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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 22, 1910, Image 1

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"WHEN LEES WAS CHIEF"
A series of 'Inside" detective stor
ies of famous crimes of San Fran
cisco, In which Chief Lees' secretary
tells just how the old master
worked.
SEE THE SUNDAY CALL
VOLUME CVIIL— NO. 175.
STATE OF WAR REIGNS IN MEXICO AND ALL NEWS CENSORED
BIRDMEN TO
FLY NEAR
TANFORAN
Big International Aviation Meet
Will Be Held Here in
January
FAMOUS AERONAUTS WILL
COMPETE FOR PRIZES
Wright Racers, Curtiss Fliers
and Foreign Stars to
Thrill Throngs
LEADING BUSINESSMEN ARE
UNIT IN SUPPORTING MEET
AN* international aviation meet,
to promore the science and sport
of aviation, in which will par
ticipate the most famous aviators of
America and Europe, will he given in
January near Tanforan. under the
auspices of the committee of business
men of San Francisco. A mass meet-
Ing presided over by F. E. Scotford
was held in the assembly room of the
chamber of commerce yesterday after
noon, and the decision was made to
have the. most notable aviation meet
ever held in the west.
Seven hundred acres of land adjoin
ing: the Tanforan racetrack property
near South San Francisco. San Mateo
county, adjacent to both the Southern
Pacific lines and the United Railroads
interurban Hne. has been secured for
/he meet, and at least $100,000 will be
raised to insure the success of the
afr contests, which will be given for
the residents of San Francisco and
northern California.
Famous Flyers Coming
Among the aviators who have agreed
to appear in the San Francisco meet
are Rrookins and Hoxsey of the
Wright team, with the new Wright
"baby" flyer;* Glenn Curtips and Ely
and Willard of the Curtiss team; Ham
ilton Moissant, th<» San Francisco avia
tor who first carried a passenger over
the English channel from France to
Enpiand; I.«atham, Garros and Aude
mar. the French birdmen, and possibly
De Lesse-ps, the monoplane flyer who
crossed the English channel.
A varied program of flights will be
held at the aviation field and there will
be prize cross country flights between
Fan Francisco and Sacramento, or
Stockton, in which the Curtiss and
Wright teams will enter. There will
be special prizes offered for California
aviators and for California built ma
chines.
The businessmen of San Francisco !
have been negotiating for some weeks
to secure a representative aviation
me*! in this city, with indifferent pros
pects, until yesterday. Then the af
fair was launched with a will.
Tfc«re were 50 prominent citizens of
Fan Francisco present at the meeting,
and it was unanimously decided to
conduct the aviation meet. Assurance
of the success of the meet Is contained
in a telegram to Henry T. Scott from
Tsra>el I^adlow, San Francisco's repre
penU.tiv« in New York on the aviation
ra*rt»r. The telegram was read at the
meeting yesterday, and Is as follows;
Henry T. Scott:
Prominent aviators are willing
to go to San Francisco the latter
part of January for $50,000 In
prizes. Saw also the officers of the
national council of Aero club of
America — can obtain sanction of
date proposed. It does not conflict
with Pacific Aero club sanction.
Make your meet a sportsmanlike
affair, open to all aviators. Do not
engage any particular group ex
clusively. Uphold the dignity of
aviation as a science and sport, and i
<5o not act quickly on any proposi
tion submitted. Form your aero
club, ask for sanction, guarantee
prizes and give entry blanks to
aviators. • ISRAEL. L.UDLOW.
Scotford Chairman
The meeting in the chamber of com
merce rooms was called to order by
Henry T? Scott, and F. E. Scotford was
chosen 'chairman. Scotford explained
that the meeting 'was called for the
purpose of considering an aviation meet
to be held at San Francisco after Janu
srr 1. • ' L
M. H. Robbins Jr. reviewed the San
Francisco aviation situation and said
that more advantageous terms could
now be secured with the aviators than
were possible when the meet was first
considered, and the prospects were far
brighter than at first for a successful
meet.
"If an aviation meet will bring the
people to San Francisco." said Robbins,
"we want it here."
Henry T.-Scott declared that It was
Continued on Fage 4t Column 1 ....
The San Francisco Call.
