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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, July 04, 1909, Image 19

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TOO MUCH GOLF
SAY FRIENDS OF
ARMY PHYSICIAN
Devotion (o the Links and So«
ciety Lead to Failure in Pro
' motion Examination
Captain Henry Stevens Kiersted,
Medical Corps, Will Have to
Doff His Uniform
Honorable discharge from the service
Is tlie portion of Captain Henry Ptev
ens Kiersted, medical corps. U. S. A..
Ti-ho has been stationed at the Presi
3io at Monterey for several years, and
who is widely known and popular In
local army and society circles. Failure
to pass the strict examinations for
promotion led to the young officer's
discharge, the order for which was
received at army headquarters in this
city yegjerday.
Captain Kiersted, who is the son of
a. former navy officer and the son in
law of Peter HcG. Mcßean. is even now
in Washington, where he journeyed in
the hope that influence might be
brought to bear in high places to se
cure him a continuance of his military
career. His efforts wpr? futile, how
ever, in face of the absolute rule of the
v.ar department, and the order re
celv«d here yesterday is irrevocable.
GOLF AXD SOCIETY
VJt was, pay those who profess to
lcv>w, too much golf and social activity
find too little burning of the midnight
oil that led to Captain KirrVted's fail
tire to pass the rigid examinations.
Under the provisions of an order made
April 23. ISOS, officers of the medical
corps who fail in an examination are
not entitled to a re-examination, as are
regular line officers. An examination,
largely oral, is rirst given, and if the
test is unsatisfactory from the stand
point of the examining board, a sup
plementary - \u25a0written examination is
given. If this also fails to reach the
required standard the papers are turned
over for inspection by a board of re
view appointed by the secretary of war.
Th« decision of this board is final in
the matter.
Captain Kiersted, who was then sta
tioned at the Presidio at Monterey, was
ordered to the Presidio at San Fran
cisco about three months ago to un
dergo the examination preparatory to
promotion to the rank of major. His
oral test showed a lack of close appli
cation to study and the written exami
nation which followed gave further
evidence of the same thing. The board
of review found a? the examining
board had done and gave its approval
to its markings.
HONORABLE DISCHARGE
Under the law. Captain Kiersted is
honorably discharged with one year's
pay. As soon as he learned that this
fate was probably in store for him he
hurriedly secured a month's leave of
absence and rushed off to Washing
ton, where for the last two weeks it is
understood some frantic appeals and
attempts to upset the usual proceed
ings of the war department have been
made.
Captain Kiersted first came to San
Francisco several years ago and was
stationed at Fort Miley. H.e received
his promotion to the rank of captain
in February, 1906. While stationed at
Fort Miley, eight Or nine years ago,
he met and married Miss Edith Mc-
Bean, a beautiful and stately blonde
and one of the most prominent of the
city's young society girls. The wed
ding was one of the most elaborate
r>f that season and the bride's father
furnished the new home of the young
couple at Fort Miley, even installing
hardwood floors in the army cottage
which they were forced to leave within
a few months.
Captain Kiersted was ordered from
t^an Francisco to Washington, but aft
er a short time secured a transfer
back to .Monterey. His next service
consisted of two years in Alaska, dur
ing a portion of which time his wife
\u25a0was with him. He returned again to
Monterey and has remained at the
Presidio post there ever since.
Both Captain and Mrs. Kiersted have
taken a lively interest in society in
Han Francisco, as well as at Monterey,
end have many friends in this city.
RUSSIA SEEKS CLOSER
RELATIONS WITH AMERICA
Inspired Article Appears in the
Novoe Vremya
ST. PETERSBURG. July 3. — The Xo
voe Vremya today published an edi
torial article on Russo-Chinese rela
tions. In which it urges an understand
ing with the United States in German
llaft Africa.
Close co-operation of the powers in
terested in maintaining the independ
ence and territorial integrity of China
is aIA» urged.
Attention is called to the success of
Ihe Russian policy in Korea prior to
1^36. irhile working with America for
tt;e defense and independence of Korea.
niJSSIA PROTESTS TO PEKIXG
• PEKING. July 3.— The protests of
Russia regarding the opening by China
of the Sungari. Amu r -nd Ussuri rivers
to international *,A.Ac, presented here
by M. Korostov* ~s. the Russian minis
ter, are based upon Russia's right, un
der the Aigun and other treaties, to
conjoint authority with China in the
naval regulations.
PATRIOTIC CELEBRATION
AT NAPA STATE HOSPITAL
Band Concert, Fireworks, Pa
rade and Recitals for Patients"
[Special Dispatch to The Call]?
NAPA, July 3. — An elaborate celebra
tion of Independence- day was held at
the Napa state hospital last night and
today, several hundred patients being
allowed to witness the exercises and
some taking part in the program. Last
night the State Hospital band gave a
patriotic, concert, and a display of fire
works followed. Today there was a
unique parade, with Herbert T. Slo
cum as grand marshal, William H.
