the victim of a deep conspira
cy, with tha murder cf C'heong for its
cbject.
L&.&1 Saturday Cheons was arrested in
this city en a warrant issued by a Jus
tice of the Peace of Santa Clara, charg
ing him with an assault with a deadly
veapoa. He was taken to the City Prison
and locJced up in default of the necessary
bonds. In some w«y several of his friends
learned of h:» arrtst. and they lost no
time in consulting Attorney James. They
declared that his arrest was part of a
dee;>-iiijd plot to pet hoid of him and
then put him out of t!ie way. The attor
ney, after satisfying himself that the
::.•:. Wf-r<_- trllir.g: the truth, wont to a Su
perior Judge of Sar.ta Clara County arid
obtained &11 order lor the release of the
prisoner. Alter securing the document
Janus tcok the first train for this city,
arriving here yesterday aXurnoon. He at
once repaired to the City Prison, and. to
his great surprise, found that Cheone
only a j^hort time before had been turned
over to a Constable of Santa Clara.
"It le ai! off with Cheong." remarked
James to Sergeant Wripht. "I doubt If
lie wjII ever roach San Jose."
Wh'n a^=ked what he meant the attorney
eaid he had positive proof that the ene
mies of Cneong had entered into a con
spiracy to assassinate him.
I'naJjle to induce him to visit Santa
Clara, they caused to be issued a warrant
charging him with an assault with a
deadly we.ij>on. The warrant was eworn
to last October and placed In the hands
of an officer to be servod. A few days
later it disappeared; and was supposed to
have been lost. No effort vram made to
recover it until ia^t Saturday, when the
conspirators learned that Cheong was in
this city, and then they promptly resur
rected it. The warrant was bent here.
and given to Policeman Hutching!, who
found Cheong on Washington street and
placed him under arre.-=t.
C'heong formerly lived in Santa Clara.
l>ut on learning that his enemies werecon
spiring to kill him he came to this city.
Attorney Janus returned to San Jose last
evening, determined to prevent the con
spirators from carrying out their dia
bolical scheme, and incidentally to bring
them to justice.
1 OUR JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE
SE BEGINS TO-MORROW, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2.
g- We have planned to make this SALE a memorable one. Not only because of the extraordinarily low prices.
•^ but because of the reliability of the merchandise offered. Each department in our Establishment will be repre-
£: sented by Bargains unequaled before. Come and view them and note the marvelous saving advantages.
E Plaids^ftj^rttsfc Black Serge ££••£££ Flannelettes ~ifa-£Z
g- Weaves, beautiful, bright colors and fIrAKC Cheviot Serge, stripes and checks, light and rn?-
g= combinations; excellent for chil- 1/l ca;3 Oivil IC3 perca ij ne \ me d, dium colorings, good heavy quality
jg— dren's dresses; sale price OE?/» velvet binding, regular price, $7.00. for gowns and skirts; regular c^.
g^. yard Sale price co qc value 10c. Sale price yard
5~ • • each w«J«cjJ
£ All-Wool w - a&gj La^les'''"'"'^ «- Pillow «c — ST^ ;
I CaSHmere SS e and SO nr h for Kid GIOVCS SS?S CflSeS \
g= wa.sts and tea gowns, in shades of c , fasteners> in the foliowine col- 15c each. Sale price each »*• ;
navy, cadet blue gray tan brown ors . B rown,tan, mode, ox blood and : r i
g and reseda; excellent value at 33 whit „ ' th $i.« oq- SliPPt<« ldb dozen Ready-Made :
XZ 65c; sale price.... yard JJ^ qualit^ Sale price pair O*IC OlieeU> Hemmed Sheets, torn •
All-Wnn! 260 pcs. 44-inch All- Ribbon No - 5 ?"-*lk nc y Taf - by h , and ' d P* laundered; size 8lxQo; j
All-YYOOI Wo( J cheviots an mUUU " feta Ribbon; the latest regular price 5734 c Salej_-fi c .