Count Is Hit on
Vaudeville Stage;
Creditors Cheer
Special Dxpalch io The Call]
CHICAGO. Xov. 21. — Count
Jacques Alexander yon Mourik
de Beaufort made a hit on the
stage tonight in his initial per
formance before the footlights.
It looks as If he will henceforth
be a vaudeville headliner.
The creditors of the nobleman,
who has been dieownert- by his
wealthy father in law, M. H.
Kilgallen, whose daughter, Irma,
he married about a year ago,
helped to make the count's debut
a success. They led in the cheer
ing, but there was method in
their madness, for after the per
formance they began to talk of
garnishment proceedings to at
tach the salary of the count.
De Beaufort sang, danced, gave
a monologue and scattered flow
ers over the audience among the
fair ones. Many a Chicago woman
tonight cherished a flower from
a real live count.
With his success on the stage
De Beaufort stemmed the tide of
misfortune and troubles with
which he has been pelted of late.
(He has been ""kicked out of the
home of his rich father in law,
then thrashed by the same unap
preclative relative; he has been
thrown out of hotels and sued by
his creditors.
PHILANTHROPIST TO START STORE
WHERE GOODS WILL BE GIVEN AWAY
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
LOS AXGELES, Nov. 21.— A depart
ment store in which nothing will be
sold; clerks who will wait on the cus
tomers and refuse to take any money
for the goods purchased; an institu
tion where all who are poor may buy
whatever they need without price., thif
Is the project that Dr. B. E. Toakum, a
local philanthropist, will Inaugurate
within two weeks.
Doctor Yoakum's department store is
built, a big concrete structure with
plenty of interior space, and he in
tends to stock it with general lines of
staple articles, including groceries,
clothing and dry goods. The store will
ARRIVES THREE DAYS TOO LATE TO
SAVE HIS BROTHER FROM PRISON
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
MEMPHIS, Term., Xov. 21.— Three
days after A. B. Trunkey, former cashier
and book keeper for the McDonald hay
and grain company, had pleaded guilty
to embezzlement and been sentenced to
five years in the penitentiary his brother
appeared today with funds to pay him
WIRELESS MESSAGE FROM KEY WEST
RECEIVED AT MARE ISLAND STATION
[Special Dispatch io The Call]
VALLEJO, Xov. 21. — A message In
transit through the air from Key West,
Fla., to Norfolk, Va., was received by
Operator Bennish at the United States
PERSISTENT LOVER
KILLED BY WOMAN
Claims He Threatened Her Life
if She Refused to Elope
With Him
I*)S ANGELES. Nov. 21.— Mrs. Angelo
Maria de Vito, 35 years of age, mar
ried and the mother, of several children,
today shot Abel Brove, 40 years of age,
five times with a revolver while they
were on a street car near her home
at Main street and College avenue, kill
ing him instantly. Mrs. de Vito de
clared Brove had forced his attentions
on her repeatedly and threatened her
life if she did not elope with him.
Brove, who was a carpenter, former
ly boarded with the De Vito family.
Mrs. De Vito says he threatened her
yesterday with a long knife and told
her that unless she ran away with him
he would blow up the house tomorrow
and kill the whole family. V
Girl Wounds Detective
MONONGAHELA. Pa., Nov. 21.— Iva
Bush. 27 yeacs old, a telegraph, opera
tor at Balrd tower, on the Pennsyl
vania railroad, near here, declared to
night that the shots she fired at Harry
F. Smith, a railroad detective, yearly
today were Intentional and necessary
to defend herself. Smith,' who, has a
wife and two children, is in the hospi
tal with a wound in the hip.
In the night Smith went .to the tower
and found Edwin Lloyd, a" close friend
of : Miss Bush, visiting her. Hesar
rested Lloyd, taking him to the office
of Alderman A. R. Day, where -.he* was.
told no charge would be preferred,
co Lloyd was released. .— w —^ •->:,•\u25a0-
SAN FRANCISCO; TUESDAY, -NQ^MBER '22^ 1910.
