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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 01, 1902, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1902-06-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE SMDAY GALL.
2
SAN FRANCISCO'S
YOUNGEST MILLINER
np away from the face, u boldly as th«
chapeau of a light opera singer. Tn«
fringe played ostrich father again,
drooping occasionally over the brim. Un
derneath the brim, near the face, ap
peared a great chou of lace and rosea
worked in together in the «*teit TO * \
running combination of red and 1 whUe \
and pale pink that set off the dull brown \
braid to advantage. \
This nat showed the siy way that the
young milliner,, has of tucking awa, '
•¦lift
and there didn't seem to
¦ left for a single picnic _ mow.
dirty. It was ragged, to the straw
,. 'and then proceeded to adorn At.
No laces and flower, tor flt .
• mind you. She has a what J
ness of things. s * e " d It must .
8I nart outing bat Jj"^^.
have smart bowa and long -<vu g and
So she hunted the closets grow^
found a crisp .atln ribbon that^a
self into crisp little bow^
Bh e had ironed ".She a profes .
n;e^hff--t S:r
one of the bow».~ tudc •* « wo Ion *
redate the <«*« *££n, T chicken who
have been a ™*£™ tQT »ake of
l0 aned the use of W V£ M es ma
art - At w y r;^ is protty gur#
terial that »h© wauw
to get It. -'¦).. :.r ft easily
An old brown beaver hat. bisl9 £or
.haped. is the most Wtf^ „ a
'STJSS doming to a g
net, and to fasten It wu»
Another tremendous
dow under the chin. An
Oi. economy of »«°<* * ha4 left
pasteboard plate th»1 _«• * e Mnt up „
was turned upsM" «"™ ' A Io ia ot .1*
« th. «»<* °'' h ; 1 ' <^tn e«e«. » *~>t
j«tt in ptlviW * swtrl °~i 4 'Sit .Us was
. ,oln S to ar«» th. P*"^ » mal[e „„
.h« fortliwltli set »""_¦_, ot it
a wreath of roses encircled the crown and
gave the finishing touch of delicate color
It waa all pink and white and blue. a3
dainty as a sweet pea garden. .
Hazel depends upon pins for the hold
ins together of her work. So do many
of the artistic milliners. She evidently
grasps the principle that trimmings must
be as loose as possible In order to be ef
fective.
Pins are convenient for her. too. with
her restless spirit. Uor her creations are
/ ephemeral things that last no longer than
/ the lilies of the field.
; But she is a whole lot happier making
and destroying than other little girls are
cuddling their dolls.
Perhaps some day touring Parisians
Trill proudly take home hats which bear
Hazel's name emblazoned in gilded let
ters upon their white linings.
This will come when Hazel sets the
fashloE.8 for Pari3. And who knows?
Talent oF L
a UWe )
M?SS OF ST*.
iipmfiftii
That |HpB
the .-Pa^srtnJ
Creations, b
y TTTLja HAZBJIi FOWZER haa hat«
I that would dazzle a Parisian favor
17 lte. The wonder of the thing is
that she makes every one of them
. herself. Think of a young lady of
six .wno has hatted herself for over a V
year. Not only does she do her own
trimming but she designs as well and the
hats. are marvelously original creations.
All is fish that comes to Hazel's net.
She can make a Parisian hat out of a
pie plate Just as readily as other people
can from a straw .frame. More readiiy,
In fact. It takes her anywhere from five
to twenty-five minutes to produce a ere- •
ation.
She Is absolute about it. With the
conviction of true genius she will toier- ,'.
ate no advice. She must have her own :
materials, her own workshop. She works
as arbitrarily as an inspired painter or
musician driving all interruptions out of
the way when her. fits of inspiration come
on.
The hats that Hazel has made number
up into the scores. But she has only a
few of these in her possession, for with *
true artistic zeal she destroys ruthlessly.
If a hat does not quite suit her, it ia
not worthy of being let live. With the
nand of fate she bears down upon it.
fears out the pins and, stitches and scat- •
cers materials upon the floor— a cluster '
JT roses here, a wing there, a bit of lace,
& frame of straw. They can't tell them
selves from the contents of the scrap
oag. Then, in the burst of a new inspira
tion, she seizes them again takes up a
mouthful of pins and goes at the materi
als with as much zest as if they were
new. And they might be, jii'Vng by the
way they turn out.
Other little girls of Hazel's age «re well
>»ough satisfied to be the dressmaker or
milhncr of a family of dolls. But thia
has always been child's play to her. She /
never cared about making such a trifling '
thmg -as a doll's hat.- She always wanted
to ma tt really, truly grown-up hats.
So she has done it
She doesn't caro for the styles that be:'
JThey arc arbitrary matters. " according to
her way of thinking, and she prefers her
¦XT' ¦„ S ? € kn ° WS what is becomi «e
2 to £ r matterS - She buiIds a
g'ass'aVX faCe ' trying " on " before th C
g"iss as sne works. '.. --- .'
wotl cV , r nCVer hOard Of Virot - She
worked out her own methods according
to her own little head, and nobody ever
i her ll0W to proceed. She wouldn't
have listened if they had.
The milliners around the neighborhood'^
of Market and Taylor streets have cme
to know her. She goes to then, for her
tnctenal* She doesn't w,nt anything
mon> of their... Advice is thrown away
..onetimes they have an old straw frame
Jthut is past its day of salableness, or a
emnact of ribbon, or a bunch of flowers
hat has fcided by exposure in the win
~nv. rcr the price of the nickel or the
dirr'- t" r.t she treasures in her chubby
litre Land they can set her up in busi
es for awhile. The only condition they
•jai.t k- ihat they shall ses the hat when
t is dane. An hcur later she proudly
Marches into the shop in a bandy new
That is what becomes of all the stray
Terries that Hazel finds rolling up hill.
Other girls can spend their all in riotous
living among the candy stores if they
There is a wonderful old • brown and
white straw, a rough mix. that has
rrrvrd her more than a dozen times. It
is a bi^ flip which .lends itself very will
ingly •.•¦> shejv/y effects. She never sees'
It but she think:; of some uew tilt to give
It. Sometimes it is dashed up rakishly
ill the fror.t. again ft; cocks i-oquettj^hly
at 'he siSe.' Onro slip dr^w it down prim
' \y Into bonnet shape ovrr her rosy little
cars.
ireasur^fJ a Ftrip o f. old fringe,
li'.tvy and Rlliea. that came in beautiful-
Ij- tcr ni<-tt:n»-hat effects. Thla was used
h Scfaclt cf an ostrich plume, and* it was
".,t..Vr'ul how n?ar the little millinpr
<«7yo so the <?"jired droopins: effect. She
.-hoo'c the frin^n until if w:us Fomewhat
tangKfT. a? a:i ostrich plume looks -when
it Is curly. Then sh» fastened one end'
iK-ar the front, hiding the end away in-
Ron!oii:^y under a knot of ribbon;, drew
the etrip of fringe alov.g the edge of the
tr.rr. lotting the ends dangle ever "so little
over.
A clupter of roses gave height to the hat
ai «5 thy brim was tilted slightly at the
fcMe, just enough to encourage co>
j.iun«-ef. Under the brim, on the side tha>
l-jrnod up. appeared a big. saucy pink
r"r<*. !ts petals lying becomingly against
ty+ hair.
""'he old broTvn and white straw was
t ¦ »» to «;<) Outy al! over again for a niag
«i..i.« -.'. F"r«»nrhy affair that cast its brim'
:'•¦¦. r> • '-• ¦-. ¦ :--¦

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