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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 08, 1901, Image 1

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SAN SATURDAY, JUNE 8il9dl^
VOLUME XC-NO. 8.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
Cable Message;: From- the Fair Young Bride jnYokohama Brings the News
of Death," but Gives Absolutely No Particulars of the Sad 'Event.
Mother of Deceased Summoned From ' Monterey to Hear Sad Tidings
TRAGIC AND STARLING IS ENDING
IN FAR-AWAY JAPAN 0F THE ROMANTIC MARRIAGE
AND THE BRIEF HONEYMOON OF HUGH TEVIS
Railroad Attorney Returns From East Elated Over Inside Information That
Directors Are Indignant Over Summary Removal of J. B. Wright--"De
posed Division Superintendent to Continue as Chief Political Aid
HERRIN STILL IN POLITICS, IN DISREGARD
OF FAMOUS ULTIMATUM OF PRESIDENT HAYS,
AND A CLASH WITH CHIEF SEEMS IMMINENT
rr UPENDING conflict between W. F.
I Herrin and President Hays of the
j i Southern Pacific Railroad has
"^ thrown the men in the "big yellow
building" into a flurry, for all realize
that when issue is Joined between these
two no man can foretell the result. They
await the crisis and Btart at shadows and
duck at the rustling in the wind of a stack
of papers.
A ehort time ago it was not as it Is now.
Hays issued his famous proclamation
anent politics and outside business ven
tures not mixing properly with railroad
duties. Herrin thought Hays was looking
straight at him and he shook in his boots.
But lately something has come over the
spirit of his dreams. He has resumed his
old air of hauteur, and his friends look
¦wise and hint of a directorate displeased
and a president not too firmly entrenched
in the favor of his employers.
THE TWO MEN MOST DIRECTLY AFFECTED BY HAYS' ULTIMATUM
THAT EMPLOYES MUST KEEP, OUT OF POLITICS, AND WHO MAY
CAUSE TROUBLE FOR THE SOUTHERN. PACIFIC PRESIDENT. - -
It Is said that Morgan, has had in mind
for a considerable period the creation of
a single great institution \. which "would
dominate j not only , the banking [ business
passing to and fro between | America and
Europe, but. would practically dictate' trie
financial . operations of L the ; world. ' S :> £
. His < experience L .with | existing L banking
facilities during the .recent, panic,' It ¦ is
said, .'has hastened his de3ire "to ."put. into
operation his great scheme. ; • :'•-;" ' • •
XEW; TORK, June 7.— A cablegram to
the World from London says: It Is're
ported here that J. Pierpont Morgan is
engaged in arranging for the establish
ment of a great Anglo-American bank
•with a capital of $1,000,000,000. It is pro
posed to abolish all of the "principal finan
cial agencies and banks already; engaged
In the Anglo-American business.
The proposed institution,' It Is" sald,~ is
Morgan la understood to have associat
ed with him In the stupendous undertak
ing: not only the principal capitalists who
aided in the organization of the billion
dollar Bteel trust,- but also I the' Roths-
Child.- \". -
Intended to be the. principal agency for
the already vast and rapidly growing
banking transactions between Europe and
America. '"". . - -
Special Dispatch to The Call.
Associated With Him Are Said to Be the Rothschilds and the Principal
Capitalists Who Aided in Organizing the Gigantic Steel Trust.
MORGAN NOW PLANS A GREAT ANGLO-AMERIGAN
BANK WITH A CAPITAL OF ONE BILLION DOLLARS
yesterday states that J. B. Wright, the
deposed division superintendent, has con
fided to friends the storv of his dismissal,
and that It has become gossip among rail
road men. i
As early as March General : Manager
Julius KruttschnJtt had a talk with
Wright and ordered him to keep his hands
off politics In future. Wright replied that
he had dabbled in the came in the uast
under instruction from the ©resident of
the company, who was his employer and
had full authority to give him instruc
tions. At this same conference ; Krutt
schnitt made the peremptory demand that
J. W. Heintzelman. master mechanic, J.
R. B. Robinson, resident engineer, and T.
J. Jones, Wright's assistant division su
perintendent, be removed. Wright de
clined to discharge these men, saying that
they were all faithful and capable em
ployes.
Genesis of "Wright's Dismissal.
"Well, if my wish is not respected,. in
that matter," Kruttschnitt Is reported, to
have said, "you had better look about for
something else to do about July L"
Wright replied . that if such demand
were insisted upon, his resignation .was
from that moment in Kruttschnitt's
hands, to be acted upon at his pleasure.