MEN ACCUSED
OF $40,000,000
FRAUDS JAILED
Postmaster General Leads Raids
on Pacific OH and Wireless
Stock Promoters
Scores of Victims Robbed of
Millions by Two Firms,
. Says Hitchcock
NEW YORK, Nov. 21. — In raids so
Important that Postmaster General
Hitchcock took charge In person, his
inspectors raided two concerns this
afternoon, which , they charge with
swindling the public out of more than
$40,000,000 by fraudulent use of_ the
mails. ' .
Sheldon H. Burr, president, Eugene
H. Burr, secretary and treasurer, and
Frank H. Tobey, vice president of Burr
Brothers, were arrested in the first raid
and held in $20,000 bail each. The gov
ernment charges that the firm sold
between $40,000,000 and $50,000,000 of
mining and oil. stock, worth little or
nothing. ;
Charles Ia Vaughan, a director of the
Continental wireless telegraph and tele-
Continued on Page 2, Column 3
be maintained by Doctor Toakum and
his friends and other charitable per
sons. The only requisite for becoming
a customer in that the person must be
poor and actually in need of the sup
plies.
For 13 years , the founder has been
engaged *n charitable work in X«o« An
geles, one of *hTsln*stitutlons being fa
mous for the work accomplished in re
forming drunkards.
Doctor Toakum believes that the
fame of his unique store will bring
large donations and that these, with
what money will be subscribed in Ix>s
Angeles, will be sufficient to make the
institution permanent.
out. The law is that after a man has
been sentenced it is impossible to pay
him out, so Trunkey will be forced to
serve the term, unless he is successful
in getting a pardon. A. H. Trunkey, an
easterner, the brother who sought* to
pay out the convicted man, is president
of the Quaker Oats company.
government station at tho Mare Island
navy yard early this -morning. Every
word of a conversation between the
two operators on the Atlantic coast was
distinctly read. '
HIGH OPIUM PRICES
SPUR SMUGGLERS
Customs Inspector Finds Five
Tins Worth $400 in Liner's
Printing Press
With the price of opium increased
to nearly $80 a 5 tael tin, ; the incentive
to smuggle the drug Into the city has
become very great, and every day; the
customs inspectors confiscate' several
tins on board Incoming vessels orr in
stores and lodging houses in China
town.
Inspector P. O. Huffaker noticed a
printing press half closed yesterday on
the steamer 'Siberia. - He turned the
flywheel and heart! a crunching sound
as. the mouth of the press closed.' Upon
opening it he found five 5 .tael tins- of
opium. ' ', . • •>\u25a0.-<
Inspector^ John Toland yesterday
watched a Chinese apparently addicted
to .the -drug, -go into a » room at 1039
Dupont street. When-: the. oriental"' left,
Toland raided, the room and found two
tins of opium.: ' '
Wong Yu, who was arrested for.hav
ing 20 tins of opium in his possession,
was held to answer by Commissioner
Harry M. Wright and his : bail:"s et at
$1,000. ' . ' \u25a0:\u25a0;-\u25a0;
; William Tong, the \u25a0 stewa rd .'.of 'i the
steamer Isthmian, also ; was held to'an
swer for attempting, to smuggle ashore
opium, which he had,* concealed in ; his
blouse. His bail.was-set at $500.
KEGEO STABS AND B.OBS STORE \u25a0 KEEPER—
~ i New „ York,* Not. \ 21.~Simon \u25a0 Hamhsch. a store
;'= keeper;, was counting, his i money in- hlsipla'ce of
\u25a0•\u25a0! business', today. wh^«' a \u25a0' npjrro enterp<i and
•stabbed him twice la; tb'e ; left ch.egt;aaa took
V fl~l and fled, . - •\u25a0\u25a0-- - "* ""T^*
BAY CITIES TO
UNITE IN HETCH
HETCHY FIGHT
Movement Started in Oakland
Council to Stand Behind
San Francisco
Alameda County Will Appoint
Third Member of Board of
Engineers i
[Special Dispatch Jo The Call]
OAKLAND, Nov. 21.— A movement to
unite the cities^ of Oakiandr~Berkeley
and Alameda with San Francisco In the
fight to prevent ;; the revocation \ of ij the
grant of „ HetcJi-.Hetchy valley as a
reservoir slte'for the bay region "was
initiated inthexity counoll this even
ing by PresidenCß.^H.. Pendleton." Pen
dleton introduced'a 1 resolution, ( which
was adopted, 'favoring. the appointment
by the three east bay, cities of an engi
neer to act with John R. Freeman of
PRESIDENT DIAZ OF MEXIGG, iWHO; IS
USING MAILED FISTMETHOD^O
CRUSH REBELIiIONi
New York and Professor Marks of Stan
ford university as the third member, of
the board of engineers selected to pre
pare a report to be submitted at the*
hearing before the secretary of the In
terior. - . .