Finch as Uncle Sam, Miss Minnie De
foithson as goddess *of liberty. Wil
liam Finch, an intelligent patient, gave
the oration of the day. Edward Cur
ran rave a scene from Richard IIL
Miss Bowen performed a fancy dance,
and a tug of war was held.
IMc» on Graves
The Chinese have a custom of leaving
roast pig at the graves of the newly
burled. There is probably not the slight
est connection between this oriental ob
servance and the fact that Ellis Parker
Butler, the man who wrote that im
mortal satire, "Plga Is Pigs," has writ
ten another whimsical story called
"Thompson's Truthful Graveyard" for
the July number of Sunset Magazine.
But it is delightful reading, •
Buildings Worth More
Than Before the Fire
TOTAL OF ASSESSMENT ROLL '
IS MORE THAN $492,000,000
Assessment on buildings before fire .\ .-.'s 97,800,000
Present assessment on buildings 114,000,000
Gain in assessment roll. .'.......... $38,000,000
Gain due to erection of new buildings .. $24,000,000
Total assessment roll over $492,000,000
Revenue city will receive $7,877,264
Modern Structures Erected During Last Three
Years Are Valued at $24,000,000
"A striking 'a<*t to he noted Is that
the aswumrnt of buildings Is now
sroatcr than at any time in our city's
history.** says Assessor .Washington
Dodge, In his annual report to the board
of supervisors, which will be presented
Tuesday. He continues:
**Theae (the building*) are now as
sessed at $114,000,000, whereas the
greatest previous assessment was that
of the year prior to the fire, vrhicb.
was $07,S00,000. This Increase is due
to the fact that a great number of
modern and costly buildings have
been erected on slte» which were
formerly occupied by old and obso
lete buslneNK structures.
"The total assessment roll," says
Dodge, "is $492,329,000, a gain of $3S,
000,000 over that of lasjL year. This
roll is sufficiently s large to Rive a safe
margin, namely, about 2*i per cent,
above the amount upon which reve
nues were estimated, to provide for
all possible delinquencies. .Of this gain
ENTIRE DELEGATION
DEPRIVED OF VOTE
Suffrage Convention Unseats
Washington Members After
Acrid Debate
SEATTLE, July 3.— The fight between
the factions of the Washington Equal
Suffrage association was discussed on
the floor of the national woman suf
frage convention this afternoon and
the convention decided unanimously to
unseat all the Washington, delegates.
The national executive committee, to
whom the Spokane delegates unseated
by the state convention appealed, tried
for three days to effect a compromise
between the factions, and, falllhg, re
ferred the contest to the national con
vention.
DEPRIVED OF VOTIXG
The question came up in the form of
a motion of Miss Alice Stone Blackwell
of Boston that the convention is not
satisfied with the credentials of the
Washington delegates, and withdraws
from them the privilege of voting, but
grants them the other privileges of
delegates.
In the debate on the motion each, side
was allotted 15 minutes. D. C. Coates
of Spokane, formerly lieutenant gov
ernor of Colorado, stated the case for
the unseated delegates to the state
convention and Mrs. Emma Smith de
Voe, president of the state association,
made no argument except that the na
tional convention was without au
thority to pass on the acts of the
Washington association.
"MIXD YOUR OWX BUSINESS** .'"
Another Washington delegate de
clared that the national convention
should mind its own business and said
that suffrage had been lost in Oregon
through Its interference.
National President Anna M. Shaw
broke into the debate to say that the
national body had jurisdiction and to
protest hotly against insults offered by
those who denied such jurisdiction.
The vote that unseated all the com
batants was then taken. The state of
Washington now has no vote In the
convention and the j regulars are in
control, of the state organization, but
under censure by the national body.
SIILXIOX SIGNATURES •
The convention devoted the morning
to the reading and discussion of re
ports. Mrs. Rachel Foster Avery, who
has directed the obtaining of a million
signatures to a petition to congress
asking for a submission of a sixteenth
amendment enabling women to, vote,
reported her work nearly completed.
The report of the committee on legisla
tion for civic rights was submitted by
Chairman Lucretia Blankenburg. A
conference of methods of work was
held for interchange of views.
Mrs. Mary E. Craigle of New Tork, In
her report as chairman of the; com
mittee on church work, spoke of the
courtesy and kindness she had receives
from clergymen. She said:,
CHURCH AXD SUFFRAGE
"There are two reasons why clergy
men should support the woman suf
frage movement.. Fii^t, because ', it is
just and right and in accordance with
the golden rule, and second because it
would augment the power of the
churches to have an enfranchised
womanhood to aid in carrying on the
warfare against the liquor traffic, the
white slave traffic, child labor, impure
food and many other existing evils that
depend upon legislative enactment that
now Is being waged, with only a third
the power of the churches.'.'