About May 1 Wright received a tele
gram frtm a high railroad official, rumor
has it, warning him of the forthcoming
ultimatum about politics and the oil busi
ness as an avocation for railroad gentle-
men. Wright replied that he was willing
to drop all outside ventures. Soon after
the. same official .wired to Wright that it
would be just as well if he would send in
his resignation. Wright telegraphed back
that his resignation had been in Krutt
schnitt's'hands since March.
It was that resignation that was accept
ed late in. May, setting adrift one of the
most popular men in the. employ of the
Southern Pacific. ; . ,.
They are trying up in Sacramento to get
Jack Wright to accept a crown, but he
has "thrice refused." . Employes of the
Southern Pacilic shops at Sacramento,
numbering 3000 men. subscribed $1000 for
a silver service, which will be presented
to their deposed chief as soon as its man
ufacture Is completed. Prominent resi
dents of Sacramento will present him an
elegant gold service.
Influential. Republicans and .Democrats
alike are urging Wright to accept the
nomination . for Mayor of Sacramento,
with the assurance that no opposing can
didate will be named. .Wright has de
clined. He says he has been a busy man
and needs rest, and that he plans to take
a trip .to Europe with | his wife. : Sacra
mentans, however, have not given up
hope, and they. believe that he will ulti
mately yield to popular clamor and con
sent to serve his city as Mayor:
Should Wright persist in his declination
W. E. Gerber, cashier of the California
State Bank, will probably be the Republi
can nominee for Mayor of the Capital
City.
"Keep your hands' off politics,!" Hays
eay? end scowls at Herrin.
"I'm not out of politics. There are a
few Ecores to be paid off, and I'll" pay
them, and Jack Wright Is the man who
will help me," says Herrin, making "goo
poo" eyes at the deposed division super
intendent up at Sacramento.
Herrin went East recently to argue a
case before the Interstate Commerce
Commission, feeling very shaky as to h!s
future. He came back with, a good bal
last of self-assurance, to the amazement
of those who thought his days of power
¦were gone.
Men close to Herrin say that during his
absence he obtained knowledge 6V facts
thai makes him sanguine of his own fu
ture and gleeful in anticipation of the
downfall of Hays and the withdrawal of
the anti-politics ultimatum.
Three Directors Indignant.
Herrin has confided to some that three i
members of the present board of directors
are indignant over the. summary dismissal
of Jack Wright, the popular division su
perintendent, and displeased with numer
ous features of Hays' policy. Hays has a
live-year contract, to be sure, but the men
in power now are not the men -who em
ployed him.
"And what do they care for a five-year
contract," Herrin is reported to have said,
"when the whole question of the railroad's
policy is at Issue?"
Herrin has done more. He has passed
the word along to Jack Wright that he is
In politics still and that he wants him as
his chief lieutenant, even though he is no
longer on the payroll of the Southern Pa
cific. Such palpable disloyalty would
never be ventured. It Is reasoned. If. Her
rin dlfi not feel certain of his own strength
and of Hays' weakness with the director
ate.
The attorney, however, has said that In
future he will not take so prominent a
part in politics as he has at times in the
past, and that he will play the game only
when forced into it 1n self-defense or to
settle old scores.
A telegram received from Sacramento
- Continued oh • Page Two. «
;W;'~*UGH TEVIS Is dead.In faraway
'[ I-HI; Yokohama the^beautiful girl who
I ¦ I •:'^?'»^®e^ aT.as° be^. ame nls , bl?de
:.~.'- ~' Swatches-.beside^; Ills;-lifeless • body. -j
¦ ' :*^.wWlo^thp r _members^of t hlsjfa.inlly",
In this' city,anxiously.-a.wait the expectevl.
message that : wijl; more «fully explain 'the
sorrowful %of>h[s sudden taking off.