i cheviots v^mm Dept - r , ; ,«¦ « h ;
............ Ribbon, extra heavy, worth TOWelina In stri P es and checks, :
fc: SSIk and Wnnl Broken line * 45c yard. Sale price yard ' , worth 8c yard c r :
£ OIIK af | Q nOOI of Silk and 3 No. 50, All-Silk Novefty Ribbon. Sale price yard OC :
jg- i\nVPltlP<s Wool Nov- jn the latest color combinations, in :
gj- "w*ciuca clty Dress str j pes and p ers i an effects: worth RoH 5 cases extra large -
Goods, in dark and medium color- 30c a yard. Sale price IT/* s * zc te Honey- •
S£= ings; regular selling price from $1.25 yard I'C SofCflds com b e<^ Spreads; ;
ri to $2.00. Sale price ; ! HoSIPrv and' Children's fast . S°°d V*titJ- Qi: c :
S£= yard J v L lIU^ICI y allU black heavy Sale P ncc each ;
B $1.50 50 pieces Underwear ?? o ho r ol d u ?° o sc v Blankets 2 * cas « hher * c slze \
RI^L rV,*^«o B1 ? ck £ Ie " ribbed, full finished, double knees. „„ " California All-Wool -
y= OIdLK l^repOflS hair Cre- j lce i s anc j toes; s ; zes 6to i 0; re gular White Blankets, made of extra qual- :
fc fnr QBr X/arti p ons > »" value, 20c. Sale price ¦.*_ »jy wool, silk bound, in pretty bor- I
gr lUI JOt yai U i arg re and pair '^C ders; regular value $5.50. C"5 fiC: :
fe= medium designs, with rich blister " La'dieV' Herrnsdorf dye fast black Sale P rice P air *4><*>»V3 :
Z~ mohair effects; they are well worth Cotton Hose, the regular 3 for "
$1.50 a yard. Sale price.... QO r $1.00 quality. Sale price. pair fnmfortPrS 2° casM lar * c :
£ -yard yOC Lad / es , irnporte / Cashmere Hose. miOr «-Cr^ sizfi B?d Com . .
E= Silk <*prna in the leading col- fast black, a very soft and extra fine forters, silkohne covered, in pretty I
OIIK OCrye ors th qual . qua iit y; regular value, 50c. q->_ designs, filled with extra quality -
S: I In'tnn ity- saie otr Sal « P rice pair ->^^ white cotton; nicely tutted; regular :
ZZ Llllllig { c ' c d 33C Children's gray merino Vests and P"ce $2.00. Sale price... Kfl -
~~ m., 1 • Pants: covered seams: a splendid «eh :
fc Near Silk I, I , nche ? wlde ' , in garment; all sizes. Sale price <)O r T , , . .•' :
ST "*-" 1 Ilf% black only; regular 6 each Trjhlp Io ° P ieces 70-inch '
I Lining jft .-,- 9c Ladies' Wool jg -- D^sk T#ffi» \
fc I aHIPQ 9 Io ° dozen Ladies' Flan- DJkkAH Voctc a 'so Pants: . c ,s, sl Bn?'8 n ?' regular .
£ Ladies ndette Gowns . Mother KlOOea VeSIS regu value 75c Sale price.... yard **O«- :
Jp: finvvnti Hubbard style; double lar value $i. Sale price... each «3C . :
fc UUWII!) yoke front and back: • •• % A-^:*^ Gray only Linen s«> dozen Napkins. # .
large turn-down collar; fully 58 LadlCS Oneita %*oo d ' Z . . f'"' warran , tcd P ur<r =
£ inches long; extra width: made of ... o•- wefring NapklHS ne " : J^l, P "" =
good flannelette. Sale price 77 UrtlOn 3U11.S Karment: **-7> Sale $135 .