ATTITUDE OF PRESS
At the afternoon session the report
of the press committee which. was read
showed a growing Interest in suffrage
by the leading daily papers and maga
zines»_. The report dwelt with.'satis
faction on the surrender of the manag
ing editor of "one of the largest Ohio
dallies," who, once vowing . that he
would never print" an editorial * favor
able to woman suffrage, was doing that
very thing, explaining that, while his
own views were unaltered, the public
mind had changed.
Scholarships at a 20% Discount
Removal rates,. l mo. $10; 6 mos. $50.
Metropolitan Bus. C0L.1490 Market St.*
BR AXEMAN KILLED— San Diego. : ; July 3.—
Charles Barring-ton, -a Santa Fe . brakeman, Mt-
Inj: at ; San ,: Bernardino, was almost instantly
killed early _ this afternoon , «l ; Oceanslde. \u25a0-.Har
rington w» "standing on a car of ' a • gravel train
sod sravii the signal to rh ahead.; In Mine.man
ner lie . lo»t bis foot In? ; and ' fell : to : the ground.'
A; projecting, rod on : the oar. caught ihlnijiinder
the arius and be was dragged for 200 yards.. \u25a0•
THE, SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SUNDAY, -JULY :-4," 1909;
approximately $24,000,000 is dueto the
erection of new buildings.", 'j.
Upon the total assessment roll of
over $132,000,000 the tax rate of $1.60
wilt .furnish revenue amounting 1 to
$7.S77,2t>4, or, allowing for the widest
posslble N delinquencies, ' $7,500,000. -
Dqdge concludes his report with the
items of personal taxation. He says:
"The tax collections made by , this
office during the last 60 days on un
secured personal property, are the larg
est in our city's history, amounting
to $761. 3S0. This is an increase over
the collections on personal property
taxes made by this office last year of
$118,622.
•The collections of the state poll
tax also show a material increase.
The amount collected to date is $96,000
as against collections of $76,000 at this
date in 1908. This increase in collec
tions represents a gain to the credit
of our city's school funds, and to the
city, of $8,000."
TEA AND COFFEE
ON THE TREE LIST
Senate Strikes Out Proposed
Retaliatory Duty on the [Two
Beverage Commodities
WASHINGTON, July 3.— The maxi
mum and minimum provisions of the
tariff bill were adopted today by a vote
of 36 to IS by the senate. The final
action upon this amendment came at
the close of a day devoted to a lively
discussion of the proposed retaliatory
measure that brought out a great
variety of views as to the advisability
of enacting such legislation.
The provisions of this measure will
go into effect March 11, 1910, and 90
days must elapse before a president's
proclamation applying the maximum
duty of 25 per cent ad valorem in; ad
dition to other duties provided for In
the bill will be operative.
TEA AXD COFFEE FREE
The duty on tea and coffee as pro
vided for in the amendment originally
reported by the committee was
stricken out by the senate finance com
mittee. ,
The senate also agreed to vote on
the submission of an income tax
amendment to the constitution to the
several states for ratification, this vote
to be taken upon the resolution and all
amendments next Monday at 1 o'clock.
Senator Culberson offered an amend
ment to make nonpartisan the' ap
pointment of the tariff commission and
to pay the members salaries of $7,500
annually. Aldrich said experts were
to be selected and he did not believe
politics would be considered by the
president In that connection.
PARTISAN APPOINTMENTS
"From the morning papers," said
Bailey,' "the director of the census is
making his appointments for partisan
reasons. If that is true it Is the first
time it has been done in the history
of this country." In view of the re
port he said he would not trtist the
executive authority to make the ap
pointments without some restriction.
Aldrich said lie did not believe cen
sus appointments were being made for
political reasons. . "I know the pres
ident of the United' States too well,''
he said, "to believe he would permit
anything that kind." *-
Declaring the trend of the times
was . toward . nonpartisanship. Root
said the .very purpose ; sought by the
Texas senator would be defeated by
dividing these appointments between
republicans and democrats. He pointed
to the record, of the president as f a
guarantee that he would : not be in
fluenced by partisan motives.
MONEY IS FACETIOUS - f
"We are united in our esteem for
the president," said Money, "but under
the dispensation of providence he
might die and we might, have a bad
man like the: presiding officer of the
senate and' he might make partisan
appointments."'.
Vice President Sherman joined, in the
smile that became general as the Mis
sissippi senator proceeded to show, the
temptation of "men to make appoint
ments with a partisan bias.'
"Then there is the chairman of the
finance committee." he added. 1 "He has
never- been charged with being any
body's, good Sunday school boy. He
has never; been shot at as an angel."
-The discussion of Culberson's
amendment .was "Incidental; and', when
it was concluded ; the ' controversy over
the minimum, and maximum provision
was renewed.
TOBACCO IN; THE LEAP
July 3.— The tobacco
free", leaf question; was taken] up today
by a subcommittee of the senate com
mittee on finance and > a number of
tobacco manufacturers were heard Mn
opposition to the removal of any of .the
restrictions l- governing the sale of to
bacco in -the? leaf.