:V. Thursday; night at 11 -'o'clock Dr. * Harry
, Tevis {received ~sl]. "cablegram ( f rbiin'-¦ Yolio-^
hama^ffoTTi^hiS'.-sI^ter-in-law '»informing
Mm\thatihis.-.brother' Hugh ,'w*asi'danscr-
ously ; ill. ,Two , hours' later came another
cablegram with ¦ tlie 'news of Hugh .Tevis*.
death. ' The cablegram contained < hot one
V of (explanation. -' Just ¦ the fact . that
ABMED CATTLEMEN :• .
v RAID A SHEEP ; CAMP
Horses . and - Sheep, Shot and Tvn
¦• Herders ; on a; Dis- ¦
puted f Range. ¦ ;
CHEYENNE*- Wy O ;, ; June, 7.-There was
a clash • between : cattlemen -and flockmas-
ters over a division; of -"/the. range near
Piedmont, \InUthe," aputhwesterri^ part Vof
the State, last nlgiifVi The isheepmea had
been warned toinot ; trespass upon a cer-
range "claimed.' by\, the cattleipenl\ : ; No
attention ¦ was; paid to .the ; and
last "; night * one : of , the /sheep camps i was
,vlsited I by .„ a ¦ party, off armed , cattjeinen/
The sheep '; herders woWd ¦ not ¦ move 'their
flocks ! arid 'the > cattlemen 'opened ; fire.*. One
herder- was shot ' in • the"; leg and ' another, in
. the :^ arm.': -The , cattlemen* then: shot^ the
horscsl and j killed'^ several ; head : of , sheep
and '-burned- the;, wagons. J", Officers are- out
rounding > up ;the^ marauders. y v The '. names
of the wounded ¦' herders^ have not' been
, learned.' - ; : :V VVi> v ' ';"• ;«-". : -:;i
' HE impression that tlCe widozv of ¦Hugh tevis zvill. come \ in for a considerable share of the
J^ Tevis millions -is 'not clear^in the light of Lloyd Tevis'-zvilV Lloyd Tevis, father of Hugh
,! Tevis, died July '24;. i8op, leaving an estate zvhichzvas'subsequently appraised' at $7,837,600.
His zvill I filed [Augiist}7, 1889/ bequeathed the ert The zvill contains the fol
lozving paragraph: :.-¦¦ '¦ ; • / ";• , ;:¦ ,. : ¦¦ :.-;:-:- -V ¦';¦•' ' &iffc$\*^i
• ..'. tc IJiereby declare that in m^ Margaret S.
Bldnding; zvifc of' Gordon Blanding;- Louise Tevis Sharon, v:ife, of Frederick W. Sharon; Harry
L. Tevis,' Hugh Tevis [and William S. Tevis j and r that my .omission to maker any provision for
them' by ..this 'will is .intentional; and 1 [commend my said, children to the 'can r and a ffection of my
' said I wife/ hi zvhoml , Have- full' faithMnd Confidence." . « ; ; : ', .- '; 'JWJji
¦ O;t August 6y : ipoo^Judgc Coffcy of ' the "> Probate y Court made' an order of distribution in
which all the, property \'o '// the estate was conveyed .to Susan G. Tevis, zvidow of Tevis. The
amount, conveyed : to. her children: since the' death of her husband As. probably not very large.
life"':';' '4 ypromirimVjawfa Tevis zvill only receive '
one-half < of zvJiatcvcr ['estate 'her deceased {.husband left, as [a ¦ child/ by : a former wife, is a joint hcirjto ;
the property, li Had Hugh )-TcvisJmttiivcd: h is. mother: his . estate jvouldh'ave been ¦ triple in value, as he
twouWJiaveinhcritcdiajp^ :'. > . . -/: - ,"'
'No' doubt -the wealth, of Mrs. Susan G.Tci>is; widow pfc^
¦' praised -'value' of 'the.cstatc: practical business c
J$ij,ood,qoo. -Ike widow;of [Hugh^Tmisjim^ amount will be:
dctcrmiried;by:Mrs.;SusanG:}f /. .-,_;..;,":'• ¦.;;;¦•_¦ -.'V.-.v- -; :^<W* •• '..'¦ V ¦ - •
WEALTH OF LLOYD TEVIS IS WILLED TO HIS WIFE.
LATE MILLIONAIRE WHOSE SAD AND ; UNEXPECTED DEATH WIULE ON* HIS 1 HONEYMOON TRIP IN THE
LAND OF THE MIKADO HAS PLUNGED. HIS FAMILY AND - LEGIONS OF : FRIENDS IN DEEP SORROW.
;- i HIS l YOUNG ) WIDOW;.WILL BRINGHIS BODY HOME; ' .' . ' :'":/- ' .' \ • .
Mob Breaks Into Jail to Lynch
: '¦ a Negro and Is Fired »
Governor; Calls* Out the Militia and
¦. the Prisoner Is Sent to a Place
¦ J* • of Safety.