The city officials of : the three cities
will decide unofficially on: their report
regardingf the .third "board member.'
Then the councils "of the cities will Lap
point 'him simultaneously, I authprizing
him .to -work with -the two members
named by San, Francisco. - ' / \u0084
' "This is a matter of utmost^lmport
ance "to all the east bay- cities,"- said
President \ Pendleton. \u25a0 "it .is ', the ;-. duty
of Oakland, Berkeley f and . Alameda to
lend their support to! San Francisco to
save the -He tch^Hetchy project/
CONTEST OVER $7,000;000^
AVILL ISj COMMENCED
/WHITE^^ PLAINS, .•N.'--T./>Nov. i2l.i 21.— The
contest . over tfie' will of ; Mrs. ? Brinker
hoff/ who:died:atxher : country-horne -at
Hastings-onj-the-Hudson, ' leaving \u25a0 • an
estate -" estimated i to Y be \u25a0„ worth ; nearly
>77b00,O0O.ywa^^begun> here rin the-sur
rogate | court -\ todays :.-\u25a0 More- >than 100
heirs are -Involved. • .. «.-\u25a0-.;.•« .-\u25a0-. ;.• y,, , . , > :
8.r & . 0. DIBECTOES \u25a0 BE-ELECTED^-BaUlmore.
vXot. 21. — At -. the '.annual} meeting ;pf«th** stock
- holders of the. Baltimore. & v oblo< railroad "here
todaj the board U directors was re-d«csed*.
GENERAL BERNARDO REYES, NOW IN
MILITARY EXILE, SAID TO BE REAL
HEADOF THE REVOLUTIONISTS
BABY FOLLOWS HER
MOTHER TO GRAVE
Child Dies: Few* Days After Her
Parent
..-..• 'Suicide -.^SSI
-".'- \u25a0'\u25a0; '-\u25a0- — \u25a0:; . ~"~ . ;
'[Special Dispatch' to iThe Call]
, BERKELEY, ;; Nov. .^l-V^-With " ,the.
death •Sunday /-afternoon at^.the . home
of Mrs.. RC-'J.d Cherry,- a" trained nursed
of * 1 9 1 S ; Har mqn 'stret. ". South •'-, Berkeley,
ofaittleiKatheflne^Milne.vS-weeksfold,
the ;•;' tragedy -btK a /mother's : love. :i and
melancholyAwas'broughtito* light ; The
babe's 'mother, v Mrs.^ Anna Milne; after
.two . years iof heartbroken | -existence,
following, the death .'of, her. elder'daugh
ter.'Mary," who .was. killed in a;runaway:
'aocidehtiatvChugwater.'Wyo.,. commit-;
ted : ; suicide * October.. 2B ;s at ( her... home,
2821* Stuart; streetr/when kittle '; Kather
ine 'was, butla;few) weeks old^VßoVlng:
to ; the? grief of.? the.>motherYover- ? the
death^'of 'her'; flrst^borHrOeorgre, Milne,
tbrehusband'andifather^a' wealthy icat
tlemanjbf .Ch"ug ; water. : ,brought;hls-wlfe
to;.: Berkeley; -Slast < ; June;'? hqkirigr^ the
change; of vwould do) her. good.
But iJsh'e^neverxquit": grieving i'arid.; her
g nime?cas§ear/r}-j-f
• i Map shows section of Mexico
affected by revolution and border
which is being guarded by United
States troops.
+- — : , , i
Coming- as it does after what was officially reported o have been a per
fectly tranquil Sunday throughout the greater part of the republic, broken
only by a few almost insignificant disorders in the samller places, this action,
on the part of the government, would appear to lend substance to rumors of
bloody rits at Zacatacas, Gmer Palachio and Torreon, the authenticity of
which had been in doubt.