' .'The \ hearing was upon the Bradley
amendment,- which would ; permit : the
first .purchaser: to sell ; the- leaf without
the payment; of -'a itax. and all subse
quent',; purchasers .to ."make ;: similar
transfers;' so- long .'as* the '\u25a0/ tobacco /was
not ; manufactured mi any,* form.'; ; ':
: Tobacco -manufacturers ;' contended
today' that this j.woulcT- open "r.the ; whole
subject Vtor possibility Jof "great i fraud
and I also /that ; it' /would materially \u25a0 re
duce * revenues, - \ ' -.-• ".'::, ..•\u25a0 : ; : ;; •"';:
fi The proposition '\u25a0 to increase the rates
of tax upon. emoklng and! plug tobacco,
cigars, 'cigarettes and snuff '.was also
discussed-; \u25a0*'•':**
BANKERS LIST
THEIR WEALTH
FOR TAXATION
Other Prominent Citizens Leave
Assessor to Guess Value of
Personal Property
Dodge Sends Arbitrary Assess
ment Roll to Supervisors for
Final Review
The bond holders and bankers who
formerly made no report of their per
sonal property have seen fit thisVear
to apprise . Assessor Washington
Dodge of the value of their posses
sions. A few years ago when Daniel
Meyer and some other financiers failed
to report their personal holdings.
Dodge hit on the expedient of raising
the arbitrary valuation $250,000 each
year. This was done for two or three
years, at the end of which time Meyer
and his colleagues capitulated, and, as
this year, gave the office a report. :
Dodge sent the arbitrary, assess
ment roll to the board of supervisors
yesterday and in the next two weeks
the supervisors will review it "as a
board of equalization. The real es
tate valuations of the assessor, they
may reduce or advance, as they ' may
determine, upon 12 j hours' J notice, but
the arbitrary assessments they -may
only increase. A large number of per
sons arbitrarily assessed have since
called at the assessor's office and paid
the amounts due. precluding any pos
siblity of the board increasing the
estimate. .- ' : .
Many well known citizens have been
too busy with their usual undertak
ings to give the time necessary to
end the assessor a frank confession
of their invisible possessions, and a
number of property holders, reputed
wealthy, have omitted that duty, per
haps, in the expectation -that the as
sessor's decree would be a light one.
Following are some of the prominent
citizens who have allowed the assessor
to name the. amount of their personal
holdings:
Ignatz Stelnhart, $40,000.
Thomas H. .Wlllinmw, «30,000.
Dr. A. Barkan, $25,000.
'William B. Bourn, $25,000. |
Parrott & Co., $25,000. -
City atreet improvement company,
$20,000.
Mn honey B rot hem, $20,000.
Charles S. Wheoler. $20,000.
Garret McEnerny, $15,000.
Homer S. King, $10,000.
John Mahoney, $10,000.
H. Shiiln.val.l, $10,000.
Mrs. A. "Welsh, $10,000.
Charles Holbrook. $7,500.
F. "W. Bradley, $7,000.
AY. H. Metson, $6,500. /
Horace G. Platt. $6,000. •
T. C. Van \pm. $«,000.
"W. W. Montague, $5,000.
Mm. M. Huntlnjerton. $5,000.
C. F. Hum phrcy, $3,000. ij •V"
EdTrard'J. McCutolien, $3,000.
M. A. Gunut, $2,500. \u25a0:'\u25a0
J. Levlfison, $2,500.
Sullivan, Sullivan and Roche, $2,500.
William Denman, $2,000.
Abe Ruef, $2,000.
11. N". Stetson, $2,000.
F. J. Devlin, 5i. 500.
Morrison, Cope & Brobeck, $5,000.
J. S. Dram, $1,500.
Campbell, Metson, Drew A Oat
man, $10,000.
TIMELY RETURN SAVES
LIFE OF INNOCENT MAN
Supposed Murder Victim Reap-
pears at His Home
ZACATECAS. M^x.. July 3.—Re
appearing at his old home in the n*ck
of time Pedro Ortiz .was the means
of giving liberty to two men.
When Ortiz disappeared two years
ago he was last seen In the company
of Ramon Zarate and Bibania Lira. .
Soon after the dead body of a man
was found which was believed, to be
that of Ortiz and his companions were
arrested on the charge of having killed
him.
Zerate was sentenced to be shot,
while Mra was given a prison sen
tence. Ortiz returned as the sen
tences were about to , be executed.
INJURED DEPUTY SHERIFF
WILL PROBABLY SUCCUMB
Man Gives Himself Up, Con-
fessing the Shooting
TRINIDAD, Colo., July 3^— Isham
Williams, the deputy sheriff who 'was
wounded yesterday when James I. Kent,
also a deputy sheriff, was killed In a
fight with supposed horse thieves. near
Folsom, N. M., was brought to the
hospital here this morning in a dying
condition. ,
George Jamieson has given himself
up and has confessed to the shooting.