ZZ caen sale price A.Rf -
rhilHrPn'Q 50 doz. Children's each T"OU IVrannPrQ Ladies' Wrappers. =
fc V/»» UI Cll » Flannelette Gowns. CJII, 200 Ladies' Silk Waists: "ia|J|JCI» made oi . cood =
2Z fifiwnc Mother Hubbard broken lines: made of quality flannelette, in stripes and I
J^ v7L»YY II3 style, double yoke Wfljctc pretty fancy silks, lined figures; pretty colorings, made with ~
fc= back and front, turn-down collar. TTai^ tCs throughout; good value a 13-inch Spanish flounce, nicely :
•*_ heavy flannelette; ages from 6 A*}* at $6 and $5. Sale price. tf»<^ qc braided, extra width and tf»| as Z
to 12. Sale price each t"^^ each vP-£»-*CJ length. Sale price.... each **H»tO z
£ /\IN EXCEPTIONAL CLEAN-UP lIN SILKS. =
S^ A\> have nrlrcted from oar largr and eitrmlTc atoclc IR.OOO y« r«H \ovrltr Silica, 'which will he Z
¦"""* cloned oat reffardlenn of cost. The name have been conveniently nrnnerd on oar raantrr* and dl- ~
£n vlded into three lotn, which *re nliall offer at the following unprecedented low prlcent -
LOT I— 2000, yds. Corded. Checked, Figured and Plaid Taffetas, regular $1 and 75c; your choice at. yard 30c Z
S^ LOT II — 7000 yds. Two-Toned Corded Taffeta, Brocades, Checked and Figured Taffeta, regular price $1.25 :
fc: and $1.00. Sale price yard 67c r
SH LOT III — 600o a yds. Fancy Satin Duchesse, Persian Effects. Plaids and Figured Taffeta, regular price $i.;o Z
and $2.00. Sale price yard 89c -
S^ In connection with the above marvelona offerlngra, we "hall place on Male the fellowlnc extraor- -
g*" dintiry SHU Valneni -
S= 1000 yards All-Silk Faille Francais, a heavy, dependable, wearing Silk, in colors of tan, brown, navy, cardinal. =
gfcz garnet, green, lilac and gray; regular value $1.00; sale price yard 72c z
g"~ 3000 yds. All-Silk Foulards, in new blue and violet grounds, in choicest patterns; regular 75c. Sale Drice.yd 50c "
«g~ JSOO yds. 27-inch Black Taffeta Silk, a splendid, heavy quality, very lustrous; regular $1.10. Sale price. yard 85c z
g-; 2000 yds. 20-inch Black Peau de Soie, a quality most reliable for wear; regular value $1.25. Sale price.. yd 95c z
I*2 . COUNTKY ORDERS RECEIVE fROMrT ATTENTION. -
A good character is more easily lost
than gained.
BELATED SHIPS
ARE ARRIVING
IN GOOD ORDER
Six of the Overdues
Have Made Port.
FAST RUN OF A FRENCH BARK
MARGUERITE MOLINOS OTJT
SAH^ NINE OTHERS.
?
Dead Whale Taken for a Derelict — A
Big Fleet of Deep-Water Ships
Reported Outside — Trouble
on the Gaelic.
The overdue fleet kept the pilots busy
yetterday. Early in the day about a
dozen deep water vessels showed up on
the horizon, and half that number made
port before sundown. The remainder
Jlnding the weather unfavorable stood off
shore and will probably set in to-day. In
order to be ready for them the pilot boats
were kept outside and the tug Fearless
took out half & dozen pilots to iill the va
cancies caused by the incoming fleet.
Five of the arrivals are coal laden and
their advent will tend to relieve the strin
gency In the fuel market. The sixth ves
sel is nearly us welcome, as she is loaded
with nitrate. The powder company has
been anxiously looking for her during the
past week.
The banner run of the season has been
mud« by the French barK Marguerite
«*ounos. Both she and tlie Britlsn bark
Invermay arrived from Swansea yester
day, but the Britisher was IoJ uayi mail
ing the run while the Frenchman made it
m 113, the best passage ot the year. The
other vessels that tne iiolinos nau beaten
irom bw&nsea are the Invcrlyon, now out
120; Inverlochy, i^?: t'aas of jvllllecrankle,
J-»6; citssarti J4S; Normanaie. vi. ..m,
Cialline, K7, and General Neumayer, ISO
days. The owners of the Cass-aru, Xor
mandie ajid .Ncumayor have reinsured
their risks on tne vessels, la per cent be
ing piUd on ».ie Neumayer.