These three important cities are situated in a region that has been dis
affected, for years. Gomez Pafachto and Torreon are cities of about 15,0C0T.
and 25,000 inhabitants, respectively, and are four miles apart in the Laguna
district of the state of Coahuila.
;• , This territory was the scene of the insurrection in 1908* which was
quickly quelled* by the federal governemnt and which is supposed to have
eventually resulted in sending General Bernardo Reyes out of Mexico. Gen
eral Rcyes-at that time was governor of the contiguous state of Nuevo Leon.
The revolutionists proclaimed him as their leader and repeated disavow^
als on his.part did not seem to convince the central government that he was
not covertly abetting. the disaffecion. .He was dispached o Europe ostensibly
onta military mission and his not yet returned.
Almost. at once the same element that had recognized Reyes as their
standard bearer turned to Francisco I. Madero and nominated him for pres
ident of the republic in opposition to the incumbent, Porfirio Diaz, in the
election, last spring^ .
Madero and his. supporters claimed they were not. being accorded fair
treatment in the campaign, and Madero was imprisoned on the charge of
insulting the government by his statement that he could no get justice in the
courts. -He was held in prison until some weeks after the election, when the
existing government was overwhelmingly returned to power, after which he'
was' released on. bail.
\u25a0He made w his way to San Antonio, Tex., whence he is alleged to have
been secretly, preparing his partisans for the widespread revolt which was
planned^ to-commence"last Sunday, November 20.
\u25a0\u25a0.y, -November. 18 Madero supped out of San Antonio, made hisway to Co
tulla, Tex., where he was met by four companions with horses and a guide
and then started .in a westerly direction. It was then understood he was
gpingto the family estate in Coahuila to take personal command of the anti
government forces. Xo further word has been obtainable regarding his
movements'and it is believed he is in Mexico tonight.
* Every precaution is being taken by the American authorities to prevent
violation of neutrality laws of the United Stacs. Governor Campbell is re-*
ported to. have ordered- the entire force of Texas rangers to the Rio Grande,"
arid; the cmrnanding officer of Fort Mclntosh has .placed a double guard over
"gun (racks in : each barracks of the four companies of infantry stationed
here as* a precaution against theft or seizure by Mexican revolutionists.
plt'has been*impossible,to"obtain details of yesterday's fight at Guerrero,
in the s4ate of > Coahuila. Mexico.
Soldiers are said to be on guard. in the telegraph office at Guerrero and
further than the statement that rioting occurred he second day, no word has
been : permitted ' to "come out.
i§ an isblaed yiilage; far removed froa the railroad and-3*itj»
y£S^^s^H«fert> / Smep-<riare. 64;
FORECAST FOR TODAY— Cloudy, with
showers; moderate south wind. ,
PRICE -FIVE CENTS.
SEIZES ALL
TELEGRAPH
HMD CO
1 1 mll JLj %3
Circuits of Associated Press
v Are Commandeered on Plea
of Military Need and
Outlets Blocked
100 ARE REPORTED
KILLED AT ZACATECAS
Bloody Riots Follow the Lull of
Sunday and Battles Occur
in Gomez Palachio and
Other Cities
REBELS HOLD THE TOWN
OF GOMEZ PALACHIO
T AREDO, Tex., Nov. 21,— Reports
I from what is considered a reli
able source are to the effect that
rioting was renewed in Puebia. Mex
ico, today and 30 persons were killed.
It is said the Mexican military author
itie^s^re conscripting large numbers of
residents of Nuevo Laredo into the
army for emergency service.
Wires Arc Seized
LAREDO, Tex.. Nov. 21.— The sit
uation in Mexico appears serkros to
night. For the first time in 15 years
of operation the leased wire of the
Associated Press from Laredo to
Monterey and Mexico City was com
mandeered by the Mexican govern
ment on the plea of military need, and
; the federal circuit manager in Xuevo
Laredo was ordered to cut off the La
redo office of the Associated Press to
! prevent information being gleaned
from messages moving over the wire.
These instructions emanated from
4he headquarters* of the federal tele
graphs in Mexico City, where it was
explained the government would re
quire the full capacity of all it 3 tele
graph facilities throughout the night.

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