His brothers. Jim and Dan I Jamieson,
have escaped and a posse is follow
ing them. ' It is not' believed that
George did the shooting, but gave him
self up thinking to save his brothers.
A3 T OLD TIMER
Has Had Experiences.
A woman who has used Postum since
it came upon the market knows from,
experience the wisdom of using Postum
in place of ; coffee if one values health
and^a clear brain. She says:
, "At the time Postum. was , first put on
the market I was suffering from nerv-
ous dyspepsia, and my physician had re-
peatedly; told me hot tto use • tea \u25a0 or cof-
fee^; Finally ;i decided' to take his ad-^
vice and', try Postum. I got a package
and had it carefully 'prepared; finding it
delicious to the , taste. So I continued
Its; use and very soon its beneficial ef-
fects convinced 'me of -its value, for I
got well of my nervousness and dyspep-,
sia. : - *: ;'./\u25a0; './\u25a0 .';.' ; -•' \u25a0'.:'._ \u25a0; ,\u25a0 '\u25a0
: "My husband had been drinking cof-
fee allhis;llfe until it had?affected his
nerves terribly, and 1 persuaded him i to
shift to Postum.i ; It; was -easy to V get
him to make, the change," f or . the '\u25a0 Pos-
tum \u25a0'\u25a0 is '.bo: delicious. , It* certainly
worked \u25a0 wonders for him.
"We soon learned -'that Postum does
not -exhilarate on depress "and does not
stimulate,* but steadily .and * ; honestly
strengthens the nerves and .the; stom--
ach. ' i x • '-?iy?SaiS§§Sts.V ..\u25a0-'•.
'.'To make along story short,' our en-
tire : family '? qontinued -" to \u25a0._; use : Postum
wi th satisfy in g resul ts,' as shown; in ; our
fine condition^ of health,; and i we i Have
noticed ,(a ! 7 rather ! -unexpected : Improve-"
ment ;lns brain; and nerve power." fy
\u25a0-Increased; brain; and >; nerve? power al- ;
ways.follows theuse, of Postum In plage'
of coffee,*, sometimes in; a 'very ; marked
manner. v"There]s r a Reason."
Look - in , pkgs^for .the' famous ? little
book.* "The Road -to Wellville." . ; " ; :
vEver'rend the- above, letter f A new
onej appears; from; time to* time. They
nref Renolne,V true ; and ,£nll of ; hnni«in
interest.* "'. j ' ; - •\u25a0 : ,J"; ".,,'"• ( '
Miners Killed by
Powder Explosion
Due to Lightning
Flash From Sky Fuses Wires
And Completes Circuit
;6f Electricity
SALT LAKE CITY. ,Utah, July 3.—
Three miners were killed and six others
were seriously injured in a powder ex
plosion late this afternoon at Toplitz,
Utah.' ~. ;
'The dead are Pat' Campbell, P. B.
Bowman'; and Matt "'Regan.
The men were blpwntb atoms by the
explosion of 750 kegs of black powder.
The men were working. in a 35 foot
tunnel and had just completed tamping
the charge.
The powder was connected with two
wires which were to -have been con
nected later with a battery on a hill
quite a distance away. -
A heavy. thunderstorm came up and a
flash of lightning struck the wires, fus
ing them, completing a circuit and dis
charging the powder.
HARRY K. THAW STILL
STRIVING FOR LIBERTY
Counsel Declares He Will Prove
Client's Sanity
NEW YORK, July 3.— Counsel for
Harry K. Thaw appeared today before
Supreme Court Justice Gaynor at St.
James, L. 1., and argued against the
application for a change of venue from
Westchester to New York county of
"»« hearing to decide the question
JT, he Vr e^ Thaw should be released from
the Matteawan asylum.
\u2666 « J^trict; Attorney Jerome is anxious
nu&r* 8 T the ;<l u «f"<>n of Thaw's sanity
ultimately tried out in New - vnrir
county. Charles MorschauW oT T haw^
counsel said today that when the Ts-
S2 wftS^^nSf reached the courts
«,,„¥.? \u2666u p l ov £ Thaw s sanity so thor
oughly there would .be no douot
as to his right to his freedom. UOUDt
unm' Mon2K nOr - reSerVCd hiS dccl " to »
BABY'S BODY DISCOVERED
BURIED IN A CESSPOOL
Woman Unable to Explain Mys
tery, of Infant's Death
PASO ROBLES, July 3—An infant
about 3 days old ! was discovered to
day in a cesspool near the home of Ra
mone French, a young woman; Ac
cording to a statement made by Sheriff
McFadden, Miss French admitted to
ii m * u\ she ,T as tne m <>ther of the
child, but could not explain how the
little one came to be buried in the
cesspool.