'J.he British ship Godiva, on which 7 per
cent was paid, also arrived. She left Kii£
land wlti. tne itajore and had an experi
ence similar to that vessel. She was off
port a couple of uays ago, but owtuj to
a change or wind ha<! to stana oft shore.
On tne British ship Australian 2i) per
cent reinsurance was paid and the gamb
lers were pleased when she came sailing
into port. The vessel was *l<j4 days out
from Cardiff and it was feared that her
cargo ol coal nad taken iire. The .Lvder
liorn was one of the arrivals on which no
reinsurance was paid. <sh<» was HO days
making the run irom Hamburg and has
beaten the Reliance, now out 175. and the
Canrobert, 803 days. The latter vessel got
Into trouble off tne Horn, and had to put
Into Valparaiso for water.
The lit-rman ship Schwarzenbek and
German bark Birma were the other ar
rivals. The Schwarzenbek made the run
from Newcastle. Australia, in 74 days,
and the Birma came from Iquique In 08
days. Both vessels had uneventful pas
sages.
The schooner Lena Sweasy arrived from
Manzanillo yesterday with a cargo of
cedar logs, and Captain Johnson reports
that there is a tleet of at h-ast twenty
deep wan r ships off ?hore. In that event
the list of arrivals should be very large
to-day. When fifty miles west southwest
of Point Keycs the lookout on the schoon
er reported a derelict on the starboard
bow. It was petting dusk at the time and
ail hands made sure it was the remains of
a schooner bottom up. Captain Johnson
altered his course ana stood down toward
the de-relict, but before h* got within a
quarter of a mile of It the odor and the
Hock of sea fowl that arose from it told
him it WiL» a dead whale. This is prob
ably the same derelict that has been
sighted by passing vessels several times
during the past week. The whale has
probably been killed by the hunters who
make their headquarters at Monterey and
getting away from them in heavy weather
ha^ been drifting around ever since.
The stevedores working on the Gaelic
got a touch of quarantine yesterday that
they did not like. The vessel had been
thoroughly fumigated at the quarantine
elation In order to kill the rats. When
she ¦was berthed at th*» mall dock there
were no windfalls to carry off the fumes
of the drugs us'?d In fumigating. In con
eequence when the longshoremen got Into
the 'tween decks they were nearly suf
focated, and after regaining the wharf
half of them could not be persuaded to go
back aboard the vessel again. The steve
dores thought it was a good Joke, but
the longshoremen could not see It in that
lipht and refused to work.
ITnited States Quarantine Officer Kln
youn is determined that no bubonic plague
ehall come into San Francisco from Hono
lulu. He Is on watch night and day, and
any packet that comes from the islands
will be rigidly Inspected before she Is al
lowed to dock. In the case of vessels ar
riving from Honolulu direct, the Captain
•will have to show an extra clean bill of
health or his vessel will be quarantined.
The transport Tartar has been re
chartered by the Government and will
take a load of emergency stores to Man
ila,
The Alaska Commercial Company's
steamer Uertha arrived from Unga
Island yesterday. She brought down a
large quantity of concentrates from the
Apollo mine.
p| ted soluble cocoa —^superior pi
|| the Dutch and other Euro- i|
1 D. GHIRARDELLI CO. j|
AMUSEMENTS.
SPECIAL MATINEE TO-DAY, NEW YEAR'S
. DAY.
A NEW TEAR'S VAUDEVILLE FEAST.
EVERY ACT A HIT.
BILLY RICE and H. W. FRILLMAN: THE
ROSINOS: DOROTHY DREW; DOUGLAS
AND FORD;
FOUGERE
THORNE AND CARLETON; *LA SYLPHE;
THE AVERTS; AMERICAN BIOGRAPH.
Reserved seats, 23c; balcony. 10c; opera chairs
and box seats, 50c.
Matinees To-day, Wednesday, Saturday and
Sunday.
TIVOLI OPERA-HOUSE.
A HAPPY NEW~mR TO ALL!
Two Performances To-Day.
MATINEE AT 2. EVENING AT 8.
The' Gorgeous Holiday Extravaganza,
LITTLE 80-PEEP
OVER TWENTY-THREE THOUSAND PEO-
PLE HAVE ALREADY SKEN THIS
GREAT SHOW! I
Seats Now Selling One Week Ahead! !