CARROLLTON.pa. , June 7.— The nerve
of a Georgia Sheriff, Joseph Merrill, to
day. UDheld the [ law of the State and
saved the life of a negro from a mob. In
protecting the negro, who was saved.from
the* gallows only:"- a few hours before
through the efforts oMiis lawyers, one life
was lost and two men were wounded. The
arrival 'of '<' the "¦: State >-' ; militia averted
threatened- trouble . to-night and at 9
o'clock a special-train the negro,
whose crime* was" the; murder of a little
white boy wham he found fishing- alone,
was speeding toward ' Atlanta,' under
guard.
-The man killed In attacking the jail was
George Bennett ' of Carrollton, ' and the
wounded men are Thomas Smith, a citi
zen of Car6llton,<and an unknown man,
presumably a farmer.' Thomas S. Word,
father: of the murdered boy, who was in
the front rank of the would-be lynchers,
was not'hit. • After Bennett fell Mr. Wood
jumped upon a' window sill and exclaimed
dramatically: ' . .».'¦_
. "Shoot me, Mr. Sheriff; I would as soon
die now as any time.-' , j;
Only nine shots'were fired and the walls
of the jail show the marks of the bullets.
None of the Sheriff's posse was hit.
Williams; the' negro who caused the
trouble, was - tried and found .guilty of
murdering Otis Word, January 1, 1901, and
sentenced to be hanged to-day. He was
only this morning, refused- a : new trial,
but his attorneys filed a bill of exceptions
and carried the case "toV the Supreme
Court. "*'¦¦- r 1 : > V
Jail Door. Battered Down. I
\- A, large crowd of people- had come to
j town to witness the hanging,, and when It
1 1 was lea rned-.that' 'an aibp^Li ¦'< ., ha*V -bf ern
''taken to the. Supreme 'Cp.atti^delaylng ; thje^
exe'cutiori.v there was much, excited' talk,
which, crystallized soon after In the* form-*,
ation of a mob., At "noon the mob made
an assault on * the jali. They battered
down the outside door, despite the warn
ing of: the Sheriff, and entered the bulld-
They made a demand on the Sheriff for
the keys to the negro's cell, but were re
fused.. With the refusal they began their
advance upon ; the , Sheriff and the j few
deputies which he. had been able. to sum
mon to his aid. They were told t<T"stop
or they would- be fired on,' but the order
was. not obeyed. , , 7. ¦ ., .."*....!..,,.
Shot Down by Officers. - ;*•-.
As they ". advanced down th*;*, corridor
toward the Sheriff the order. was given to
fire.. Bennett fell, dying almost Instantly.
Thomas Word, the father of .Williams'
victim,' who was in the front of the mob,
was badly shot, as was also an unknown
countryman. ,The unexpected ¦" fight i of
the Sheriff and his little posse frightened
the mob, and they retreated outside of. the
jail. Here they, broke and ran and were
soon divided .Into, little 'groups discussing
the event.' . ¦ > ,> .-;'.'• ."/.
Sheriff. Merrill at . once consulted Judge
Harris of the County Court and- it was
decided to call upon Governor Candler for
aid.' ¦ The Governor .was communicated
with by telephone and said he would send
two companies from Atlanta as soon' as
. they could be assembled. :
Governor Acts Promptly.
During • the', afternoon ¦'; the , mob ,-tele
phoned the situation to friends In the ad
joining towns of Villa Rica and Temple, 1
and made an appeal for more men to get'
possession ' of the negro. This ;was com-'
munlcated also'to Governor Candler, who'
soon wired a proclamation to the people
of the county. It was read from the steps
of the Courthouse- at 4 o'clock by I the
Mayor.: The Governor commanded the
people to disperse and said the entire mil
itary and civil ; forces. of^the State would
be used to enforce the, order if necessary.
-.The readlngr'of the proclamation appar
ently had a^ good^effect, as many people
were seen to' mount their horses and leave
town. Much apprehension was- felt for
the night, and the Sheriff and city. and'
county officials, after, a consultation, de
cided' to take ! the prisoner, out 'of-, the
county for safe keeping. "'iThe .'* Atlanta
militia under command ' of . Major Barker
arrived, about 6 o'clock and one hour later
escorted the * negro ' and Sheriff . Merrill to
the train/which was soon speeding south
ward to Atlanta. \ ; . ¦'...- '. ?.
Georgia Sheriff Takes
Life in Protecting a
: ' • • Murderer.
LAW UPHELD
BY THE USE
OF BULLETS
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL.

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