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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 03, 1902, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1902-06-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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Many Men Injured
During the Street
Encounters.
Chicago Police and
Teamsters Fight
Fiercely.
Strife and Bloodshed
Mark Progress of
One Strike.
FURIOUS
RIOTING
IS BEGUN
Dawning -of Peace Is
Followed by Good
Wishes.
Many Congratulatory
Messages Received
by King Edward.
Streets of Metropolis
Have a Carnival
Appearance.
BRITISH
PEOPLE
REJOICE
LONDON GIVES WAY TO WILDEST JOY
OVER CLOSE OF SOUTH AFRICAN WAR
NEW RULER AND FORMER RULERS OF ¦ THE BOERS; THE MAX/WHO SCHEMED TO ADD THE AFRICAN RE
PUBLICS : TO BRITISH DOMAIN,- BUT. DID NOT LJVE TO SEE HIS DREAM FULFILLED; CAPTAINS
' ' OF FIGHTING MEN AND BRITISH. STATESMEN WHO URGED THE WAR. . -
;y and in three minutes the ' crowd was
broken and in ; full ."flight. Forming his
men around t the ;.wagons Once . more Col
lins.,, started -.on; his ;march.V> As- soon .'as
The most interesting scenes were those
witnessed along ' the Strand and Hol
born. These two great thoroughfares
were practically impassable to traffic ex
cept at a walking pace from early till
late to-night. Everybody was happy and
everybody, made a noise. One very amus
ing feature was that while comparatively
few sang "God Save the King" every
body shouted ..in chorus "Dolly
Gray" at the top ., of their voices.
Some enterprising - dealer in paper
lanterns had a brilliant Idea. These
lanterns when closed looked .like a
thin slice of pumpkin, but when opened
formed half a sphere of gaudy paper in
colors with the design of the union jack.
By cutting off one side of the pasteboard
brim the lanterns when opened resembled
on . the 'whole day prices in many cases
closed fractionally lower.
Continued on' Page Two.
Y Jf IS EXCELLEXCY LORD MII.XKR; his Excellency Mr.
m B Steyn, General Bremner. General C. R. Dewet nnd
JL JL Judge Ilertzog. acting in behalf of the Orange Free
State, and General .. Schalk-Burger, . General Reitx,
General Louis Botha and General Delarey, acting for their
respective burghers, desiring to terminate the present hos
tilities, agree to the following terms:
First— The burgher forces in the leld will forthwith
lay down their arms and hand over all their gnns, rifles nnd
ammunition In their possession or under their control, dc
•list from farther resistance and acknowledge' King Ed
ward VII as their lawful . sovereign. The manner and de
tails of this surrender will, be arranged bet-ween. Lord
Kitchener and Commandant General Botha. ' assisted by
General Delarey and Chief Commandant Dewct.
Second— AH burghers outside the limits of the Trans
vaal and Orange River Colony, and all prisoners of war at
present outside South Africa, who arc burghers, will, on
duly declaring their acceptance of tb.0? position of' ttabjc'Cts
of his Majesty, be brought back-to their home* n* soon as
means of • transport '.can be provided and means' of subsist
ence- assured. ¦".•¦•- -¦'-'. ¦'¦¦ •-.-/¦>'¦¦• "'¦¦*¦¦'; '¦;*¦¦."'.¦
Third — The ; burghers so, returning will, not be deprived
of their personal liberty, or property. ". /' .'
Fourth— No proceeding,: civil or criminal,: will be taken
against any burgher's surrendered or ¦ returning .'.tor ¦ any
nets In connection with the prosecution, of the: war. The
benefits of this clause do 'not extend to certain acts- coni
trary to the usages of war, rrhieh had been notified by the
rommnnder-in-chlef to the Boer generals, and' which sbnll
lie tried by court-martia 1 -after the close 'of Hostilities. <; \
/_ Fifth— The Dutch language will bcWnnghtln the public
xchools of the Transvaal and Orange : River i Cplony, h where
the parents desire It, and will be allowed Inr the courts of
law." for the ljetter and more effectual -administration of
justice. '• ¦ ' '"¦¦-¦ " ./•v. '."/.•> ~~;.[u: ¦¦_]¦¦¦_ '¦',''¦ ¦.•.,¦;. '-:¦ :¦„¦¦'¦¦
Sixth — Possession of -rifles will be [ alloyred in'";the
Trnnsvnnl ,aud Orange. RlTer.,; Colqny,.- ta persons
them for their protection, on taking: out a license,y»ccord-
Ing (o lawn. - ; . . -, : ¦ ¦-' . , • *..' ...¦"
.'. Seventh— The- military administration of the\Trans
raal and Orange River',- Colony trill, at the earliest possible
date, he succeeded by a civil -government, and, as ; soon as}
circumstances permit,- representative Institutions ¦ leading
up 'to- self-government Will be introduced. ' ; \ ."
, ElKhth— TheV-qncntloH of granting the franchise to na
.tlves.-Tvlll not be decided until , after the Introduction* of
melf-Rpvernment. ..»,.. .