POPULAR PRICES .......25 and SO CENTS
TELEPHONE BUSH 9.
THE PEOPLE'S POPULAR PLAYHOUSE.
Eddy »nd Jones B ts. PDONB. 30UTH 770.
r . * A VERY JOYOUS EVENT.
MATINEE TO-DAY!
• TO-NIGHT.
PROFESSIONAL MATINEE THURSDAY
THE ORIGINALS.
MURRAY AND MACK,
In Their Hilarious Farce.
FINNIGAN'S BALL!
7'" • POPULAR PRICES.
•- , Evening— lsc. 25c, 35c. 50c and 73c
¦ : ' Matinee— lsc. 25c. 35c and oOc
NEXT SUNDAY NIGHT— THE REVTSV
SANTLEY NOVELTY COMPANY.
CHUTES JVND ZOO.
EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENINO.
7VV/\JOR MITE,
The Smallest Actor on Earth. •
ADGIE ANDHER LIONS,
In Her SPECTACULAR MIRROR DANCE.
ELLA BURT, Coasting the Chutes.
AND A GREAT VAUDEVILLE SHOW.
PRESENTS FROM THE
NEW YEAR'S TREE
for the CHILDREN
TO-PAY.
Phone for Seats— Park 2a.
AMUSEMENTS.
TESTING THE CAPACITY OP THB THBjU
TER EVERT PERFORMANCE
LAST TIA/O WEEKS
— Besins with—
SPECIAL MATINEE TO-DAY.
Lleblpr and Company Present
HALL CAINE*S Powerful Play. THB
CHRISTIAN.
THE GREATEST PI*AY OP THB DAT.
RATES REDUCED !
THB GREAT HISTORIC PANORAMA.
BATTLE OF
MANILA BAY,
MARKET ST.. NKAR EIGHTH.
Will soon be takpn to the Parts Exhibition. X?B»
til that time the admission ts reduced to
25 CENTS. CHILDREN 10c.
See the entry of the American ships durtn*
the night, the dentruction of the Spanish fleet
and the charge of the First California Volun-
teers.
Open from 9 a. m. to 10 p. m.
- INTERSTATE PANORAMA CO.
WESTERN TURF ASSOCIATION.
TANFORAN PARK.
THIRD MEETING, Jan. 1-M. 1900. InclustTe.
Six high-class running races every week-day,
rain oi» shine. beglnnir.K at 1:30 p. m.
The Ideal winter racetrack of America. Pa-
trons step directly from the railroad cars lnu
a superb grand stand, glass-enclosed. wher«»
comfortably housed In bad weather they can
enjoy an unobstructed view of the races.
Trains leave Third and Townsend street* at
9:00. 10:W and 11:30 a. m.. and 12:13. 12:33, 1250
and 1:23 p. m..' returning Immediately after
last race at 4:43 p. m. Rear cars reserved
for women and their escorts. No sxnoklnir
Valencia street 10 minutes later. , • '
San Jose and way utattons. Arrive at San
I Bruno at 12:45 p. m. Leave San Bruno at 400
and 4:43 v. m. .
Rate*: San Francisco to Tanforan and re-
turn. Including admission to track, Jl :5
„ TI „„-.„„ V- J - MARTIN. President
¦ F. H. GREEN. Secretary and Manager.
CONCERTS AND BESORTSw.
TWO FAREWELL RECITALS.
SHERMAN. CLAY & CO."S H\M,,
THURSDAY and SATURDAY AFTERNOONS.
JANUARY 4th and «th. at J:IJ.
VLADIMIR DE
f>/\ c h m f\ im rv,
The World's Greatest Chopin Interpreter
Cla 6*6 * & Co°?; " al>d J1 Wm ° n "^ at Sn *™*a.
COMPLETE CHOPIN PROGRAMMES
¦ STEIN'WAY PIANO USED.
COKE! COKE 7
' P. A. MCDONALD,
wholesale Dealer ana Shipper of Ccfcs*.
OFFICE IU FOLSOM ST • •
6

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