Neighbors notified the sheriff and dis
trict attorney that they had heard the
cries + of a child for several days and
then they ceased. . . •
Coroner Palmer instituted a search
which resulted in the finding of the
win^e^he^F^y. 0 " 6 - \
BRANDENBURG TAKEN TO
ST. LOUIS FROM GOTHAM
Prisoner Calls Charges Against
Him a "Frame Up"
NEW YORK. July 3— Broughton
Brandenburg, the magazine writer, who
was acquitted last week on the charge
of larceny in connection with the pub
lication of a letter purporting to have
been, signed by the late Grover Cleve
land was taken to St. Louis today to
race the. charge of enticing away his
stepson. James Shepard Cabanne
Brandenburg waived extradition., and
as he left the Tombs today he said-
M wlllt^ see you all in two weeks.
The case- out there is a frameup. the
same as the one here was."
CAPTURE LEADER OF
GANG SMUGGLING CHINESE
Mexican Authorities Make Im-
. .. portant Arrest in Sonora
'EL PASO, Tex., JuTy 3.— ln the ar
rest at Lapasa, a hamlet in Sonora, on
the Arizona border v of Francisco Du
rano, the Mexican officials believe they
have captured the director of the gi
gantic smuggling scheme.
A number of papers have been taken
which indicate that the band carried
on extensive operations, including the
smuggling of Chinese into the United
States.
The . American officials have been
asked to co-operate.
- Kohler &• Chase's temporary quarters in the Harry J. Moore
building almost ready, giving an added impetus to this
' As the date of our removal approaches drastic measures
are necessary to meet the emergency which confronts us. The
insufficient accommodations of our temporary quarters neces-
sitate the quick disposal of a considerable portion of our pres-
T his unique situation is responsible for the - extraordi-
nary reductions which- nov> prevail. To meet this emer-
•"-" gency we are now presenting the most attractive opportuni-
ties to ; piano \u25a0 buyers in a-, career of 59 'years.
The famous makes of pianos included are alone sufficient
to distingfuish this sale. Coupled with the extremely low
prices and remarkably easy terms now in force, this event
should corrimahd the attention of every intending piano 'pur-
chaser. -The following' items are merely representative of the
reductions: . s
BARGAINS IN NEW PIANOS
" Every piano in< the house reduced, including the. Weber. Kohler &
Campbell. . Krell. Andrew. Kohler. Kohler& Chase, Fischer, Starck and a
dozen other famous .-makes. \u0084 \u25a0
New $250 Pianos;'.. \if 115 and $125 1 $250 Ward $115
,<s6 monthly) . I $500 Art Stuyvesant $345
$500 Steck..: ... ..;.......•.... ..$415 I $425 Fischer --. ..........'.../... .$365
USED PIANOS— SHARPLY REDUCED
. .''".- vl .All Are Practically Xtw
$375Winthrop . ..sil»s ( $6 monthly) $300 Hoffman . ..$1»5( $6 monthly)
$350 Knight; Brinkerhoff . ,^,'^ , $250 Knight Brinkerhoff ~
$•-115 ( $6 monthly) v 9165 ( $6 monthly)
\u25a0$350Trowbridge j;sU2sv( -$7 monthly) $325 Mansfield ...$225( $6 monthly)
$300'Albrechtr.'...$l,s5.( $6 monthly) $250 Hartman ... $125 ! ( $6 monthly)
$350 Franklin \u25a0.. .S2"JS;( $7 monthly) $650 Steinway . . .$485 ($l2 monthly)
$750 Starck :.... .$395'(510 monthly) $275 Winthrop ..'.5105 ( $7 monthly)
$375 Kohler.;& : . . \ $250 Koh'ler & ,\u25a0
.-;; s .Chase \u25a0... .S2SSJ( $8 monthly) Campbell .slos' ( $s monthly)
i's37s Kohler '& '\u25a0•- . - ' $750 Weber, .. $530 ($l5 monthly)
:. .Chase ....$205 (»$8 monthly) $1,000 Weber I ,
; $300 Pianola V.... 5225 -($10 monthly) -? Pianola ..S6SS ($l5 monthly)
C 1850
SUTTER: STREET AT FRANKLIN
HENEY ESCAPES
DEATH IN BAD
AUTO ACCIDENT
Machine Turns Somersault,
Pinning Dr. Beasley and Sen*
\u25a0 x sdor Mulkey to Ground
Bodyguard of Graft Prosecutor
Burned Internally by Inhaling
Steam From Boiler
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
CASTLE ROCK, Wash., July 3.—
Francis J. Heney, who had an almost
miraculous escape from death or fatal
injury in an automobile accident near
here this afternoon, left tonight for.
Seattle, taking with him for hospital
treatment his bodyguard, John McCar-
thy, who is burned "internally by hav
ing inhaled escaping steam from the
boiler of the automobile.