.- .\in <li- — \o npecinl tn.v Trill.be imposed on land property
In the Traiidvnnl'or Orange River Colony to- defray the'ex
penses of thc^vrnr. • . ,-.-.¦_ j
. Tenth— -Ag'noon as the condit'ions permit it, a commis
sion, on- which. the local inhabitants ;,\Till be, represented,
ivill -be appointed In each 'district of the Tran.ivnnl and Or
nnge, River Colony* under the supervision of a magistrate
or othcrTvine, r for the .purpose of ' assisting people : to 'their
homes, nnd . for those -irlio ¦ are not "able to ; provide ' for
themselves, etc., indispensable to the resumption of their
normal occupations; . His Majesty'" Government -will place
at 'the, disposal ot those commission* the »am of 3.000,000
pounds sterling:, and -will allow all notes Issued under the
law of JOOO of the South African Republic and all receipts
given up to officers In the field of the late republic, or un
der their order*, to be presented to a judicial commission,
which will; be appointed by the Government, and If such
notes and receipts are found by this commtMlon to have
been duly issued in return for valuable . considerations,
they will be received by the flrst-named commission as evi
dences of war- losses suffered by the persons to -which they
were • originally given. In' addition to the above named
free grant . of 3,000,000 pounds sterling his Majesty's Gov
ernment will be prepared to make advances on loans, for
the same purpose, free oC interest for two years, and after
ward repayable, over a period of years, with :; per cent In
terest. So foreigner or rebel will be; entitled to benefit
under this clause. ¦" ' - *
TERMS OF PEACE AGREEMENT BETWEEN BRITISH GOVERNMENT AND THE BOERS
• Continued ; on Page Two.
.: On the. Stock' Exchange there was a
scene of 'tremendous enthusiasm, mem
bers indulging in .all manner of horse
play.' At 11 o'clock , the whole house be
came silent, and Charles Clarke, mount
ing a bench, conducted the singing of the
national anthem. . Never before has this
great. hymn : been more impressively, ren-:
dcred at the Stock Exchange than to-day,:
¦when some 14.000 voices blended in one
great 'volume. Dealings opened with a
rush, . and at : first prices went up. but a
reaction due to profit-taking ensued and
A great crowd was ] early around the
Mansion House, but despite much cheer
ing the - Lord Mayor did not make a
speech.; . .. - >
CLARKE LEADS HYMN.
£ther, good-naturedly. The first official
celebration took place at the City of Lon
don School, where the Lord Mayor an
nounced the news in a speech and gave
the boys a half holiday.
. . saw that many revelers of the
night before had no intention of going to
bfcd, but were preparing for another day's
jubilation: c As the sun rose all the streets
began to put on a flag-bedecked appear
ance. No British workman sallied forth
to labor, but to celebrate, and in many
instances took his. wife and children with
him." 'Each carried a small union jack.
By 10 o'clock the principal streets were
junimcd with a laughing, shouting, "sing
ing crowd, members of which jostled each
-w- ¦'• ONDON, June 2.— London went
> M • . wild - with joy to-day. , Its
'"¦¦ mj f ' ' streets seemed most enthusias
¦¦;B. ,-. 'tic in the manifestations. Early
n iifiy . in the morning any one abroad
Special Cable to The Cull -""^ tV
: New f> Yoric Herald. Copyright,
. 1902, by the New. York Herald
Publishing Company.
The police fell back : until , they had
formed a compact, mass ... close to the
wagons and then on Lieutenant Collins'
order, drew their revolvers ..and' charged
the crowd once more. This tune the fight
was more desperate, than before, and it
was over in much less time." The police
struck down numbers of men and used
their clubs and revolver butts with ener-
POLICE WIN BATTLE.'
man got to the man from the gas house,
and when it was over the leader was car
ried off by his friends with his head and
face covered with blood.- The police made
no attempt to arrest him, for th'ey. had
their hands full with hundreds pf men
and women who er*owded around them
and fought viciously with anything they
could lay .their hands upon. The 'crowd
increased so rapidly that Lieutenant Col
lins soon saw that his men would be over
powered unless he" took Vigorous action. at
once.. He ordered the "men to fall back
slowly toward the wagons and the crowd,
seeing in" this action, a token of victory,
pressed in with shouts and the volleys of
stones came more quickly. ..
"KILL THE COPS FIRST.".
The mob was led by a large man who
came from the gas house near Crosby
and who continually called to. his follow
ers to "Kill the cops first and hang the
scabs afterward." Finally a big police-
Finally one teamster refused to pull his
team out of the way of the meat wagons
and the police placed ; him under arrest.
Then the fight commenced. In an instant
a shower of stones, rhud and sticks fell
around and upon the officers, bruising
some of them badly. Lieutenant Collins
ordered the march of the meat wagons
stopped and at once charged the crowd.
The crowd refused to budge when the po
lice came on. A large number of women
who came to the aid of the strikers were
the fiercest fighters' of. the lot. One police
man was knocked down with a brick and
his companions then drew; their clubs and
made war with such energy that in. a
few minutes the street was filled with
men wltli bleeding heads.
riGHTING COMMENCES.
repeated, much to the delight of the im
mense crowd that. was following' on."
ers and their sympathizers.
The fighting began on the West Pidc
shortly after noon, and in different parts
of the city continued practically^ all the
afternoon. The most serious trouble of the
day occurred >n Crosby street, in the dis
trict known in police circles as "Little
Hell." A detachment of policemen under
the command of Lieutenant Collins was
escorting a number of wagons loaded
with meat to the distributing stations
¦down town. A large crowd followed the
wagons, shouting and jeering and now and
then sending a stone over the heads of the
officers in the direction of the men on the
meat wagons. The line of wagons es
corted by the police was frequently
ctopped by other teamsters, who would
manage to pull across the street just in
the proper place to prevent the meat
wagons from making any progress. The
police would order the men away and In
a few minutes the performance would be
*»IirCAGO. June 2.— Riot and
g bloodshed marker] the progress
fl of the teamsters' strike to-day.
RV J There were numerous fights be
>52&^ tween Hie police and the strik-
VOLUME XCII-NO. 3.
SAN FRANCISCO, TUESDAY^ c JUNE K 3, 1902.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
The San Francisco Call.

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