Dr. C. S. Beasley had recovered suf
ficiently from his injuries to help look
after the suffering detective and to ac
company Heney to Seattle. Jesse' Mc-
Laughlin, chauffeur, who received a bad
ankle sprain, was unable to travel, and
was left behind*
Heney expects to meet Mrs. Heney in
Seattle. The automobile is wrecked, it
is believed, beyond repair, and Heney
announced that he would make ar
rangements to secure a new one in
Seattle. V
CHAUFFEUR IS XOT BLAMED
"I do not blame McLaughlin for the
accident," said Heney tonight. "We
were traveling at a good speed and
while turning a sharp curve, a pile
of sand In the roadbed caused the
wheels of the machine to swerve to one
side. The roadbed was elevated and
the skidding of the wheels caused the
automobile to turn a complete somer
sault.
"I leaped in time, to escape being
pinned beneath the 'heavy touring car.
The others were not so fortunate, and,
finding that I was unable to extricate
them, I hurried at once to town for
help.
"Before we got back Senator Mul
key had "extricated himself, and ap
peared uninjured. It was 25 minutes
before Dr Beasley could be taken
from under the heavjf machine. He
was unconscious and seriously bruised
and scratched. McCarthy was seriously
burned by having inhaled escaping
steam. The \u25a0 chauffeur suffered a
sprained ankle."
MBS. HEXEY PREFERS PULLMAN
Heney and party were en route to
Seattle in a car in which they had made
the trip of over 800 miles from San
Francisco. The accident happened short
ly after noon and only a few minutes
atter hiving passed through Castle
Rock.
Heney says if he can get a new ma
chine he will make the return trip over
land in defiance of fate. Mrs. Heney, it
is said, prefers the comforts of a Pull
man car and will not venture far in
the auto again.
Auto Falls Over Precipice
EUGENE. Ore.. July 3. — In an auto
mobile accident near Triangle lake. 25
miles west of Eugene, in the mountains
last evening. Mrs. Al Kuykendall. wife
of a Eusrene druggist, suffered a broken
leg. and Mrs. D. A. P.iJne. wife of
Doctor Payne, owner and driver of the
machine, was seriousJj- hurt. The
party was goins: to Triangle lake when
Doctor Paine lost control of the ma
chine, which plunged do;vn a precipice
and struck a tree, demolishing the ma
chine and injuring all of <the occupants.
AMERICANS IN BERLIN
COMMEMORATE JULY 4
Ambassador and Mrs. Hill Hold
Reception in Garden
BERLIN. July 3. — Ambassador and
Mrs. Hill gave a fourth of July recep
tion at their residence today to the
members of the American colony. Five
hundred persons were present and re
freshments were served in the garden.
_ v : >\u25a0* .-.\u25a0\u25a0"\u25a0 •\u25a0 : *LjS6 **\u25a0 "-' *-±+ /j^Myv ''\u25a0'\u25a0'\u25a0 " \u25a0"\u25a0"\u25a0"\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0'\u25a0 ? \
.<\u25a0:\u25a0 : \u25a0\u25a0"\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0*\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 &*^s»vyxB£ b ' Ss*i *""<." \. \u25a0\u25a0
t, > •t'sy&riL ilif fair "... 1
A^N OF»EIV LETTER
(From Her. Henry FL' Wyman. C. S. P..
Cbaptaia of th« Semite)
Senate California Legislature.
MR. GEOHGE MAYEKLE— Dear Sir: r
am happy to inform you tnat the spectacle";*
which you furnlshcii me orer tbree years ago
still serre their purpose as wet> as when t
first put them on. I wish you erery success
in titrenffthenins an«i susfainlnc the eyesight
or your many patrons. Very sineeretv yours
HEN BY H. WYMAS. C.S. F.
GEORGE MAYERLE
GKADUATE GERMAN EXPERT OPTICIAN
Charter Member of Arcerlcan Asj«.x-iat!on of
; Opt'.cisn.H.
S*'<O Market st.. Opposite Ilale's.
Phone Franklin H27!>. S. F.
Mayer!*** t;ori»*a K.TPw»ri>r at all Reliable
Druzjtists. T>oe; hy mat! «sc.
FRENCH SAVINGS BANK
3lrmbrr of Asnocl.iicd 9sTlas»
Bank* of snn Kramrluro
IOS StTTEIt STUEfcT
Paid up capital *fio*WO.f!o
T.-taJ ass*-;« 3^819^836.11
Pws a »trictl.r >«»::>£:.-. bank business. C'pvu
Saturday evea.:i.-» from 7 to S:UO.
OFFICERS*
CHARLES CARPY Present
ARTHUR LEGALLET... First Vice President
LEON BOCQt'ERAZ... Second Vice President
A. BOUSQfET Secretary
P. X. BERGEROT Attorney
PAYS 4%
OIV ALL DEPOSITS
CHIGHESTER'S PILLS
>^7«v\ Jr a<l *«* A»ky«wrl>r»«rf»tfer
frNjs^JQk **HI» 'a E» 1 »ai OolJ m<n.:ieSSfS
E\ Zr^Yffl xc! * »">-* *^^ Bine Kilr-oa. \Y
I*l *^*« %!* k U* • Uer - B 2T •' T?«r V
121 ig diamond jii;am> riJxs. «Se»-
VC* ffl ymr» known ts Dot. Ssfert. Always Rel!»bl«
r SOLD BY DRtTtfiSTS WsnVHERE
J. B. McINTYRE BINDERY CO.
BOOK EIND2B3.
1161-1165 HOWARD STREET
Between 7ta and 3ta.
Preaent T«L No. Market 2359. Saa ITnaclw.
UXITED STATES BRANCH
STATE3IEXT
OF THE CONDITIONS AN^> AFFAIRS OF" THE
STANDARD MARINE
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF LIVERPOOL. ENGLAND, on the 31st day
of December. A. D. 190 S. and for the year
• endins on that day. Published pars'iant xn
the prorlslons of Section 611 of the Political
Code, and compiled from the annual fttatecsent
filed with the Insurance Commissioner of the
State of California.
ASSETS
Cash market Taltte of all stocks and
bonds owned by company $347.2.^1.84
Interest and rents doe and accrued. 4.8TU.U1
Premiums in due coarse of collection 118,700.87
Bills receiTable. not matured, taken
for marine risks 3.038.50
Total assets 5J73.S7fi.fC
LIABILITIES ** *
Losses in process of adjustment or
In suspense $32,500.00
Cross premiums on marine rists.
$126,315.00; reinsurance 100 per
cent 1C8.313.00
Total liabilities SlU.siTfwi
INCOME *
Net cash actually received for ma-
rine premiums $3 : 2. v: -"..»:>
ReeelTed from home offlcs 557.175.2."
Total Income $1.C(2\710.:*»
EXPENDITURES
Net amount paid fur marine los.sess
(Including $366,394.71. lisse* of
previous years " $1,101,779 7*
Paid or allowed for commission or
brokerage so Z,'\\ "•;
Paid for salaries, fees «nt! other
cbarces for of fleers, clerfc?. etc. . . is *\u25a0;'• \u25a0;-
Paid for state, national and local
Total expenditures $1,i!i».!>C5.7« .
Losses Inenrred dnrlTTg tho y»ar. .. .$5,071.:dr.7j
UISKS A.M» PKL'MIL'MS
.Marine liUk*. ; l*reoiium».
Net amonnt of risks'
written during the*
year I $U5.057.335 |a.-».013.-J«
Net amount «f riikst
expirt-d durins the
yeai- 160.338, 5.V> 913.r>57.M
Net amotmt in forrel
December 31. IWiS| Cr«.257.9fi5. ! l«v..3:r..fii»
A&TUI'K C. IILMPIIKEYS.
General Managar and Attorney.
Subserved and swora to before me tills 10th
day of i'ebreary. 1!K)9.
CUABLK3 C. RICHAP.DSON.
Notary Public
J. D. SPREttELS & BROS. CO.
General Asent*
J. B. F. DAVIS & SOX
.Mnnncrrs
507 MooteanKry Street
San Francisco, California
The California Promotion Committee
I'the State Central Organization organized la
1902 — An association for the commercial and
industrial derelopment of California.)
"PROMOTION-- The act of promotioa. adTsnca-
ment. encouragement." — Century Dictionary.
The committee has for Us object the PROMO-
TION of California's Interests. It has notUing to
sell. It fosters all things tending to the AD-
VANCEMENT of California. It is an antaorlty
on all matters relating to California. It EN-
COLKAGES the establl«!im«nt of new Industries
and fosters those already established. It Inritos
desirable immigration. It presents the oppor-
tunities and needs of all fields of business and
professional actlThy. It is supported by popular
subscription and maXes nu charge for any serxica
rendered. It has affiliated with It 200 commer-
cial organisations of the state, with » combined
membership of more than 30.000. Meetings of
representatives of these organizations are held
semiannually In different parts of tae state.
where matters of California's Interests are dis-
cussed. Headquarters of tbe committee are main-
tained in California building. Union sqaare. Saa
Francisco. CORRESPONDENCE INVITED.
THE GALL'S
BRANCH OFFICES
Subscriptions and advertise-
ments will be received in
San Francisco at following
offices:
; JCSI FILLJIORE STREET
Open until 10 o'clock every nisat
SIS VAX XESS AVEXUB
Parent's Stationery Store '
2200 FILL.MOUK STHEET
Tremaynos Branch
633 HAIGHT STIIKKT
Christian's Branch
'SIXTEENTH A.VO MAIIKETSTS. .
Jackson's* -Branch
11OS VAI*E.\CIA STREET
Blake's Bazaar
974 VA L.E.XCIA STREKT
Halilday's Stationery Stor»
SOU IKTH ST. COR. MISSION
International Stationery Stor»
492 CASTRO STREET
t The BrouiUet Stationery Compar.v '
— -— - — \ '
[— If You' -Want What -Yon -Want— f
U— When You Want It«-—
J USE CALL WANT ADS— I
19

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